Job hunting while pregnant

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Topic Author
Jags4186
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Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2014 7:12 pm

Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Jags4186 »

Hello folks,

Looking for some unbiased feedback.

A little back story: my wife and I struggled with infertility, and after 4 IVF cycles she is pregnant and has just entered her 12th week of pregnancy. Unfortunately, she was laid off from her job in July due to COVID. She has been job hunting since, but there are just slim pickings available in her field (architectural designer). As of present she is just about to exhaust her 26 weeks of state unemployment benefits. She will switch to the recently passed 13 weeks federal unemployment benefits. If she still hasn’t been hired by the end of those 13 weeks, she will switch back to NJ state 20 week extended unemployment benefits which will bring her right up until around she is due around the very end of July, beginning of August. Based on what I have read, if she gives birth while on unemployment benefits, she will be able to collect an additional 12 weeks of NJ maternity-while-unemployed benefits which would keep getting her paid until November, assuming no other federal or state extensions are put into place. She currently is receiving $713/wk and will be getting the additional $300/wk for 11 weeks.

I did a search for “job hunting while pregnant” on the Boglehead site, and quite frankly, many of the threads were employers complaining that they hired someone who was pregnant and not finding out until after the fact. Before all this happened, we had planned on her staying home for 6 months, collecting state maternity benefits of ~$900/wk for 12 weeks, and then going without for 12 weeks, then she would return 3 days a week, 4 days, a week, and then 5 days a week as her company had done with other women.

Actual Questions Start Here

Now that this has all blown up, I’m not sure what to do. At what point should she stop looking for work while pregnant and just punt until she’s ready to go back permanently? While I can pay for all of our bills on my salary alone, it wouldn’t really be comfortable (my take home would match our outgoing). Additionally, the thought of her being out of work for almost two years makes me nervous of her ability to ever get back into the game. She isn’t a big earner, but she was making $65k a year.

How would you folks handle this?
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KneePartsPro
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by KneePartsPro »

Hi Jags4186,

Could she interview now for deferred employment (i.e. land a job that she doesn't actually start until after baby comes [congratulations!])?

Possibly position herself to takeover for an upcoming retiree, etc.

KneePartsPro
I can tell you almost anything about artificial knees used in knee replacement, and almost nothing about investing.
oldfatguy
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by oldfatguy »

If she stops looking for work before having the child, wouldn't she no longer be eligible for unemployment benefits?
phinanciallyfit
Posts: 82
Joined: Mon Jul 27, 2020 12:33 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by phinanciallyfit »

Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:07 am Hello folks,

Looking for some unbiased feedback.

A little back story: my wife and I struggled with infertility, and after 4 IVF cycles she is pregnant and has just entered her 12th week of pregnancy. Unfortunately, she was laid off from her job in July due to COVID. She has been job hunting since, but there are just slim pickings available in her field (architectural designer). As of present she is just about to exhaust her 26 weeks of state unemployment benefits. She will switch to the recently passed 13 weeks federal unemployment benefits. If she still hasn’t been hired by the end of those 13 weeks, she will switch back to NJ state 20 week extended unemployment benefits which will bring her right up until around she is due around the very end of July, beginning of August. Based on what I have read, if she gives birth while on unemployment benefits, she will be able to collect an additional 12 weeks of NJ maternity-while-unemployed benefits which would keep getting her paid until November, assuming no other federal or state extensions are put into place. She currently is receiving $713/wk and will be getting the additional $300/wk for 11 weeks.

I did a search for “job hunting while pregnant” on the Boglehead site, and quite frankly, many of the threads were employers complaining that they hired someone who was pregnant and not finding out until after the fact. Before all this happened, we had planned on her staying home for 6 months, collecting state maternity benefits of ~$900/wk for 12 weeks, and then going without for 12 weeks, then she would return 3 days a week, 4 days, a week, and then 5 days a week as her company had done with other women.

Actual Questions Start Here

Now that this has all blown up, I’m not sure what to do. At what point should she stop looking for work while pregnant and just punt until she’s ready to go back permanently? While I can pay for all of our bills on my salary alone, it wouldn’t really be comfortable (my take home would match our outgoing). Additionally, the thought of her being out of work for almost two years makes me nervous of her ability to ever get back into the game. She isn’t a big earner, but she was making $65k a year.

How would you folks handle this?
She should keep looking. The job searches are generally not kind to new moms (which is a different conversation) and honestly can be extremely difficult with the exhaustion that comes with a new born. It is also extremely hard to re-enter employment after a large gap in employment. If having a career is important to her, then this inability to work can have a major impact on her wellbeing long term.

I understand the employers who complain about not finding out about someone's pregnancy until after they are hired, but at the same time, when women disclose this in advance they are less likely to get hired, despite this discrimination being illegal.

She can try and negotiate various options after recieving a written job offer (not over the phone, which is easily rescinded). For example, she can request a delayed start after being offered the job, part time work, flexible work times, etc. With my second, I worked with my baby from 8-16wks of age (they sleep a lot at this age and I baby wore), then we hired a part-time nanny until we were ready for daycare. My husband and I alternated our schedules to balance baby sleep and our work (I went to bed early - 8pm- and he attended to baby if she woke from before 1am, but generally worked at this time. Then I was up by 5am to work and attended to baby if she woke past 1am. I started work at 5am). We are both lucky to have flexible work schedules. My point in sharing this is just to say that there are a lot of different work arrangements that can be arranged if and employer is willing to work with them.
Topic Author
Jags4186
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Jags4186 »

oldfatguy wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:25 am If she stops looking for work before having the child, wouldn't she no longer be eligible for unemployment benefits?
NJ doesn’t do any sort of verification. At least not in the 6 months she’s currently been looking.
DoubleComma
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by DoubleComma »

I would offer an alternative view than those who have already responded.

If this was my wife, and we had the challenges getting pregnant that you shared, we would have already pulled the plug on the job search. I don’t think the stress, frustration and aggravation that comes with a job search is anyway beneficial to a baby and/or a new mom.

Additionally I’ll add, as a first time parent you don’t know what you don’t know. Maybe your wife won’t want to return to the same field or maybe she will want some alternative schedule that is hard to find.

Before starting our family, both my wife and I had MegaCorp heavy travel jobs and loved our careers and lifestyle. After our first was born my wife remained with her megacorp, but changed positions slightly to not have as much overnight travel, then within a year changed again to a zero travel position. She never wanted to “not work” but ultimately she wasn’t getting the fulfillment she wanted out of that career. By the time #1 was 18 months we decided to expand our family. After lots of discussion my wife decided to resign her megacorp; to both our surprise being a SAHM was not suitable for her. So she set out to explore options, ultimately returned to school for 15 months to get a teaching credential, it’s been ~15 years now that she has been a teacher and is much happier. Of course there are good and bad days, but ultimately working with children, having the same schedule as our kids and the amazing benefits of being a teacher have been a tremendous blessing to our family.

