Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

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mirror
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Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by mirror » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:40 pm

I got a new job several months ago, but am having second thoughts about the move. During the interview process I was led to believe the role was much more than it has turned out to be. It was presented as a very similar role to my previous job and I was excited to continue on my career growth. I enjoyed my previous job, but the company itself wasn't doing well. I was offered more money for what I thought was a similar role so I was happy to accept the new position.

After I left the company a senior leader at my previous employer told me that I was severely underpaid at my previous role and should have been making more than my new job is now paying. I lobbied for raises often showing tangible things that I had accomplished while I was there, but kept getting stonewalled by my direct supervisor.

As it turns out my responsibility/authority at the new company is a fraction of what it was at my old job. The job itself is not particularly satisfying nor challenging (a lot of busy work and no real decision making). In addition the department which I joined is highly dysfunctional and everyone seems miserable. Between finding out (confirming) that I was underpaid and having much less responsibility, I feel like I ended up taking 2 steps back in my career progression. :oops:

I feel stuck. How could I apply for jobs after only being at this company for such a short time? Had I known previously what I know now about the role and the department I wouldn't have taken the job. Do I just ride it out, or is it better to try to get out now and in future interviews (assuming I would get any...) explain that I am looking for more of a challenge and responsibility similar to my previous role?

I used to enjoy going to work now it is something that I dread.
There are two types of people: those that can extrapolate from incomplete data.

123
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by 123 » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:45 pm

Yes it's time to start looking. There's no reason to have to sit in the "penalty box" when there may be other suitable opportunities. When asked about the reason for leaving so soon I would simply say that the job/responsibilities didn't turn out the way it had been described. That's accurate, honest, and non-judgmental.
The closest helping hand is at the end of your own arm.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:57 pm

Sorry to hear of your misfortunes.
One suggestion: You can apply for other jobs and omit this latest one on your resume.
Also, continue working at the present job to preserve your income stream while you send your resume out to explore other jobs.
An option amongst many options.
Dreading to go to work is not a happy place to be.
Good luck in your job searches.
j

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CaliJim
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by CaliJim » Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:15 am

Would your old company take you back? I saw it happen a few times during my career where someone left, and came back, and it worked out ok.

Do actively and quietly look for an exit. Don't rot. You owe your new employer nothing, they misrepresented the new job to you.
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mouses
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by mouses » Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:23 am

I would certainly start looking for another job. It is not unusual in a career to make a mistake about a job, or I suppose in this case it is more accurate to say be deceived. I would be careful about the idea of approaching your old company.

furikake
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by furikake » Tue Oct 10, 2017 2:26 am

Yup, start looking. I was at a job for 4 months, and then I switched jobs, because I didn't like the job I had so I started looking. Definitely start looking now.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by basspond » Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:21 am

Don't believe anything from your previous employer. Several months is not enough time to find out if this is a bad fit. Work with your new employer to see what plans they have for you and show them they are getting value for you by correcting the dysfunction. Give it at least 6 months, and before you make a decision weigh the positives and negatives. You don't want to be stuck in an unhappy situation but then again you don't want to be known as the person who hops from job to job.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by mouses » Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:16 am

basspond wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:21 am
Don't believe anything from your previous employer. Several months is not enough time to find out if this is a bad fit. Work with your new employer to see what plans they have for you and show them they are getting value for you by correcting the dysfunction. Give it at least 6 months, and before you make a decision weigh the positives and negatives. You don't want to be stuck in an unhappy situation but then again you don't want to be known as the person who hops from job to job.
One instance isn't a job hopper. I've had a couple of really disastrous jobs, that I stuck it out with for a year; If I could do it again I would have left much sooner.

aristotelian
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by aristotelian » Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:36 am

Explain your situation just as you have here. Put a sentence in your cover letter and be prepared to expand on the situation when you interview. I would find your situation very compelling and be open to hiring you

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by BeneIRA » Tue Oct 10, 2017 7:24 am

mirror wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:40 pm
I got a new job several months ago, but am having second thoughts about the move. During the interview process I was led to believe the role was much more than it has turned out to be. It was presented as a very similar role to my previous job and I was excited to continue on my career growth. I enjoyed my previous job, but the company itself wasn't doing well. I was offered more money for what I thought was a similar role so I was happy to accept the new position.

