[Eating] Fish

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sunnyday
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[Eating] Fish

Post by sunnyday » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:03 pm

I'm planning to eat more fish for it protein and nutritional value. I usually stick to tuna or salmon but I'd like to expand my options and get into a weekly rotation eating fish 2 -3 times a week but not spending a ton of $ or time preparing it. I love lobster (but never get it because it's so $), like salmon (but it can get pricey) and tuna (but I'm concerned about eating too much of it because of the mercury levels). There's a fish market about 10 minutes from us and also a Whole Foods that seems fresh. If you like fish, what do you usually get? Any recommendations for trying new types of fish and some sort of weekly rotation?
Last edited by sunnyday on Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:27 am, edited 1 time in total.

livesoft
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Re: Fish

Post by livesoft » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:09 pm

I eat quite a lot of fish, usually rotating between salmon, tuna, snapper, rockfish/cod, striped bass, redfish/drum, tilapia, catfish. I usually eat sushi at least twice a week and sometimes more often.

Local names vary across the country. I am generally unconcerned about mercury at my age, but maybe I should be?

I avoid shrimp, lobster, crabs, shellfish because I am not fond of them.
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dm200
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Re: Fish

Post by dm200 » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:12 pm

As part of "getting healthy" two or three years ago, I did exactly what you are planning. My rotation includes:

1. Canned tuna (7 ounce cans at Costco, the lowest price type, two meals)
2. Wild Alaska Salmonburger from Costco. Comes frozen with about a dozen 1/4 pound patties in a bag. Sometimes eat a whole patty and sometimes 1/2 with 1/2 for the next day's meal.
3. Canned Chicken-of-the-Sea Chubb Mackerel. [Sometimes it is labeled Jack mackerel and sometimes just mackerel]. To me, tastes like salmon, but much lower cost. One 15 ounce can costs about $1.99 at a local grocery store. One can gives me about 4 meals.
4. Other (depending on what happens to be available, on sale, etc.) This might be Tilapia fillets or Flounder (both from Costco) or something else.

I eat the above "rotation" 5 or 6 meals a week, with fish at only one meal a day.

From what I read, avoid high mercury fish such as swordfish -- eat a variety of different fish. Then don't worry about it - fish like this is good for you.
Last edited by dm200 on Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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EternalOptimist
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Re: Fish

Post by EternalOptimist » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:13 pm

Go out for Japanese sushi once in a while.....yummy :thumbsup :thumbsup
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SnapShots
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Re: Fish

Post by SnapShots » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:31 pm

At a Whole Foods type grocery store, Sushi is prepared daily and is a great meal. Talapia. Salmon. Canned Tuna. This tread is giving me other ideas.
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hicabob
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Re: Fish

Post by hicabob » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:43 pm

Tilapia is a good texture, mild taste + inexpensive farmed whitefish - catfish is great - I like Barumundi too. I'm pretty sure the future of edible fish for the masses is in farming.

gkaplan
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Re: Fish

Post by gkaplan » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:50 pm

I eat canned tuna seven times a week. When I go out to eat, it's usually to a Japanese restaurant; invariably I'll order sashimi.
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Jake46
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Re: Fish

Post by Jake46 » Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:50 pm

I love trout.

fareastwarriors
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Re: Fish

Post by fareastwarriors » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:01 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/29/us/in ... sters.html

In Maine, More Lobsters Than They Know What to Do With

newbie_Mo
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Re: Fish

Post by newbie_Mo » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:04 pm

We eat meat more than fish, but we eat salmon once a week. We also buy catfish, carp, striped bass, and tilapia when I see them fresh. We usually braise the catfish and carp with lots of ginger and green onion. For striped bass and tilapia, I steam them. Steam the fresh bass and tilapia with a bit a ginger. After it is steamed, pour boiled oil, green onion and soy sauce.. eat..

