leaving a job

Non-investing personal finance issues including insurance, credit, real estate, taxes, employment and legal issues such as trusts and wills
Post Reply
Topic Author
bb
Posts: 326
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 10:04 pm

leaving a job

Post by bb »

Anybody leave a technical job in search of a more interesting/challenging
job? How did you decide the change made sense vs grass being greener
fallacy?

Brian
stan1
Posts: 9833
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 4:35 pm

Re: leaving a job

Post by stan1 »

In this economy, I wouldn't leave a job before you have accepted an offer for a different job.

Have you tried working with your current employer to do something a little different, so you don't get pigeonholed doing the same thing you are currently doing for many years? My experience is that many employers will work with a good employee to help them grow -- horizontally as well as vertically in the organization. This is even possible in small companies. Coming to work is a lot more pleasant if you like the people you work with -- management, your boss, and your co-workers. Do you enjoy and trust the people you work with? Finally, are you primarily looking to do something different -- or greater pay?
lawman3966
Posts: 1224
Joined: Sun Aug 10, 2008 12:09 pm
Location: Tacoma WA

It's no fallacy

Post by lawman3966 »

Well, I hate to contradict a popular myth, but in many cases, the grass is greener on the other side of the technical fence. At least one computer science professor thinks so.

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-04-2 ... ajors.html

In my case, I switched to Law at the age of about thirty, and have never regretted it. I found that I enjoyed my first year in a Biglaw firm more than I ever did my Engineering job, in spite of the long hours and high pressure. The salary being four times what I earned as an engineer didn't hurt.

Before undertaking any expense, or burning any bridges in my old career, I called some patent attorneys in the town I lived in, and asked about the profession. I heard some differing views on how to best proceed within the patent legal field, but nothing that discouraged me from believing that I would be better off in Law than in Engineering. This isn't the only approach to take in evaluating your decision, but it's one avenue worth considering.
gator15
Posts: 481
Joined: Sun Mar 18, 2012 8:33 pm

Re: leaving a job

Post by gator15 »

I left the military for a technical job. I wanted to see what the civilian sector had to offer. Was the grass greener? I would say yes and no. Yes because I had a stress free job, defined hours (7am-4pm), and really enjoyed the people I worked with. I loved the atmosphere. I also loved the free time it allowed me after my workday. I never had to take work home. The problem with the job was the job wasn't challenging at all. I went from a job with a great deal of responsibility to a job with little to no responsibility. In the beginning that's what I wanted. After two years, I couldn't do it anymore. I went back to the military where I felt I belong. Now I work long days and take work home often. I don't have as much free time as I used to. I'm fine with this though because for the most part, I enjoy the challenge of my job. I like that I continue to grow as a person.
User avatar
Remy Winchester
Posts: 49
Joined: Sat Jun 04, 2011 2:31 pm
Location: Carolina

Re: leaving a job

Post by Remy Winchester »

wow gator, that's a very profound story.

I'm leaving the service, by choice, and will be signed out in September. I'm really looking forward to it. I've been in 5 years. And before that I was in college for 4. This is the first time I really feel excited about my future.

I mean, when I went to college I was 18, yeah I was excited, but it was school. And then when I went into the service at 22, I kind of just decided to do it on a whim ( obviously a little more to the story - but really it was kind of impulse) I more more anxious or nervous about going into the military as I knew absolutely nothing about it!

But now, for the first time, I am optimistic and excited to be entering the civilian world. I have a job offer already for the DC area in a technical field, almost doubling my current income (though it's more $$$ to live in DC)

I feel excited for my future, that I have the freedom and flexibility to do anything or go anywhere, which to a certain degree I didn't have during my service.

Maybe in a few years my optimism and hope will change. I know I will miss the camaraderie of my team, and the uniqueness and experience of the military environment.
Default User BR
Posts: 7501
Joined: Mon Dec 17, 2007 7:32 pm

Re: leaving a job

Post by Default User BR »

Even if other jobs paid more, technical (software engineering) fits me best. I have even passed over opportunities to move into management at MyMegaCorp because that sort of thing just doesn't interest me.


Brian
Muchtolearn
Posts: 1563
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:41 am

Re: leaving a job

Post by Muchtolearn »

gator15 wrote:I left the military for a technical job. I wanted to see what the civilian sector had to offer. Was the grass greener? I would say yes and no. Yes because I had a stress free job, defined hours (7am-4pm), and really enjoyed the people I worked with. I loved the atmosphere. I also loved the free time it allowed me after my workday. I never had to take work home. The problem with the job was the job wasn't challenging at all. I went from a job with a great deal of responsibility to a job with little to no responsibility. In the beginning that's what I wanted. After two years, I couldn't do it anymore. I went back to the military where I felt I belong. Now I work long days and take work home often. I don't have as much free time as I used to. I'm fine with this though because for the most part, I enjoy the challenge of my job. I like that I continue to grow as a person.
If you take work home from the military I guess you aren't involved in combat. I was always afraid of guns so I never would have fared well in the military. Fortunately I got a college then medical school deferrment so I didn't get asked to go to the VIetNam war.
stan1
Posts: 9833
Joined: Mon Oct 08, 2007 4:35 pm

