Asking HR for a raise

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Topic Author
RetireSomeday5
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Asking HR for a raise

Post by RetireSomeday5 »

Hey all,

I'm in an "interesting" situation. But I'll try and get right to the crux of it.

I know i'm underpaid in base salary--work for a major company. I have 1 direct report; they didn't report to me when initially hired-- they are making within $1000 of my base salary. They also have given 2 week notice that they are taking a job for $50k base more than I make ( and over 200k total- which he's probably batting above his average). The profession is highly specialized and requires an exam process, whereby I'm completed with exams---this person isn't even close to done. Everyone in the company likes me/the work i do and is disappointed my report is leaving because he adds value too.

In setting up the new hire, I have permission to hire someone up to X, which is actually 10% more than I make :oops:

I discussed with my boss who also has finished the exams and is pretty much the only other person in the company who does what we do. We have a very good relationship but he basically said "yeah, I'd hate to lose you but would completely understand if you looked around".

HR recently asked me if we "have trouble finding good candidates at the salary my report is at".

How do I respond to that? So far I just said "it's not really a straightforward answer".

Do I mention to HR I'm underpaid, or just look around for a new job? I like the job I currently have and this is purely financial.


Thanks for any advice
runner540
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by runner540 »

Update resume and LInkedIn (with the keywords/certifications that are relevant, and the setting that recruiters can see you are open to work). Start shopping your resume. If someone less qualified and junior to you is making $50k more, you can too.
When you get an offer, then talk to boss/HR.
oldfatguy
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by oldfatguy »

RetireSomeday5 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 12:47 pm
I discussed with my boss who also has finished the exams and is pretty much the only other person in the company who does what we do. We have a very good relationship but he basically said "yeah, I'd hate to lose you but would completely understand if you looked around".
That's your answer.
jarjarM
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by jarjarM »

I have done this a few times in my career. There's no point to ask HR for a raise, the only way to push the company to pay you more is to bring in a competitive offer. With the competitive offer on hand, your boss, if he/she choose to, can push for a "market adjustment" and adjust your salary up. Also, don't use your direct report's salary as a base for your own raise, it's not a good practice, especially since there are plenty of incidents where direct reports make more than the manager.

P.S. The only time in my career I didn't need a competitive offer for a "market adjustment" is when I openly questioned the new CEO of a megacorp in his initial townhall on pay disparity between new hires and experienced employees. Let's just say I make enough noises in an open forum that my bosses took care of me. I would not suggest doing that often. I was young and naive back then :oops:
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FIREchief
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by FIREchief »

oldfatguy wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 1:09 pm
RetireSomeday5 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 12:47 pm
I discussed with my boss who also has finished the exams and is pretty much the only other person in the company who does what we do. We have a very good relationship but he basically said "yeah, I'd hate to lose you but would completely understand if you looked around".
That's your answer.
Bingo! Talking to HR would be pointless, unless you have some case for being discriminated against due to your inclusion in some protected class.
I am not a lawyer, accountant or financial advisor. Any advice or suggestions that I may provide shall be considered for entertainment purposes only.
Joe Public
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by Joe Public »

Offer the position you are filling to yourself with the $10K bump. Then take that offer to HR and ask them to match or beat it. :D
mayday23
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by mayday23 »

I would simply reply “The salary range for my direct report is not consistent with the market. Joe left and is making $XYZ and that is more consistent with the current market.”

You’ll eventually have a meeting with HR then would be the time to mention “Is it normal for a direct report to be making more than his/her manager?”

As someone else said, you manager already gave you the answer that will most likely happen – you need to leave to find a position that is paying you at market rate.

I would have a conversation with your boss now about salary. If you have a good relationship then you should be able to tell him you are being approached by outside companies with a much higher salary. you love it here, blah blah blah, but you need to look after your family. Better to start the wheels turning now, then holding a gun to their head when you have a competing job offer and they can't jump through hoops in a few days to match it.
BillWalters
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by BillWalters »

You need to get another offer and go from there.
humblecoder
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by humblecoder »

Joe Public wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 3:01 pm Offer the position you are filling to yourself with the $10K bump. Then take that offer to HR and ask them to match or beat it. :D
+1000

Truly, you are a genius. I am not worthy. 8-)
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Stinky
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by Stinky »

Just curious - are you an actuary? If so, the job market is pretty robust.

