is a Mac really worth it?

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Valuethinker
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Post by Valuethinker » Sun Aug 12, 2007 2:49 am

SpringMan wrote:Nitsuj,
Okay, your systems are clean. BTW, I worked 36 years in IT, the last 10 of which I was both a UNIX systems administrator (HP-UX, AIX, Solaris) and a DBA. Supported General Motors both as a direct employee and later EDS. Worked in most areas but not specifically network security. This is not meant to be a resume. I have seen malware on most home PCs I have checked. I still feel it is a problem with Microsoft. Not that Microsoft is bad but 85% of the home machines run Microsoft, that is why malware is written for Microsoft. I am not endorsing Mac, I don't own one, my son does and is very happy with Mac. He also likes his ipods.
Best,
Generally my experience is most PCs seem to have malware infections. Home PCs this is.

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craigr
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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by craigr » Sun Aug 12, 2007 3:10 am

There is no Mac price premium. They are all priced competitively with a PC when you roll in all the factors.

Here's why I switched to Macs a couple years back:

1) Their hardware works without compatibility issues.
2) They have a good product support system.
3) They had the best battery life, size and weight for a laptop with the size screen I wanted (I now own a desktop system as well).
4) They ran all the software I needed to work each day: Microsoft Office, web browser, etc.
5) Virtually no issues with viruses or spyware (yet).
6) More stable OS.
7) The core software is more reliable.
8) The systems don't come pre-loaded with a bunch of crippleware/spyware junk.
9) They had the best looking screens and I value my eyes.
10) It integrates best with my iPod (and now my iPhone).
11) They just plain work better.

I consider myself a pretty technically savvy guy and I liked the Unix underpinnings. But honestly I rarely use the core Unix features such as the terminal shell, scripting, etc.

What I did appreciate is how much time I don't waste any more updating software or trying to get things to work. I don't have to run a really slow anti-virus program. I don't have a bunch of applications trying to install themselves deep into the OS causing stability problems. Finally, the computer software just looks and works better than the Windows versions I've seen.

On the downside if you're a PC gamer you have less of a selection to choose from for the Mac. Since I really don't play PC games this wasn't an issue for me (I own an Xbox for gaming).

So is there a Mac premium? I say no because my time is valuable. I could buy a cheaper generic machine. But the real costs are how much time you spend tinkering with it now and in the future. For me, I'm happy with Apple products and don't even use my Windows system any longer. When I do have to use Windows I just marvel at how unbelievably bad the experience is.
Last edited by craigr on Sun Aug 12, 2007 3:23 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by grumel » Sun Aug 12, 2007 3:13 am

Have all the mac fans used a PC in the last 5 years ? Things did get a lot better somewhere after windows 98.

The only thing that crashes my windows pc nowadays is my 8 year old favourite pc game. Anything else works. Viruses were only an issue when i made a fault. So yes you cant just surf with firewall off and an old unupdated version of windows. But thats about it. As long as fire wall and virusscanner arent turned off while on the internet, everythign is fine.
Last edited by grumel on Sun Aug 12, 2007 3:17 am, edited 1 time in total.

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craigr
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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by craigr » Sun Aug 12, 2007 3:16 am

EmergDoc wrote:
mptfan wrote: I am getting a laptop, and I am torn between the 15" and 17" widescreen. The 15 is easier to carry and lighter, but the 17 obviously has a bigger viewing area while being bulkier. Any thoughts on which is better for a laptop?
This 17" is REALLY big. I think 15" is much more portable. I think I would very seriously consider the 15" if I were to do it again. Just MHO.
I run all laptops through my "Coach Seat Test".

Here it is: "Can I open the screen of my laptop on the table in a coach class seat and not have the screen destroyed if the guy in front of me reclines?"

For me that means buying the 15" laptop. :)

I also look at weight and battery life. Again the 15" is the sweet spot on that too.

If you need a bigger monitor I'd suggest just buying an external one for it. I hooked up my 23" widescreen to my laptop for a long time before I got a desktop system. This is a really good solution if you want the portability of a 15" system but the usability when you're at your desk for long stretches of time.
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craigr
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Post by craigr » Sun Aug 12, 2007 3:20 am

grumel wrote:Have all the mac fans used a PC in the last 5 years ? Things did get a lot better somewhere after windows 98.
Yep. Windows XP was OK, but it is nowhere near as good as OS X. I haven't really tried Vista yet although I've used it a bit in the stores. I can't say I'm ready to switch back anytime soon.