We buy losters when they are $5 a lb on sale. There are usually a period of time (late in the summer if I remember it right), the losters would be $5-6 per lb.
We also eat squids (just clean and steam for 6 mins, then eat with soy sauce).
Last edited by newbie_Mo on Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.

John3754
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Re: Fish

Post by John3754 » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:50 pm

hicabob wrote:Tilapia is a good texture, mild taste....
It's also void of nutrition.

John3754
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Re: Fish

Post by John3754 » Fri Aug 09, 2013 8:53 pm

If you want really nutritious fish thats very low in mercury and other contaminants in a very cheap, very convenient format, then try canned sardines. I'm not kidding. They're loaded with protein, omega-3s, and calcium, and because they're low on the food chain they're very low is contaminants.

thewizzer
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Re: Fish

Post by thewizzer » Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:06 pm

We eat a lot of catfish and scored carp where I'm from. Unfortunately, it's all deep fried (but sooo delicious :D )

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tetractys
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Re: Fish

Post by tetractys » Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:32 pm

Some of my favorites are cutthroat, salmon, halibut, and cabazon. -- Tet

wingnutty
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by wingnutty » Fri Aug 09, 2013 9:41 pm

I'm not a fan of fish, but fish a lot :? My wife and kids like fish, so when i have time to fish we eat it pretty often. Usually landlocked salmon (kokanee), perch, walleye, lake whitefish, lake trout. I get mad when she buys fish since I can usually catch whatever we want. But we do eat tuna and since I live a ways from the coast, we buy wild caught pacific salmon once in a while. Often I can get free salmon from friends/family that fish in Alaska and the Pacific NW.

I smoke a lot of the little inland salmon that I catch, as well as the whitefish. Smoked salmon and whitefish is outstanding.

DonM17
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by DonM17 » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:21 am

For those who love eating tilapia, it might be worthwhile to read this article: Tilapia raised on feces hits US tables

http://money.msn.com/now/post--tilapia- ... -us-tables

sunnyday
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by sunnyday » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:31 am

DonM17 wrote:For those who love eating tilapia, it might be worthwhile to read this article: Tilapia raised on feces hits US tables

http://money.msn.com/now/post--tilapia- ... -us-tables
It's important to know where the fish came from. China would be on my do not buy list. What are the best places to buy certain types of fish. Like:

Maine Lobster
Wild Alaskan Salmon
???

The Wizard
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by The Wizard » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:33 am

I eat fish/seafood a few times per week: haddock or cod baked in the oven; swordfish baked or grilled; steamer clams, steamed; lobsters boiled; shrimp boiled. Lobsters on sale $4 a lb next week here.
Used to do salmon, but not so much anymore after reading how they farm it.
I need to find out how to cook squid, especially RI style with spicy peppers...
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sunnyday
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Re: Fish

Post by sunnyday » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:34 am

John3754 wrote:
hicabob wrote:Tilapia is a good texture, mild taste....
It's also void of nutrition.
Really, why's that? It's high in protein, no carbs, some omega 3's

wingnutty
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by wingnutty » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:39 am

DonM17 wrote:For those who love eating tilapia, it might be worthwhile to read this article: Tilapia raised on feces hits US tables

http://money.msn.com/now/post--tilapia- ... -us-tables

From what I have heard it is the same with shrimp raised in Asia. I always think twice before I eat shrimp now and certainly try not to eat it too often in restaurants. If I buy shrimp in the store its usually ocean caught, although that brings its own set of ecological consequences.

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jeffyscott
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by jeffyscott » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:40 am

We like haddock, as well as the already mentioned salmon and trout.
press on, regardless - John C. Bogle

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jeffyscott
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by jeffyscott » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:44 am

wingnutty wrote:
DonM17 wrote:For those who love eating tilapia, it might be worthwhile to read this article: Tilapia raised on feces hits US tables

http://money.msn.com/now/post--tilapia- ... -us-tables

From what I have heard it is the same with shrimp raised in Asia. I always think twice before I eat shrimp now and certainly try not to eat it too often in restaurants.
I don't worry much about what the shrimp may have eaten, but avoid it in restaurants because it's own poop is never completely cleaned out. We buy peeled and deveined shimp to eat at home, but I always have to do more cleaning.
press on, regardless - John C. Bogle

HurdyGurdy
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by HurdyGurdy » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:47 am

I just had a very tasty mahi-mahi burger.

