Anyone else freeze their credit score?

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AlwaysBeClimbing
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by AlwaysBeClimbing » Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:44 am

Nope. Placed a fraud alert and will renew every 90 days. Have free credit monitoring through credit card providers and Credit Karma, and will use the three free annual credit reports(one every four months). Will freeze Innovis since it is free. If my state ever does the right thing and makes freezing free, I'll be happy to do it.

bluegrassman
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by bluegrassman » Sun Sep 10, 2017 12:59 pm

I am a bit surprised some folks think the Equifax breach issue is protecting against bogus credit card charges. It makes no difference if you have zero or a hundred credit cards; the real issue is criminals accessing SS numbers and using/selling them for future identity theft. There's a world of difference. We are freezing our credit ASAP.

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RyeWhiskey
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by RyeWhiskey » Sun Sep 10, 2017 5:51 pm

nisiprius wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:24 am
I also gave in and added two-factor authentication, which Vanguard calls a "security code" to my Vanguard account. And then, of course, I read this. It appears as if "two-factor authentication" is just another bit of ineffective security theatre.
The argument there, at least in the Wired article, is that the weak link in 2FA is the text message. This is true, your texts are completely unsecured and cannot really be secured against outside texts like these (you can secure your texts between two or more people by everyone using an app like Signal). So in order to secure your 2FA texts, and for those that take this seriously we will have a fair amount coming in, you need an app for that. The one I'm looking at is called Authy. There are others, but the article's headline is overblown; we just have to take another step to secure our privacy. :beer
This post was brought to you by Vanguard Total World Stock Index (VTWSX/VT).

b.lock
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by b.lock » Sun Sep 10, 2017 5:55 pm

I froze mine with Equifax and Experian and it was easy to do online. TransUnion wasn't working when I tried a couple of hours ago, I got a message saying they were having technical difficulties. I have worried about people opening cards and taking out loans in my name for a long time, but never bothered to get a credit freeze until now.

hightower
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by hightower » Sun Sep 10, 2017 8:42 pm

MnD wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:47 am
Nope - not going to pay money and spend time creating an ongoing cost and inconvenience for myself and family.
We make 5-figures annually getting using premium reward cards and save a lot of other money by having and using a high credit score (insurance rates etc.) Just checked equifax site and got the not affected screen for both of us but I figure the basic PII that's being discussed has been hacked numerous time in the past.
You'll change your mind when someone steals your identity and you start getting harassing phone calls from debt collectors saying you owe them thousands of dollars for something you didnt buy. It can take a year or more to clear your name from something like that and you'll wish you had spent 5 mins and 15 bucks freezing your credit now. I've had it happen to me and I froze my credit immediately after. Its alot less of an inconvenience to freeze and unfreeze when u need to.

TVBogle
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by TVBogle » Sun Sep 10, 2017 9:02 pm

b.lock wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 5:55 pm
I froze mine with Equifax and Experian and it was easy to do online. TransUnion wasn't working when I tried a couple of hours ago, I got a message saying they were having technical difficulties. I have worried about people opening cards and taking out loans in my name for a long time, but never bothered to get a credit freeze until now.
Same experience with TransUnion here. I had to pay a fee for Experian but did not see any fee for Equifax and Innovis. Did I miss something?

dcabler
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by dcabler » Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:11 am

Yep - did mine yesterday, but had to do Transunion by phone (automated) because they want you to set up an account. Turns out I already had an account but I didn't know the answer to the secret question. Oh and pay attention to the Equifax message about only using the Adobe Print button to print out the confirmation with the PIN on it. I didn't and I now have 2 sheets of paper, including the one which should have the PIN and is blank. And I deleted the browser tab after printing. But they do have a way to get a new pin by snailmail, which is fine since I'm in no hurry to unfreeze any time soon.....

AntsOnTheMarch
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by AntsOnTheMarch » Mon Sep 11, 2017 6:35 am

TVBogle wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 9:02 pm
Same experience with TransUnion here. I had to pay a fee for Experian but did not see any fee for Equifax and Innovis. Did I miss something?
No, you didn't miss anything. Same here. Also, no fee for Chex. So only TansUnion and Experian charged me a fee.

learning_head
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by learning_head » Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:25 am

nisiprius wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 11:24 am
I am still baffled as to exactly how freezing my credit records is supposed to help me. Freezing my credit records doesn't stop me or anybody else from charging things on my credit cards, let alone stop the hackers from using the information they have about me to impersonate me.
Charging your own credit cards is not a big deal it seems. You'd just get that reimbursed by the company. Bigger issue is new accounts being opened and charged up by the thieves, which is apparently much harder to clear up.

My impression is that
(a) you might as well assume that by now hackers know your info and it's being sold on the dark web among millions of others; so it might be just a matter of time before someone gets to your entry to try and use it
(b) freezing the 5 agencies will make it more difficult for hackers to open accounts in your name because new lenders (and in case of Chexsystems, banks for deposit accounts) will not open accounts while frozen, making it more likely they will move on to the next target

I was especially excited to freeze Chexsystems fearing that hackers opening a checking/savings account in my name could then try to connect it to my real accounts and ACH / drain the real accounts into the ones under their control.

