Underlayment for hardwood floors

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
Post Reply
User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:13 pm

I'm getting 3/4 inch hardwood floors installed on a wood subfloor.

I told the GC what underlayment was going to be used as I don't want sound traveling into the lower level.

And he said that they don't usually use anything, since they nail and glue the flooring.

I said that I didn't want him to glue down the floors, just nailing. Isn't that the most common way to install hardwood flooring?

He then recommend with go with 10mm isostep underlay, which is made from recycled rubber. Is this the best product to use to avoid sound traveling between floors?

Also, on that lower level, we'll be installing tile over a concrete slab. Can you use an underlay for that? Maybe it will give the floor some cushion, and keep it from being so cold in winter?

JBTX
Posts: 1522
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2017 12:46 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by JBTX » Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:21 pm

We just had engineered wood put in our house and they glued it all. It is one story house. I don't think there was underlaying with the tile in our bathroom or previous tile in kitchen (that we just ripped out).

Some people float their hardwood floors (not glued or nailed).

edge
Posts: 3221
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:44 pm
Location: Great Falls VA

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by edge » Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:48 pm

Usually 3/4 hw w/ tongue and groove is nailed down with a felt underlayment. Not glued unless it is slab. You mentioned wood subfloor which I assume is plywood. So, no glue.

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:47 pm

JBTX wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:21 pm
We just had engineered wood put in our house and they glued it all. It is one story house. I don't think there was underlaying with the tile in our bathroom or previous tile in kitchen (that we just ripped out).

Some people float their hardwood floors (not glued or nailed).
My concern with glue is if you ever need to replace any planks, as they're glued to the subfloor, you'll end up destroying the subfloor.

JBTX
Posts: 1522
Joined: Wed Jul 26, 2017 12:46 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by JBTX » Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:56 pm

unclescrooge wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:47 pm
JBTX wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:21 pm
We just had engineered wood put in our house and they glued it all. It is one story house. I don't think there was underlaying with the tile in our bathroom or previous tile in kitchen (that we just ripped out).

Some people float their hardwood floors (not glued or nailed).
My concern with glue is if you ever need to replace any planks, as they're glued to the subfloor, you'll end up destroying the subfloor.
I'm not at all an expert on this. Ours was glued to concrete slab.

My brother is more DIY than I am. He floated his bamboo floor because it would be easier to replace than if glued.

red5
Posts: 757
Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2012 4:42 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by red5 » Mon Sep 11, 2017 3:46 am

#15 roofing felt is what we are using (we are the middle of the project) for a couple reasons. One, it seems to be a common underlayment, perhaps even the most common. Two, the instructions say to use #15 roofing felt or the warranty would be void. This stuff does nothing for sound though, just moisture. Read any papers that came with your floor and see what they say.

lazydavid
Posts: 1130
Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2016 1:37 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by lazydavid » Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:11 am

For your second question, for the tile you'll want to use something like Schluter Ditra. But this is more about providing moisture a path out from under the tile, as well as protecting the tile/grout from cracks. Not so much about keeping the tile from getting cold, though it may help ever so slightly in that regard.

If you don't want cold tile, you'll have to heat it. I've had good experiences with both Warmly Yours and Suntouch, but Schluter also makes a version of their membrane that can integrate heat as well.

nyjetfan
Posts: 48
Joined: Mon Nov 25, 2013 2:25 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by nyjetfan » Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:02 am

How wide are your hardwood planks? We recently did hardwoods and I think it was about 6" or 7" or wider then they strongly recommend that the floor is glued and nailed. If it is more standard 2-1/4 or 3-1/4" planks than gluing isn't necessary.

As for tile I have ditra heat installed in my house. One thing to be aware of is you will need to have good idea of furniture layout as it's recommended to not have heated tile covered by furniture or area rugs as it will keep the temperature higher than rest of floorand the increased thermal expansion could cause problems with the tile.
Last edited by nyjetfan on Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:29 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
mrc
Posts: 1002
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2016 6:39 am
Location: right here