Re: leaving a job

Post by stan1 »

Muchtolearn wrote:
gator15 wrote:I left the military for a technical job. I wanted to see what the civilian sector had to offer. Was the grass greener? I would say yes and no. Yes because I had a stress free job, defined hours (7am-4pm), and really enjoyed the people I worked with. I loved the atmosphere. I also loved the free time it allowed me after my workday. I never had to take work home. The problem with the job was the job wasn't challenging at all. I went from a job with a great deal of responsibility to a job with little to no responsibility. In the beginning that's what I wanted. After two years, I couldn't do it anymore. I went back to the military where I felt I belong. Now I work long days and take work home often. I don't have as much free time as I used to. I'm fine with this though because for the most part, I enjoy the challenge of my job. I like that I continue to grow as a person.
If you take work home from the military I guess you aren't involved in combat. I was always afraid of guns so I never would have fared well in the military. Fortunately I got a college then medical school deferrment so I didn't get asked to go to the VIetNam war.
Muchtolearn, your user name is very appropriate in this situation. :)

Running the military is about leading people and managing things. Along the way, there are plenty of emails to send, forms to fill out, reports/papers to write, incidents to investigate, requests to be made, and everything else that goes with a highly complex organization. The 20 yo with a gun and some bullets isn't born that way and doesn't teleport to Afghanistan inside a Humvee with her gear! Of course that Humvee never needs maintenance, never wears out, and a new one magically appears when needed. The soldier never gets hurt, never needs training, doesn't need recognition, and has perfect judgement. Wish it was that simple! It is a very challenging job for those with the commitment and dedication to do it right. They deserve our sincere appreciation.
User avatar
VictoriaF
Posts: 19549
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 7:27 am
Location: Black Swan Lake

Re: leaving a job

Post by VictoriaF »

stan1 wrote:
Muchtolearn wrote:
gator15 wrote:I left the military for a technical job. I wanted to see what the civilian sector had to offer. Was the grass greener? I would say yes and no. Yes because I had a stress free job, defined hours (7am-4pm), and really enjoyed the people I worked with. I loved the atmosphere. I also loved the free time it allowed me after my workday. I never had to take work home. The problem with the job was the job wasn't challenging at all. I went from a job with a great deal of responsibility to a job with little to no responsibility. In the beginning that's what I wanted. After two years, I couldn't do it anymore. I went back to the military where I felt I belong. Now I work long days and take work home often. I don't have as much free time as I used to. I'm fine with this though because for the most part, I enjoy the challenge of my job. I like that I continue to grow as a person.
If you take work home from the military I guess you aren't involved in combat. I was always afraid of guns so I never would have fared well in the military. Fortunately I got a college then medical school deferrment so I didn't get asked to go to the VIetNam war.
Muchtolearn, your user name is very appropriate in this situation. :)

Running the military is about leading people and managing things. Along the way, there are plenty of emails to send, forms to fill out, reports/papers to write, incidents to investigate, requests to be made, and everything else that goes with a highly complex organization. The 20 yo with a gun and some bullets isn't born that way and doesn't teleport to Afghanistan inside a Humvee with her gear! Of course that Humvee never needs maintenance, never wears out, and a new one magically appears when needed. The soldier never gets hurt, never needs training, doesn't need recognition, and has perfect judgement. Wish it was that simple! It is a very challenging job for those with the commitment and dedication to do it right. They deserve our sincere appreciation.
I don't think Muchtolearn has expressed lack of appreciation; I think he has distinguished combat deployments from U.S. based tours of duty. When gator15 went back to the military, he may have done it as a DoD civilian.

Victoria
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
Muchtolearn
Posts: 1563
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:41 am

Re: leaving a job

Post by Muchtolearn »

stan1 wrote:
Muchtolearn wrote:
gator15 wrote:I left the military for a technical job. I wanted to see what the civilian sector had to offer. Was the grass greener? I would say yes and no. Yes because I had a stress free job, defined hours (7am-4pm), and really enjoyed the people I worked with. I loved the atmosphere. I also loved the free time it allowed me after my workday. I never had to take work home. The problem with the job was the job wasn't challenging at all. I went from a job with a great deal of responsibility to a job with little to no responsibility. In the beginning that's what I wanted. After two years, I couldn't do it anymore. I went back to the military where I felt I belong. Now I work long days and take work home often. I don't have as much free time as I used to. I'm fine with this though because for the most part, I enjoy the challenge of my job. I like that I continue to grow as a person.
If you take work home from the military I guess you aren't involved in combat. I was always afraid of guns so I never would have fared well in the military. Fortunately I got a college then medical school deferrment so I didn't get asked to go to the VIetNam war.
Muchtolearn, your user name is very appropriate in this situation. :)