One more thing about Macs too. I notice that they can be run for a longer time before they are considered "obsolete". That means you can delay having to purchase a machine longer than a comparable Windows platform in my experience. So again I don't think there is a Mac premium the way people perceive.
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Post by tfb » Sun Aug 12, 2007 4:09 am

A Mac requires a higher initial investment. Whether it's worth it or not, it's up to you. However for a home user, a sub-$500 desktop PC is often adequate. If you don't play games or encode video, you can hardly tell the difference.
Harry Sit, taking a break from the forums.

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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by zhiwiller » Sun Aug 12, 2007 11:07 am

craigr wrote:There is no Mac price premium. They are all priced competitively with a PC when you roll in all the factors.
That is misleading. Your argument is that you get more value for your money, not that there isn't a price premium.

Valuethinker
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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Aug 12, 2007 11:53 am

zhiwiller wrote:
craigr wrote:There is no Mac price premium. They are all priced competitively with a PC when you roll in all the factors.
That is misleading. Your argument is that you get more value for your money, not that there isn't a price premium.
One real problem for the Mac, I think, is that if you need additional software (you might not), then 1.the programme may well not be available in Mac format 2. it tends to cost more (fewer sales to amortise development costs).

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Post by Nitsuj » Sun Aug 12, 2007 12:08 pm

The upgrade path on the mac is also pretty limited. The smaller macs, like the mini and iMac aren't really designed for users to upgrade hard drives. Video cards can't be upgraded for the most part, adding new features (DVR, new wireless standards, better sound cards, etc.) require external attachments, etc. etc.

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craigr
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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by craigr » Sun Aug 12, 2007 12:27 pm

zhiwiller wrote:
craigr wrote:There is no Mac price premium. They are all priced competitively with a PC when you roll in all the factors.
That is misleading. Your argument is that you get more value for your money, not that there isn't a price premium.
There really isn't a price premium. We can be pedantic about comparing a laundry list of technical specs but by and large the Mac is essentially identical at a given price point against a PC. This is even more so when you consider the costs of upgrades and the aggravation of having to deal with PC hardware (especially if you roll your own computer). Apple wouldn't be able to compete if this wasn't the case.

A $1000 Mac is going to work better than a $1000 PC. You're going to have less hardware problems, less software problems, less need to purchase things like anti-virus software updates each year, video and photo editing is superior, etc. The Mac is simply a better computer at any given price.

This gets into a religious debate though so I'll just stop. I worked in a computer store for many years during college. I've assembled thousands of PC's during that time. All I can say is I'd rather have the Mac over a comparable PC any day of the week. A lot of these cheap PC's you see are just junk. They use cheap cases, cheap power supplies, cheaper components, cheap keyboards and cheap monitors. When I use the word "cheap" I don't just mean "inexpensive" I mean "Junk".

So keeping with my philosophy on spending, I'd rather buy a good product once and be done with it than cheaper products many times over which costs more in the end.
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Target2019
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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by Target2019 » Sun Aug 12, 2007 2:14 pm

craigr wrote:There really isn't a price premium. We can be pedantic about comparing a laundry list of technical specs but by and large the Mac is essentially identical at a given price point against a PC. This is even more so when you consider the costs of upgrades and the aggravation of having to deal with PC hardware (especially if you roll your own computer). Apple wouldn't be able to compete if this wasn't the case.

A $1000 Mac is going to work better than a $1000 PC. You're going to have less hardware problems, less software problems, less need to purchase things like anti-virus software updates each year, video and photo editing is superior, etc. The Mac is simply a better computer at any given price.
My experience (20+ years using and supporting both systems) tells me that there is a premium. Software upgrades are comparable, whether it is OS or App. I'm trying to understand why Apple hardware runs better, or with less failures. I can understand why someone would prefer to have a Mac only, but I could not use your observations as convincing reasons for a client to invest in one.

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craigr
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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by craigr » Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:17 pm

Target2019 wrote:My experience (20+ years using and supporting both systems) tells me that there is a premium. Software upgrades are comparable, whether it is OS or App. I'm trying to understand why Apple hardware runs better, or with less failures. I can understand why someone would prefer to have a Mac only, but I could not use your observations as convincing reasons for a client to invest in one.
On the networks I had administered with thousands of computers we usually had a couple hundred Macs. I don't have formal statistics, but my anecdotal observations were far fewer problems with the Macs on both the hardware and software side of things. I noticed this even before I owned a Mac.