Your boss basically told you to look for a new job. I’d take him up on it.
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cabfranc
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by cabfranc »

I know every industry and company is different, but it seems a little odd to me that you (as the employee) would have to ask HR for a raise. At my company, HR just administers benefits and has no decision-making authority in raises. If a manager wants a raise for someone, they have to convince their management, and then they tell HR to give the person a raise. As a manager, if I want a raise for one of my staff, I have to convince my manager, and if he says yes, he will get the raise.
random_walker_77
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by random_walker_77 »

Stinky wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 5:21 pm Your boss basically told you to look for a new job. I’d take him up on it.
+1. RetireSomeday5 needs to look out for themselves, b/c no one else will. Their boss has said about as much as they can (and probably more than they are supposed to). Start interviewing, and don't plan on getting that offer matched.
Dave55
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by Dave55 »

I agree with Stinky, sounds like your boss is asking you to look for another job.

Dave
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JoeRetire
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by JoeRetire »

RetireSomeday5 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 12:47 pm HR recently asked me if we "have trouble finding good candidates at the salary my report is at".

How do I respond to that? So far I just said "it's not really a straightforward answer".
Why not? The answer is either "Yes, I am having trouble finding good candidates." or "No, I'm am not having trouble finding good candidates."
Do I mention to HR I'm underpaid, or just look around for a new job? I like the job I currently have and this is purely financial.
Waste of time. HR isn't going to tell your manager to give you more money. And your manager knows your situation.

If you feel the need to make more money, find a new job and leave this one.
It's the end of the world as we know it. | It's the end of the world as we know it. | It's the end of the world as we know it. | And I feel fine.
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galawdawg
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by galawdawg »

I would probably be tempted to reply, "Am I understanding you correctly that you want me to find a less qualified, less experienced candidate with no tenure at this firm to be my direct report and offer them a salary that exceeds mine by 10%"?

If you truly believe that you are valued and respected at this company and have a good relationship with your supervisor, you may wish to request a meeting with your supervisor and HR to discuss the compensation disparity. Otherwise, I agree with the others that it is time to update the resume and start looking elsewhere.
Topic Author
RetireSomeday5
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by RetireSomeday5 »

Stinky wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 5:21 pm Just curious - are you an actuary? If so, the job market is pretty robust.

Your boss basically told you to look for a new job. I’d take him up on it.
Yes and yes it is... this is what I had convinced myself of, but I wanted to see if others thought I was crazy. Seems not.

Thanks.
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NewMoneyMustBeSmart
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by NewMoneyMustBeSmart »

RetireSomeday5 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 12:47 pm In setting up the new hire, I have permission to hire someone up to X, which is actually 10% more than I make :oops:
Easy question! Apply for the job at the 10% raise!
-- | Few are those who see with their own eyes and feel with their own hearts - Einstein
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scorcher31
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by scorcher31 »

I'm going to just speak from my families experience. It may not generalize to your situation.

I know for my family member who is an actuary, in a company with a large number of actuaries, it is much easier to get a promotion/raise by changing jobs within the same company. Who knows why, but it is essentially expected that internally actuaries jump from spot to spot in the same company to get those raises with a title bump. At least in my family members company, the boss can promote you also, but typically they won't unless they are multiple levels ahead of you. Someone only one level over you can't/won't promote you to their own level, but if they are a few levels ahead it is possible. Are you sure this isn't the situation you are running into?

Your salary and bonus significantly appear to depend on your title after your have your FSA. Unless you are doing some consulting work or putting in more than 40 hours per week, I would guess 200k salary including bonus is about a director level. Do you know what others are making at your title with an FSA?
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scorcher31
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by scorcher31 »

I assume you know about this website but if not: https://www.dwsimpson.com/about/salary-survey/

Make sure you pick the right type of actuary with FSA. Because there are no titles listed look at total compensation and years to get a ballpark.
vtjon02
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by vtjon02 »

Actuaries are in ridiculous demand in today’s hard market conditions. Start applying at mega Corp insurers/brokers/consultants (Willis, marsh, aon, brown and brown, etc). You’ll likely get a gigantic increase in money and benefits.
JuniorBH
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by JuniorBH »

We run into this all the time. Given the initial reaction from your boss, it sounds like you need to go get a competitive offer. That's the best way to demonstrate what the market value is. It doesn't guarantee the company will match, but it's the best way to compel them.
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bottlecap
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by bottlecap »

HR doesn't set salaries. Your manager has more influence over that. It sounds like your manager implied you are not in line for a salary bump.