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by mrc » Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:27 am

unclescrooge wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:13 pm
...
He then recommend with go with 10mm isostep underlay, which is made from recycled rubber. Is this the best product to use to avoid sound traveling between floors?
I have installed over a dozen 3/4" hardwood strip floors in various rooms. I used 30# felt over the plywood sub floor, and nails. No glue. People that glue floors to wood sub floors will live in the room in hell next to those that paint brick. I didn't know about isostep, but if I were to install a floor now, I would use it. The description is quite promising:
Our Iso-Step® Floor Underlayment is engineered to provide superior impact sound insulation and better performance over other sound control materials. It may be installed over wood or concrete sub floor and under a wide range of flooring finishes. Installing Iso-Step® as part of your flooring assembly, short circuits impact noise to combat footfall and other structure borne sound and vibration.
A great challenge of life: Knowing enough to think you're doing it right, but not enough to know you're doing it wrong. — Neil deGrasse Tyson

sheepla
Posts: 3
Joined: Wed Aug 02, 2017 10:10 am

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by sheepla » Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:52 am

mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:27 am
People that glue floors to wood sub floors will live in the room in hell next to those that paint brick.
+1,000

noco-hawkeye
Posts: 223
Joined: Sat Aug 16, 2014 8:20 am

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by noco-hawkeye » Mon Sep 11, 2017 7:29 am

I thought felt underlayment was most common, and nailing most of it. Glue can be used for transitions / thresholds where nailing might be more visible or problematic.

Is the bottom side of the floor accessible? I've found adding insulation is an inexpensive way to reduce a lot of sound as well.

renue74
Posts: 893
Joined: Tue Apr 07, 2015 7:24 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by renue74 » Mon Sep 11, 2017 7:45 am

#15 felt underlayment is the norm in my area. In fact, I just installed 300 sq/ft of old antique heart pine flooring (nailed it) this weekend and used felt underlayment.

I'm not really sold on the fact of soundproofing floors as a working option. Sure it can deaden the sounds of foot steps, but I think people thinks it will be like a soundproof room...which in many cases is not.

pshonore
Posts: 5642
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 2:21 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by pshonore » Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:17 am

Solid wood expands and contracts with temperature and moisture changes. (across the grain not lengthwise). I would not glue it. 15# tar paper should be fine.

User avatar
lthenderson
Posts: 2391
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by lthenderson » Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:24 am

When installing a hardwood floor, there are many things to consider when deciding how to attach it to the subfloor.

Appearance - Putting felt and glue under a subfloor while the rest of the house has none will give it a different height difference which can be noticeable.

Cost - Floating cost less than nailing which cost less than glueing.

Sub floor type - Concrete versus leveling gypsum versus plywood can all affect which options you can use.

Manufacturers recommendations - A big one if you ever want to claim a warrenty later on.

Feel and sound - Glued and nailed hardwood feels solid with no movement versus floating which have some give and a more hollow sound to it. Can be important if you have other hardwood throughout your house.

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:22 am

red5 wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 3:46 am
#15 roofing felt is what we are using (we are the middle of the project) for a couple reasons. One, it seems to be a common underlayment, perhaps even the most common. Two, the instructions say to use #15 roofing felt or the warranty would be void. This stuff does nothing for sound though, just moisture. Read any papers that came with your floor and see what they say.
That sounds like a vapor barrier, which won't do much for sound dampening. The papers say use felt or SVS paper, but don't mention their absence voiding the warranty.

Also, I'm in southern California - I'm not too worried about moisture!

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:51 am

mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:27 am
unclescrooge wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 10:13 pm
...
He then recommend with go with 10mm isostep underlay, which is made from recycled rubber. Is this the best product to use to avoid sound traveling between floors?
I have installed over a dozen 3/4" hardwood strip floors in various rooms. I used 30# felt over the plywood sub floor, and nails. No glue. People that glue floors to wood sub floors will live in the room in hell next to those that paint brick. I didn't know about isostep, but if I were to install a floor now, I would use it. The description is quite promising:
Our Iso-Step® Floor Underlayment is engineered to provide superior impact sound insulation and better performance over other sound control materials. It may be installed over wood or concrete sub floor and under a wide range of flooring finishes. Installing Iso-Step® as part of your flooring assembly, short circuits impact noise to combat footfall and other structure borne sound and vibration.
Uh oh, I'm thinking of painting the 10ft brick accent wall outside!

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:52 am

noco-hawkeye wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 7:29 am
I thought felt underlayment was most common, and nailing most of it. Glue can be used for transitions / thresholds where nailing might be more visible or problematic.

Is the bottom side of the floor accessible? I've found adding insulation is an inexpensive way to reduce a lot of sound as well.
Yes, we've already put insulation in the lower floor.

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:54 am

lthenderson wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:24 am
When installing a hardwood floor, there are many things to consider when deciding how to attach it to the subfloor.

Appearance - Putting felt and glue under a subfloor while the rest of the house has none will give it a different height difference which can be noticeable.