Having said that, hackers can still open accounts in banks you already deal with as those will still have access to your Chexsystems files. Similarly, I think lenders you already have cards from might be able to open new accounts.

MnD
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by MnD » Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:10 pm

hightower wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 8:42 pm
MnD wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:47 am
Nope - not going to pay money and spend time creating an ongoing cost and inconvenience for myself and family.
We make 5-figures annually getting using premium reward cards and save a lot of other money by having and using a high credit score (insurance rates etc.) Just checked equifax site and got the not affected screen for both of us but I figure the basic PII that's being discussed has been hacked numerous time in the past.
You'll change your mind when someone steals your identity and you start getting harassing phone calls from debt collectors saying you owe them thousands of dollars for something you didnt buy. It can take a year or more to clear your name from something like that and you'll wish you had spent 5 mins and 15 bucks freezing your credit now. I've had it happen to me and I froze my credit immediately after. Its alot less of an inconvenience to freeze and unfreeze when u need to.
Doubtful. This assumes that identity theft is PII limited.
Likely more related to the number of dirtbags, randomness and sloppiness.
You don't have to be the fastest to avoid being eaten by the bear. Just not the slowest.

takeshi
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by takeshi » Tue Sep 12, 2017 7:26 am

blueman457 wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 10:47 am
Anyone else freeze their credit score?
Picking nits but you can't freeze your score and you don't have just one score. You can, however, freeze your reports. The freeze won't prevent creditors from updating your reports if you have an existing relationships with them. Those updates can cause your scores to change as well as factors such as the aging of your accounts.

need403bhelp
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by need403bhelp » Tue Sep 12, 2017 9:54 am

F150HD wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:32 am
Rainmaker41 wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:16 am

- Verified two-factor authentication was in place for financial accounts & verified email alerts for all non-credit card transactions.

- Setup two-factor authentication for Google accounts.....
Not sure 2 factor is all that great (?)

A hacker could call Sprint AT&T etc and port your phone # to a new phone they could use it to access all connected accounts and change the passwords or drain them.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurash ... 984360f7
FYI, Google allows to set up 2FA with Google Authenticator + backup codes ONLY - ie, no SMS option at all. You basically set up all 3 then delete SMS.

A caveat - I saw an article or two that a thief who can log your keystrokes on your computer (with malware, or a camera hidden somewhere in your house?) can eventually guess your Google Authenticator codes with enough inputs (don't have reference handy and not sure how easy/difficult this would be or how many times they would have to capture your 2FA code).

BW1985
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by BW1985 » Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:28 am

Vanguard has a computer access restriction option where you can choose to only allow previously known devices to access your account.
"Squirrels figured out how to save eons ago. They buried acorns. Some, they dug up, for food. Others, they let to sprout, in new oak trees. We could learn from squirrels." -john94549

BW1985
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by BW1985 » Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:31 am

If they have all your info, whats to stop the hacker from unfreezing your credit reports?
"Squirrels figured out how to save eons ago. They buried acorns. Some, they dug up, for food. Others, they let to sprout, in new oak trees. We could learn from squirrels." -john94549

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flamesabers
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by flamesabers » Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:47 am

I'm going to freeze my file with Chexsystems and Innovis, but not with TransUnion, Experian and Equifax. There are no fees for freezing my file with the first two companies, plus I don't chase bank bonuses so I don't see a need for me to unfreeze my Chexsystems report anytime in the foreseeable future. For the last three I'll probably utilize a fraud alert. Even though I'll have to renew a fraud alert every 90 days, it's free and I can just set a reminder on my calendar. I'm wanting to get a few new credit cards every year to get the sign-up bonus so freezing my credit isn't the ideal option for me.

BW1985
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by BW1985 » Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:49 am

flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:47 am
I'm going to freeze my file with Chexsystems and Innovis, but not with TransUnion, Experian and Equifax. There are no fees for freezing my file with the first two companies, plus I don't chase bank bonuses so I don't see a need for me to unfreeze my Chexsystems report anytime in the foreseeable future. For the last three I'll probably utilize a fraud alert. Even though I'll have to renew a fraud alert every 90 days, it's free and I can just set a reminder on my calendar. I'm wanting to get a few new credit cards every year to get the sign-up bonus so freezing my credit isn't the ideal option for me.
Equifax is free to freeze too. There is a 1 year fraud alert option on Equifax as well, I don't know if there's a fee for that though.
"Squirrels figured out how to save eons ago. They buried acorns. Some, they dug up, for food. Others, they let to sprout, in new oak trees. We could learn from squirrels." -john94549

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Pajamas
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by Pajamas » Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:58 am

BW1985 wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:49 am
Equifax is free to freeze too. There is a 1 year fraud alert option on Equifax as well, I don't know if there's a fee for that though.
I did the one year "active duty" fraud alert with Experian, who will notify the other two major credit reporting agencies to do the same, and at Innovis. I wasn't in the mood to interact with Equifax. I haven't decided about freezing yet.