Start looking elsewhere. Once the process is started, ask your manager for a raise directly. If the manager declines, continue with the job search and leave for hopefully greener pastures.

JT
tibbitts
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by tibbitts »

mayday23 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 4:18 pm You’ll eventually have a meeting with HR then would be the time to mention “Is it normal for a direct report to be making more than his/her manager?”
In some industries it's pretty common for direct reports to earn more than their managers, so while it seems like there is a disparity here that the OP can address, that might not be the way to approach it.
stoptothink
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by stoptothink »

tibbitts wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:06 am
mayday23 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 4:18 pm You’ll eventually have a meeting with HR then would be the time to mention “Is it normal for a direct report to be making more than his/her manager?”
In some industries it's pretty common for direct reports to earn more than their managers, so while it seems like there is a disparity here that the OP can address, that might not be the way to approach it.
I've been in both situations; earning more than who I reported to and having an employee earn more than me. No advice other than echoing that going to HR is a total waste of time.
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Stinky
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by Stinky »

tibbitts wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:06 am
mayday23 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 4:18 pm You’ll eventually have a meeting with HR then would be the time to mention “Is it normal for a direct report to be making more than his/her manager?”
In some industries it's pretty common for direct reports to earn more than their managers, so while it seems like there is a disparity here that the OP can address, that might not be the way to approach it.
It’s not common in the insurance industry. That’s where OP works since he/she identified as an actuary.
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tibbitts
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by tibbitts »

Stinky wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:18 am
tibbitts wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:06 am
mayday23 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 4:18 pm You’ll eventually have a meeting with HR then would be the time to mention “Is it normal for a direct report to be making more than his/her manager?”
In some industries it's pretty common for direct reports to earn more than their managers, so while it seems like there is a disparity here that the OP can address, that might not be the way to approach it.
It’s not common in the insurance industry. That’s where OP works since he/she identified as an actuary.
I'm surprised since the insurance industry includes commission-based sales.
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Stinky
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by Stinky »

tibbitts wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:29 am
Stinky wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:18 am
tibbitts wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:06 am
mayday23 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 4:18 pm You’ll eventually have a meeting with HR then would be the time to mention “Is it normal for a direct report to be making more than his/her manager?”
In some industries it's pretty common for direct reports to earn more than their managers, so while it seems like there is a disparity here that the OP can address, that might not be the way to approach it.
It’s not common in the insurance industry. That’s where OP works since he/she identified as an actuary.
I'm surprised since the insurance industry includes commission-based sales.
I should have been more precise. :oops:

It would be very uncommon for a junior actuary to make more than a senior actuary within the same company.
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index2max
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by index2max »

I have read about people requesting raises from their current employers by showing a legitimate offer in hand from another company, but that's risky.

What if your boss gets jealous or sees your move as "back-stabbing" them or looking "ungreateful"? Even if the current company agrees to give you a raise, won't that make them resentful of you from then on? Maybe the answer is to just leave a company if you have a better offer in hand in the first place?

That's the advice Ask the HeadHunter offered on his blog

https://www.asktheheadhunter.com/13351/ ... lary-raise
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scorcher31
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by scorcher31 »

Is this a company with a couple of actuaries or hundreds of actuaries. Again if it's a small company that's one thing, and you may need to jump ship. If it's a large company with hundreds of actuaries, a student program, etc, consider my prior post before you jump ship. I know of multiple companies where you are expected to jump between actuarial spots internally for your promotions. I.e. if your a director you look for an open senior director roll internally and you get a raise and bonus bump with it. We really need to hear more from the OP.
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scorcher31
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by scorcher31 »