Cost - Floating cost less than nailing which cost less than glueing.

Sub floor type - Concrete versus leveling gypsum versus plywood can all affect which options you can use.

Manufacturers recommendations - A big one if you ever want to claim a warrenty later on.

Feel and sound - Glued and nailed hardwood feels solid with no movement versus floating which have some give and a more hollow sound to it. Can be important if you have other hardwood throughout your house.
The entire upper level (2400 sq ft) will be wood, including the kitchen. Just the bathrooms will be tile.

We're installing solid hardwood, I want to feel solid, not hollow.

The downstairs (700sq ft) is on cement slab. We'll be installing wood-look tile there.

User avatar
mrc
Posts: 1002
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2016 6:39 am
Location: right here

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by mrc » Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:25 am

unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:51 am
mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:27 am

I have installed over a dozen 3/4" hardwood strip floors in various rooms. I used 30# felt over the plywood sub floor, and nails. No glue. People that glue floors to wood sub floors will live in the room in hell next to those that paint brick. I didn't know about isostep, but if I were to install a floor now, I would use it. The description is quite promising:
Uh oh, I'm thinking of painting the 10ft brick accent wall outside!
Then you may as well glue the floor! No not really, :( I like the isostep idea a lot.

There are special exemptions for certain brick paint jobs, but never for a fireplace hearth.
A great challenge of life: Knowing enough to think you're doing it right, but not enough to know you're doing it wrong. — Neil deGrasse Tyson

Chicken lady
Posts: 93
Joined: Tue Dec 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by Chicken lady » Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:09 am

You know, I'd think twice about using an installer who doesn't want to use some sort of underlayment under hardwood flooring. What was his reasoning?

There's a good bit of information on the net about underlayment, what to use, what not to use and why. There is a special underlayment for hardwood flooring that is a bit more expensive than tar paper but doesn't have the negatives associated with tar paper. I've never seen it for sale in the big box stores but the fellow who laid our recently installed 3/4" floor brought it with them. My understanding is that not only does the underlayment offer a moisture barrier but also provides a small level of cushioning that might be needed due to less than absolutely level flooring which might result in squeeks.

Good luck.

db1216
Posts: 17
Joined: Thu Oct 23, 2014 3:44 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by db1216 » Mon Sep 11, 2017 12:04 pm

Our last house, our contractor used Luanne, stapled to the subfloor for vinyl flooring and some laminate planks. If you care at all about enjoying your floors, don't use Luanne. What a mistake; the most crackling I've ever heard. I have never installed hardwood myself and I can't comment on that, I just wanted to drop that tidbit of knowledge I do have. Use 3/4" if doing any sort of wood layer underneath.

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:59 pm

mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:25 am
unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:51 am
mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:27 am

I have installed over a dozen 3/4" hardwood strip floors in various rooms. I used 30# felt over the plywood sub floor, and nails. No glue. People that glue floors to wood sub floors will live in the room in hell next to those that paint brick. I didn't know about isostep, but if I were to install a floor now, I would use it. The description is quite promising:
Uh oh, I'm thinking of painting the 10ft brick accent wall outside!
Then you may as well glue the floor! No not really, :( I like the isostep idea a lot.
LOL.

Would nailing down the isostep underlay defeat the purpose?

I spoke to the GC, and he said, if you're going to go with the acoustic underlayment, it needs to be glued down. Nails will defeat the whole purpose. :oops:

I'm really going to hell aren't I!
Last edited by unclescrooge on Mon Sep 11, 2017 4:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Mon Sep 11, 2017 4:05 pm

Chicken lady wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 11:09 am
You know, I'd think twice about using an installer who doesn't want to use some sort of underlayment under hardwood flooring. What was his reasoning?

There's a good bit of information on the net about underlayment, what to use, what not to use and why. There is a special underlayment for hardwood flooring that is a bit more expensive than tar paper but doesn't have the negatives associated with tar paper. I've never seen it for sale in the big box stores but the fellow who laid our recently installed 3/4" floor brought it with them. My understanding is that not only does the underlayment offer a moisture barrier but also provides a small level of cushioning that might be needed due to less than absolutely level flooring which might result in squeeks.

Good luck.
It seems like nearly all installers will put down something, even if it's just paper. However, I want an acoustic underlayment, so that requires someone with specialized knowledge, or who actually cares about the end product. From my personal experience, finding someone who cares usually means you're paying 2x the median price for labor - sometimes it's worth it, and sometimes it isn't (but mostly, it's not in the budget).