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flamesabers
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by flamesabers » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:00 pm

BW1985 wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:49 am
flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:47 am
I'm going to freeze my file with Chexsystems and Innovis, but not with TransUnion, Experian and Equifax. There are no fees for freezing my file with the first two companies, plus I don't chase bank bonuses so I don't see a need for me to unfreeze my Chexsystems report anytime in the foreseeable future. For the last three I'll probably utilize a fraud alert. Even though I'll have to renew a fraud alert every 90 days, it's free and I can just set a reminder on my calendar. I'm wanting to get a few new credit cards every year to get the sign-up bonus so freezing my credit isn't the ideal option for me.
Equifax is free to freeze too. There is a 1 year fraud alert option on Equifax as well, I don't know if there's a fee for that though.
There is not a fee for fraud alert from what I can tell. In regards to getting the 1 year fraud alert (vs. the 90 day fraud alert) you have to prove you are a victim of identity thief with a police report. You don't need special documentation to get the 90 day fraud alert.

itstoomuch
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by itstoomuch » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:03 pm

yes, we want to refinance a subprime (retiree penalty) loan in 6-12 months. Don't need any more problems
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rustymutt
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by rustymutt » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:12 pm

I just tried to freeze my credit with Equifax, and the website was so busy it's down.
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SurferLife
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by SurferLife » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:16 pm

blueman457 wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 10:47 am
The Equifax hack was the straw the broke the camel's back. I froze my wife's and my credit at the 3 major bureaus and Innovis. It's going to be a pain to unfreeze it when we apply for a mortgage, but that is the life we live in now-a-days.

Anyone freeze their credit?

Blue Man
We are thinking the same thing and I just froze my credit with one agency and was surprised that I had to pay to do it, and not just for them but for every agency. It shouldn't be this hard or this costly to do it.

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Pajamas
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by Pajamas » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:16 pm

flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:00 pm

There is not a fee for fraud alert from what I can tell. In regards to getting the 1 year fraud alert (vs. the 90 day fraud alert) you have to prove you are a victim of identity thief with a police report. You don't need special documentation to get the 90 day fraud alert.


You don't need documentation of identity theft for the 90 day or 1 year alert on Experian, only for the 7 year alert. I assume the other agencies are similar. Experian didn't ask for anything more than basic demographic information and Social Security number for the "active duty" 1 year alert.

The alert just requests potential creditors to verify your identity before issuing credit.

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DaftInvestor
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by DaftInvestor » Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:27 pm

MnD wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:10 pm
hightower wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 8:42 pm
MnD wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:47 am
Nope - not going to pay money and spend time creating an ongoing cost and inconvenience for myself and family.
We make 5-figures annually getting using premium reward cards and save a lot of other money by having and using a high credit score (insurance rates etc.) Just checked equifax site and got the not affected screen for both of us but I figure the basic PII that's being discussed has been hacked numerous time in the past.
You'll change your mind when someone steals your identity and you start getting harassing phone calls from debt collectors saying you owe them thousands of dollars for something you didnt buy. It can take a year or more to clear your name from something like that and you'll wish you had spent 5 mins and 15 bucks freezing your credit now. I've had it happen to me and I froze my credit immediately after. Its alot less of an inconvenience to freeze and unfreeze when u need to.
Doubtful. This assumes that identity theft is PII limited.
Likely more related to the number of dirtbags, randomness and sloppiness.
You don't have to be the fastest to avoid being eaten by the bear. Just not the slowest.
You are essentially putting yourself in the class of the "slowest" by not freezing your credit though. The thieves will focus on those that have chosen not to freeze their credit versus the rest of us that have chosen to do so. Thieves in nicer towns walk down the street and check car doors to see who left their door unlocked - that is faster and easier than breaking in and disabling an alarm for many thieves. You are simply choosing to leave your doors unlocked so the rest of us won't get broken into.

BW1985
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by BW1985 » Tue Sep 12, 2017 1:31 pm

flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:00 pm
BW1985 wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:49 am
flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:47 am
I'm going to freeze my file with Chexsystems and Innovis, but not with TransUnion, Experian and Equifax. There are no fees for freezing my file with the first two companies, plus I don't chase bank bonuses so I don't see a need for me to unfreeze my Chexsystems report anytime in the foreseeable future. For the last three I'll probably utilize a fraud alert. Even though I'll have to renew a fraud alert every 90 days, it's free and I can just set a reminder on my calendar. I'm wanting to get a few new credit cards every year to get the sign-up bonus so freezing my credit isn't the ideal option for me.
Equifax is free to freeze too. There is a 1 year fraud alert option on Equifax as well, I don't know if there's a fee for that though.
There is not a fee for fraud alert from what I can tell. In regards to getting the 1 year fraud alert (vs. the 90 day fraud alert) you have to prove you are a victim of identity thief with a police report. You don't need special documentation to get the 90 day fraud alert.
Just did the 1 year fraud alert at Experian, no charge and no documentation needed. Also gave me access to my credit report which I thought you had to pay for. Also froze Equifax and Inovis since they're free.
"Squirrels figured out how to save eons ago. They buried acorns. Some, they dug up, for food. Others, they let to sprout, in new oak trees. We could learn from squirrels." -john94549