After I left the company a senior leader at my previous employer told me that I was severely underpaid at my previous role and should have been making more than my new job is now paying. I lobbied for raises often showing tangible things that I had accomplished while I was there, but kept getting stonewalled by my direct supervisor.

As it turns out my responsibility/authority at the new company is a fraction of what it was at my old job. The job itself is not particularly satisfying nor challenging (a lot of busy work and no real decision making). In addition the department which I joined is highly dysfunctional and everyone seems miserable. Between finding out (confirming) that I was underpaid and having much less responsibility, I feel like I ended up taking 2 steps back in my career progression. :oops:

I feel stuck. How could I apply for jobs after only being at this company for such a short time? Had I known previously what I know now about the role and the department I wouldn't have taken the job. Do I just ride it out, or is it better to try to get out now and in future interviews (assuming I would get any...) explain that I am looking for more of a challenge and responsibility similar to my previous role?

I used to enjoy going to work now it is something that I dread.
OP, life is too short to stay in a job you hate and dread. A few months is plenty of time to know if it is a fit or not. I am assuming you Googled the company and looked at sites like Glassdoor, if not, make sure that you do in the future. It has been pretty helpful in my last couple of jobs.

I disagree that this is not enough time to know you made a mistake. In a past job, I had been at my employer less than a year but layoffs were pending and we all knew it. I spent so much time coming up with a reason why I hadn’t been at my employer a year. No one ever asked. It is a different age. Years ago, why you were leaving your employer and why you only stayed for “X” amount of time would absolutely have been asked. I was pleasantly surprised that I wasn’t.

My advice: Apply immediately. See if you can go back to the old job, for sure, and get out of that toxic environment. Best of luck.

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Pretzel lover
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by Pretzel lover » Tue Oct 10, 2017 7:54 am

As others have offered above...actively start looking for a job that is a better fit.

Going back to your old company may be a mistake. You stated they weren't doing well financially and you were being held down by your supervisor. If senior management there also allowed you to be underpaid and to leave...why go back?

wilked
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by wilked » Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:27 am

One thing I saw nowhere was an honest conversation with your management.

As a manager, if I hired someone and that person believes they were mis-led and are unhappy I would like to know about it now rather than in an exit interview.

Have an honest conversation with your management, you might be surprised at the outcome.

clutchied
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by clutchied » Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:38 am

when presented with something like this I usually like to change the culture and expand my scope. Be a change agent for good if they're open to it.


If you think the company is worthwhile, invest yourself and make the company better.

Perhaps it's self serving but I always feel like every company I've worked at is always better than when I joined.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by surveyor » Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:42 am

I'm having trouble understanding how there was such a disconnect between what they said and what you heard. I mean, it has to be noticeably massive if what you say is true. Was your now manager involved in hiring you? Have you talked to your manager or leadership?

staythecourse
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by staythecourse » Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:49 am

wilked wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:27 am
One thing I saw nowhere was an honest conversation with your management.

As a manager, if I hired someone and that person believes they were mis-led and are unhappy I would like to know about it now rather than in an exit interview.

Have an honest conversation with your management, you might be surprised at the outcome.
I would agree with this ONLY if you have another job lined up. In an ideal world with no egos the above advice is spot on, but being new (no one knows you) they may just end up blaming you and see you as a "me" person and not a team player. That is a worst case scenario, but making decisions like this should always be done thinking of worst case.

Personally, I would do both. Line up a new job and then talk to the current manager/ hiring manager and tell them, "Hey this is what I thought I was signing up for so if you can do it now great and if not its okay and I'll move onto to a job I thought I was signing up for here."