User avatar
mrc
Posts: 1002
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2016 6:39 am
Location: right here

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by mrc » Mon Sep 11, 2017 4:18 pm

unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:59 pm
mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:25 am
unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:51 am
mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:27 am

I have installed over a dozen 3/4" hardwood strip floors in various rooms. I used 30# felt over the plywood sub floor, and nails. No glue. People that glue floors to wood sub floors will live in the room in hell next to those that paint brick. I didn't know about isostep, but if I were to install a floor now, I would use it. The description is quite promising:
Uh oh, I'm thinking of painting the 10ft brick accent wall outside!
Then you may as well glue the floor! No not really, :( I like the isostep idea a lot.
LOL.

Would nailing down the isostep underlay defeat the purpose?

I spoke to the GC, and he said, if you're going to go with the acoustic underlayment, it needs to be glued down. Nails will defeat the whole purpose. :oops:

I'm really going to hell aren't I!
I don't see how one could get a 3/4" hardwood strip installed satisfactorily with an adhesive. I can see how nails could transmit some sound, but it might be worth a call to acousticalsolutions.com to discuss. Engineered yes, I glued a Pergo float in one room 20 years ago but would never again because walking on that floor sounded like we were loading a horse into a trailer. I'd be curious what they said.
A great challenge of life: Knowing enough to think you're doing it right, but not enough to know you're doing it wrong. — Neil deGrasse Tyson

richardglm
Posts: 246
Joined: Sun Jan 04, 2015 9:42 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by richardglm » Mon Sep 11, 2017 4:21 pm

Nailing is more work because in order to prevent squeaks you have to be very diligent about nailing very frequently and not missing any regions.

If you are expecting good soundproofing from any underlayment, you will be disappointed. A thin felt can help a bit but only insulation will really muffle noise.

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:49 pm

mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 4:18 pm
unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 1:59 pm
mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:25 am
unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 9:51 am
mrc wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:27 am

I have installed over a dozen 3/4" hardwood strip floors in various rooms. I used 30# felt over the plywood sub floor, and nails. No glue. People that glue floors to wood sub floors will live in the room in hell next to those that paint brick. I didn't know about isostep, but if I were to install a floor now, I would use it. The description is quite promising:
Uh oh, I'm thinking of painting the 10ft brick accent wall outside!
Then you may as well glue the floor! No not really, :( I like the isostep idea a lot.
LOL.

Would nailing down the isostep underlay defeat the purpose?

I spoke to the GC, and he said, if you're going to go with the acoustic underlayment, it needs to be glued down. Nails will defeat the whole purpose. :oops:

I'm really going to hell aren't I!
I don't see how one could get a 3/4" hardwood strip installed satisfactorily with an adhesive. I can see how nails could transmit some sound, but it might be worth a call to acousticalsolutions.com to discuss. Engineered yes, I glued a Pergo float in one room 20 years ago but would never again because walking on that floor sounded like we were loading a horse into a trailer. I'd be curious what they said.
Why would it be unsatisfactory to glue a 5inch wide plank that's 3/4 inch thick? I would have thought thicker planks were pretty easy to glue down.

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Mon Sep 11, 2017 10:21 pm

So I got back the estimate for installing IsoStep accoustic flooring - it came out to $5.95/sqft :shock:

Plus the cost of the hardwood install, which was $4.25/sqft.

After some negotiating, the hardwood is $4.15, and i'm going to forgo any accoustic underlay. The floor guy will show me some cheap cork underlay that will be about $1/sqft extra.

Thanks all for your great help and insights!

Maybe in my next house, I'll be able to spend $10/sqft just on installation :beer

User avatar
mrc
Posts: 1002
Joined: Sun Jan 10, 2016 6:39 am
Location: right here

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by mrc » Tue Sep 12, 2017 5:42 am

unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:49 pm
...
Why would it be unsatisfactory to glue a 5inch wide plank that's 3/4 inch thick? I would have thought thicker planks were pretty easy to glue down.
Much of the 3/4" hardwood I've installed is not perfectly straight and true (as engineered would be). Warps, cups, twists, bows, even wanes on some. I don't see how you can clamp 3/4" while glue dries. Moreover, just edge gluing (because you're floating on an underlayment of some sort), simply cannot work for non-engineered products. IMHO.

Nearly every board needs a good whack from the hammer & nailer show shoe to seat properly. Then, there is the installed cost :shock:

Good luck, and I hope you love the new floor.