I guess my advice is don’t over engineer this. Enjoy the pregnancy and see how things change once the baby comes. Maybe you have to adjust lifestyle or savings rate some, but ultimately if your responsible everything will work out great.
DoubleComma
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by DoubleComma »

phinanciallyfit wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:00 pm
Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:07 am Hello folks,

Looking for some unbiased feedback.

A little back story: my wife and I struggled with infertility, and after 4 IVF cycles she is pregnant and has just entered her 12th week of pregnancy. Unfortunately, she was laid off from her job in July due to COVID. She has been job hunting since, but there are just slim pickings available in her field (architectural designer). As of present she is just about to exhaust her 26 weeks of state unemployment benefits. She will switch to the recently passed 13 weeks federal unemployment benefits. If she still hasn’t been hired by the end of those 13 weeks, she will switch back to NJ state 20 week extended unemployment benefits which will bring her right up until around she is due around the very end of July, beginning of August. Based on what I have read, if she gives birth while on unemployment benefits, she will be able to collect an additional 12 weeks of NJ maternity-while-unemployed benefits which would keep getting her paid until November, assuming no other federal or state extensions are put into place. She currently is receiving $713/wk and will be getting the additional $300/wk for 11 weeks.

I did a search for “job hunting while pregnant” on the Boglehead site, and quite frankly, many of the threads were employers complaining that they hired someone who was pregnant and not finding out until after the fact. Before all this happened, we had planned on her staying home for 6 months, collecting state maternity benefits of ~$900/wk for 12 weeks, and then going without for 12 weeks, then she would return 3 days a week, 4 days, a week, and then 5 days a week as her company had done with other women.

Actual Questions Start Here

Now that this has all blown up, I’m not sure what to do. At what point should she stop looking for work while pregnant and just punt until she’s ready to go back permanently? While I can pay for all of our bills on my salary alone, it wouldn’t really be comfortable (my take home would match our outgoing). Additionally, the thought of her being out of work for almost two years makes me nervous of her ability to ever get back into the game. She isn’t a big earner, but she was making $65k a year.

How would you folks handle this?
I understand the employers who complain about not finding out about someone's pregnancy until after they are hired, but at the same time, when women disclose this in advance they are less likely to get hired, despite this discrimination being illegal.
This is such a catch-22.

As a hiring manager and parent I’ve been on both sides of this equation. I’m responding here as purely the manager.

I had this happen to me once. The women was hired into a field sales role for an existing territory and that required extensive training (cost). Within 90 days I was informed of her pregnancy and how that would limit travel and of course result in a 12 week absence. We honored the law, it crushed her peers on the team as they had to fill the gap of her inability due to lack of training and when she was out. When she returned we were all excited to resume getting her back up to speed and fully launched. She left the company to be a SAHM within a year of returning.

I don’t fault her for the choices she made. Both myself abs the company did everything legally, but I can say it still burns to this day and I always remember it when I’m filling a role which might create some unconscious bias towards women of a certain age range.
junior
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by junior »

Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:07 am many of the threads were employers complaining that they hired someone who was pregnant and not finding out until after the fact.
Why should you care what those posters think?
stoptothink
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by stoptothink »

DoubleComma wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:30 pm
phinanciallyfit wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:00 pm
Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:07 am Hello folks,

Looking for some unbiased feedback.

A little back story: my wife and I struggled with infertility, and after 4 IVF cycles she is pregnant and has just entered her 12th week of pregnancy. Unfortunately, she was laid off from her job in July due to COVID. She has been job hunting since, but there are just slim pickings available in her field (architectural designer). As of present she is just about to exhaust her 26 weeks of state unemployment benefits. She will switch to the recently passed 13 weeks federal unemployment benefits. If she still hasn’t been hired by the end of those 13 weeks, she will switch back to NJ state 20 week extended unemployment benefits which will bring her right up until around she is due around the very end of July, beginning of August. Based on what I have read, if she gives birth while on unemployment benefits, she will be able to collect an additional 12 weeks of NJ maternity-while-unemployed benefits which would keep getting her paid until November, assuming no other federal or state extensions are put into place. She currently is receiving $713/wk and will be getting the additional $300/wk for 11 weeks.

I did a search for “job hunting while pregnant” on the Boglehead site, and quite frankly, many of the threads were employers complaining that they hired someone who was pregnant and not finding out until after the fact. Before all this happened, we had planned on her staying home for 6 months, collecting state maternity benefits of ~$900/wk for 12 weeks, and then going without for 12 weeks, then she would return 3 days a week, 4 days, a week, and then 5 days a week as her company had done with other women.

Actual Questions Start Here

Now that this has all blown up, I’m not sure what to do. At what point should she stop looking for work while pregnant and just punt until she’s ready to go back permanently? While I can pay for all of our bills on my salary alone, it wouldn’t really be comfortable (my take home would match our outgoing). Additionally, the thought of her being out of work for almost two years makes me nervous of her ability to ever get back into the game. She isn’t a big earner, but she was making $65k a year.

How would you folks handle this?
I understand the employers who complain about not finding out about someone's pregnancy until after they are hired, but at the same time, when women disclose this in advance they are less likely to get hired, despite this discrimination being illegal.
This is such a catch-22.

As a hiring manager and parent I’ve been on both sides of this equation. I’m responding here as purely the manager.

I had this happen to me once. The women was hired into a field sales role for an existing territory and that required extensive training (cost). Within 90 days I was informed of her pregnancy and how that would limit travel and of course result in a 12 week absence. We honored the law, it crushed her peers on the team as they had to fill the gap of her inability due to lack of training and when she was out. When she returned we were all excited to resume getting her back up to speed and fully launched. She left the company to be a SAHM within a year of returning.

I don’t fault her for the choices she made. Both myself abs the company did everything legally, but I can say it still burns to this day and I always remember it when I’m filling a role which might create some unconscious bias towards women of a certain age range.
Had a similar situation happen to me...twice. Take that back; three times, but one of the times the former employee begged for the job back a few months later.
Pizza1415
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Pizza1415 »

Would like to echo the opinion that Mom may want to stay home during this special time.

Although timing is a little different, my situation was similar. My wife found out her company was being sold when she was 6 months pregnant. We decided to see what would happen with her being home, and obviously, the pandemic has kind of made the decision easier for us.

