Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

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Andyrunner
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Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by Andyrunner » Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:12 am

Anyone else been in this situation? How did you come to a decision?

I currently work in my company's HR department doing the ACA employer mandate compliance work. I enjoy what I do, one other co-worker understands most of it, but I do the day to day stuff, and she does the overall management. Another position opened up in HR that I think I would be very good at and might enjoy, so I applied. This position would be a lateral move from a pay perspective and step down in seeing high level changes in the company.

The reason why I applied is because I don't know the longevity of my current job. Based on the current political environment, I don't expect the employer requirements to stay around, if it does, to be greatly reduced. I know we need to avoid politics, but I don't see it sustainable. If the work did go away, I'm certain I would be re-assigned somewhere, so its not like I would be unemployed.

I told my manager and she support me (though I'm not 100% sure, because that puts a burden on her to back fill me). Where I really struggle is I know my job in and out, I like my co-workers, if I move I feel like I'll give up all of the knowledge that I have gained in this position (4.5 years) and my co-workers will have to figure out what I do day to day. Also, I have no idea if I'll like the new job, I'll start over from a knowledge and seniority perspective. I could potentially delay a promotion by 4-5 years.

This has been killing me, I'm prepping myself as if I get the job as I'm highly qualified. Would I hurt myself for future jobs if I turned it down?

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Strayshot
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by Strayshot » Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:56 am

Learning new skills in a role change is good for you and is looked on favorably when considered for promotion. If you were promoting someone to a higher-level position, would you rather know they spent 10 years doing the same role or 5 years at each of two different roles?
Generally I have seen people move around every 3-7 years. There is no rule of thumb, but I believe it is because that is the time it takes to learn and become comfortable and efficient in a role at which point it becomes boring and people want to move on. The folks who move too rapidly (1-2 years) do so for reasons that reflect negatively on them (can’t do the job, can’t team with colleagues, are undecided in their career path and have no grit, etc). The folks who stay too long are very appreciated because of the experience they build, but are passed by for promotion for those who demonstrate they are not “one trick ponies”.

Obviously this advice doesn’t apply in highly specialized roles (an ENT is not going to decide to go do pediatrics as a role change) but even in those cases folks will try new side-roles and bail on old ones to mix things up (take on a class as volunteer faculty, join a hospital board, etc).

I would go for the new job, but if you want to back out of application you need to do so yesterday (ASAP!) via written notice to the hiring manager and HR.

quantAndHold
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by quantAndHold » Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:01 am

If you’ve been doing your current job for 4.5 years, it’s probably time to change. You’ll get challenged and learn new things, instead of ratholing on a really narrow area.

I would also suggest that a lateral move will help your upward mobility, not hurt it.

But if you do the interviews, get the offer, and decide not to take the position? It’s probably not something anyone will ever remember a year from now.

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Watty
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by Watty » Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:05 am

Andyrunner wrote:
Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:12 am
The reason why I applied is because
Since you have already applied there is little to lose by talking with people about the job since you can always decline it if it turns out to not be a good opportunity.

2015
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by 2015 » Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:30 am

What is the title and nature of the new position?

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Pajamas
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by Pajamas » Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:44 am

Andyrunner wrote:
Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:12 am
This position would be a lateral move from a pay perspective and step down in seeing high level changes in the company.
Doesn't sound like a better position for you. If you are going to find a new job, look for the best one that you can get, inside or outside of your current organization.
The reason why I applied is because I don't know the longevity of my current job. Based on the current political environment, I don't expect the employer requirements to stay around, if it does, to be greatly reduced. I know we need to avoid politics, but I don't see it sustainable. If the work did go away, I'm certain I would be re-assigned somewhere, so its not like I would be unemployed.
If you would be reassigned, then that's not worth worrying about until you know to what position you would be reassigned. You're worrying about future unknowns that may or may not materialize and which may or may not be beneficial to you.
I told my manager and she support me (though I'm not 100% sure, because that puts a burden on her to back fill me). Where I really struggle is I know my job in and out, I like my co-workers, if I move I feel like I'll give up all of the knowledge that I have gained in this position (4.5 years) and my co-workers will have to figure out what I do day to day. Also, I have no idea if I'll like the new job, I'll start over from a knowledge and seniority perspective. I could potentially delay a promotion by 4-5 years.