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shmidds
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Re: Fish

Post by shmidds » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:48 am

John3754 wrote:If you want really nutritious fish thats very low in mercury and other contaminants in a very cheap, very convenient format, then try canned sardines. I'm not kidding. They're loaded with protein, omega-3s, and calcium, and because they're low on the food chain they're very low is contaminants.
Swedish sailor Sven Yrvind (yrvind.com) is planning to circumnavigate the globe in a boat a little bit bigger than a bathtub with only granola and sardines as provisions. So I guess sardines are pretty good for you.

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tuckeverlasting
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by tuckeverlasting » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:00 am

I buy selected fish from the fish market near me and use the Monterey Bay Aquarium's Seafood Watch as a guide to sustainable and healthy choices:

http://www.montereybayaquarium.org/cr/c ... tions.aspx

100% grass-fed, pastured beef also has a favorable omega fatty acid profile and I buy it from a small local ranch which I found at this site:

http://www.eatwild.com/

I buy my vegetables at a local stand straight from the farm and by these methods have been able to minimize my use of a conventional grocery store, at least during the growing season, and even living in an urban environment. Eating "off the grid", as it were. :happy
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carolinaman
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by carolinaman » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:02 am

I eat salmon filets often and like most white fish. My favorites are grouper and halibut but there are many varieties. Cod is good for lower cost. Also like canned tuna. I also eat shrimp and crab and avoid Asian imported shrimp.

Mrxyz
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by Mrxyz » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:03 am

newbie_Mo wrote:We eat meat more than fish, but we eat salmon once a week. We also buy catfish, carp, striped bass, and tilapia when I see them fresh. We usually braise the catfish and carp with lots of ginger and green onion. For striped bass and tilapia, I steam them. Steam the fresh bass and tilapia with a bit a ginger. After it is steamed, pour boiled oil, green onion and soy sauce.. eat..

We buy losters when they are $5 a lb on sale. There are usually a period of time (late in the summer if I remember it right), the losters would be $5-6 per lb.
We also eat squids (just clean and steam for 6 mins, then eat with soy sauce).
Thanks for the instructions!
I wonder if others could share their cooking methods please. I am trying to get my kids to eat fish/seafood and cooking it to make it palatable/tasty is an important step to prevent the 'yuck' comment!

Thanks

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dm200
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by dm200 » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:30 am

Mrxyz wrote:
newbie_Mo wrote:We eat meat more than fish, but we eat salmon once a week. We also buy catfish, carp, striped bass, and tilapia when I see them fresh. We usually braise the catfish and carp with lots of ginger and green onion. For striped bass and tilapia, I steam them. Steam the fresh bass and tilapia with a bit a ginger. After it is steamed, pour boiled oil, green onion and soy sauce.. eat..

We buy losters when they are $5 a lb on sale. There are usually a period of time (late in the summer if I remember it right), the losters would be $5-6 per lb.
We also eat squids (just clean and steam for 6 mins, then eat with soy sauce).
Thanks for the instructions!
I wonder if others could share their cooking methods please. I am trying to get my kids to eat fish/seafood and cooking it to make it palatable/tasty is an important step to prevent the 'yuck' comment!

Thanks
I am NO general expert on kids, but with food issues, sometimes it is what you call something that makes the most difference to kids. Many years ago, when our son was very young, we would have liver (I think beef) from time to time. Our son would turn up his nose and refuse to eat it. "Liver - YUK!!!"

