Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
Topic Author
SoDakJeff
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:48 am

Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by SoDakJeff » Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:03 pm

I'm currently retired, my wife is still working. I'm on COBRA, but it's ending soon, so I'll be going on my wife's health plan through her employer for the next 14 months until I reach Medicare age. Where I live, we have two main health systems. All of the doctors on System A are out of network for System B, and all of the doctors on System B are out of network for System A. My wife works for System A, and I'm a retired employee of System B. The plan she's signed up for in 2018 is a high-deductible plan with HSA.

For my part, I'm looking at her plan as mostly a "catastrophic" plan, as I don't see the point in getting set up with all new doctors, getting all my records transferred, etc. for one year, only to resume going back to my familiar doctors as soon as I get on Medicare. So, since I'd be paying out-of-pocket anyway for everything up to our $7,000 deductible on my wife's plan, I figure I'll just continue to go to my usual System B doctors for routine care and pay cash for the visits/lab work/etc.

My question, then, for anyone who's had a situation even vaguely resembling this, is what's the best way to go about paying cash for medical care? Do you negotiate a price with your doctor? What about testing, such as lab work or radiology? Is it better to go through the hospital/clinic billing office in advance of the office visit to arrange for billing? Should I expect a discount of some kind, since they should be saving money by not having to submit a lot of paperwork to insurance and worry about reimbursement? Anything else I should be thinking about?

Thanks.

User avatar
ResearchMed
Posts: 9582
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2008 11:25 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by ResearchMed » Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:16 pm

SoDakJeff wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:03 pm
I'm currently retired, my wife is still working. I'm on COBRA, but it's ending soon, so I'll be going on my wife's health plan through her employer for the next 14 months until I reach Medicare age. Where I live, we have two main health systems. All of the doctors on System A are out of network for System B, and all of the doctors on System B are out of network for System A. My wife works for System A, and I'm a retired employee of System B. The plan she's signed up for in 2018 is a high-deductible plan with HSA.

For my part, I'm looking at her plan as mostly a "catastrophic" plan, as I don't see the point in getting set up with all new doctors, getting all my records transferred, etc. for one year, only to resume going back to my familiar doctors as soon as I get on Medicare. So, since I'd be paying out-of-pocket anyway for everything up to our $7,000 deductible on my wife's plan, I figure I'll just continue to go to my usual System B doctors for routine care and pay cash for the visits/lab work/etc.

My question, then, for anyone who's had a situation even vaguely resembling this, is what's the best way to go about paying cash for medical care? Do you negotiate a price with your doctor? What about testing, such as lab work or radiology? Is it better to go through the hospital/clinic billing office in advance of the office visit to arrange for billing? Should I expect a discount of some kind, since they should be saving money by not having to submit a lot of paperwork to insurance and worry about reimbursement? Anything else I should be thinking about?

Thanks.
I'm not sure this makes sense.

FIrst, wouldn't your new physician want - need? - your medical records to give proper care/medical oversight?

Also, you may pay more if you just pay the "uninsured rate". But you are planning to check on this, although there may be unexpected providers who might surprise you...

Finally, IF something catastrophic happens, you would not have already paid your out of pocket/deductibles that apply for that policy.
And if you paid more than the insured rate, you wouldn't even get reimbursed fully if you submit receipts later.

If it was for 2 weeks or other very short time, that's one thing.
(And although we wouldn't risk even that for any uninsured time, at least you are not dealing with that... you do have coverage should anything catastrophic happen.)
For 14 months? Your risk is limited, of course (unlike a period without insurance coverage), so you know what you'd be paying at the worst, which might be higher (as mentioned) than if you did submit for insurance coverage. But at least it's not a bankruptcy situation.

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

stan1
Posts: 8115
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 4:35 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by stan1 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:25 pm

I would transfer to the new doctors. Then decide next year whether you want to stay or go back. Even if you have a high deductible you want to be getting billed at the insurer's negotiated rate and will be hard to negotiate a cash rate ahead of when you need service. I don't think you'll come close trying to negotiate a cash rate with a large provider. You might have better luck with a one doctor private practice but in my area there are almost none of those left.

