Good way to split allocations with non-resident spouse [Netherlands]

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goinghome
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Good way to split allocations with non-resident spouse [Netherlands]

Post by goinghome » Thu May 30, 2019 12:10 am

We are going back to Amsterdam, probably for good, and I am wondering if it makes more sense for me to hold higher percentage of bonds from our portfolio? He is the only one employed, and we have only taxable accounts.

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asset_chaos
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Re: Good way to split allocations with non-resident spouse

Post by asset_chaos » Thu May 30, 2019 6:58 pm

Not being familiar with Dutch tax principles, it's hard to say. If like the US where tax is based on household income, then I think it makes little difference whose investment account the taxable income comes from. If like Australia---the US and Australian tax systems being the only ones I'm familiar with---where tax is levied on each individual's income, then it makes sense to put income generating investments in the name of the lower earning spouse, in order to pay a lower tax rate on the security's income.

You may want to ask one of the moderators to move this thread into the non-US investing forum, where it may have a better chance of attracting the attention of someone who is familiar with Dutch tax principles and who can give a more informed opinion.
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LadyGeek
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Re: Good way to split allocations with non-resident spouse [Netherlands]

Post by LadyGeek » Thu May 30, 2019 7:19 pm

This thread is now in the Non-US Investing forum (portfolio help). I also retitled the thread to attract the attention of our EU experts.
asset_chaos wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 6:58 pm
You may want to ask one of the moderators to move this thread into the non-US investing forum, where it may have a better chance of attracting the attention of someone who is familiar with Dutch tax principles and who can give a more informed opinion.
The best way to get a moderator's attention is to report the post using the ! in the top-right corner of the post. One of the reasons is "Wrong forum". Thanks to the member who reported the post.
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Schlabba
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Re: Good way to split allocations with non-resident spouse [Netherlands]

Post by Schlabba » Thu May 30, 2019 10:06 pm

goinghome wrote:
Thu May 30, 2019 12:10 am
We are going back to Amsterdam, probably for good, and I am wondering if it makes more sense for me to hold higher percentage of bonds from our portfolio? He is the only one employed, and we have only taxable accounts.
To answer we need much more information. Howmuch (%) bonds do you have already? What does moving to Amsterdam have to do with your asset allocation?

Splitting AA between spouses seems pointless to me, you can both hold stocks and bonds at the click of a button.
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DJN
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Re: Good way to split allocations with non-resident spouse [Netherlands]

Post by DJN » Fri May 31, 2019 4:40 am

Hi,
I think that the request for further information would be helpful in trying to piece together your options. You state the your spouse is non resident, I assume that means non resident in the Netherlands? If that is correct depending upon the actual domicile of your spouse there may be a possibility to keep some funds offshore and benefit from a more advantageous tax regime?
DJN
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crre
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Re: Good way to split allocations with non-resident spouse [Netherlands]

Post by crre » Sat Jun 01, 2019 12:11 am

if one of you is a u.s. citizen and the other is not, be aware that there are tax implications down the road, to your heirs, depending on how you split the u.s. accounts between you. if neither of you is a u.s. citizen, then there are also tax implications, but different ones. if the amount is significant, consult an estate tax attorney.

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