My other observations came from working and putting together PCs. I noticed that the components were generally poor quality in the clone systems. Power supplies carried no safety ratings for instance (or bogus ones). Motherboards generated a lot of RF interference. The cases were cheap with buttons that stuck and indicator lights that didn't work well. The keyboards were cheap feeling and spongy and not good for touch typists compared with other better versions. Etc.

My other observations on the whole "upgradeability" argument is pretty simple: People don't usually do it or they usually can't do it as they think.

Usually you can upgrade the hard drive with no problems on just about any system. Once you move beyond this though things get funny. You may have a computer that is a couple years old for instance. Let's look at what usually happens based on my experience working and putting these things together:

1) You think you're going to upgrade and head out to the store. Now you're looking around and suddenly you realize that your CPU is too slow and you can't do anything about it because the socket type has changed. You need to buy a whole new motherboard now to work with the faster CPU.

2) So you think maybe you'll just get some more RAM. Well it turns out that the type of RAM you have is too old/slow/etc. and upgrades are either not possible or are more expensive because it's harder to find. So you buy some anyway only to find out that the motherboard doesn't support it correctly or it doesn't work with the RAM you have and you get hardware errors.

3) Ok so now you move to the video card. You go and buy a brand new high end card and it might work OK. However you find that you now need to upgrade the video drivers in the OS, upgrade DirectX, etc. and something breaks and your other software is now having problems. You still have the CPU bottleneck as well if you don't upgrade the motherboard.

4) Even assuming you did get all of the above to actually work after sinking in many hours of your time you may find that the cheap power supply in your case can't handle the load. It fails. You go to find a new power supply and find that it costs just about as much as buying a whole new case.

5) Let's assume a miracle happens and all of your upgrades work. You have a faster motherboard/CPU. Your RAM is now doubled and works. Your video card upgraded with some hassle but is faster. Your power supply/case was upgraded to handle the new demands. So now you go and add up what it cost to do this cost-saving upgrade and what do you find: It costed more to do the upgrade than to just buy a whole new computer! You then hide this fact from your wife/significant other so you don't look like a sucker. :)

Anyway that's my experience and I'm sure many other's. So I'm not in on the whole upgrade thing as an argument against a Mac. When people ask me about upgrading a computer I tell them to try to sell their old system (if it's less than two years old or so) and just buy a brand new one. That's always the cheapest option in my experience.

The PC vs. Mac debate is one of religion. I simply like the Mac. I'm a convert and don't regret it. I think there is no price premium because the systems simply work better, require less baby sitting, and allow me to get my job done faster without having to worry about irritating glitches.

It's all personal opinion.
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Gregory
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joke about our computers

Post by Gregory » Sun Aug 12, 2007 5:31 pm

At my office we have a server running Windows 2000. (It will soon be replaced with a much larger, fancier server running XP -- thank goodness not Vista. Please keep us in your prayers as we make the server transition.) We joke that Windows 2000 is "stable, well, at least as stable as a Windows OS can be." I re-start the server weekly, to "reset" everything, at the suggesting of our IT expert.

Hey, anyone remember Windows Me? Wow, that was a real winner.

My IT guy was a Vista beta tester. He told me he would not even consider using it on anything but a laptop that he wouldn't mind losing (his joke). It's no coincidence that XP is still selling well, and Vista is garnering a reputation as a real pain.

I guess my experience as a non-computer expert, but one who's been using PC's and Mac's daily for years, and who does know a fair amount (for a non-computer expert) about these systems, has shown me that my Mac's essentially never crash; the Mac OS is awesome; and I'd switch the entire office to Mac in a heartbeat if there were Mac software for what I do (it's a niche software I use, so none available yet).

Greg
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Re: joke about our computers

Post by Target2019 » Sun Aug 12, 2007 7:26 pm

Gregory wrote:At my office we have a server running Windows 2000. (It will soon be replaced with a much larger, fancier server running XP -- thank goodness not Vista. Please keep us in your prayers as we make the server transition.) We joke that Windows 2000 is "stable, well, at least as stable as a Windows OS can be." I re-start the server weekly, to "reset" everything, at the suggesting of our IT expert.

Hey, anyone remember Windows Me? Wow, that was a real winner.

My IT guy was a Vista beta tester. He told me he would not even consider using it on anything but a laptop that he wouldn't mind losing (his joke). It's no coincidence that XP is still selling well, and Vista is garnering a reputation as a real pain.