Fast forward to nearly 2 years later, my wife has been home with our son, and she clearly loves it. As for the finances, we have made it work, despite my wife earning more than I did.
JWooden10
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by JWooden10 »

Speaking exclusively as the hiring manager. I recommend continuing to apply and interview. Be transparent about timing and your career expectations post-baby. Architectural firms often have long sales cycles and it may be possible that the right firm wishes to hire quality people while they can. It wasn’t that long ago that many firms desperately needed people. She’ll get more declines than offers, but that offer may come from a great firm who doesn’t think short-term.

I hired pregnant women before and while the training period did get extended, all has worked out well more often than not. I do feel for the prior poster who had the bad experience but the fact that architectural designers don’t travel much and often have work from home flexibility will be a plus.
mushripu
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by mushripu »

Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:07 am Hello folks,

Looking for some unbiased feedback.

How would you folks handle this?
A child is the more important than any earnings . Just take comfort in the blessing that you got. Collect the unemployment and try for a her job but do not obsess over it. In due time this pandemic shall end and most employers would not look harshly at the unemployment during this time.
Normchad
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Normchad »

mushripu wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:01 pm
Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:07 am Hello folks,

Looking for some unbiased feedback.

How would you folks handle this?
A child is the more important than any earnings . Just take comfort in the blessing that you got. Collect the unemployment and try for a her job but do not obsess over it. In due time this pandemic shall end and most employers would not look harshly at the unemployment during this time.
This is wise advice. If your wife is able to stay home with the baby, that is wonderful.

I’ll also add, that with the pandemic, a lot of companies are now figuring out how to support remote work. I’ve been told there are job search sites now just for remote work. If your wife could find something that was remote, and maybe even part time, that might be a nice fit. Might be hard to find, but sometimes you get lucky.

Best of luck with everything, and congratulations on your new born!
humblecoder
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by humblecoder »

First and foremost, what does your wife want to do? Does she want to keep interviewing while pregnant or does she prefer to focus on the pregnancy and birth? It sounds like finances aren't an issue.

Generally, interviewers can't ask you if you are pregnant, but at a certain point, it is going to be visibly obvious. She will need to decide how transparent to be with it. If she is showing, it might be worthwhile to bring it up and explain your plans to put any concerns to bed. Despite that there are some managers who will have some unconscious (or even conscious) bias against somebody who is pregnant, but honestly, I would not want to work for a manager like that anyway.

BEGIN RANT:
I view pregnancy as any other temporary disability. You can hire someone today and then tomorrow find out that they need to take a month off for back surgery or cancer treatments or something else. Even in those cases, there is a chance that the person might take a leave of absence and not come back. Heck, somebody could decide to quit at a moment's notice. However, for some reason, some people view pregnancy through a different lens, which is a shame in this day and age.
END RANT :happy
wilked
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by wilked »

JWooden10 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:51 pm Speaking exclusively as the hiring manager. I recommend continuing to apply and interview. Be transparent about timing and your career expectations post-baby. Architectural firms often have long sales cycles and it may be possible that the right firm wishes to hire quality people while they can. It wasn’t that long ago that many firms desperately needed people. She’ll get more declines than offers, but that offer may come from a great firm who doesn’t think short-term.

I hired pregnant women before and while the training period did get extended, all has worked out well more often than not. I do feel for the prior poster who had the bad experience but the fact that architectural designers don’t travel much and often have work from home flexibility will be a plus.
This is about where I am at.

I wouldn't put "Pregnant!" on my resume but I also wouldn't conceal it until I had a written offer. Once we got down to final discussions, if I were selected, I would come clean / lay the cards on the table. As a hiring manager it would not stop me from hiring the right candidate. It may stop others but I also think to conceal it and then reveal it after a signed offer is in place starts things on the wrong foot and I would likely resent that.

It's not the same, but a friend of a friend "hid" that he was living in a different country until after the job offer was in place (the role was likely to be full remote). That job offer was quickly rescinded, and afterward the company said if the person had been honest they could have worked through it. Again, this is not the same at all, but the core idea of transparency / honesty applies.

It's not a fair system, in spite of laws and best intentions. The best your spouse can do is to network, network, network. A referred candidate has a much stronger chance at getting past these biases than one that has no connections
oldfatguy
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by oldfatguy »

Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 12:18 pm
oldfatguy wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:25 am If she stops looking for work before having the child, wouldn't she no longer be eligible for unemployment benefits?
NJ doesn’t do any sort of verification. At least not in the 6 months she’s currently been looking.
They may not do any verification, but all the states I am familiar with you must be willing and available to work each week that that file for unemployment benefits.

From the NJ unemployment website:

In order to receive benefits, and continue to get them each week you, must also be:

- able to work
- actively seeking work
- available for work, and
- not refuse an offer of suitable work

In short, you must be looking for a new job, and in a position to accept a job offer when it comes.
phinanciallyfit
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by phinanciallyfit »

Normchad wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:10 pm
mushripu wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:01 pm
Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:07 am
This is wise advice. If your wife is able to stay home with the baby, that is wonderful.

There is a lot of bias in this comment. I would challenge many folks to think about what advice they would give if it was the husband who lost their job and was deciding whether or not to keep looking or perhaps stay home for a while after the baby was born. There is no inherent reason why a woman would want to stop working any more than a man might wish to stop working (beyond physical recovery from childbirth, which is no joke). I know so many woman who really struggle being home full-time with a baby and who are so happy to return to work when they can. Mom's who feel stuck may struggle more with the mind-numbing (even if rewarding) tasks of childcare and may not talk about it because it is a cultural taboo to do so. There are other parents who wish to stay home longer. The key really is flexibility and thinking about what the parent wants long term, then making decisions based on that. If choices should not be made based on short-term goals, as this will likely limit the long-term career prospects of women. For some reason, men's careers tend to benefit from having children (people seem to have a bias towards thinking father's are better workers), while women's do not (less likely to be hired, fewer raises, avoiding giving women the projects that allow for growth, etc.). Making choices that further hurt one's career potential is fine, as long as it is an intentional choice made to focus on one's own priorities. Having choices limited unintentionally can make someone feel stuck and resentful.
Last edited by phinanciallyfit on Wed Jan 13, 2021 2:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
phinanciallyfit
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by phinanciallyfit »

Normchad wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:10 pm
mushripu wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:01 pm
Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:07 am
This is wise advice. If your wife is able to stay home with the baby, that is wonderful.