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flamesabers
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by flamesabers » Tue Sep 12, 2017 1:38 pm

Pajamas wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:16 pm
flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:00 pm

There is not a fee for fraud alert from what I can tell. In regards to getting the 1 year fraud alert (vs. the 90 day fraud alert) you have to prove you are a victim of identity thief with a police report. You don't need special documentation to get the 90 day fraud alert.


You don't need documentation of identity theft for the 90 day or 1 year alert on Experian, only for the 7 year alert. I assume the other agencies are similar. Experian didn't ask for anything more than basic demographic information and Social Security number for the "active duty" 1 year alert.

The alert just requests potential creditors to verify your identity before issuing credit.
Don't you have to provide military orders to be eligible for the "active duty" alert?
DaftInvestor wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:27 pm
You are essentially putting yourself in the class of the "slowest" by not freezing your credit though. The thieves will focus on those that have chosen not to freeze their credit versus the rest of us that have chosen to do so. Thieves in nicer towns walk down the street and check car doors to see who left their door unlocked - that is faster and easier than breaking in and disabling an alarm for many thieves. You are simply choosing to leave your doors unlocked so the rest of us won't get broken into.
I think something to keep in mind is thieves, like the rest of us, don't have an unlimited amount of time. Depending on their dedication and competence, thieves will have to decide between searching for easy targets or honing their ability to bypass security measures to steal a potentially much more rewarding target. If the vast majority of thieves are primarily looking for easy targets, then I would agree that not taking some additional measure to protect your credit would put you at a greater risk of being victimized. However, if the vast majority of thieves are working to find ways to break through a credit freeze, (or another security measure) you may find yourself in the "slowest" class when you least expect it.

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DaftInvestor
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by DaftInvestor » Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:14 pm

flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 1:38 pm
DaftInvestor wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:27 pm
You are essentially putting yourself in the class of the "slowest" by not freezing your credit though. The thieves will focus on those that have chosen not to freeze their credit versus the rest of us that have chosen to do so. Thieves in nicer towns walk down the street and check car doors to see who left their door unlocked - that is faster and easier than breaking in and disabling an alarm for many thieves. You are simply choosing to leave your doors unlocked so the rest of us won't get broken into.
I think something to keep in mind is thieves, like the rest of us, don't have an unlimited amount of time. Depending on their dedication and competence, thieves will have to decide between searching for easy targets or honing their ability to bypass security measures to steal a potentially much more rewarding target. If the vast majority of thieves are primarily looking for easy targets, then I would agree that not taking some additional measure to protect your credit would put you at a greater risk of being victimized. However, if the vast majority of thieves are working to find ways to break through a credit freeze, (or another security measure) you may find yourself in the "slowest" class when you least expect it.
Sure - doing a credit-freeze won't protect you from everything. But it is a simple thing that adds basic protection (like locking the doors in your car before you walk into the shopping mall).
If I buy 100 hacked IDs from the dark-web - I might try to open up credit cards with them. I might expect only 1 of them to actually work for me (which might pay me back 10-fold for what I paid for for that list of 100). Why make yourself that 1 in 100? (Which is what the person I responded to decided to be).
Perhaps you might feel "so what - I won't be liable for charges I didn't make". I might at the same time make up a fake drivers license with all your info and my picture. Then I might use that driver's license and credit card to rent the most expensive car from hertz and drive to NYC and book the most expensive hotel room. By the time you find out I've done it you have a lawsuit and criminal-warrant from the car rental company for not returning the car and from the hotel room for trashing their room. There might be other criminal charges for other things I decided to do while checked into the hotel (use your imagination here). Now you have to hire a lawyer to help you get out of the mess after you are arrested.
Me - I'd rather freeze my credit and then go through the hassle and extra $10 of unfreezing it when I need to.

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Pajamas
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by Pajamas » Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:40 pm

flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 1:38 pm
Don't you have to provide military orders to be eligible for the "active duty" alert?
Not on Experian. It's the same online form for the 90 day fraud alert, you just click on one radio button or the other. They didn't even mention the word "military".

https://www.experian.com/fraud/center.html#content-01

investor4life
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by investor4life » Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:53 pm

Some questions about a credit freeze:

1. Do I have to lift the freeze each time I want to request a free credit report from annualcreditreport.com?
2. Besides the following activities, what others would necessitate lifting a freeze?: Applying for a credit card, opening a bank account, opening a brokerage account, opening a mutual fund account, getting/refinancing a mortgage, renting an apartment, taking out a car/other loan.
3. When I opened a CD recently at Ally they created a separate account for it (different from my checking and savings account). Would opening a CD require lifting the freeze as well?