I guess my experience as a non-computer expert, but one who's been using PC's and Mac's daily for years, and who does know a fair amount (for a non-computer expert) about these systems, has shown me that my Mac's essentially never crash; the Mac OS is awesome; and I'd switch the entire office to Mac in a heartbeat if there were Mac software for what I do (it's a niche software I use, so none available yet).
I have one client with a Windows 2000 server, and it hasn't crashed yet. The problem they have is the cleaners (pulled the power plug a few times) and the backup battery (they are clueless about on buttons.) YMMV, but the fewer admins you have, the better off you are.

As mentioned, a major OS upgrade is never worth the price of admission. They always require more horsepower, more memory, more hard drive.

If I buy a new system, it will have Vista. It will work.

Now to Macs. Are they the never-crash, holy grail that proponents say? My experience as an admin for a few studios has told me otherwise. People that use a Mac or a PC or a Linux in any production environment have crashes. It's inevitable as you push a machine, install software upgrades and add specialized output devices. It's part of the game.

I think that as we bring more and more of our war stories to this thread it doesn't serve any purpose. One can say Macs are great. One can say Linux is a charm. It's all just hearsay until you actually get the machine and embrace the reality. Most of this chatter goes over the head of the average user (who is a Windows user BTW.)

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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by Target2019 » Sun Aug 12, 2007 7:34 pm

craigr wrote:My other observations on the whole "upgradeability" argument is pretty simple: People don't usually do it or they usually can't do it as they think.

Usually you can upgrade the hard drive with no problems on just about any system. Once you move beyond this though things get funny. You may have a computer that is a couple years old for instance. Let's look at what usually happens based on my experience working and putting these things together.
Yes, all of that brings back bad memories. I always tell a client or firend, "in with the new, out with the old." Buy an external case for your old drive, or install it in the new machine.

The diehard in us wants to squeeze more mileage out of old electronics, but you'll have a failure, and will lose data.

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I prefer Macs

Post by newlifeca » Sun Aug 12, 2007 7:45 pm

And I would definately wait for the new OS to come out.

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Post by mlebuf » Sun Aug 12, 2007 7:49 pm

I've been using Macs over 20 years and like them very much. However, they are not crash proof. A few weeks ago, my wife's 2 year-old iMac had a hard disk failure and the HD had to be replaced. Fortunately, we automatically backup everything on our computers every day to an external HD, using a program called "SuperDuper!." That saved her bacon.

Mac users who are interested can download "SuperDuper!" here:
http://www.versiontracker.com/dyn/moreinfo/macosx/22126

With the new Macs, you have the luxury of being able to run both a Windows and Mac platform.

Best wishes,
Michael
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WiseNLucky
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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by WiseNLucky » Mon Aug 13, 2007 7:39 am

mptfan wrote:I am getting a laptop, and I am torn between the 15" and 17" widescreen. The 15 is easier to carry and lighter, but the 17 obviously has a bigger viewing area while being bulkier. Any thoughts on which is better for a laptop?
At work we are all issued laptops with 14" screens because we have to travel a bit, but in the office we have docking stations and a separate full-scale keyboard, mouse and (most importantly) monitor. Mine is 20". I like it so much that that is what I will do at home with my next computer purchase.

I appreciate this very good debate as I too am trying to decide whether to go with Mac or PC next go around.
WiseNLucky

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Post by harland » Mon Aug 13, 2007 8:58 am

To the OP:

I switched to a Mac by purchasing a PowerBook G4 about three years ago and have not looked back. The OS is very responsive (especially when multitasking multimedia - something Windows up to XP hasn't really mastered), stable, and unlike Windows I don't need to scan daily for malware/viruses.

That being said, I've read recently that the displays on the 20" iMac appear "washed-out" and the viewing angle for the LCD has diminished from the previous model:

http://www.xlr8yourmac.com/feedback/20i ... l#storytop

However, Apple seems to track this kind of negative feedback very closely. For example, the 15" PowerBook G4 developed display problems ("white spots") and Apple set up a replacement program to send in the defective units, free of charge.

Hope this helps...