User avatar
dm200
Posts: 23133
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:21 pm
Location: Washington DC area

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by dm200 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:29 pm

stan1 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:25 pm
I would transfer to the new doctors. Then decide next year whether you want to stay or go back. Even if you have a high deductible you want to be getting billed at the insurer's negotiated rate and will be hard to negotiate a cash rate ahead of when you need service. I don't think you'll come close trying to negotiate a cash rate with a large provider. You might have better luck with a one doctor private practice but in my area there are almost none of those left.
I think I would do this as well - unless you have a very large amount of cash to pay for the care you need and want.

Topic Author
SoDakJeff
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:48 am

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by SoDakJeff » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:06 pm

Sorry if I wasn't clear on my first post - I would not be transferring to the new doctors in my wife's health system. I was thinking of just continuing to see the doctors I've been seeing for years in my current health system and paying cash for the visits. My thought was that the cost of several routine visits wouldn't make a dent in my wife's deductible anyway.

I was just going over the EOB's from the routine visits I've made this year. They are the same visits I make year after year. Figuring I should get billed at most what insurance pays (rather than what the provider bills), my costs should be around $2,000 - $2,500. I'll be paying that out-of-pocket whether it's at System A or System B, but of course that wouldn't go towards the $7,000 deductible should the need arise for one of us to need to use the insurance for a serious illness or injury.

User avatar
ResearchMed
Posts: 9582
Joined: Fri Dec 26, 2008 11:25 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by ResearchMed » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:16 pm

SoDakJeff wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:06 pm
Sorry if I wasn't clear on my first post - I would not be transferring to the new doctors in my wife's health system. I was thinking of just continuing to see the doctors I've been seeing for years in my current health system and paying cash for the visits. My thought was that the cost of several routine visits wouldn't make a dent in my wife's deductible anyway.

I was just going over the EOB's from the routine visits I've made this year. They are the same visits I make year after year. Figuring I should get billed at most what insurance pays (rather than what the provider bills), my costs should be around $2,000 - $2,500. I'll be paying that out-of-pocket whether it's at System A or System B, but of course that wouldn't go towards the $7,000 deductible should the need arise for one of us to need to use the insurance for a serious illness or injury.
Chances are that you would get billed more than what the insurance pays; that's part of one real problem with current health care... those without insurance pay *more* for the privilege of paying cash directly.
You may well be expected to pay the full billed price. That will probably be difficult to predict accurately.

Is there any harm in submitting as out of network? That makes the most sense, it would seem. You'll at least get "credit" for the allowed portion, towards that deductible.

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

Topic Author
SoDakJeff
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:48 am

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by SoDakJeff » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:27 pm

[/quote]

Chances are that you would get billed more than what the insurance pays; that's part of one real problem with current health care... those without insurance pay *more* for the privilege of paying cash directly.
You may well be expected to pay the full billed price. That will probably be difficult to predict accurately.

Is there any harm in submitting as out of network? That makes the most sense, it would seem. You'll at least get "credit" for the allowed portion, towards that deductible.

RM
[/quote]

Probably not. I just thought (hoped) there might be a way to get these office visits a little cheaper by bypassing insurance altogether and saving the provider some of the costs as well.

Apparently it doesn't pay to buck the system, huh? :?

jebmke
Posts: 10079
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by jebmke » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:30 pm

If you are paying cash, isn't your exposure unlimited? What happens in a situation where you need expensive treatment? Are your doctors going to refer you to someone in her network?
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

investing1012
Posts: 182
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2016 5:19 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by investing1012 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:44 pm

As a doctor I highly recommend against this plan.

A patient of mine signed up for Catastrophic insurance and subsequently got diagnosed with cancer. The catastrophic insurance did not cover any of the chemo medications that are given as an outpatient. They can run on the order of $100,000 per drug per dose. So unless you have a 10 figure retirement fund I wouldn't bank on paying cash for them. Also you shouldn't wait for a year to get those chemo meds since by then the cancer would have progressed to a higher stage or possibly have taken your life already. Paying a doctor's fee is the least concerning thing when you have to pay the devastating costs of healthcare without insurance.

Topic Author
SoDakJeff
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:48 am

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by SoDakJeff » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:49 pm

jebmke wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:30 pm
If you are paying cash, isn't your exposure unlimited? What happens in a situation where you need expensive treatment? Are your doctors going to refer you to someone in her network?
That's what I thought would happen. If something serious happened to me (broken bone, suspected appendix or gallbladder, etc.), I'd go to a doctor in her network. If something serious was found during a routine visit with one of my doctors, I'd have to have them send me over to a provider in her network.