There are a lot of bias in this comment. I would stay if either OP or his wife WISH to stay home, that is wonderful. Being able to or having to, but not wanting to do so fulltime, is not necessarily wonderful. I would challenge many folks to think about what advice they would give if it was the husband who lost their job and was deciding whether or not to keep looking or perhaps stay home for a while after the baby was born. There is no inherent reason why a woman would want to stop working any more than a man might wish to stop working (beyond physical recovery from childbirth, which is no joke). I know so many woman who really struggle being home full-time with a baby and who are so happy to return to work when they can. Mom's who feel stuck may struggle more with the mind-numbing (even if rewarding) tasks of childcare and may not talk about it because it is a cultural taboo to do so. There are other parents who wish to stay home longer. The key really is flexibility and thinking about what the parent wants long term, then making decisions based on that. If choices should not be made based on short-term goals, as this will likely limit the long-term career prospects of women. For some reason, men's careers tend to benefit from having children (people seem to have a bias towards thinking father's are better workers), while women's do not (less likely to be hired, fewer raises, avoiding giving women the projects that allow for growth, etc.). Making choices that further hurt one's career potential is fine, as long as it is an intentional choice made to focus on one's own priorities. Having choices limited unintentionally can make someone feel stuck and resentful.
phinanciallyfit
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by phinanciallyfit »

humblecoder wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:15 pm First and foremost, what does your wife want to do? Does she want to keep interviewing while pregnant or does she prefer to focus on the pregnancy and birth?
Yes, this should be the key consideration.
phinanciallyfit
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by phinanciallyfit »

wilked wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:20 pm


I wouldn't put "Pregnant!" on my resume but I also wouldn't conceal it until I had a written offer. Once we got down to final discussions, if I were selected, I would come clean / lay the cards on the table. As a hiring manager it would not stop me from hiring the right candidate. It may stop others but I also think to conceal it and then reveal it after a signed offer is in place starts things on the wrong foot and I would likely resent that.

[/quote]



In the field I am in (highly educated and generally career driven folks), men tend to give similar advice... share the info early because it gives HR and potential supervisors time to work with you. And I agree that from that stand point it is far easier to begin this conversation early. But women, tend to give different advice, because time and time again they find that revealing a pregnancy before a written offer tends to result in sudden 'loss of funding' for the position at an alarming rate. I am in an online group with over 10K mothers in my field and this is a question that comes up frequently.

Once this practice ends, woman will likely be more forthcoming with pregnancy information, but as long as woman are regularly discriminated against for their pregnancies, they will continue to hide it and be advised to do so. I'm glad you would not discriminate against women for their pregnancies, but a pregnant candidate has no way to know if you would or would not.
barnaclebob
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by barnaclebob »

humblecoder wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:15 pm
BEGIN RANT:
I view pregnancy as any other temporary disability. You can hire someone today and then tomorrow find out that they need to take a month off for back surgery or cancer treatments or something else. Even in those cases, there is a chance that the person might take a leave of absence and not come back. Heck, somebody could decide to quit at a moment's notice. However, for some reason, some people view pregnancy through a different lens, which is a shame in this day and age.
END RANT :happy
Amen. If an employee taking a few months of leave causes excessive stress to their coworkers, the organization is not being run well. Leaving no margin for the human condition is not an ethical business plan.
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eye.surgeon
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by eye.surgeon »

barnaclebob wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:10 pm
humblecoder wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:15 pm
BEGIN RANT:
I view pregnancy as any other temporary disability. You can hire someone today and then tomorrow find out that they need to take a month off for back surgery or cancer treatments or something else. Even in those cases, there is a chance that the person might take a leave of absence and not come back. Heck, somebody could decide to quit at a moment's notice. However, for some reason, some people view pregnancy through a different lens, which is a shame in this day and age.
END RANT :happy
Amen. If an employee taking a few months of leave causes excessive stress to their coworkers, the organization is not being run well. Leaving no margin for the human condition is not an ethical business plan.
Show me a business where an employee can disappear for a few months and no one is stressed or overworked as a result and I will show you a business that is overstaffed and inefficient. Does your company have staff sitting around waiting for someone to have a human condition so they can jump in? Mine does not.
Last edited by eye.surgeon on Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:20 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Normchad
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Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Normchad »

phinanciallyfit wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 2:55 pm
Normchad wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:10 pm
mushripu wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:01 pm
Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 11:07 am
This is wise advice. If your wife is able to stay home with the baby, that is wonderful.

There are a lot of bias in this comment. I would stay if either OP or his wife WISH to stay home, that is wonderful. Being able to or having to, but not wanting to do so fulltime, is not necessarily wonderful. I would challenge many folks to think about what advice they would give if it was the husband who lost their job and was deciding whether or not to keep looking or perhaps stay home for a while after the baby was born. There is no inherent reason why a woman would want to stop working any more than a man might wish to stop working (beyond physical recovery from childbirth, which is no joke). I know so many woman who really struggle being home full-time with a baby and who are so happy to return to work when they can. Mom's who feel stuck may struggle more with the mind-numbing (even if rewarding) tasks of childcare and may not talk about it because it is a cultural taboo to do so. There are other parents who wish to stay home longer. The key really is flexibility and thinking about what the parent wants long term, then making decisions based on that. If choices should not be made based on short-term goals, as this will likely limit the long-term career prospects of women. For some reason, men's careers tend to benefit from having children (people seem to have a bias towards thinking father's are better workers), while women's do not (less likely to be hired, fewer raises, avoiding giving women the projects that allow for growth, etc.). Making choices that further hurt one's career potential is fine, as long as it is an intentional choice made to focus on one's own priorities. Having choices limited unintentionally can make someone feel stuck and resentful.
I stand corrected. If you are able to stay home with a newborn, that IS NOT a wonderful thing. Apparently.
barnaclebob
Posts: 4331
Joined: Thu Aug 09, 2012 10:54 am

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by barnaclebob »

eye.surgeon wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:16 pm
barnaclebob wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:10 pm
humblecoder wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:15 pm
BEGIN RANT:
I view pregnancy as any other temporary disability. You can hire someone today and then tomorrow find out that they need to take a month off for back surgery or cancer treatments or something else. Even in those cases, there is a chance that the person might take a leave of absence and not come back. Heck, somebody could decide to quit at a moment's notice. However, for some reason, some people view pregnancy through a different lens, which is a shame in this day and age.
END RANT :happy
Amen. If an employee taking a few months of leave causes excessive stress to their coworkers, the organization is not being run well. Leaving no margin for the human condition is not an ethical business plan.
Show me a business where an employee can disappear for a few months and no one is stressed or overworked as a result and I will show you a business that is overstaffed and inefficient.
Why is the burden of "efficiency" expected to be placed on other staff and not the shareholders? I doubt the other employees are getting a raise for the increased productivity while a coworker is out unless paid OT.
Last edited by barnaclebob on Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:24 pm, edited 1 time in total.
regularguy455
Posts: 287
Joined: Tue Jul 18, 2017 2:08 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by regularguy455 »

I have witnessed multiple pregnant women successfully find work so keep a positive mind set. It is possible and people do it all the time.