Stinky wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:49 am
tibbitts wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:29 am
Stinky wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:18 am
tibbitts wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 9:06 am
mayday23 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 4:18 pm You’ll eventually have a meeting with HR then would be the time to mention “Is it normal for a direct report to be making more than his/her manager?”
In some industries it's pretty common for direct reports to earn more than their managers, so while it seems like there is a disparity here that the OP can address, that might not be the way to approach it.
It’s not common in the insurance industry. That’s where OP works since he/she identified as an actuary.
I'm surprised since the insurance industry includes commission-based sales.
I should have been more precise. :oops:

It would be very uncommon for a junior actuary to make more than a senior actuary within the same company.
Agreed, especially a direct report in the same exact area of business.
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RetireSomeday5
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by RetireSomeday5 »

scorcher31 wrote: Tue Mar 16, 2021 5:24 pm Is this a company with a couple of actuaries or hundreds of actuaries. Again if it's a small company that's one thing, and you may need to jump ship. If it's a large company with hundreds of actuaries, a student program, etc, consider my prior post before you jump ship. I know of multiple companies where you are expected to jump between actuarial spots internally for your promotions. I.e. if your a director you look for an open senior director roll internally and you get a raise and bonus bump with it. We really need to hear more from the OP.
I've been pretty quiet intentionally to hear as many varied views as possible but they all some in relative agreement with each other and with what I have been thinking.

I don't work for an insurance company--- no study program/100's of peers etc.

I've opened my search up independently and through various recruiters.

I'm already well compensated, but my long term incentives are offsetting shortcomings in guaranteed shoter-term pay, and that bothers me---and is not what should be expected.

I suspect my boss wants to keep me and would counter any reasonable offer but doesn't have the desire to request a pre-emptive adjustment on my behalf without me at least demanding it, which I don't want to do.
tibbitts
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by tibbitts »

RetireSomeday5 wrote: Wed Mar 17, 2021 9:06 am I'm already well compensated, but my long term incentives are offsetting shortcomings in guaranteed shoter-term pay, and that bothers me---and is not what should be expected.
I don't understand this: it would be normal for longer-term incentives (like a pension) to offset short-term pay.
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Stinky
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by Stinky »

RetireSomeday5 wrote: Wed Mar 17, 2021 9:06 am I've opened my search up independently and through various recruiters.

I'm already well compensated, but my long term incentives are offsetting shortcomings in guaranteed shoter-term pay, and that bothers me---and is not what should be expected.

I suspect my boss wants to keep me and would counter any reasonable offer but doesn't have the desire to request a pre-emptive adjustment on my behalf without me at least demanding it, which I don't want to do.
It sounds like you’ve entered the job market. You might be pleasantly surprised as to what’s available out there.

Please let us know how this turns out.

Best of luck to you.
It's a GREAT day to be alive! - Travis Tritt
oilrig
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by oilrig »

I work in HR. In my experience, you talk to your supervisor about a raise first, and then your supervisor works with HR to get it approved or not. Schedule a meeting with your supervisor as a "check-in", then lay it all out for him. Be sure to have facts and data to support your claim. Im sure he knows you are underpaid already.

Best of luck OP.
ScaledWheel
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by ScaledWheel »

I think the sad reality is that most companies are very happy to have huge differences in pay between employees doing essentially the same role.

I’m in tech, and relatively well paid, but found out that I was paid ~40% less than a colleague brought in at approximately the same time for the same role. After over a year at the company it was also clear I was the higher performer. I started a conversation about how I was bringing in considerable value and underpaid relative to the market last fall. Those talks fizzled out which I took as an implicit “take a better role if you can find it” directive. My last day in this job is at the end of the month.

One of the positive things about tech is there is relative transparency, for larger companies at least, through levels.fyi.
BrooklynInvest
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by BrooklynInvest »

The fact that a subordinate might have a higher salary than you is a good thing - it puts the pressure on without you saying a word.

Suggestion -

Me, I wouldn't get another offer to force the issue. I'd ask your boss for a raise citing only the positives you bring and how much you love it there. They know the relative salary story and the positives-only positioning demonstrates you're a team player and committed to the firm... whether that's true or not ;-)

Probably not a great probability of success as others have said but in these kinda things I always find (after learning the hard way) that being clear with the ask is usually best.