Running the military is about leading people and managing things. Along the way, there are plenty of emails to send, forms to fill out, reports/papers to write, incidents to investigate, requests to be made, and everything else that goes with a highly complex organization. The 20 yo with a gun and some bullets isn't born that way and doesn't teleport to Afghanistan inside a Humvee with her gear! Of course that Humvee never needs maintenance, never wears out, and a new one magically appears when needed. The soldier never gets hurt, never needs training, doesn't need recognition, and has perfect judgement. Wish it was that simple! It is a very challenging job for those with the commitment and dedication to do it right. They deserve our sincere appreciation.
I know people do those things. Probably 10 beurocrats and trainers per soldier. Was just commenting that I assumed the poster wasn't in combat.
Muchtolearn
Posts: 1563
Joined: Sun Dec 25, 2011 10:41 am

Re: leaving a job

Post by Muchtolearn »

VictoriaF wrote:
stan1 wrote:
Muchtolearn wrote:
gator15 wrote:I left the military for a technical job. I wanted to see what the civilian sector had to offer. Was the grass greener? I would say yes and no. Yes because I had a stress free job, defined hours (7am-4pm), and really enjoyed the people I worked with. I loved the atmosphere. I also loved the free time it allowed me after my workday. I never had to take work home. The problem with the job was the job wasn't challenging at all. I went from a job with a great deal of responsibility to a job with little to no responsibility. In the beginning that's what I wanted. After two years, I couldn't do it anymore. I went back to the military where I felt I belong. Now I work long days and take work home often. I don't have as much free time as I used to. I'm fine with this though because for the most part, I enjoy the challenge of my job. I like that I continue to grow as a person.
If you take work home from the military I guess you aren't involved in combat. I was always afraid of guns so I never would have fared well in the military. Fortunately I got a college then medical school deferrment so I didn't get asked to go to the VIetNam war.
Muchtolearn, your user name is very appropriate in this situation. :)

Running the military is about leading people and managing things. Along the way, there are plenty of emails to send, forms to fill out, reports/papers to write, incidents to investigate, requests to be made, and everything else that goes with a highly complex organization. The 20 yo with a gun and some bullets isn't born that way and doesn't teleport to Afghanistan inside a Humvee with her gear! Of course that Humvee never needs maintenance, never wears out, and a new one magically appears when needed. The soldier never gets hurt, never needs training, doesn't need recognition, and has perfect judgement. Wish it was that simple! It is a very challenging job for those with the commitment and dedication to do it right. They deserve our sincere appreciation.
I don't think Muchtolearn has expressed lack of appreciation; I think he has distinguished combat deployments from U.S. based tours of duty. When gator15 went back to the military, he may have done it as a DoD civilian.

Victoria
Thank you Victoria. That's what I meant.
Topic Author
bb
Posts: 326
Joined: Wed Apr 25, 2007 10:04 pm

Re: leaving a job

Post by bb »

Guess in my case the thought experiment (that's all it is currently) is
same field, same work, just different company. Near term goal would be
to get to more challenging/interesting environment. Longer term
goal would be hopefully more chance for technical career growth.
itypefast
Posts: 199
Joined: Sat Nov 19, 2011 5:35 pm

Re: leaving a job

Post by itypefast »

I've been in IT for about 20 years. Turning 40 this year... right now I'm vastly over-employed and with the current bubble blowing in technology I don't see that changing in the next few years.

I work full time for an investment bank and currently have two side-projects. Suffice it to say I could literally bill 24 hours per day 365 days per year with a bill rate ranging from $150 to $200 per hour.

In fact I'm slacking off just posting this... 8-)
consciousoverride
Posts: 39
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 6:26 pm

Re: leaving a job

Post by consciousoverride »

itypefast wrote:I've been in IT for about 20 years. Turning 40 this year... right now I'm vastly over-employed and with the current bubble blowing in technology I don't see that changing in the next few years.

I work full time for an investment bank and currently have two side-projects. Suffice it to say I could literally bill 24 hours per day 365 days per year with a bill rate ranging from $150 to $200 per hour.

In fact I'm slacking off just posting this... 8-)

Go on.... :shock:
TheEternalVortex
Posts: 2569
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 9:17 pm
Location: San Jose, CA

Re: It's no fallacy

Post by TheEternalVortex »

OTOH: http://jacquesmattheij.com/Programmers+ ... 50k+and+up

Maybe software engineers don't work past 40 because they don't have to... ?

(Actually there are a lot of older software engineers in less "hip" tech companies.)
Post Reply