Thanks!

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flamesabers
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by flamesabers » Tue Sep 12, 2017 3:08 pm

Pajamas wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:40 pm
flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 1:38 pm
Don't you have to provide military orders to be eligible for the "active duty" alert?
Not on Experian. It's the same online form for the 90 day fraud alert, you just click on one radio button or the other. They didn't even mention the word "military".

https://www.experian.com/fraud/center.html#content-01
When I place my cursor over the question mark icon next to the type of alert section, a message appears that if you're an active duty military consumer you can add the active duty fraud alert.

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Pajamas
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by Pajamas » Tue Sep 12, 2017 3:22 pm

flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 3:08 pm
Pajamas wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 2:40 pm
flamesabers wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 1:38 pm
Don't you have to provide military orders to be eligible for the "active duty" alert?
Not on Experian. It's the same online form for the 90 day fraud alert, you just click on one radio button or the other. They didn't even mention the word "military".

https://www.experian.com/fraud/center.html#content-01
When I place my cursor over the question mark icon next to the type of alert section, a message appears that if you're an active duty military consumer you can add the active duty fraud alert.
I don't get that message, maybe because my browser blocks pop-ups or because of an ad-blocker add-on or similar.

I guess I am on some kind of list now and probably will get offers from USAA and similar. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

Cruncher
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by Cruncher » Wed Sep 13, 2017 1:25 am

Okay, the big 3, innovis and chexsystems.

Who else do we protect our identity through?

I had not heard of the latter two until this week.

This is a mess that might last many years, if not longer like forever (until you die that is). All of our personal information is always available on the dark web ... forever.

When do you stop protecting your identity?

Mapache
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by Mapache » Wed Sep 13, 2017 2:34 am

To Investor4life

I have an answer to your Question No. 1. I froze my credit at Equifax earlier today. I then noticed that I had not gotten a free credit report from this company for quite sometime. I went to annualcreditreport.com and got my free Equifax credit report without having to lift the freeze. The credit report had an annotation stating that there was a freeze on my credit.

Sorry but I didn't know how to enter your questions as a quote in this reply.

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pfrank
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by pfrank » Wed Sep 13, 2017 4:38 am

Rainmaker41 wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:40 am
F150HD wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:32 am
Rainmaker41 wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:16 am

- Verified two-factor authentication was in place for financial accounts & verified email alerts for all non-credit card transactions.

- Setup two-factor authentication for Google accounts.....
Not sure 2 factor is all that great (?)

A hacker could call Sprint AT&T etc and port your phone # to a new phone they could use it to access all connected accounts and change the passwords or drain them.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurash ... 984360f7
Yes, a thief could go into the phone store, 'upgrade' to a new phone, and port my number to the new one, turning mine into a brick. They would still also need the login information for accounts, and in any case it would be a dead giveaway prompting me to grab the nearest available phone and call Vanguard and my bank to lock down my accounts.
For the past 3 years or so, AT&T Wireless let me set up a 4 digit passcode on my account (in addition to my password). You can't change plans, information or even buy a phone without the PIN. This is true for online and in the store. I had to give the rep my PIN in addition to my driver's license when I went to the local AT&T store to buy new phone a couple of weeks ago.

AntsOnTheMarch
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by AntsOnTheMarch » Wed Sep 13, 2017 5:30 am

pfrank wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 4:38 am
Rainmaker41 wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:40 am
F150HD wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:32 am
Rainmaker41 wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:16 am

- Verified two-factor authentication was in place for financial accounts & verified email alerts for all non-credit card transactions.

- Setup two-factor authentication for Google accounts.....
Not sure 2 factor is all that great (?)

A hacker could call Sprint AT&T etc and port your phone # to a new phone they could use it to access all connected accounts and change the passwords or drain them.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/laurash ... 984360f7
Yes, a thief could go into the phone store, 'upgrade' to a new phone, and port my number to the new one, turning mine into a brick. They would still also need the login information for accounts, and in any case it would be a dead giveaway prompting me to grab the nearest available phone and call Vanguard and my bank to lock down my accounts.
For the past 3 years or so, AT&T Wireless let me set up a 4 digit passcode on my account (in addition to my password). You can't change plans, information or even buy a phone without the PIN. This is true for online and in the store. I had to give the rep my PIN in addition to my driver's license when I went to the local AT&T store to buy new phone a couple of weeks ago.
Ditto. Let's hope hackers can't social engineer their way around the PIN as well. These attacks are coming fast and furious. When I talk to friends and family I realize that almost all are oblivious to the risks. They think that by not using their phones for banking it makes them bulletproof.