Good luck OP.
Pikel
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by Pikel »

This happened to my wife twice. Once at ACAS and then again at FCAS. The smaller/midsized companies just don't keep pace with compensation.

The credentialing process is too much work to settle.

A reasonably experienced actuary should have a compensation floor at 250k if you are motivated.
Ocean77
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by Ocean77 »

RetireSomeday5 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 12:47 pm "yeah, I'd hate to lose you but would completely understand if you looked around".
I don't know how to put in a gentle way, but this is what I routinely tell people in my organization who are not very good at their job, and who I would not mind replacing.
KyleAAA
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by KyleAAA »

HR doesn't have much decision making ability over individual compensation at most companies. Find out who owns the budget (probably your VP) and get your manager to advocate for you to that person. It your manager's manager, if your manager can't so anything. Or get a competitive offer. Talking to HR won't accomplish anything other than to let them know the ranges are way off. But even if they adjust the ranges, there's usually no budget to give raises to current employees.
inbox788
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by inbox788 »

RetireSomeday5 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 12:47 pmI know i'm underpaid in base salary--work for a major company. I have 1 direct report; they didn't report to me when initially hired-- they are making within $1000 of my base salary. They also have given 2 week notice that they are taking a job for $50k base more than I make ( and over 200k total- which he's probably batting above his average). The profession is highly specialized and requires an exam process, whereby I'm completed with exams---this person isn't even close to done. Everyone in the company likes me/the work i do and is disappointed my report is leaving because he adds value too.

In setting up the new hire, I have permission to hire someone up to X, which is actually 10% more than I make :oops:

I discussed with my boss who also has finished the exams and is pretty much the only other person in the company who does what we do. We have a very good relationship but he basically said "yeah, I'd hate to lose you but would completely understand if you looked around".

HR recently asked me if we "have trouble finding good candidates at the salary my report is at".

How do I respond to that? So far I just said "it's not really a straightforward answer".
Why don't you see if there is a similar job as the direct report who left for another company or if that company is looking for someone with even more experience. If you get $50k more, do you care if you report to him?

Why is it not straightforward? The obvious answer is yes. You haven't filled the position. You don't have dozens of qualified knocking on your door (willing to be underpaid).

If you leave, your boss is even more valuable.

What's the benefit of working at the "major company"? Sometimes you sacrifice pay early in the career (paying your dues) if it's a useful steppingstone to bigger and better things, but doesn't sound like you're in that situation.
TheHiker
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by TheHiker »

The only way to show that you are underpaid is to get an offer from somewhere else.
You can then ask your boss to match it. Worst case you will have to leave for a better paying job.
But a good company will usually try to keep you. Last time I quit my job I had directors and VPs lined up next to my office asking what it would take to change my mind.
stimulacra
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by stimulacra »

You don't ask HR for a raise.
gogreen
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by gogreen »

KyleAAA wrote: Wed Mar 17, 2021 10:25 am HR doesn't have much decision making ability over individual compensation at most companies. Find out who owns the budget (probably your VP) and get your manager to advocate for you to that person. It your manager's manager, if your manager can't so anything. Or get a competitive offer. Talking to HR won't accomplish anything other than to let them know the ranges are way off. But even if they adjust the ranges, there's usually no budget to give raises to current employees.
+ many. Moreover even if HR realize the ranges are way off, the answer will be 'But have such a great culture/diversity/mission/opportunities/etc' :mrgreen:
bugleheadd
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by bugleheadd »

NewMoneyMustBeSmart wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 7:02 pm
RetireSomeday5 wrote: Mon Mar 15, 2021 12:47 pm In setting up the new hire, I have permission to hire someone up to X, which is actually 10% more than I make :oops:
Easy question! Apply for the job at the 10% raise!
and just interview yourself to get the job. genius

my first thought was actuary as well, after seeing the mention of series of exams and 6 figure salaries
dbr
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by dbr »

Your boss is the one to approach for a raise. He apparently is not willing to go to bat for you, which is good reason to look elsewhere. He is doing part of his job by telling you exactly that.
Afty
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by Afty »