So, one day my wife cut the liver into small cubes, cooked it and told our son at dinner these were "Liver NUGGETS" . He quickly gobbled them up, with a smile on his face! :wink:

Maybe Fish "Nuggets" (or whatever is the IN thing these days.

I just eat fish plain, cold from the can (tuna or mackerel), or pan cooked (salmonburgers) or baked (Tilapia or Flounder). Canned tuna is good in a pasta salad (with some pasta, various vegetables). Some folks I know put canned tuna or salmon in a mixed greed salad. Tunafish sandwiches are a staple. seafood "gumbo" is good also.

"Attitude" (in my opinion and experience) has a lot to do with eating fish or seafood. One side of my family (from the days of Catholics no meat Fridays) regarded eating fish as a sort of "punishment" and had the attitude that you only ate fish when you "had to". The other side of my family (not burdened with the attitude that eating fish was "punishment") came from a heritage of eating fish (such as picked herring) and always saw fish and seafood as something to be enjoyed.

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jeffyscott
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by jeffyscott » Sat Aug 10, 2013 10:40 am

[quote="DonM17"]For those who love eating tilapia, it might be worthwhile to read this article: Tilapia raised on feces hits US tables

My wife does not like tilapia so we never buy it, but FWIW...
FDA spokesperson Theresa Eisenman flatly denied that the widespread practice of feeding feces to farmed fish occurs.
http://news.msn.com/rumors/rumor-import ... d-on-feces
press on, regardless - John C. Bogle

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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by hicabob » Sat Aug 10, 2013 11:02 am

jeffyscott wrote:
DonM17 wrote:For those who love eating tilapia, it might be worthwhile to read this article: Tilapia raised on feces hits US tables

My wife does not like tilapia so we never buy it, but FWIW...
FDA spokesperson Theresa Eisenman flatly denied that the widespread practice of feeding feces to farmed fish occurs.
http://news.msn.com/rumors/rumor-import ... d-on-feces
US beef manufacturers apparently like to use chicken manure to feed the cows we eat too.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-kir ... 30404.html

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jeffyscott
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by jeffyscott » Sat Aug 10, 2013 11:54 am

Seems like everything eats poop, including dogs, which we don't eat, but...
Image
:mrgreen:
press on, regardless - John C. Bogle

Mrxyz
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by Mrxyz » Sat Aug 10, 2013 11:57 am

dm200 wrote:
Mrxyz wrote:
newbie_Mo wrote:We eat meat more than fish, but we eat salmon once a week. We also buy catfish, carp, striped bass, and tilapia when I see them fresh. We usually braise the catfish and carp with lots of ginger and green onion. For striped bass and tilapia, I steam them. Steam the fresh bass and tilapia with a bit a ginger. After it is steamed, pour boiled oil, green onion and soy sauce.. eat..

We buy losters when they are $5 a lb on sale. There are usually a period of time (late in the summer if I remember it right), the losters would be $5-6 per lb.
We also eat squids (just clean and steam for 6 mins, then eat with soy sauce).
Thanks for the instructions!
I wonder if others could share their cooking methods please. I am trying to get my kids to eat fish/seafood and cooking it to make it palatable/tasty is an important step to prevent the 'yuck' comment!

Thanks
I am NO general expert on kids, but with food issues, sometimes it is what you call something that makes the most difference to kids. Many years ago, when our son was very young, we would have liver (I think beef) from time to time. Our son would turn up his nose and refuse to eat it. "Liver - YUK!!!"

So, one day my wife cut the liver into small cubes, cooked it and told our son at dinner these were "Liver NUGGETS" . He quickly gobbled them up, with a smile on his face! :wink:

Maybe Fish "Nuggets" (or whatever is the IN thing these days.

I just eat fish plain, cold from the can (tuna or mackerel), or pan cooked (salmonburgers) or baked (Tilapia or Flounder). Canned tuna is good in a pasta salad (with some pasta, various vegetables). Some folks I know put canned tuna or salmon in a mixed greed salad. Tunafish sandwiches are a staple. seafood "gumbo" is good also.