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unclescrooge
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by unclescrooge » Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:09 am

danaht wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:53 pm
I change electricity providers every three months in TX. They always run a credit check when you do this (even if you were a prior customer). So, I probably will not be freezing my credit. However, I will monitor my credit activity every week (for the next 10 years)
So you have the time to change your utilities every 3 months, but not 10 minutes to thaw your credit?

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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by AntsOnTheMarch » Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:13 am

unclescrooge wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:09 am
danaht wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:53 pm
I change electricity providers every three months in TX. They always run a credit check when you do this (even if you were a prior customer). So, I probably will not be freezing my credit. However, I will monitor my credit activity every week (for the next 10 years)
So you have the time to change your utilities every 3 months, but not 10 minutes to thaw your credit?
I think that he's saying that because he chooses to change electricity providers regularly, freezing credit would inhibit him in that activity so he will monitor credit weekly instead.

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unclescrooge
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by unclescrooge » Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:33 am

AntsOnTheMarch wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:13 am
unclescrooge wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:09 am
danaht wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:53 pm
I change electricity providers every three months in TX. They always run a credit check when you do this (even if you were a prior customer). So, I probably will not be freezing my credit. However, I will monitor my credit activity every week (for the next 10 years)
So you have the time to change your utilities every 3 months, but not 10 minutes to thaw your credit?
I think that he's saying that because he chooses to change electricity providers regularly, freezing credit would inhibit him in that activity so he will monitor credit weekly instead.
Still doesn't make sense to me.

It shouldn't inhibit anything. But getting a notification that your credit information was used to get a $60k car loan which then entails you having to file a police report and hire a lawyer might.

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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by beardsworth » Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:41 am

This New York Times article suggests some things to do.

It also points out that (at least, as of a few days ago when the article was written) Equifax itself doesn't really seem to know who was specifically affected by the security breach, and the company's site seems to tell everyone who inputs the few requested personal details that their security "may" have been affected. To test that hunch, the journalist input to the special Equifax security site that his last name was "Trump" and then entered random numbers for the requested abbreviated version of a Social Security number, and was still told that his personal information "may" have been affected by the breach.

So the author advises people to assume, by default, that their data have been compromised, and to take the necessary self-protective measures.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/08/your ... o-now.html

AntsOnTheMarch
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by AntsOnTheMarch » Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:48 am

unclescrooge wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:33 am
AntsOnTheMarch wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:13 am
unclescrooge wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:09 am
danaht wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:53 pm
I change electricity providers every three months in TX. They always run a credit check when you do this (even if you were a prior customer). So, I probably will not be freezing my credit. However, I will monitor my credit activity every week (for the next 10 years)
So you have the time to change your utilities every 3 months, but not 10 minutes to thaw your credit?
I think that he's saying that because he chooses to change electricity providers regularly, freezing credit would inhibit him in that activity so he will monitor credit weekly instead.
Still doesn't make sense to me.

It shouldn't inhibit anything. But getting a notification that your credit information was used to get a $60k car loan which then entails you having to file a police report and hire a lawyer might.
I agree with you but I was just trying to clarify what I think the reasoning was (i.e., it was not about saving time but about having the ability to easily switch electric providers--which a credit freeze would interfere with).

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nisiprius
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by nisiprius » Wed Sep 13, 2017 6:55 am

BW1985 wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 11:31 am
If they have all your info, whats to stop the hacker from unfreezing your credit reports?
I think I can speak to that, because I actually misplaced mailed-to-me my unfreeze PIN for one of the agencies and decided to find out what would actually happen if I tried to retrieve it. It turned out that the Experian website had an option for retrieving your PIN, and originally I was gobsmacked because the first few steps in it just involve entering all the old familiar data that hackers probably have (name, SSN, address, phone, driver's license...)

But after that step, the next step was the semi-familiar thing you encounter in situations where companies want you to "sign electronically" over the Internet: several sets of questions about things like what make and model of car I had before my current one, street addresses previously lived at, etc. Based on my experience with this procedure, these questions are different every time. (And fairly clever, a high percentage of them do not include any correct choices and you have to say so). They involve personal data that is not just name-address-phone-SSN, and it is data that does not appear in your credit report.

So, if they literally have ALL your info--that is to say if they have penetrated the credit reporting agencies complete database and know everything about you that the agency knows about you, then, yes, they can. But if all they have is the half-dozen-or-so "usual" pieces of data, then maybe not.

The next question, of course, is just how much the hackers did get in the Equifax breach. I don't think Equifax knows, and they will go on giving themselves the benefit of the doubt for a long time, but Equifax says that the breach included "certain dispute documents with personal identifying information for approximately 182,000 U.S. consumers." It seems to me that the very least Equifax could do is put up an are-you-affected website that (a) worked, and (b) specifically told you whether or not you were part of those 182,000 customers at high risk.
Last edited by nisiprius on Wed Sep 13, 2017 7:11 am, edited 2 times in total.
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nisiprius
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by nisiprius » Wed Sep 13, 2017 7:04 am

danaht wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:53 pm
I change electricity providers every three months in TX. They always run a credit check when you do this (even if you were a prior customer). So, I probably will not be freezing my credit.
It would be a Good Thing if part of the fallout from all this would be that enough people get credit freezes that it started to gum up the works for companies that "always" run credit checks just out of ornery snoopiness.
Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness; Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.