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Re: The price premium may be real, but it may be for the Del

Post by rolleur » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:46 am

Wow, this thread is getting long.
lowwall wrote: My quote was accurate. Perhaps we are looking at different systems? http://configure.us.dell.com/dellstore/ ... wsaz&s=bsd
...
Gigabit ethernet is pointless on a personal machine. Nothing you will be connected to can feed that much bandwidth and your drive couldn't keep up with it even if it could. A USB webcam is what $30?
When I follow the link you gave then I see why our price quotes differ (mine is accurate too) - I started at the Home store for Dell and your quote is from the Small Business store. I have no idea why the prices come up different at each store, but they do and I guess Dell can charge as they please for different users.

Still, the extra features the iMac comes with are still worth more than the price difference to me.

I notice a speed difference in our home network with gigabit ethernet (although perhaps it is psychological, if, as you say, it is too fast for the hard drive to even handle).

The 802.11n wireless is quantifiably faster as is the firewire 800. I did upgrade the ram, I do use the webcam, and we got rid of a TV and use the remote all the time.

So like I said before *for me* the Dell has a price premium - but it will depend upon the user. If the Dell is the right system for your needs, go for it, but if the iMac is, then go for it. There isn't a general price premium one way or the other.

-Lee

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Re: is a Mac really worth it?

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:51 am

WiseNLucky wrote:
mptfan wrote:I am getting a laptop, and I am torn between the 15" and 17" widescreen. The 15 is easier to carry and lighter, but the 17 obviously has a bigger viewing area while being bulkier. Any thoughts on which is better for a laptop?
At work we are all issued laptops with 14" screens because we have to travel a bit, but in the office we have docking stations and a separate full-scale keyboard, mouse and (most importantly) monitor. Mine is 20". I like it so much that that is what I will do at home with my next computer purchase.

I appreciate this very good debate as I too am trying to decide whether to go with Mac or PC next go around.
If it's work I am 90% sure you will go with a Windows OS.

I would avoid Vista for as long as you possibly can, though. It grinds laptops to a halt.

It seems to be the case that Firefox has fewer security problems. I would recommend its use (but find many bank sites, for example, just won't accept it).

if it's for personal use there is a bit of theology in this. For probably 90% of applications, 90% of the time, it really, truly makes no difference: most people use the PC to surf, download music and photos, send email. For those applications, a Mac is probably easier to use, there are more people around who can help you with a PC.

If you do get a Mac, I would keep the old PC for a while, there are often applications that you want to use that don't run on Mac.

Upgrading machines has never really been worth it in my experience (exception: adding memory, but the price of memory chips for a PC goes up from about the end of year 2 post introduction, as there is no additional demand for that particular spec). You can buy an external HD if you need storage.

But PCs are use & throw machines (note, if you give it away, make sure a professional programme is used to wipe the hard drives. In theory, it is only possible to wipe a hard drive by smashing it, but it does take a NSA-type piece of hardware to recreate a hard drive wiped by professional software. The New York Times (or another paper) sent a reporter to buy 20 PCs off the streets in Lagos, Nigeria and had their hard drives examined: these were US PCs and they were full of confidential credit card numbers, employee data etc.).

Every 4 years or so, you are probably going to replace your PC. You can stretch a desktop to 5, typically, before the HD gets flakey and the performance becomes a complete pain (especially if you buy a decently fast processor and lots of RAM when you start off). Laptops probably last around 3 years (although my wife's Thinkpad is 5 years old).

There's far more malware and security problems with PCs, however this doesn't mean Mac is immune.

Linux is a step up in terms of safety and general efficiency as an OS, but it seems to require a fair commitment to understanding how it works.

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Re: The price premium may be real, but it may be for the Del

Post by tat2ng » Mon Aug 13, 2007 10:51 am

rolleur wrote:Wow, this thread is getting long.
I love it! :lol:

Thanks to all of you for the excellent feedback. I'm overwhelmed by the amount of information and opinions that I've received.

As of right now, I thinking I'm leaning towards getting the iMac, but will definitely wait for the new OS if I do. I'll research some of the Dell Vostro options that were recommended as well... I believe my IT guy can get a pretty good discount through them since we do so much business with them for our office.

Thanks again to all, and any more comments/suggestions/advice is greatly appreciated.

Thad

edit: fixed a typo

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Malware on a PC

Post by Alex Frakt » Mon Aug 13, 2007 12:05 pm

I have 10 Windows machines running everything from 98SE to XP Pro in my business. I use our DSL router as a hardware firewall, but behind that I use nothing: no software firewalls and no antivirus programs. I will do a web-based antivirus scan and run Adaware on the rare occasions I suspect there is a problem.