Good luck.
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by KyleAAA » Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:56 am

Could you go back to your previous employer? Presumably they valued your contribution. It's actually very common for people to change jobs after only a few months and so long as you don't make a habit of it, it won't generally be held against you. There is an army of recruiters out there who specialize in contacting people who just started a new job in the hopes they are unhappy because those people are likely to jump ship if something better comes along.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by keystone » Tue Oct 10, 2017 9:31 am

I started a job that I disliked and at around the 4 month point I decided to start looking. I ended up finding a new job very quickly and have been here 6 years now. I had to field questions about why I was looking to leave after such a short period of time. I answered the questions honestly and I don't feel like it was ever held against me. I think you'll be fine as long as you don't have a pattern of doing this throughout your career. My advice is to start looking ASAP.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by bloom2708 » Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:36 am

On the other hand...higher pay with less responsibility..isn't that kind of the goal?

I want the highest pay possible and the least responsibility possible. :twisted:

I know it doesn't work like that. You could have received higher pay and gotten much more responsibility. More hours, more stress.

Maybe not so bad. Just work and focus on life outside of work? Not the advice others have given, but work to live, not live to work.
"We are here not to please but to provoke thoughtfulness" Unknown Boglehead

aristotelian
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by aristotelian » Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:50 am

wilked wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 8:27 am
One thing I saw nowhere was an honest conversation with your management.

As a manager, if I hired someone and that person believes they were mis-led and are unhappy I would like to know about it now rather than in an exit interview.

Have an honest conversation with your management, you might be surprised at the outcome.
That conversation might go best if you have a competing offer in hand.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by MathWizard » Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:09 pm

The senior leader could have been saying that to be nice, but let's assume
that we can take the senior leader at your old company at his/her word.

I would ask how it happened that you were underpaid, and if he/she can offer any advice
on how that could have been avoided.

I'd ask if there were other places in the same field where they were paying that well.
If your old company is not doing well, maybe the leader will need a reference later.

2015
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by 2015 » Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:58 pm

mouses wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:16 am
basspond wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:21 am
Don't believe anything from your previous employer. Several months is not enough time to find out if this is a bad fit. Work with your new employer to see what plans they have for you and show them they are getting value for you by correcting the dysfunction. Give it at least 6 months, and before you make a decision weigh the positives and negatives. You don't want to be stuck in an unhappy situation but then again you don't want to be known as the person who hops from job to job.
One instance isn't a job hopper. I've had a couple of really disastrous jobs, that I stuck it out with for a year; If I could do it again I would have left much sooner.
+1
I "job hopped" throughout the entire decade of my forties. As a consequence, I:

1) Gained knowledge from a variety of organizations, projects, industries, leadership styles, and company political systems;
2) Became more valuable to organizations based on these broad-based knowledge, skills, and abilities acquired;
3) Moved up faster than I ever would have had I not job hopped; and
4) Increased my salary substantially in a very short time as I always asked for increases when taking new jobs;

Let's be clear, the business world is littered with dysfunctional individuals, teams, leadership, politics, and just plain inability to execute. Simply requiring all of your managers to read a book like Bossidy's Execute does not an effective organization make. It's a waste of valuable time to stay in any untenable situation. Use the smell test: if it stinks, get out, as fast as you'd get out of a burning house. Remember, you can move/rise faster under a good manager/in a good team/in a rising organization than you can in 5 years in any bad situation where one or (ideally) more of these factors are not present.

IMO, you never make a "mistake" in a "career" from which you cannot recover. Make it a plan to come back bigger and better than before. It's what I always did and it worked every time.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by Spirit Rider » Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:23 pm

I made two major "mistakes" in my 40+ year career. In both cases, I knew within a month I had made a very bad mistake. In both cases I started looking immediately. This time I was far more particular in where I looked and I did far more due diligence in what I was looking for. In both cases I found something truly spectacular within 3-4 months.