Now that we're talking this through, it's starting to sound like it might be more trouble than it's worth. I guess I just resent having to give up the doctors who know me and that I've been seeing for 20+ years just because of insurance.

investing1012
Posts: 182
Joined: Sun Aug 07, 2016 5:19 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by investing1012 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:54 pm

SoDakJeff wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:49 pm
jebmke wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:30 pm
If you are paying cash, isn't your exposure unlimited? What happens in a situation where you need expensive treatment? Are your doctors going to refer you to someone in her network?
That's what I thought would happen. If something serious happened to me (broken bone, suspected appendix or gallbladder, etc.), I'd go to a doctor in her network. If something serious was found during a routine visit with one of my doctors, I'd have to have them send me over to a provider in her network.

Now that we're talking this through, it's starting to sound like it might be more trouble than it's worth. I guess I just resent having to give up the doctors who know me and that I've been seeing for 20+ years just because of insurance.
Insurance companies are literally saying how I should treatment my cancer patients. Unfortunately with the current system Insurance companies are king.

Topic Author
SoDakJeff
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:48 am

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by SoDakJeff » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:55 pm

investing1012 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:44 pm
As a doctor I highly recommend against this plan.

A patient of mine signed up for Catastrophic insurance and subsequently got diagnosed with cancer. The catastrophic insurance did not cover any of the chemo medications that are given as an outpatient. They can run on the order of $100,000 per drug per dose. So unless you have a 10 figure retirement fund I wouldn't bank on paying cash for them. Also you shouldn't wait for a year to get those chemo meds since by then the cancer would have progressed to a higher stage or possibly have taken your life already. Paying a doctor's fee is the least concerning thing when you have to pay the devastating costs of healthcare without insurance.
My wife's plan isn't a Catastrophic plan - I was only going to treat it as one while I continued to see my usual doctors for routine things. Her plan is just a high deductible plan, but otherwise provides full coverage. Believe me, as a cancer survivor (non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma w/stem cell transplant) I know the costs and importance of having coverage for things like this that can come along. Thanks, though...

User avatar
dm200
Posts: 23133
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:21 pm
Location: Washington DC area

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by dm200 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:59 pm

SoDakJeff wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:49 pm
jebmke wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:30 pm
If you are paying cash, isn't your exposure unlimited? What happens in a situation where you need expensive treatment? Are your doctors going to refer you to someone in her network?
That's what I thought would happen. If something serious happened to me (broken bone, suspected appendix or gallbladder, etc.), I'd go to a doctor in her network. If something serious was found during a routine visit with one of my doctors, I'd have to have them send me over to a provider in her network.
Now that we're talking this through, it's starting to sound like it might be more trouble than it's worth. I guess I just resent having to give up the doctors who know me and that I've been seeing for 20+ years just because of insurance.
If only "serious" medical conditions could always (or even usually) be moved to another plan/providers. You do not have (as I understand) any relationships with providers in HER plan. You encounter a serious condiiton, get hospitalized for it (say heart trouble, or pancreatitis), need emergency treatment - and THEN try to switch over to providers who have no relationship with you? You could be faced with (or your wife faced with) a choice between paying a lot of money or your death -- OR BOTH. It is not just the money (perhaps a LOT) you place at risk, but maybe your life.

Mike Scott
Posts: 1342
Joined: Fri Jul 19, 2013 2:45 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by Mike Scott » Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:04 pm

I would recommend using the new insurance network as their negotiated discounts are probably better than a simple cash discount somewhere else. You don't have to like it but that is part of the new health care "game".

CppCoder
Posts: 916
Joined: Sat Jan 23, 2016 9:16 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by CppCoder » Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:48 pm

Is there an ACA plan that might let you continue coverage with your doctors? It might cost more than your wife's plan, but it might give you the coverage you want to bridge the gap to medicare.

User avatar
dm200
Posts: 23133
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:21 pm
Location: Washington DC area

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by dm200 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:53 pm

Let me just give two examples (my wife) of how it can be difficult/impossible to know when/if you need expensive care.

Decades ago, my wife had some breathing issues, made an appointment with her Primary Care physician - and the physician determined she had pneumonia - and IMMEDIATELY admitted her to the hospital for three days. Just a few years ago, my wife had a late night weekend attach of what turned out to be Pancreatitis - was admitted to the hosiptal (from an urgent care center) for three days. Both situations were potentially life threatening, required immediate hospitalization and treatment - with little or no ability (safely) to find different providers/insurance.

stan1
Posts: 8115
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 4:35 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by stan1 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 4:41 pm

It is possible you'll switch doctors and like the new ones better.