The hardware firewall is completely effective at keeping uninvited problems out, so the only way for malware to get in is for my employees to invite it in via download or running an infected e-mail attachment. I've made it quite clear to everyone that they are not to download anything or open any attachments (other than pdfs or image files from clients) without checking with me if it is OK.

The only other precautions I've taken is a switch to Firefox to avoid IE security holes and I use gmail's free small business e-mail hosting services. They do a great job of filtering out e-mail viruses.

I've been running naked like this since since 1998 and have had exactly 2 problems. Both were avoidable, secretaries downloaded something they thought was innocuous, but was bundled with adware. Our data is safe on a unix server, so an infection means I rebuild the machine. The first time this occurred, it was a Win98 machine so it took most of the day to reinstall the OS and our applications. The second time was an XP Pro machine so I just used the systems restore option to go back to a clean state.

The point is that the best defense against problems is just using your head and not downloading or clicking on anything questionable. Compare a few minutes of instruction and a day of fixing things over 9 years with the endless hassle and expense and system instability caused by running and updating antivirus programs.

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Re: Malware on a PC

Post by celkins » Mon Aug 13, 2007 2:36 pm

lowwall wrote:The point is that the best defense against problems is just using your head and not downloading or clicking on anything questionable.
In the spirit of this great advice, here are two simple steps you can take to make using Mac OS X even safer:
  • 1. Disable Safari's 'Open "safe" files after downloading' preference. Tricking Safari into believing that a file is safe has been an obvious and frequently-used attack vector.

    2. Do not use an administrator-enabled account as your everyday account. Unlike Windows, where it is nearly impossible to do this and get anything done, OS X works great with reduced privileges (except for some brain-dead third-party applications/installers which you would do well to avoid anyway).

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Post by epilnk » Mon Aug 13, 2007 8:58 pm

If you don't care about aesthetics and have already made a substantial investment in PC software, then it's hard to see how switching to Mac would be worth it. Gamers should stick with PC of course. OTOH, for technophobes, neophytes, or anyone worried about gremlin invasions, Mac is a clear choice.

For everyone else it comes down to personal preference. Most people familiar with both consider the macs to be nicer to work on, and I agree that there appears to be little, if any, actual price premium.

For all the beauty of OS X I still think that for it's time, System 7 has never been surpassed. Mac has made many changes designed to appeal to the PC base, and for the most part these have not been for the better.

Linda

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Post by tfb » Mon Aug 13, 2007 9:15 pm

Circuit City sells a PC with 2.1GHz CPU, 1GB RAM, 250GB hard drive, AND a 19" LCD for $450. It's fast enough for most home use.

http://www.circuitcity.com/rpsm/oid/184 ... eDetail.do

How does a mac beat that on price?
Harry Sit, taking a break from the forums.

Valuethinker
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Post by Valuethinker » Tue Aug 14, 2007 12:55 am

tfb wrote:Circuit City sells a PC with 2.1GHz CPU, 1GB RAM, 250GB hard drive, AND a 19" LCD for $450. It's fast enough for most home use.

http://www.circuitcity.com/rpsm/oid/184 ... eDetail.do

How does a mac beat that on price?
As long as you are not running Windows Vista, that configuration should be OK. Run XP Pro on it, not Vista.

Target2019
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Post by Target2019 » Tue Aug 14, 2007 6:51 pm

tfb wrote:Circuit City sells a PC with 2.1GHz CPU, 1GB RAM, 250GB hard drive, AND a 19" LCD for $450. It's fast enough for most home use.

http://www.circuitcity.com/rpsm/oid/184 ... eDetail.do

How does a mac beat that on price?
This is a better PC choice for the future:

http://www.circuitcity.com/rpsm/oid/185 ... eDetail.do

Nitsuj
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Post by Nitsuj » Tue Aug 14, 2007 6:59 pm

Target2019 wrote:This is a better PC choice for the future:

http://www.circuitcity.com/rpsm/oid/185 ... eDetail.do
Still the champeen. There's no way you can really compare an iMac to that.
HP FTW!

epilnk
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Post by epilnk » Tue Aug 14, 2007 9:16 pm

Nitsuj wrote:
Target2019 wrote:This is a better PC choice for the future:

http://www.circuitcity.com/rpsm/oid/185 ... eDetail.do
Still the champeen. There's no way you can really compare an iMac to that.
HP FTW!
No, there really is no comparison, is there? But the computer in this link certainly looks like an excellent choice for people who like PCs. Most of them won't know the difference anyway.

Linda

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