Think of this as a really bad investment. It is a sunk cost and there is no point in hoping it will turn around. Just take your time looking and now you know what to look out for. I never found that having those two positions < 6 months was a determent to future job prospects. People might have asked about them, but a simple explanation was all that was required. You will find that many people can identify with you. I also had an average of several years per employer. A single event a trend does not make.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by Pajamas » Tue Oct 10, 2017 4:10 pm

Are you sure you have given the new position a fair chance and enough time to conclude that it is not going to work out?

Have you looked at your current job's less-than-ideal nature as a possible opportunity? If your department is a problem within a better-functioning organization, becoming known as a problem-solving go-to person can put you in a good position when there are changes. You might also be able to move within the organization if you find the right position.

If you were severely underpaid in your previous organization because your supervisor was a roadblock, don't consider going back to your old position or any position under that supervisor or maybe even that department, if you do go back to the organization. If the entire organization has problems, going back there might not be the best decision, anyway.

Regardless, there is nothing wrong with looking around to see what's available out there.

I would not look at any of what has already happened as a mistake, because you made the best decisions you could at the time, based on the information that was available to you. You feel like you made mistakes because you now have more information that would have caused you to make different decisions. That's really just learning from experience and gaining wisdom, not making mistakes. If you hadn't taken the new job, you would not have known that you were underpaid in your old job.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by celia » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:10 am

mirror wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:40 pm
After I left the company a senior leader at my previous employer told me that I was severely underpaid at my previous role and should have been making more than my new job is now paying.
How do you know this is accurate information? Maybe a consultation with a "headhunter" could confirm/correct it. Maybe he/she will also steer you someplace worthwhile.
Between finding out (confirming) that I was underpaid and having much less responsibility, I feel like I ended up taking 2 steps back in my career progression. :oops:
It doesn't look like "2 steps back" to me. Getting paid more is a step up. But having less responsibility than before is a step down. So you're probably equal to where you were before, but with more money, but less job satisfaction.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by mirror » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:23 am

bloom2708 wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 10:36 am
On the other hand...higher pay with less responsibility..isn't that kind of the goal?

I want the highest pay possible and the least responsibility possible. :twisted:

I know it doesn't work like that.
Like Big Tom Callahan says "You're either growing or you're dying. There ain't no third direction." (Tommy Boy) :beer

All, thanks for the feedback. It is nice to get some objective opinions.

I left my previous job on a good note, and its not my pride getting in the way, but I don't intend to return to my previous employer. There are several reasons, none of which I will disclose here.

I will start looking and hope I can find something quickly.

I don't know that it was deliberate, but I definitely feel I was misled about the role. Almost all jobs entail some level of busy/administrative work. The amount of that work was severely downplayed during the interview. The work isn't mentally stimulating/challenging there is just a high volume of busy/admin work that people need done "NOW". The other part of the role that involves critical thinking, coming up with creative solutions etc. is a small fraction of what this group does. The way it was presented to me initially was the exact opposite. How does one avoid getting into situations like this? During the interview process everything seemed on the up and up. Without getting a feel for the team dynamic and management style it seems almost inevitable to end up in this type of situation at some point.
There are two types of people: those that can extrapolate from incomplete data.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by HomerJ » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:37 am

basspond wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:21 am
you don't want to be known as the person who hops from job to job.
The OP can make one more quick jump without being labeled a job hopper, but he'll want to be sure the next job is a good fit, because jumping again right away will be more difficult.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by HomerJ » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:42 am

2015 wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:58 pm
mouses wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:16 am
basspond wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:21 am
Don't believe anything from your previous employer. Several months is not enough time to find out if this is a bad fit. Work with your new employer to see what plans they have for you and show them they are getting value for you by correcting the dysfunction. Give it at least 6 months, and before you make a decision weigh the positives and negatives. You don't want to be stuck in an unhappy situation but then again you don't want to be known as the person who hops from job to job.
One instance isn't a job hopper. I've had a couple of really disastrous jobs, that I stuck it out with for a year; If I could do it again I would have left much sooner.
+1
I "job hopped" throughout the entire decade of my forties. As a consequence, I:

1) Gained knowledge from a variety of organizations, projects, industries, leadership styles, and company political systems;
2) Became more valuable to organizations based on these broad-based knowledge, skills, and abilities acquired;
3) Moved up faster than I ever would have had I not job hopped; and
4) Increased my salary substantially in a very short time as I always asked for increases when taking new jobs;

Let's be clear, the business world is littered with dysfunctional individuals, teams, leadership, politics, and just plain inability to execute. Simply requiring all of your managers to read a book like Bossidy's Execute does not an effective organization make. It's a waste of valuable time to stay in any untenable situation. Use the smell test: if it stinks, get out, as fast as you'd get out of a burning house. Remember, you can move/rise faster under a good manager/in a good team/in a rising organization than you can in 5 years in any bad situation where one or (ideally) more of these factors are not present.

IMO, you never make a "mistake" in a "career" from which you cannot recover. Make it a plan to come back bigger and better than before. It's what I always did and it worked every time.
I'm not sure what your definition of "job hopping" is. If you stayed less than a year at most jobs, you weren't very valuable at those jobs, no matter how awesome you are.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by Pajamas » Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:43 pm

mirror wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:23 am
I don't know that it was deliberate, but I definitely feel I was misled about the role. Almost all jobs entail some level of busy/administrative work. The amount of that work was severely downplayed during the interview. The work isn't mentally stimulating/challenging there is just a high volume of busy/admin work that people need done "NOW". The other part of the role that involves critical thinking, coming up with creative solutions etc. is a small fraction of what this group does. The way it was presented to me initially was the exact opposite.
Have you actually discussed this with your immediate supervisor and the department head if that is not your immediate supervisor? Seems like you have nothing to lose in doing so, since you are planning to leave if things continue as they are.

Sometimes something that can't be changed causes you to leave a job, but if it is something that might be able to be changed that is causing you to leave, it doesn't hurt to try to change it first.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by 2015 » Wed Oct 11, 2017 1:30 pm

HomerJ wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 12:42 am
2015 wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 12:58 pm
mouses wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 6:16 am
basspond wrote:
Tue Oct 10, 2017 3:21 am
Don't believe anything from your previous employer. Several months is not enough time to find out if this is a bad fit. Work with your new employer to see what plans they have for you and show them they are getting value for you by correcting the dysfunction. Give it at least 6 months, and before you make a decision weigh the positives and negatives. You don't want to be stuck in an unhappy situation but then again you don't want to be known as the person who hops from job to job.
One instance isn't a job hopper. I've had a couple of really disastrous jobs, that I stuck it out with for a year; If I could do it again I would have left much sooner.
+1
I "job hopped" throughout the entire decade of my forties. As a consequence, I:

1) Gained knowledge from a variety of organizations, projects, industries, leadership styles, and company political systems;
2) Became more valuable to organizations based on these broad-based knowledge, skills, and abilities acquired;
3) Moved up faster than I ever would have had I not job hopped; and
4) Increased my salary substantially in a very short time as I always asked for increases when taking new jobs;

Let's be clear, the business world is littered with dysfunctional individuals, teams, leadership, politics, and just plain inability to execute. Simply requiring all of your managers to read a book like Bossidy's Execute does not an effective organization make. It's a waste of valuable time to stay in any untenable situation. Use the smell test: if it stinks, get out, as fast as you'd get out of a burning house. Remember, you can move/rise faster under a good manager/in a good team/in a rising organization than you can in 5 years in any bad situation where one or (ideally) more of these factors are not present.