A lot of the replies seem to be from the hiring manager perspective. Frankly, I don’t think that’s helpful. Without getting into politics, I think it’s fair to say the deck is heavily stacked against pregnant women. I would suggest doing anything you can to even the tables. Remote application make this a lot easier since employers can’t see you in person.

Having a child will change your perspective on work. Having the option to quit or go back is different than finding a job with a newborn.
humblecoder
Posts: 275
Joined: Thu Aug 06, 2020 8:46 am

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by humblecoder »

eye.surgeon wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:16 pm
barnaclebob wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:10 pm
humblecoder wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:15 pm
BEGIN RANT:
I view pregnancy as any other temporary disability. You can hire someone today and then tomorrow find out that they need to take a month off for back surgery or cancer treatments or something else. Even in those cases, there is a chance that the person might take a leave of absence and not come back. Heck, somebody could decide to quit at a moment's notice. However, for some reason, some people view pregnancy through a different lens, which is a shame in this day and age.
END RANT :happy
Amen. If an employee taking a few months of leave causes excessive stress to their coworkers, the organization is not being run well. Leaving no margin for the human condition is not an ethical business plan.
Show me a business where an employee can disappear for a few months and no one is stressed or overworked as a result and I will show you a business that is overstaffed and inefficient. Does your company have staff sitting around waiting for someone to have a human condition so they can jump in? Mine does not.
I have had people take temporary leave for a variety of reasons: pregnancy, disability, extended vacation (I have many South Asian co-workers who save up their vacation time so that they can spend 2-3 weeks visiting family in their home country), COVID sickness, etc. Unless your company does not have paid vacation or sick time, hires completely healthy workers who never get sick or injured, doesn't hire women of childbearing age, only hires people who will stay with the company forever or won't quit until a replacement is hired and trained, companies need to account for this whether the owners like it or not.

You can call it "disappear for a few months", but I would call it "the reality of doing business".

Instead of working people harder to fill the gap, you could:
1. Hire temp staff to fill the gap (we did this with somebody who took FMLA leave to care for a sick parent).
2. Deliver less, which could mean that some lower priority item doesn't get done.

It is sort of like when you are a landlord, you need to account for vacancies between tenants because unless you are lucky, those vacancies are going to happen. Ignoring this in your business plan doesn't make sense.
bloom2708
Posts: 8365
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Location: Fargo, ND

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by bloom2708 »

Can you make ends meet on one income? Not counting unemployment?

What would you do to have her not work during this time?

Less house? less car?

If 1a or b is "No", then I'd say she continues actively pursuing a new career. Being open/honest about the pregnancy.

If you can easily swing it on one income, then the choice is yours.

My wife is a SAHM. Our kids are now getting older. Last 2 are 17 and 13. Still nice to have the flexibility right now.

Good luck with the decision.
"We are here to provoke thoughtfulness, not agree with you." Unknown Boglehead
Thegame14
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Joined: Mon May 07, 2018 11:53 am

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Thegame14 »

I am sure it is illegal to discriminate against a pregnant person but I dont see many companies who are willing to hire someone knowing they will be training them for a couple months and then the person is going to be on leave for 3 months and a decent chance that person ends up just saying I will just be a SAHM, so then they paid someone for 3 months with little return, had to keep the position open for another 3 months while on leave, and now 6 months later have to be at less than square one, so no one will admit it, but it will be very very very hard to find a job.
simas
Posts: 845
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2007 5:50 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by simas »

phinanciallyfit wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:08 pm
Once this practice ends, woman will likely be more forthcoming with pregnancy information, but as long as woman are regularly discriminated against for their pregnancies, they will continue to hide it and be advised to do so. I'm glad you would not discriminate against women for their pregnancies, but a pregnant candidate has no way to know if you would or would not.
at the same time I hope you do see that intentionally withholding information that would directly influence whether or not you will be doing the job you are wanting to fill (at least for few months) creates the very burn managers (men and women) describe here and just reinforces the attitude.


As a hiring manager, I would expect a common decency of candidate to inform me that position they are planning to accept they will not be doing for X weeks, months ,whatever. in US it is FLMA is too short in my opinion, however say in Ontario - hiring someone and starting to train just to be told that she would be gone for 12 months as it is her right, and may or may not be actually back (if she decided to), is what hesitation.

i have a direct report right now on her maternity leave and will do everything possible to support her while off/coming back, including partial work if that is what she desires.

I am an also an immigrant, with elderly parents elsewhere (half across the world). it is very important to me to be with them (they are frail, weak, and support system is non-existent) so I travel there and stay, for multiple weeks each year, bringing the money, repairing what I can , etc. if I have such travel planned and booked and know I am going to be gone, should I also withhold it from any potential employer just in case? Right now I don't , and every employer I dealt with was very accommodating and understanding. This is not law protected or anything. And employers that did not like it, well to me it was a huge red flag that this may not be an employer I will like working for (without any expectations).

I believe you actually work with people, and once you burn them (by direct lie or lie of omission), you burn them and that trust is destroyed. Never works longer term, imho.

to the OP, do what your wife wants. unless you absolutely starving and need the money to eat, I would just let her avoid it altogether. pregnancy is hard enough and stressful enough to add job search into the mix. have your child, welcome him/her, adjust afterwards (as father of two), try to enjoy the journey. that time will never be back, money/employment/etc could all wait.
Last edited by simas on Wed Jan 13, 2021 5:00 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Topic Author
Jags4186
Posts: 5355
Joined: Wed Jun 18, 2014 7:12 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Jags4186 »

Thanks for all of the replies.

The "let mom stay home" replies are not helpful. We are trying to find the best path forward to finding a new job for my wife. The question really is, at what point do we concede looking for work before the birth vs after birth. Obviously now is not the time to stop, but we'd definitely like to continue with the initial plan of her staying home for 6 months post birth. Although there are not many now, there used to be a ton of contract jobs (3 months, 6 months, etc.) available which could be a nice part time/stay at home bridge work until she's ready to go back to a regular 9-5 gig. That is her goal.
simas
Posts: 845
Joined: Wed Apr 04, 2007 5:50 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by simas »

Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 5:00 pm Thanks for all of the replies.