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fizxman
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by fizxman » Wed Sep 13, 2017 7:08 am

Slightly different but not unrelated topic.

Is it just me or do people with common names have the identity or credit card information stolen more than those with uncommon names? I have an uncommon last name (I believe I'm the only person in the world with my name) and I've had one of my credit card numbers stolen once. I have a coworker with an extremely common name and it seems like he gets his credit card info stolen all the time (at least a half dozen times in a 5-year span). My wife has a very common name and has had her identity stolen. Maybe it's coincidence but it seems like it would be easier to steal from someone with a common name.

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DaftInvestor
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by DaftInvestor » Wed Sep 13, 2017 7:40 am

nisiprius wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 7:04 am
danaht wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 3:53 pm
I change electricity providers every three months in TX. They always run a credit check when you do this (even if you were a prior customer). So, I probably will not be freezing my credit.
It would be a Good Thing if part of the fallout from all this would be that enough people get credit freezes that it started to gum up the works for companies that "always" run credit checks just out of ornery snoopiness.
I don't think it's out of ornery sloppiness that utilities run credit checks- they just want to assure their new sign-up customers pay their bills (and aren't switching utilities because they have a year's worth of unpaid bills to the last utility company).
There has to be a better system though.

MnD
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by MnD » Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:50 am

DaftInvestor wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:27 pm
MnD wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:10 pm
hightower wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 8:42 pm
MnD wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:47 am
Nope - not going to pay money and spend time creating an ongoing cost and inconvenience for myself and family.
We make 5-figures annually getting using premium reward cards and save a lot of other money by having and using a high credit score (insurance rates etc.) Just checked equifax site and got the not affected screen for both of us but I figure the basic PII that's being discussed has been hacked numerous time in the past.
You'll change your mind when someone steals your identity and you start getting harassing phone calls from debt collectors saying you owe them thousands of dollars for something you didnt buy. It can take a year or more to clear your name from something like that and you'll wish you had spent 5 mins and 15 bucks freezing your credit now. I've had it happen to me and I froze my credit immediately after. Its alot less of an inconvenience to freeze and unfreeze when u need to.
Doubtful. This assumes that identity theft is PII limited.
Likely more related to the number of dirtbags, randomness and sloppiness.
You don't have to be the fastest to avoid being eaten by the bear. Just not the slowest.
You are essentially putting yourself in the class of the "slowest" by not freezing your credit though. The thieves will focus on those that have chosen not to freeze their credit versus the rest of us that have chosen to do so. Thieves in nicer towns walk down the street and check car doors to see who left their door unlocked - that is faster and easier than breaking in and disabling an alarm for many thieves. You are simply choosing to leave your doors unlocked so the rest of us won't get broken into.
Only a small percentage of households will actually do all the things necessary to freeze their credit so it won't result in an appreciable change in the number of unfrozen accounts at CB's. Most just aren't "with it" enough to do so. Some will have viruses on their computers so will likely expose tons of PII and other critical information to thieves in the process of trying to freeze them. The freeze unfreeze actions involve pins and if lost or forgotten involve an extensive PII exchange which can be exploited. I can envision "emergency" fake emails supposedly from credit reporting agencies that all your credit has been unfrozen and you need to go to to this web site immediately with your PIN or other PII to verify that you initiated the action and if not to refreeze accounts. Ka-ching!

If it helps you sleep at night by all means freeze credit. But I'm not going to run with the herd into forking over $ for yet another "essential" hassle that conveniently creates another ongoing revenue stream for credit bureaus.

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DaftInvestor
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by DaftInvestor » Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:01 am