All of that is normal with leaving a job and starting a new job and more generally, for any major changes in life.
Would I hurt myself for future jobs if I turned it down?
Depends on the organization. You've already talked to your manager about it so any damage there is done. Accepting a new position that is not a good fit would probably be worse than turning it down. The interview process is for asking questions to see if the fit is good and it is two-way. Most people understand that and wouldn't hold it against you.

Andyrunner
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by Andyrunner » Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:51 pm

2015 wrote:
Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:30 am
What is the title and nature of the new position?
I'd be dealing with employee pay.

Andyrunner
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by Andyrunner » Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:56 pm

Thanks all. This is actually the longest I have been at a job. Initially 4 years, then two than now 4.5 with this one. I think what also made me question it is, most people in my company stay in their position for a long time. My co-worker has been in this position for 20 years.

To say, I really don't want it is probably a wrong statement. I spoke to two other people in the job and it sounds interesting. I want it, but I also like my current job, so its a bit of a challenge. Appreciate the feedback.

SrGrumpy
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by SrGrumpy » Mon Nov 13, 2017 1:59 pm

If you don't take chances, you won't make advances.

2015
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by 2015 » Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:31 pm

2015 wrote:
Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:30 am
What is the title and nature of the new position?
Well, if it's at all payroll related you will at a minimum increase your career security as payroll is something that won't be going away anytime soon. Are you interested in payroll? You could possibly see this lateral move as in fact a career move, because the opportunity would exist to move up in payroll. If you don't see advancement in the new position, you could move to another company where you could increase your salary by a minimum of 20% (that is, if you negotiate well) after about a year. You might also consider negotiating with your boss for additional career development if you take the move with no salary increase (e.g., attendance at high profile conferences, any training you identify that enhances your future career prospects, etc.) Of course only you will know if you're interested in pursuing such a course of action.

The good thing about your field is there's many sub-specialties, there's lots of opportunity, people tend to move around. I wouldn't view any move as permanent because the economy, the business climate, and as a result business organizations, are changing all of the time.

overthought
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Re: Applying for a job: Not sure if I really want it

Post by overthought » Tue Nov 14, 2017 12:52 pm

Pajamas wrote:
Mon Nov 13, 2017 11:44 am
Andyrunner wrote:
Mon Nov 13, 2017 10:12 am
This position would be a lateral move from a pay perspective and step down in seeing high level changes in the company.
Doesn't sound like a better position for you. If you are going to find a new job, look for the best one that you can get, inside or outside of your current organization.
It may or may not be a better position (knowing who you work for and with can be a big deal), but I agree with the general sentiment: if you're going to bother job hunting at all, you may as well do it right. The unfortunate reality seems to be that pay raises only come with job changes. Staying in one place you're lucky if your salary tracks inflation.

That said, this is also very good advice:
2015 wrote:
Mon Nov 13, 2017 3:31 pm
If it's at all payroll related you will at a minimum increase your career security as payroll is something that won't be going away anytime soon. Are you interested in payroll? You could possibly see this lateral move as in fact a career move, because the opportunity would exist to move up in payroll. If you don't see advancement in the new position, you could move to another company where you could increase your salary by a minimum of 20% (that is, if you negotiate well) after about a year. You might also consider negotiating with your boss for additional career development if you take the move with no salary increase (e.g., attendance at high profile conferences, any training you identify that enhances your future career prospects, etc.) Of course only you will know if you're interested in pursuing such a course of action.

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