"Attitude" (in my opinion and experience) has a lot to do with eating fish or seafood. One side of my family (from the days of Catholics no meat Fridays) regarded eating fish as a sort of "punishment" and had the attitude that you only ate fish when you "had to". The other side of my family (not burdened with the attitude that eating fish was "punishment") came from a heritage of eating fish (such as picked herring) and always saw fish and seafood as something to be enjoyed.
Yes, I agree with you and have similar experiences. Like my kids eat salmon which is aptly labelled by us as "sweet chicken" and they have eaten it without any complains for years.

wingnutty
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by wingnutty » Sat Aug 10, 2013 12:46 pm

jeffyscott wrote:Seems like everything eats poop, including dogs, which we don't eat, but...
Image
:mrgreen:

Hahaha, awesome, thanks for the laugh! :D

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Re: Fish

Post by Sam I Am » Sat Aug 10, 2013 12:49 pm

Message deleted.
Last edited by Sam I Am on Sun Oct 06, 2013 10:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

John3754
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Re: Fish

Post by John3754 » Sat Aug 10, 2013 12:54 pm

sunnyday wrote:
John3754 wrote:
hicabob wrote:Tilapia is a good texture, mild taste....
It's also void of nutrition.
Really, why's that? It's high in protein, no carbs, some omega 3's
Fish in the wild concentrate omega-3s in their tissues from the plants and animals they eat...farmed tilapia eat pellets made of corn and soy.

Here's an article from the NY Times:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/02/scien ... d=all&_r=0

An excerpt:

Compared with other fish, farmed tilapia contains relatively small amounts of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids, the fish oils that are the main reasons doctors recommend eating fish frequently; salmon has more than 10 times the amount of tilapia. Also, farmed tilapia contains a less healthful mix of fatty acids because the fish are fed corn and soy instead of lake plants and algae, the diet of wild tilapia. "It may look like fish and taste like fish but does not have the benefits — it may be detrimental,” said Dr. Floyd Chilton, a professor of physiology and pharmacology at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center who specializes in fish lipids.

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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by MP173 » Sat Aug 10, 2013 1:16 pm

When time permits, I catch panfish, usually bluegill, lake perch, and crappie. These are outstanding when freshly filleted and then pan fried or oven baked/broiled.

These fillets are usually fairly small and requires a number of fish to be caught and cleaned.

Just this week a local restaurant had AYCE bluegill...OUTSTANDING.

Other fresh fish that I enjoy are walleye and catfish.

Ed

scarr34
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by scarr34 » Sat Aug 10, 2013 1:47 pm

Actually, you don't need a lot of protein. [Medical and dietary comments removed by admin LadyGeek] And besides, the ocean is highly polluted. Do you really want to eat something that swims around in it?

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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by climber2020 » Sat Aug 10, 2013 1:51 pm

These are incredible:

http://www.amazon.com/Crown-Prince-Skin ... s=Sardines

Most sardines I've tried are nasty, but these specific ones are great. Make sure you get the ones dunked in olive oil.

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htdrag11
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by htdrag11 » Sat Aug 10, 2013 1:57 pm

We tried a lot of fish and shellfish. The latest is wild hake in the northeast. It's a tasty and flaky fish.

Lately we tried branzino and like it when in season. Monk fish is a bottom feeder and looks ugly; it's a poor man's lobster so the meat has a bite to it (texture). Our favorites are wild sockeye salmon, usually found frozen in Costco. Ikea also sells frozen salmon/lox as well, for cheap. Chilean seabass is priced too steeply these days. Black seabass is less expensive. Wegman and Wholefood carry a lot of fish, but rather expensive.

Generally we avoided fish and shrimps from China, including tilapia from Vietnam (everything seems to labeled as tilapia or basa). FDA's seal of approval means little to me.