IMO, you never make a "mistake" in a "career" from which you cannot recover. Make it a plan to come back bigger and better than before. It's what I always did and it worked every time.
I'm not sure what your definition of "job hopping" is. If you stayed less than a year at most jobs, you weren't very valuable at those jobs, no matter how awesome you are.
I respectfully ask that you refrain from putting words in my mouth. I never said nor would I ever say I was "awesome". In fact, I believe my greatest accomplishment in my career was coming to the conclusion that although I have, can, and do coach others to achieve high levels of effectiveness in organizational leadership, I am unable to do so myself. This is because I do not have the wherewithal to play the political aspect, which becomes more and more important the higher one rises in an organization. I find it one of life's amusing paradoxes that I understand the organization leadership game sufficient to effectively support others in their careers, but do not have that competency within myself (not without killing myself in the process). I believe it's imperative to be aware of one's weaknesses so that he or she can work around them. My workaround was execution; I was known for getting the job done effectively and efficiently when no one else was able to, no matter what that job was. This "saved" me during the several years I navigated leadership. It's a strategy I would recommend to anyone finding themselves with similar weaknesses/strengths.

You are correct, I don't think an individual can acquire sufficient skills and competencies in effectiveness if they stay at an organization for less than a year. It takes a year, maybe two, to soak as much learning from any given situation within an organization. OTOH, I believe it's important to always view one's career through a strategic lens. When you go to work, you are exchanging your mental, emotional, and physical energy for a return. Just as organizations seek to maximize return on equity, I believe individuals must always be strategically seeking to maximizing their return on energy expended. Our time is our money is our life. We can afford to waste none of it.

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HomerJ
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by HomerJ » Wed Oct 11, 2017 1:45 pm

The OP is thinking about leaving after 4 months. We tell him that's fine, but don't make a habit of it (leaving jobs very quickly), because it gets harder to find a new job if you start to look like a "job hopper".

You stated that "job hopping" worked out very well for you without a time context. This seemed like contradictory advice.

I was just pointing out that no one is really valuable to a company when they leave in under a year. Just replacing them alone is a huge drain, not to mention all the time that was wasted in training and learning domain knowledge.

I do agree with you that moving from job to job is very useful. Different companies, different styles, different competencies. And lucrative too. All my best raises came from moving from one company to another.

I'm quite sure our misunderstanding centers around the term "job hopper". I think of a job hopper as someone who jumps ship every 1-2 years (or less!). But I think moving on after 3-5 years is a very good thing, in general. But that's just my personal definition, from my personal experience.

You may have a different definition.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by Watty » Wed Oct 11, 2017 1:55 pm

I once took a new job in IT and once I started it was clear that the company had a lot more problems than they let on about in the interviews and they were not even attempting to fix the problems. Withing a month I was looking for another job and left within three months. Within two years the company was out of business.

Since I could explain why I was looking so soon, and it was a one time event, that was not a problem since all the hiring managers could picture situations like that.

If you will be leaving in a year or so anyway then it is usually better for the company if you left sooner rather than later even if they are not happy about it.

2015
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by 2015 » Wed Oct 11, 2017 10:36 pm

HomerJ wrote:
Wed Oct 11, 2017 1:45 pm
The OP is thinking about leaving after 4 months. We tell him that's fine, but don't make a habit of it (leaving jobs very quickly), because it gets harder to find a new job if you start to look like a "job hopper".

You stated that "job hopping" worked out very well for you without a time context. This seemed like contradictory advice.

I was just pointing out that no one is really valuable to a company when they leave in under a year. Just replacing them alone is a huge drain, not to mention all the time that was wasted in training and learning domain knowledge.

I do agree with you that moving from job to job is very useful. Different companies, different styles, different competencies. And lucrative too. All my best raises came from moving from one company to another.

I'm quite sure our misunderstanding centers around the term "job hopper". I think of a job hopper as someone who jumps ship every 1-2 years (or less!). But I think moving on after 3-5 years is a very good thing, in general. But that's just my personal definition, from my personal experience.

You may have a different definition.
Yes, we're in total agreement. I also think you don't get a chance to learn anything of value in under a year.