Edit: It's a nailer shoe
Last edited by mrc on Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:25 am, edited 1 time in total.
A great challenge of life: Knowing enough to think you're doing it right, but not enough to know you're doing it wrong. — Neil deGrasse Tyson

User avatar
unclescrooge
Posts: 1597
Joined: Thu Jun 07, 2012 7:00 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by unclescrooge » Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:53 am

mrc wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 5:42 am
unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:49 pm
...
Why would it be unsatisfactory to glue a 5inch wide plank that's 3/4 inch thick? I would have thought thicker planks were pretty easy to glue down.
Much of the 3/4" hardwood I've installed is not perfectly straight and true (as engineered would be). Warps, cups, twists, bows, even wanes on some. I don't see how you can clamp 3/4" while glue dries. Moreover, just edge gluing (because you're floating on an underlayment of some sort), simply cannot work for non-engineered products. IMHO.

Nearly every board needs a good whack from the hammer & nailer show to seat properly. Then, there is the installed cost :shock:

Good luck, and I hope you love the new floor.
Makes sense. Thanks for the explanation :beer

User avatar
lthenderson
Posts: 2391
Joined: Tue Feb 21, 2012 12:43 pm
Location: Iowa

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by lthenderson » Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:24 am

mrc wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 5:42 am
unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:49 pm
...
Why would it be unsatisfactory to glue a 5inch wide plank that's 3/4 inch thick? I would have thought thicker planks were pretty easy to glue down.
Much of the 3/4" hardwood I've installed is not perfectly straight and true (as engineered would be). Warps, cups, twists, bows, even wanes on some. I don't see how you can clamp 3/4" while glue dries. Moreover, just edge gluing (because you're floating on an underlayment of some sort), simply cannot work for non-engineered products. IMHO.
The idea of the glue is to not ensure that every square inch of the board get held tight to the underlayment. The glue is a filler to fill up any voids caused by the cups, bows, twists, etc and hold it in proximity to the underlayment so that you get that nice solid sound and feeling when walking across it. If there is an exceptionally large defect that wants to cause the board be noticeably higher, it is as simple as putting a weight on it for ten minutes until the glue sets. With just a handful of weights, I can go over an hour at times before needing a weight holding down a spot and by then the glue isn't going to let the board go anywhere.

pshonore
Posts: 5642
Joined: Sun Jun 28, 2009 2:21 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by pshonore » Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:56 am

lthenderson wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 10:24 am
mrc wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 5:42 am
unclescrooge wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 5:49 pm
...
Why would it be unsatisfactory to glue a 5inch wide plank that's 3/4 inch thick? I would have thought thicker planks were pretty easy to glue down.
Much of the 3/4" hardwood I've installed is not perfectly straight and true (as engineered would be). Warps, cups, twists, bows, even wanes on some. I don't see how you can clamp 3/4" while glue dries. Moreover, just edge gluing (because you're floating on an underlayment of some sort), simply cannot work for non-engineered products. IMHO.
The idea of the glue is to not ensure that every square inch of the board get held tight to the underlayment. The glue is a filler to fill up any voids caused by the cups, bows, twists, etc and hold it in proximity to the underlayment so that you get that nice solid sound and feeling when walking across it. If there is an exceptionally large defect that wants to cause the board be noticeably higher, it is as simple as putting a weight on it for ten minutes until the glue sets. With just a handful of weights, I can go over an hour at times before needing a weight holding down a spot and by then the glue isn't going to let the board go anywhere.
I recently installed approx 1500 sq ft of 3/4" solid hardwood (Bruce and Armstrong) . I think less than 1% had defects like those mentioned. If you have significantly more that, you need to change suppliers or use those pieces in closets, on the edge, etc.

Chicken lady
Posts: 93
Joined: Tue Dec 17, 2013 12:46 pm

Re: Underlayment for hardwood floors

Post by Chicken lady » Thu Sep 14, 2017 9:12 am

You might be able to whittle down your other associated costs so you can get the underlayment you want. Installation and flooring costs can be quite varied. I don't see where you are located and location can make a huge difference in costs but I'm in the Nashville area and just had 3/4 oak installed for $2.00 a sf - nailed. We were able to purchase the flooring ourselves at a discount (though still retail) from a mill that sells both rough and finished flooring. I asked the retailer if they could recommend any installers. They gave me 4 names - talked to them, and their past customers. The fellows we hired happened to be the cheapest but it was the other customers' comments about the precision and care who tipped us over to this company.

Post Reply