The "let mom stay home" replies are not helpful. We are trying to find the best path forward to finding a new job for my wife. The question really is, at what point do we concede looking for work before the birth vs after birth. Obviously now is not the time to stop, but we'd definitely like to continue with the initial plan of her staying home for 6 months post birth. Although there are not many now, there used to be a ton of contract jobs (3 months, 6 months, etc.) available which could be a nice part time/stay at home bridge work until she's ready to go back to a regular 9-5 gig. That is her goal.
If that is her desire, keep looking - that is all there is to it. It is the same pregnancy or not. apply, interview, work through their process, get to the offer and once there you can discuss your plans, etc. as part of negotiation. until there is an offer on the table, very little to negotiate.

if you wish, replace the world pregnancy with situation of medical surgery. if I knew I have a surgery on my back in 6 months that would take me 3-4 months to recover (at least), should I be disclosing it now? well, if you received an offer, you may mention it. until you get an offer, where isnt anything to mention.
SR II
Posts: 264
Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2014 7:37 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by SR II »

Before retiring, I worked for 40 years in an industry that would now be called a "gig job". I would work on a project until it was completed, then get laid off and look for the next project.

One of those times, my husband (who had been laid off in the same industry) was attending school in an accelerated program to change careers and get a teaching credential, to have a more stable job.

Just a few weeks before the project I was working on was completed, I got a call and offered a job out of the blue. An old boss had recommended me. Normally, a great thing! When I talked to the guy offering the job, I told him I wasn't sure exactly when I would be done with my then current project, but it would be in roughly three to four weeks. Then, to be completely open and honest, I mention I was six and a half months pregnant, but planned on returning to work right after my child was born because I was the sole bread-winner while my husband was in school.

He told me everything was all perfectly fine, that I was hired and to give him a call as soon as I had a definite layoff date.

Fast forward two weeks, I got my 40-hour notice and called to inform him I would be available in a week.

That was when he told me they hired someone else. WHAT??????

Luckily, I landed another job and started right away after the layoff. I worked there until I went into labor, took eight weeks off (due to C-section) and went right back after that.

So, OP, stay open and don't over think this. Hard to say what will happen, especially with a first child. You never know what will happen during this pregnancy, how the birth will go, how "mom" will feel about going back to work afterwards, etc. There are too many scenarios to know how things will play out.
Normchad
Posts: 1785
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2011 7:20 am

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Normchad »

OP mentions a desire for the mom to stay home for six months after the birth.

Note that FMLA only covers 12 weeks. I also believe that in most cases you must be employed for 12 months to be eligible for FMLA protections. So an employer may be within their rights to terminate when she stops coming to work.their may however be state regulations which provide some protections.
Helo80
Posts: 1913
Joined: Sat Apr 29, 2017 8:47 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Helo80 »

SR II wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 6:29 pm He told me everything was all perfectly fine, that I was hired and to give him a call as soon as I had a definite layoff date.

Fast forward two weeks, I got my 40-hour notice and called to inform him I would be available in a week.

That was when he told me they hired someone else. WHAT??????

Not a lawyer here, but I would imagine any company would much prefer a Hiring Manager be totally cool with you mentioning your pregnancy and having the manager react that way versus reacting by hemming and hawing and being unsure if they could move forward with your candidacy. Sad, but true.
getthatmarshmallow
Posts: 744
Joined: Mon Dec 04, 2017 9:43 am

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by getthatmarshmallow »

A good friend landed a good job (industrial engineering) while seven months pregnant; she'd been laid off just as they conceived. She worked until delivery, took parental leave, and is still employed with the same place nearly four years later. She was upfront with HR (not that it wasn't obvious.)

This is a decision for you and your wife, but you're not wrong that the longer she's out of the work force, the harder it is to get back in. If she wants to work, keep looking; turn down offers, not opportunities.
H-Town
Posts: 3188
Joined: Sun Feb 26, 2017 2:08 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by H-Town »

Jags4186 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 5:00 pm Thanks for all of the replies.

The "let mom stay home" replies are not helpful. We are trying to find the best path forward to finding a new job for my wife. The question really is, at what point do we concede looking for work before the birth vs after birth. Obviously now is not the time to stop, but we'd definitely like to continue with the initial plan of her staying home for 6 months post birth. Although there are not many now, there used to be a ton of contract jobs (3 months, 6 months, etc.) available which could be a nice part time/stay at home bridge work until she's ready to go back to a regular 9-5 gig. That is her goal.
She seems to know her goal, and what she wanted.

In your OP, you mentioned that "I'm not sure what to do". Well, just be there for her. You're her partner. Back her up. Ask her how can you help her, listen to what she says carefully, and then help her.

Many young families turn from 2 income into 1 income. It's not the end of the world. Open up the conversation about long term financial goals with your wife when the time is right. Maybe after childbirth?
EddyB
Posts: 1508
Joined: Fri May 24, 2013 3:43 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by EddyB »

eye.surgeon wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:16 pm
barnaclebob wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:10 pm
humblecoder wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:15 pm
BEGIN RANT:
I view pregnancy as any other temporary disability. You can hire someone today and then tomorrow find out that they need to take a month off for back surgery or cancer treatments or something else. Even in those cases, there is a chance that the person might take a leave of absence and not come back. Heck, somebody could decide to quit at a moment's notice. However, for some reason, some people view pregnancy through a different lens, which is a shame in this day and age.
END RANT :happy
Amen. If an employee taking a few months of leave causes excessive stress to their coworkers, the organization is not being run well. Leaving no margin for the human condition is not an ethical business plan.
Show me a business where an employee can disappear for a few months and no one is stressed or overworked as a result and I will show you a business that is overstaffed and inefficient. Does your company have staff sitting around waiting for someone to have a human condition so they can jump in? Mine does not.
Specific absences may be unpredictable, but the fact that absences will arise at some point is foreseeable. Not planning for that reflects poorly on management.
pkempfur
Posts: 36
Joined: Thu Jan 17, 2013 4:25 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by pkempfur »

eye.surgeon wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:16 pm
barnaclebob wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:10 pm
humblecoder wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:15 pm
BEGIN RANT:
I view pregnancy as any other temporary disability. You can hire someone today and then tomorrow find out that they need to take a month off for back surgery or cancer treatments or something else. Even in those cases, there is a chance that the person might take a leave of absence and not come back. Heck, somebody could decide to quit at a moment's notice. However, for some reason, some people view pregnancy through a different lens, which is a shame in this day and age.
END RANT :happy
Amen. If an employee taking a few months of leave causes excessive stress to their coworkers, the organization is not being run well. Leaving no margin for the human condition is not an ethical business plan.
Show me a business where an employee can disappear for a few months and no one is stressed or overworked as a result and I will show you a business that is overstaffed and inefficient. Does your company have staff sitting around waiting for someone to have a human condition so they can jump in? Mine does not.
Sorry, I have to play the devil's advocate here if only to use a similar tone :)

Any business that cannot run when (and does not plan for) a small fraction of its employees are unavailable is both poorly managed and most likely a sweatshop.
Maverick3320
Posts: 661
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 2:59 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Maverick3320 »

phinanciallyfit wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:08 pm
wilked wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:20 pm


I wouldn't put "Pregnant!" on my resume but I also wouldn't conceal it until I had a written offer. Once we got down to final discussions, if I were selected, I would come clean / lay the cards on the table. As a hiring manager it would not stop me from hiring the right candidate. It may stop others but I also think to conceal it and then reveal it after a signed offer is in place starts things on the wrong foot and I would likely resent that.