User avatar
dm200
Posts: 23133
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:21 pm
Location: Washington DC area

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by dm200 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 4:55 pm

stan1 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 4:41 pm
It is possible you'll switch doctors and like the new ones better.
That has happened to me - many times.

p14175
Posts: 375
Joined: Thu Sep 20, 2007 11:33 am
Location: Now in southeast Arizona

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by p14175 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 5:48 pm

I have been a cash paying customer for several years. I see the doctor 2x year for blood pressure and pain issues. If something comes up, I make an appointment. The visits cost me less than $100 each. I don't take any prescription drugs. I acknowledge that anything can happen. If something happens I'll deal with it when it does.

When the ACA open enrollment started this fall I checked into getting health insurance for 2018. The website said I could get health insurance for free with my $900/month subsidy. If I had to purchase it, the plan would cost $840/month. Is it worth it? I don't know, but I hate being beholden to the government for anything. There are always strings attached.

User avatar
dm200
Posts: 23133
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:21 pm
Location: Washington DC area

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by dm200 » Tue Nov 21, 2017 5:57 pm

p14175 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 5:48 pm
I have been a cash paying customer for several years. I see the doctor 2x year for blood pressure and pain issues. If something comes up, I make an appointment. The visits cost me less than $100 each. I don't take any prescription drugs. I acknowledge that anything can happen. If something happens I'll deal with it when it does.
When the ACA open enrollment started this fall I checked into getting health insurance for 2018. The website said I could get health insurance for free with my $900/month subsidy. If I had to purchase it, the plan would cost $840/month. Is it worth it? I don't know, but I hate being beholden to the government for anything. There are always strings attached.
"Stuff" can happen quickly - even to folks who think they are in good health.

jebmke
Posts: 10079
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by jebmke » Tue Nov 21, 2017 6:07 pm

dm200 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 5:57 pm
"Stuff" can happen quickly - even to folks who think they are in good health.
Similar to your experiences, I have a friend who was very fit and in good health. He had some breathing issues and stopped to see his doctor. She misdiagnosed it but sent him to the hospital for tests anyway. After a couple quick tests they immediately shipped him to Baltimore for cardio-pulmonary surgery. The surgeon said that had he not been very fit he would not have made it. Without Medicare he would have been bankrupt.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

Topic Author
SoDakJeff
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2017 11:48 am

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by SoDakJeff » Tue Nov 21, 2017 6:35 pm

CppCoder wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 3:48 pm
Is there an ACA plan that might let you continue coverage with your doctors? It might cost more than your wife's plan, but it might give you the coverage you want to bridge the gap to medicare.
My original plan was to get an ACA plan between COBRA and Medicare. But I guess I hadn't been paying enough attention to the ACA rules, because when I went to apply I found out that if you have a spouse with an employer plan, and you are eligible to go on that plan, then you aren't allowed to apply for a plan through the ACA. That left me with getting a plan on the open market or on my wife's plan. With the open market plan costing $1,200/month, we decided to go with her plan for the interim.

User avatar
gasdoc
Posts: 1751
Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2014 8:26 am

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by gasdoc » Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:17 pm

Why not just go to the doc you want to see, and just pay the “out of network” copay? That is the reason they make this option available. I agree that the negotiated fees are usually better than the “self pay discount.” It doesn’t hurt to check both once you receive the bill. In my experience, which is extensive, the insurance can even can be changed to “self pay” after the fact if it works better for you.

Gasdoc

bhough
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2017 6:53 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by bhough » Wed Nov 22, 2017 8:26 pm

See the doctors that you want out of network, but use your insurance. Don't pay "cash", just pay the bills as it will count as your deductible. If you need a CT/PET or an ER visit or surgery, go to her network.
b

toofache32
Posts: 1956
Joined: Sun Mar 04, 2012 6:30 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by toofache32 » Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:22 pm

investing1012 wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 2:44 pm
As a doctor I highly recommend against this plan.