Love lobsters at $5-6 per pound. I'm not as squeamish as Woody Allen in Annie Hall, so I chopped them up with the back of the cleaver for leverage. Wife cooks it outside during this time of the year with a wok, mixing with egg and ground pork for sauce.

As for cooking inside, we preferred to baked the filet in the oven with parchment paper to minimize cleaning and odor. Just put some oil, garlic, ginger and scallion on top, seasoned with fish sauce. Poaching fish does make the whole house smell, not just the kitchen.

Daughter loves live blue crab over Maryland crab cakes, though she works around Maryland area. Cleaning crabs are a pain though. Again, it's not a job for the squeamish. She and my wife like steamers also; they're like clams with a long neck. Need to clean them with vinegar to get the sands out. Dip them in butter, and they're yummy. For me, I prefer calm casino with bacon. With contamination, I avoid clams and oysters on half shells. Fried oyster or fried anything is great except for the oil and calories. Fried calamari is great too.

Out on the west coast, we tried sable fish; it is one of the best we had in the Seattle area.

As for tuna, I prefer sushi style; same works for scallop. It is too easily overcooked, as most fish are. I test it by sticking a fork in to see if it goes through easily or meeting resistance (uncooked). So that you know, most salmon used in sushi is the farm variety (more fat), unless you go to a high end restaurant.

Lastly, Gulf shrimps are the best but they are harder to come by these days.

Hearty appetite!

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dm200
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Re: Fish

Post by dm200 » Sat Aug 10, 2013 2:18 pm

Sam I Am wrote:
dm200 wrote:As part of "getting healthy" two or three years ago, I did exactly what you are planning. My rotation includes:

1. Canned tuna (7 ounce cans at Costco, the lowest price type, two meals)
2. Wild Alaska Salmonburger from Costco. Comes frozen with about a dozen 1/4 pound patties in a bag. Sometimes eat a whole patty and sometimes 1/2 with 1/2 for the next day's meal.
3. Canned Chicken-of-the-Sea Chubb Mackerel. [Sometimes it is labeled Jack mackerel and sometimes just mackerel]. To me, tastes like salmon, but much lower cost. One 15 ounce can costs about $1.99 at a local grocery store. One can gives me about 4 meals.
4. Other (depending on what happens to be available, on sale, etc.) This might be Tilapia fillets or Flounder (both from Costco) or something else.

I eat the above "rotation" 5 or 6 meals a week, with fish at only one meal a day.

From what I read, avoid high mercury fish such as swordfish -- eat a variety of different fish. Then don't worry about it - fish like this is good for you.
I have seen the salmon burgers at Costco, though I have been hesitant to buy them. Are they just salmon, or are they "fixed" up with additional ingredients like you might add to canned salmon when making salmon patties at home?

When I see the Costco store brand tuna available, we load up. More quality product and a lower price is hard to beat.
Great stuff!

Sam I Am
The COSTCO frozen "Wild Alaska" Salmon burgers (in an orange bag), according to the package details, almost all salmon. The second ingredient is water, and the third is Canola Oil. Then a bunch of what seem to be flavorings. No "filler", as you might make salmon patties at home.

I have not seen a "store brand" of tuna at COSTCO. I get Chicken of the Sea Chink Light in water, 7 ounce cans.

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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by The Wizard » Sat Aug 10, 2013 3:08 pm

scarr34 wrote:Actually, you don't need a lot of protein. [Medical and dietary comments removed by admin LadyGeek] And besides, the ocean is highly polluted. Do you really want to eat something that swims around in it?
The ocean, for the most part, is NOT highly polluted!
Cripes...
Attempted new signature...