In the field I am in (highly educated and generally career driven folks), men tend to give similar advice... share the info early because it gives HR and potential supervisors time to work with you. And I agree that from that stand point it is far easier to begin this conversation early. But women, tend to give different advice, because time and time again they find that revealing a pregnancy before a written offer tends to result in sudden 'loss of funding' for the position at an alarming rate. I am in an online group with over 10K mothers in my field and this is a question that comes up frequently.

Once this practice ends, woman will likely be more forthcoming with pregnancy information, but as long as woman are regularly discriminated against for their pregnancies, they will continue to hide it and be advised to do so. I'm glad you would not discriminate against women for their pregnancies, but a pregnant candidate has no way to know if you would or would not.
[/quote]

Like other posters, I have been on the other side of this equation: a woman doesn't disclose all the information, and then others suffer (heavily) for it. In one circumstance, a pregnancy that wasn't disclosed resulted in another pregnant employee picking up the slack.

Gender/sex politics aside, when in doubt, the best policy is honesty. Be forthright with a future employer. I'll go to the ends of the earth to support an honest employee, but if you lie or hide information up front, it's very difficult to build that trust back up. That lack of trust leads to less career opportunities for the employee and a degraded work environment for everyone. That's not just about pregnancy, it's about anything.

I understand that you view this issue from one side of the aisle, but also understand that these practices are likely to end much sooner when supervisors are burned less often. There is justified hesitation on both sides.
Maverick3320
Posts: 661
Joined: Tue May 12, 2015 2:59 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Maverick3320 »

pkempfur wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:47 am
eye.surgeon wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:16 pm
barnaclebob wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:10 pm
humblecoder wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:15 pm
BEGIN RANT:
I view pregnancy as any other temporary disability. You can hire someone today and then tomorrow find out that they need to take a month off for back surgery or cancer treatments or something else. Even in those cases, there is a chance that the person might take a leave of absence and not come back. Heck, somebody could decide to quit at a moment's notice. However, for some reason, some people view pregnancy through a different lens, which is a shame in this day and age.
END RANT :happy
Amen. If an employee taking a few months of leave causes excessive stress to their coworkers, the organization is not being run well. Leaving no margin for the human condition is not an ethical business plan.
Show me a business where an employee can disappear for a few months and no one is stressed or overworked as a result and I will show you a business that is overstaffed and inefficient. Does your company have staff sitting around waiting for someone to have a human condition so they can jump in? Mine does not.
Sorry, I have to play the devil's advocate here if only to use a similar tone :)

Any business that cannot run when (and does not plan for) a small fraction of its employees are unavailable is both poorly managed and most likely a sweatshop.
I work for a government agency. Our (very limited) budget is given to us by Congress. We are not allowed to "save" money for the future; if we don't spend our very limited funds, the money is taken back. It is very difficult for us to fiscally plan for a pregnant employee (or future applicant). How do you suggest that we plan for it? Ask for an additional 10% funding next year (in essence, every year) in case it happens so we can hire temporary help? Just apologize to the taxpayer for the degraded service? Or should we force our employees - many of whom have a union mandated 40 hour work week - to work more hours to cover down?
bloom2708
Posts: 8365
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 2:08 pm
Location: Fargo, ND

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by bloom2708 »

pkempfur wrote: Thu Jan 14, 2021 12:47 am Sorry, I have to play the devil's advocate here if only to use a similar tone :)

Any business that cannot run when (and does not plan for) a small fraction of its employees are unavailable is both poorly managed and most likely a sweatshop.
At my company, the dad/spouse gets 12 weeks off for each kid. Every employee is stuffed to the brim with work.

I had to do 2 jobs for 12 weeks earlier this year while my co-worker took 12 weeks off during the busiest time of the year. It about killt me. But I survived, with less hair and more of it gray. :D

Kids are a wonder, we have 3 fine wonders.

You can't say that maternity/paternity leave doesn't cause issues. Even the biggest companies can't/don't hire replacement workers for 12 or 24 weeks. The others left behind cover and stumble through. Or work just doesn't get done.

Some companies give 1 year off for maternity. I hope for 1 year they hire someone to replace the person.

Tough subject.
"We are here to provoke thoughtfulness, not agree with you." Unknown Boglehead
BlueCable
Posts: 373
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2016 9:20 am

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by BlueCable »

Does she need to continue looking for work to maintain unemployment benefits?
il0kin
Posts: 326
Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2018 8:19 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by il0kin »

If she’s considering a career change, now would be the time to get into school and get retrained, while being a SAHM while in school. I have known several friends who retrained to be teachers or nurses during their kids 0-3 ages and then returned to the workforce part time or full time. It’s a win win for saving on daycare $ while retraining.

No harm in continuing to apply places if she’s not interested in a career change. What’s the worst that happens? My wife interviewed while pregnant and received a job offer. 6 years later she’s still with the company and everyone is happy.
KLM0730
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2020 6:07 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by KLM0730 »

I’m mostly a lurker but I thought I would weigh in as someone who is 6 months pregnant and starting a new job next week 😉! I also am in HR so have a solid understanding of the laws and then the realities.

Anecdotally, I work in a very traditional older industry, with mostly male leadership. I was not unemployed but I did have to navigate the if when how of disclosing my pregnancy for this role. I was worried that if I disclosed the opportunity would fall through for some “other reason”. To my surprise it didn’t, and I’m grateful. Now I do 100% think that some of them are worried I won’t come back or will have issues with the travel requirements! I’m not, this is my career and I have planned for this. I took the time to address what I felt like were any concerns they may have but didn’t want to directly express. Like other posters have said, this is unfortunately a common phenomenon, so to flippantly disregard it because it “shouldn’t matter” didn’t feel like the right strategy. For myself I decided transparency was best and I believe it’s conveys respect to a potential new employer. The absence time impacts business planning.

My suggestion is to disclose but to wait until the ideal time during the interview process. This would be sometime after they decide they love her skill set and think she’d be a great fit but before they offer it to her so they don’t feel like they were “gotcha’d”. I disclosed mine after I was invited for a second round interview and personally called who would be my boss/hiring manager.