MnD wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 8:50 am
DaftInvestor wrote:
Tue Sep 12, 2017 12:27 pm
MnD wrote:
Mon Sep 11, 2017 8:10 pm
hightower wrote:
Sun Sep 10, 2017 8:42 pm
MnD wrote:
Sat Sep 09, 2017 11:47 am
Nope - not going to pay money and spend time creating an ongoing cost and inconvenience for myself and family.
We make 5-figures annually getting using premium reward cards and save a lot of other money by having and using a high credit score (insurance rates etc.) Just checked equifax site and got the not affected screen for both of us but I figure the basic PII that's being discussed has been hacked numerous time in the past.
You'll change your mind when someone steals your identity and you start getting harassing phone calls from debt collectors saying you owe them thousands of dollars for something you didnt buy. It can take a year or more to clear your name from something like that and you'll wish you had spent 5 mins and 15 bucks freezing your credit now. I've had it happen to me and I froze my credit immediately after. Its alot less of an inconvenience to freeze and unfreeze when u need to.
Doubtful. This assumes that identity theft is PII limited.
Likely more related to the number of dirtbags, randomness and sloppiness.
You don't have to be the fastest to avoid being eaten by the bear. Just not the slowest.
You are essentially putting yourself in the class of the "slowest" by not freezing your credit though. The thieves will focus on those that have chosen not to freeze their credit versus the rest of us that have chosen to do so. Thieves in nicer towns walk down the street and check car doors to see who left their door unlocked - that is faster and easier than breaking in and disabling an alarm for many thieves. You are simply choosing to leave your doors unlocked so the rest of us won't get broken into.
Only a small percentage of households will actually do all the things necessary to freeze their credit so it won't result in an appreciable change in the number of unfrozen accounts at CB's. Most just aren't "with it" enough to do so. Some will have viruses on their computers so will likely expose tons of PII and other critical information to thieves in the process of trying to freeze them. The freeze unfreeze actions involve pins and if lost or forgotten involve an extensive PII exchange which can be exploited. I can envision "emergency" fake emails supposedly from credit reporting agencies that all your credit has been unfrozen and you need to go to to this web site immediately with your PIN or other PII to verify that you initiated the action and if not to refreeze accounts. Ka-ching!

If it helps you sleep at night by all means freeze credit. But I'm not going to run with the herd into forking over $ for yet another "essential" hassle that conveniently creates another ongoing revenue stream for credit bureaus.
I would disagree about the majority of folks won't be freezing their credit reports. I believe with this breach and all of the press around it that it will start to become the new norm. With all the PII now in the wild - I believe in 5 years we will be looking back on those that chose to leave their credit wide-open with the same thoughts we now have of those that created passwords with no strength such as "password". Best of luck - hopefully something won't happen to you in the coming months/years making you look back and regret this decision. As I mentioned earlier (or in another thread) - personally I'm happy to hear that some folks are refusing to put freezes on - it will make easier targets for the thieves such that they might leave the rest of us alone.

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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by investor4life » Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:09 am

Today's NYT has a useful article on all this, including why/how long Equifax will offer free freezes, info. on TrueIdentity from Trans Union, etc. But most interesting is that there may be a service in the works to freeze at all 3 major services in one fell swoop (something that I was wondering about for a while).

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/12/your ... v=top-news

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Pajamas
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by Pajamas » Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:47 am

DaftInvestor wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:01 am
I believe with this breach and all of the press around it that it will start to become the new norm.
I agree but also believe that it will be easier and cheaper to freeze and unfreeze your credit in the near future.

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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by ResearchMed » Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:52 am

Pajamas wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:47 am
DaftInvestor wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:01 am
I believe with this breach and all of the press around it that it will start to become the new norm.
I agree but also believe that it will be easier and cheaper to freeze and unfreeze your credit in the near future.
It's tricky.
If it's easier for *you* to freeze and especially unfreeze credit, then it's likely to be easier for those "others", too.

RM
This signature is a placebo. You are in the control group.

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DaftInvestor
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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by DaftInvestor » Wed Sep 13, 2017 12:39 pm

ResearchMed wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:52 am
Pajamas wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:47 am
DaftInvestor wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:01 am
I believe with this breach and all of the press around it that it will start to become the new norm.
I agree but also believe that it will be easier and cheaper to freeze and unfreeze your credit in the near future.
It's tricky.
If it's easier for *you* to freeze and especially unfreeze credit, then it's likely to be easier for those "others", too.

RM
Easy and Secure aren't always necessarily opposites. Unlocking my phone with my fingerprint is more secure that a 4-digit pin and also happens to be easier (at least for me).

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Re: Anyone else freeze their credit score?

Post by flamesabers » Wed Sep 13, 2017 12:55 pm

DaftInvestor wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 12:39 pm
ResearchMed wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:52 am
Pajamas wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 11:47 am
DaftInvestor wrote:
Wed Sep 13, 2017 9:01 am
I believe with this breach and all of the press around it that it will start to become the new norm.
I agree but also believe that it will be easier and cheaper to freeze and unfreeze your credit in the near future.
It's tricky.
If it's easier for *you* to freeze and especially unfreeze credit, then it's likely to be easier for those "others", too.

RM
Easy and Secure aren't always necessarily opposites. Unlocking my phone with my fingerprint is more secure that a 4-digit pin and also happens to be easier (at least for me).
Bio-metrics has its own set of vulnerabilities. The system may not recognize your fingerprints for a reading or might incorrectly give access to an unauthorized person.

If you were a victim of the OPM breach, your fingerprints could have been stolen and recreated with a rubber mold by using a 3-D printer. Even if you weren't impacted by that breach, you leave your fingerprints on everything you touch, assuming you don't wear gloves all the time.

Also, unlike a PIN, you can't change your fingerprints.

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