RetireSomeday5 wrote: Wed Mar 17, 2021 9:06 am I'm already well compensated, but my long term incentives are offsetting shortcomings in guaranteed shoter-term pay, and that bothers me---and is not what should be expected.
Reading this and your original post, is it the case that only your base salary is too low in your opinion? Is your total compensation (including bonus, equity, whatever else) competitive? If that's the case, I can understand your boss's response -- it seems unlikely you would leave a job you like just to shuffle around different components of your compensation.
wilked
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by wilked »

the company stinks, your boss stinks, and you are underpaid in a market that is hot for your position.

Vote with your feet, find a new gig
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mrspock
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by mrspock »

gogreen wrote: Thu Mar 18, 2021 10:38 am
KyleAAA wrote: Wed Mar 17, 2021 10:25 am HR doesn't have much decision making ability over individual compensation at most companies. Find out who owns the budget (probably your VP) and get your manager to advocate for you to that person. It your manager's manager, if your manager can't so anything. Or get a competitive offer. Talking to HR won't accomplish anything other than to let them know the ranges are way off. But even if they adjust the ranges, there's usually no budget to give raises to current employees.
+ many. Moreover even if HR realize the ranges are way off, the answer will be 'But have such a great culture/diversity/mission/opportunities/etc' :mrgreen:
My response to this line of reasoning has always been: “If you can explain how I pay my mortgage with culture, cheer and mission, I’ll be more than happy to accept those things in lieu of money.”

Mega corps have many challenges, but one thing most have going for them is a sane objective compensation schemes grounded in reality vs the clowny systems smaller companies have. That’s one aspect of smaller firms I don’t miss...
gogreen
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Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by gogreen »

mrspock wrote: Thu Mar 18, 2021 12:38 pm
gogreen wrote: Thu Mar 18, 2021 10:38 am
KyleAAA wrote: Wed Mar 17, 2021 10:25 am HR doesn't have much decision making ability over individual compensation at most companies. Find out who owns the budget (probably your VP) and get your manager to advocate for you to that person. It your manager's manager, if your manager can't so anything. Or get a competitive offer. Talking to HR won't accomplish anything other than to let them know the ranges are way off. But even if they adjust the ranges, there's usually no budget to give raises to current employees.
+ many. Moreover even if HR realize the ranges are way off, the answer will be 'But have such a great culture/diversity/mission/opportunities/etc' :mrgreen:
My response to this line of reasoning has always been: “If you can explain how I pay my mortgage with culture, cheer and mission, I’ll be more than happy to accept those things in lieu of money.”

Mega corps have many challenges, but one thing most have going for them is a sane objective compensation schemes grounded in reality vs the clowny systems smaller companies have. That’s one aspect of smaller firms I don’t miss...
Well, you definitely can but I wouldn't suggest it :sharebeer
jackbeagle
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Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2021 5:22 pm

Re: Asking HR for a raise

Post by jackbeagle »

We have this phenomenon. In my department there are some new people, but also a lot of 10-20 year employees. The newer employees (hired directly into the department) have a higher salary than some of the 10-20 year employees. Specifically, the ones who started in lower positions and were promoted internally. This causes some resentment, maybe that's not the right word, because it's not against the person, but the situation in general.

This caused some people to take the early retirement package, who otherwise would not have. Or apply for other jobs internally to try for a promotion, when they otherwise would not have, and retired from this department in a few years. Not sure how much ground they plan to make up, because pay raises (in-place and also connected to promotions) have been recently centralized to corporate HR and taken out of the hands of the direct managers of these employees. I'll explain:

- Now, everyone "mid-band" 25-75% of pay band gets 3% a year. Once you hit 75%+ you are "slowed down" to 1% a year. Those under 25% receive 6% annually until they reach 25%. Prior, you could sit down with your manager mid-year and talk about your achievements, and walk out with a 10% raise. This is no longer able to be done "on the spot".

- Now, promotions to the next level can result in a maximum of a 10% raise. If you get promoted from an hourly position on a team to supervising that team, it is almost a certainty that several people will still make more than you.

The most leverage you'll get is as an external candidate. Make it count!
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