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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by LadyGeek » Sat Aug 10, 2013 3:20 pm

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Lon
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by Lon » Sat Aug 10, 2013 4:59 pm

Love fish and eat it several times weekly. Coho Salmon, Baramundi, Mahi Mahi are the favorites followed by Tuna & Cod? Halibut when on sale.

rayout
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by rayout » Sat Aug 10, 2013 8:13 pm

Trying this recipe this weekend: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/sa ... ian_style/

Grocery store had a fire sale on wild caught salmon: $4 for a 2lb bag of frozen fillets! I bought 6 bags so far and am thinking of going back. Cooking 4lbs today :)

Minot
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by Minot » Sat Aug 10, 2013 9:51 pm

climber2020 wrote:These are incredible:

http://www.amazon.com/Crown-Prince-Skin ... s=Sardines

Most sardines I've tried are nasty, but these specific ones are great. Make sure you get the ones dunked in olive oil.
They may be tasty, but the skin is where the majority of the Omega 3's are, and the bones are a good source of calcium.

Don't know where OP lives, but my favorite fish is blue fish--unfortunately (for this California residient) only available on the East Coast.

If you have access to Trader Joes, their frozen Argentinian shrimp are excellent, sweet and almost lobster like.

subd3v
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by subd3v » Sun Aug 11, 2013 12:50 am

It depends a lot on where you live. Living inland could limit your options. Knowing what is in season will allow you to get the best quality fresh fish. Some of my favorites, where they are caught, when they are available fresh, and how I cook them are:

King salmon caught off AK, WA, CA, OR (late spring - fall) - BBQ, baked
Red salmon AK (summer) - BBQ, baked
Albacore tuna WA, OR, CA - sushi, seared, bbq, fish tacos
Rockfish AK, OR, CA (year round)- BBQ, baked, fried, soups, fish tacos
Lingcod AK, OR, CA (year round) - BBQ, baked, fried, soups, fish tacos
Clams AK, WA, OR, CA (year round) - Fried, fritters, chowder
Mussels AK, WA, OR, CA (year round) - BBQ, chowders, soups

Some others that don't make my favorites list but I enjoy

Black cod AK, WA, OR, CA (early spring - winter) - Grilled, baked {Black cod are a very oily, fishy tasting fish. Not for everyone}
Halibut AK, WA, OR, CA (spring - fall) - Grilled, baked {amazing when cooked properly but don't overcook!}
Pacific cod AK (year round) - usually always frozen fillets and the quality varies

If possible I like to purchase fresh whole fish. This is cheaper than purchasing similar fillets and the carcasses make great fertilizer when buried in the garden or crab bait. Whole fish are not always an option for all species but if available something to consider.

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Frugal Al
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by Frugal Al » Sun Aug 11, 2013 5:15 am

For the canned fish "afishianados" I highly recommend sprats, which I tried based on a recommendation by interplanetjanet in a previous thread. Thanks ipj.

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Padlin
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by Padlin » Sun Aug 11, 2013 5:17 am

We get Salmon from Costco, comes in something like 3 lb slabs. On the weekend we cook it up on the grill, use the leftovers, which is most of it, to make salmon patties and freeze them. They make decent quick meals for use on weekdays but making them in the 1st place takes a bit of doing.
Regards | Bob

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dm200
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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by dm200 » Sun Aug 11, 2013 8:28 am

I have never purchased fish there, but in my area there is a small shopping center, where all (or at least almost all) of the space is occupied by Vietnamese establishments, such as Restaurants, Travel agencies, Video stores, food/grocery stores, produce, etc. I occasionally go there to various Vietnamese Restaurants, and I noticed lots of fresh, whole fish regularly for sale at the grocery/produce stores. I can't remember the specific prices, but I recall the prices were not high.

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Re: [Eating] Fish

Post by sunnyday » Sun Aug 11, 2013 5:04 pm

The Wizard wrote:Lobsters on sale $4 a lb next week here.
Want to buy some and ship it to me :) It's selling for $16-18 lb where I live. My grandfather was a recreational lobsterman so growing up I used to eat unlimited amounts of the stuff.

Does anyone order it online? Still seems pricey.

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