Even if she doesn’t land a role, if she’s feeling good, in her shoes I would keep chasing after it and interviewing. It gives her a chance to build relationships, get exposed to new and different firms. I was their number 1 for a role I interviewed for 6 months ago, but they ended up giving to an internal. It all worked out and the relationship built was valuable six months later. This isn’t uncommon.

Other people are probably right to mention that she may experience a shift in what type of role or work she wants after your child comes. However, I would proceed with caution here. What she thinks she may want right after your baby is born versus six or nine months later when life has settled may be drastically different. I realize she may not be working now but I follow a womens career/working moms group that advocates for waiting a decent amount of time after returning to work before making any desicions since they can impact long term horizons and earning potential so severely! That intense emotional tug at 12-13 weeks is just something to be aware of and may not be reflective of true long term desires.

But in the end if you can afford to pivot to a different path and have the flexibility in your goals to do so, then that can be a wonderful change for her if she wants that! The flexibility to not work right now could be a big positive.

Plus no decision has to be forever!

Best of luck!
KLM0730
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Nov 07, 2020 6:07 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by KLM0730 »

Sorry OP, I don’t feel I answered your additional questions. I am not sure that I would recommend she stop applying for any roles at a certain cut off, only because it’s still valuable to form those relationships. I would have her use discretion, if it’s a firm or role shes really interested in after her 6 or 7 month, I would still apply but ask when they are looking to fill by. share with the recruiter or hiring manager “realistically I won’t be available to work until (say three months after due date) however i am very interested in your organization and team in the long run. Not knowing how that fits in with your needs now, would it be possible to still interview or informally meet x y or z” worse they can do is pass or put her resume in the drawer. Best thing they can do is realize good talent is hard to come by and it’s worth a meet and greet regardless. This can get her in the door even if the timing is wrong and be to her benefit later.

To fill an open professional role usually takes 45-90 days. Often longer if the skill set is hard to come by. Onboarding takes anywhere from 2 weeks to 1 month typically. So you can kind of back into when it may not be worth the effort for a period of time and to hunker down and focus on arrival of baby. The first month or two after kiddo is here is likely to be a blur and I would be more inclined to abandon serious efforts during that period of time. I say that and there is plenty of time to scroll the open positions while your up at 2 am feeding, but you and her may both want to focus on your mental energy on surviving and thriving with the new baby without that pressure of interviews and job hunt. Maybe agree to start looking seriously again when baby is around 4 months.

Covid combined with a parenthood transition is also a perfectly reasonable explanation for a longer gap in employment. This may not be as detrimental as you are worried about it being. She can address in cover letters. I know it wouldn’t phase me if I was recruiting. Longer gaps (2+ years) is when I would let that cause any stress!
Werty
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Jul 07, 2020 9:39 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Werty »

Thegame14 wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 4:56 pm I am sure it is illegal to discriminate against a pregnant person but I dont see many companies who are willing to hire someone knowing they will be training them for a couple months and then the person is going to be on leave for 3 months and a decent chance that person ends up just saying I will just be a SAHM, so then they paid someone for 3 months with little return, had to keep the position open for another 3 months while on leave, and now 6 months later have to be at less than square one, so no one will admit it, but it will be very very very hard to find a job.
How often is it really that women who intend to return all of a sudden decide they will just become a SAHM? I'm sure it happens occasionally, but I've not seen it in my professional experience. Saying stuff like that just builds biases against women and infantilizes their ability to know what they want. Basically being openly sexist.
Katietsu
Posts: 4316
Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2013 1:48 am

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Katietsu »

I am going to think outside the box. Any chance her old company might be interested in hiring her back in the fall? It seems that it might coincide well with their business picking back up if she still has good relationships with the old company.
Monsterflockster
Posts: 524
Joined: Thu Nov 21, 2019 12:03 am

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by Monsterflockster »

Not much advice other than wishing you luck. My wife was laid off when her company found out she was pregnant. Just as hard to find a job with a child at home.

She moved from a global semiconductor and even landed a part time job for the local government once the kids were in school.

Best of luck to you... hope it works out.
sciliz
Posts: 78
Joined: Thu Feb 19, 2015 12:21 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by sciliz »

eye.surgeon wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:16 pm
barnaclebob wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 3:10 pm
humblecoder wrote: Wed Jan 13, 2021 1:15 pm
BEGIN RANT:
I view pregnancy as any other temporary disability. You can hire someone today and then tomorrow find out that they need to take a month off for back surgery or cancer treatments or something else. Even in those cases, there is a chance that the person might take a leave of absence and not come back. Heck, somebody could decide to quit at a moment's notice. However, for some reason, some people view pregnancy through a different lens, which is a shame in this day and age.
END RANT :happy
Amen. If an employee taking a few months of leave causes excessive stress to their coworkers, the organization is not being run well. Leaving no margin for the human condition is not an ethical business plan.
Show me a business where an employee can disappear for a few months and no one is stressed or overworked as a result and I will show you a business that is overstaffed and inefficient. Does your company have staff sitting around waiting for someone to have a human condition so they can jump in? Mine does not.
Your company should probably have staff who are not so tapped out they cannot cover for a coworker. We are in a pandemic, about 7% of the US population has gotten Covid, far more than are pregnant in any equivalent time period (on average those people are probably out for shorter periods, but there is overlap).
I wouldn't run a household without a 6 month emergency fund, and I worry about businesses without solid human condition contingency plans.

If you are currently working for an emergency room that cares for Covid patients everyone you work with is just tapped out beyond belief and stressed, I don't judge your business for not having slack. Educated and proficient healthcare workers cannot be magically willed into existence, after all. And very small companies will always have less slack than very large companies. But really, the idea that it is a universal sign of horrific waste to be able to manage parental leaves is poppycock.
DoubleComma
Posts: 166
Joined: Sun Aug 23, 2020 2:23 pm

Re: Job hunting while pregnant

Post by DoubleComma »

I love all these responses on how a company is staffed. To me it rings a lot like having your cake and eating it two.

I run a several hundred million $ division of a multi-billion $ public company. If my fellow leaders and I ran our respective divisions with the excess headcount you suggest it would have a material impact on our quarterly results and impact shareholder value. It would not take to many market making companies to do this and really impact the global equity market and likely invite a competitor to enter the market with a more aggressive staffing model and quite possibly put thousands of others out of work as we attempt to respond.

So like it or not, a companies exclusive role is to generate profit. A manger is a fiduciary of that company.

Isn’t the performance of these businesses why we all come to this site to begin with?

So the OP and his wife have been giving the opinions and advise they asked for. It’s up to them to make the decision that works for them. Mangers like I, other mothers, HR professional etc are just providing perspective.

Don’t like how companies are ran in today’s world, go start your own.
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