OTOH, it seemed to me OP was stating the situation he was in was not only misrepresented during the hiring process, but he found no value in staying. I was advocating (and do advocate) getting out of any employment situation that presents an employee with minimal or no value (monetary, opportunity, learning, etc.) so as not to waste precious time and energy. I also advocate having loyalty to individuals (i.e., good bosses, co-workers, teams, contacts, etc), as opposed to organizations. An organization or a department can restructure, re-engineer, reorganize, downsize, engage in reductions in force, or an organization can become acquired where the political stars are not aligned in your favor. Loyalty to individuals always pays off in my experience.

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midareff
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by midareff » Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:38 am

123 wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:45 pm
Yes it's time to start looking. There's no reason to have to sit in the "penalty box" when there may be other suitable opportunities. When asked about the reason for leaving so soon I would simply say that the job/responsibilities didn't turn out the way it had been described. That's accurate, honest, and non-judgmental.
I think I would first have a sit down with supervision about level of responsibility and decision making. I would leave all the stuff about dysfunctional and miserable out completely. After that I am very much on board with the quoted post above. DO NOT fail to include your current job on your resume. That stuff comes back with big teeth later in life.

Andyrunner
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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by Andyrunner » Thu Oct 12, 2017 7:59 am

Agreed, address with the supervisor. There is a possibility that some inner workings going on, someone is retiring, leaving, promotion coming. They hired you to replace that person.

Don't be afraid to ditch a place soon though. My first job right out of school 60 newly undergrads were hired at once, I think 70% of the people stayed within the first year, 50% in the 2nd year, and this was in 2008-2009. Company over marketed the job and once in the position people realized there was no movement upward, terrible pay and our jobs were to start transitioning work overseas.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by btenny » Thu Oct 12, 2017 10:29 am

Taking the wrong job happens a lot. That is why they have trial periods for new empolyees. I bet your new boss knows this is not working out. Go look for another job asap. Then move on asap. Moving back to your old company is fine if they offer you a better deal but make sure it is Ok with all the bosses. Or find a third company.

Good luck.

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Re: Made a career mistake- advice/next steps

Post by csm » Fri Oct 13, 2017 7:39 am

mirror wrote:
Mon Oct 09, 2017 11:40 pm
During the interview process I was led to believe the role was much more than it has turned out to be. It was presented as a very similar role to my previous job and I was excited to continue on my career growth. I was offered more money for what I thought was a similar role so I was happy to accept the new position.

After I left the company a senior leader at my previous employer told me that I was severely underpaid at my previous role and should have been making more than my new job is now paying.

As it turns out my responsibility/authority at the new company is a fraction of what it was at my old job. The job itself is not particularly satisfying nor challenging (a lot of busy work and no real decision making). In addition the department which I joined is highly dysfunctional and everyone seems miserable. Between finding out (confirming) that I was underpaid and having much less responsibility, I feel like I ended up taking 2 steps back in my career progression.
A little different perspective to consider based on some of your description:

Was your job title in your previous job accurate based on the work you were doing?

This sounds a little bit to me like you had a specific job title / job description at a certain level of pay. Regardless of that, you were doing far more responsible and challenging work which you enjoyed. Your old employer was quite happy to let you do higher level work for the lower pay.

When you interviewed for the new position, you say it was for a "similar role" - was this for a similar role to your existing job title / job description or a similar role to the work you were really doing? Is it possible that the new employer hired you in a role that they believed was similar to your existing role based on your job title and not the extra challenging role that you were not actually paid for nor recognized for at the old firm?

I'm just trying to suggest that perhaps the new company did not deliberately misrepresent the position, but rather there was some misunderstanding between you and them during the interview related to the more responsible work you were actually carrying out (and not compensated nor recognized for).

With that said, if you are miserable and the department is dysfunctional, certainly you should look for something else and be honest when interviewing as to your reasons for wishing to leave. I would not rule out a discussion with your supervisor or higher manager if you think the job is salvageable. Who do you believe misrepresented the position to which you were hired? Human Resources, your immediate supervisor (Hiring Manager) or another manager?

Good luck.

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