A patient of mine signed up for Catastrophic insurance and subsequently got diagnosed with cancer....
I agree with this. I am a cancer surgeon who is not in network with any insurance. But patients still need insurance for the hospital because I take them to an in-network hospital. That's the expensive part. Ridiculously expensive. I had a patient with no insurance that needed lymph nodes removed from her neck. Takes me about 60-90 minutes in the OR, then 2-3 nights in the hospital. I donated my services as charity (usually about $3000) and asked the hospital for an estimate. They required $30,000 from the patient for me to schedule the surgery. Within 6 weeks she raised the money at her church and I could do the surgery. My point is that out of network for doctors is way different when it involves more than doctors fees.
Last edited by toofache32 on Thu Nov 23, 2017 12:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.

SrGrumpy
Posts: 1193
Joined: Wed Aug 05, 2015 3:21 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by SrGrumpy » Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:39 pm

SoDakJeff wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:03 pm

My question, then, for anyone who's had a situation even vaguely resembling this, is what's the best way to go about paying cash for medical care? Do you negotiate a price with your doctor? What about testing, such as lab work or radiology? Is it better to go through the hospital/clinic billing office in advance of the office visit to arrange for billing? Should I expect a discount of some kind, since they should be saving money by not having to submit a lot of paperwork to insurance and worry about reimbursement? Anything else I should be thinking about?

Thanks.
I pay cash for medical care, and it is a very easy process. You tell them when making the appointment that you are paying cash, and what can they do for you. They will likely gladly offer a fair price. My cardiologist charges me about $250.

Lab tests are similar. But you need the doctor to fill in the order form, which you then present at the lab. You save a ton of money this way, maybe 50 percent.

Dentist. Just get the basic checkup. No fluoride option with the teeth-cleaning, no x-ray. I think he charges me about $150.

You are right. You are absolutely doing them a favor.

PS. I do have ACA but the deductible is about $6000.

OnTrack
Posts: 590
Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2016 11:16 pm

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by OnTrack » Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:55 pm

gasdoc wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 4:17 pm
Why not just go to the doc you want to see, and just pay the “out of network” copay? That is the reason they make this option available. I agree that the negotiated fees are usually better than the “self pay discount.” It doesn’t hurt to check both once you receive the bill. In my experience, which is extensive, the insurance can even can be changed to “self pay” after the fact if it works better for you.

Gasdoc
In my experience there can be separate deductibles for in network and out of network expenses.

SpaceCowboy
Posts: 895
Joined: Sun Aug 12, 2012 12:35 am

Re: Paying cash for medical care - best practice?

Post by SpaceCowboy » Thu Nov 23, 2017 12:43 am

SrGrumpy wrote:
Wed Nov 22, 2017 11:39 pm
SoDakJeff wrote:
Tue Nov 21, 2017 1:03 pm

My question, then, for anyone who's had a situation even vaguely resembling this, is what's the best way to go about paying cash for medical care? Do you negotiate a price with your doctor? What about testing, such as lab work or radiology? Is it better to go through the hospital/clinic billing office in advance of the office visit to arrange for billing? Should I expect a discount of some kind, since they should be saving money by not having to submit a lot of paperwork to insurance and worry about reimbursement? Anything else I should be thinking about?

Thanks.
I pay cash for medical care, and it is a very easy process. You tell them when making the appointment that you are paying cash, and what can they do for you. They will likely gladly offer a fair price. My cardiologist charges me about $250.

Lab tests are similar. But you need the doctor to fill in the order form, which you then present at the lab. You save a ton of money this way, maybe 50 percent.

Dentist. Just get the basic checkup. No fluoride option with the teeth-cleaning, no x-ray. I think he charges me about $150.

You are right. You are absolutely doing them a favor.

PS. I do have ACA but the deductible is about $6000.
This is what I would do in your situation. Your wife's insurance will cover you if anything serious comes up.
In my limited experience, if you tell the provider upfront that you have NO health insurance, the cash rate they will offer you will frequently be lower than the negotiated insurance rate. Hard to believe, but true in my experience. Tell them when you schedule the visit.
Works well for physician visits, PT, imaging (x-ray, mri, etc.)
Doesn’t work as well for labs. Need to negotiate with lab after they try to bill you retail. Frequently will discount if you offer to pay right on the first phone call. Has not worked as well for outside pathology labs. They don’t seem to want to discount.
The only issue comes up if you would actually exceed the high deductible, in which case you will end up paying more. So how frequently do your costs exceed the deductible?

Post Reply