Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

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SGM
Posts: 3091
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 4:46 am

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by SGM »

Retired 6 years. I keep my license,journals and society membership
I let Board certification lapse.

Until the virus I attended grand rounds at the local hospital for the presentations and seeing former colleagues.
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gasdoc
Posts: 1993
Joined: Mon Nov 03, 2014 8:26 am

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by gasdoc »

Retirement Nerd wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 1:56 pm
gasdoc wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 9:56 am
Retirement Nerd wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:00 am
Tattarrattat wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 7:36 pm Would be interested to hear from physicians who retired at younger ages, less than 60, about the emotional impact of losing the MD identity after so many years preparing for and living that identity. Seems like so many MDs can't let go of that.
Retired from medicine 11 months ago at age 59. I made arrangements to teach Anatomy & Physiology part time at the local University near my retirement home. Between golf, exercising regularly and sharing my clinical experience with these future health professionals I have never been happier.
:sharebeer
Wow. I might have to look into that. Can you expand on that? Was it a difficult transition?

gasdoc
I was fortunate that a retired MD at my golf club was already teaching at the University. He was an enormous help making the connection with the Dept Chairman. I always enjoyed teaching residents and new nursing staff in my office so I knew it was something I was going to like in retirement. Seeing the lights go on when I relate a clinical experience from my career with some physiology concept we a studying makes it a truly rewarding experience. Experimenting with different ways to get present the information keeps my head in the game which obviously is important in retirement.
Retirement Nerd, thanks. That really sounds like fun. I am guessing you had to get some sort of accreditation?

gasdoc
am
Posts: 3561
Joined: Sun Sep 30, 2007 9:55 am

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by am »

Not retired but thinking of it in 5-10 yrs. Worried that I may be bored and lose my identity and sense of purpose. Wondering if any retired physicians regret not going part time instead? Was the transition to retired life easy and did it make you wonder why you didn’t do it earlier?
penumbra
Posts: 311
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2007 2:42 am

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by penumbra »

Interesting questions. Fully retired about 4 years. Just wouldn't think about giving up my license. I suppose some of it is because I enjoyed being a doc, and worked so hard to get there. It's still part of my identity, although I have no medical participation to speak of. Being able to renew prescriptions for myself and family, order lab tests, and not have to bother my or my wife's physicians or their office staff for stuff I know they want on a repeating basis is immensely time saving. I keep up with CME online; journals as well. My 2 board certifications don't expire. I did let the DEA go; I won't mess with controlled meds. It's not burdensome to me. I'm in California; the expense comes to approx 0.0015% of net worth/yr. About the same as a few nice dinners. I'd rather have the license. No plans to give it up. But then, who knows?
Retirement Nerd
Posts: 24
Joined: Tue Apr 16, 2019 3:01 pm

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by Retirement Nerd »

gasdoc wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:20 pm
Retirement Nerd wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 1:56 pm
gasdoc wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 9:56 am
Retirement Nerd wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:00 am
Tattarrattat wrote: Fri Sep 25, 2020 7:36 pm Would be interested to hear from physicians who retired at younger ages, less than 60, about the emotional impact of losing the MD identity after so many years preparing for and living that identity. Seems like so many MDs can't let go of that.
Retired from medicine 11 months ago at age 59. I made arrangements to teach Anatomy & Physiology part time at the local University near my retirement home. Between golf, exercising regularly and sharing my clinical experience with these future health professionals I have never been happier.
:sharebeer
Wow. I might have to look into that. Can you expand on that? Was it a difficult transition?

gasdoc
I was fortunate that a retired MD at my golf club was already teaching at the University. He was an enormous help making the connection with the Dept Chairman. I always enjoyed teaching residents and new nursing staff in my office so I knew it was something I was going to like in retirement. Seeing the lights go on when I relate a clinical experience from my career with some physiology concept we a studying makes it a truly rewarding experience. Experimenting with different ways to get present the information keeps my head in the game which obviously is important in retirement.
Retirement Nerd, thanks. That really sounds like fun. I am guessing you had to get some sort of accreditation?

gasdoc
Not really. The usual transcript checks froM college and medical school as well as a background check. To me it’s a win-win. I get what I need and the University gets MD’s teaching undergraduates and professional students.
Topic Author
is50xenough
Posts: 135
Joined: Sat Jul 28, 2018 1:37 pm

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by is50xenough »

Retirement Nerd wrote: Sun Sep 27, 2020 2:00 pm
gasdoc wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:20 pm
Retirement Nerd wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 1:56 pm
gasdoc wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 9:56 am
Retirement Nerd wrote: Sat Sep 26, 2020 6:00 am

Retired from medicine 11 months ago at age 59. I made arrangements to teach Anatomy & Physiology part time at the local University near my retirement home. Between golf, exercising regularly and sharing my clinical experience with these future health professionals I have never been happier.
:sharebeer
Wow. I might have to look into that. Can you expand on that? Was it a difficult transition?

gasdoc
I was fortunate that a retired MD at my golf club was already teaching at the University. He was an enormous help making the connection with the Dept Chairman. I always enjoyed teaching residents and new nursing staff in my office so I knew it was something I was going to like in retirement. Seeing the lights go on when I relate a clinical experience from my career with some physiology concept we a studying makes it a truly rewarding experience. Experimenting with different ways to get present the information keeps my head in the game which obviously is important in retirement.
Retirement Nerd, thanks. That really sounds like fun. I am guessing you had to get some sort of accreditation?

gasdoc
Not really. The usual transcript checks froM college and medical school as well as a background check. To me it’s a win-win. I get what I need and the University gets MD’s teaching undergraduates and professional students.
I would presume that the University might be amenable to having an email account and maybe access to Office and even Adobe. Could be added bonus for those BHers who are looking for cheap Office
hvaclorax
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 6:01 pm

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by hvaclorax »

Retired from Family Practice in 2015. Let everything lapse as I did not wish to go back to practice. An MD colleague agreed with my view that medical knowledge declines rapidly when one stops seeing patients and I felt younger providers could take care of my patients and staff so why not just let it go. Yes I have friends who kept their medical license 10 years or more but I think they are fooling no one. Ego I suppose. BTW, I am enjoying my volunteer work as a case tracer for my county public health department as I again can talk to patients.
reimann
Posts: 64
Joined: Thu Mar 30, 2017 9:31 pm

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by reimann »

Hi,
Retired Gen Surg end of 2019 at age 61. I was in a regional referral center with a busy practice and frequently on call. Could not take the call, abuse, ungrateful patients, and anxiety. I believe I had PTSD. Now working month to month taking relatively easy call in a small rural hospital that has a 'mother ship' for referrals. I work five 24 hour shifts/month and am appreciated and valued.

So of course I am keeping up my license etc for now. The only subscription I get is "Selected Readings" which fulfills my CME and keeps me up to date.
Rajsx
Posts: 554
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 10:07 pm
Location: Florida

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by Rajsx »

Interesting thread, reading the different routes Docs took after retirement.

Looking back, I was burnt out managing a solo, office only, Cardiology practice. I could not round in the hospital due to a weak leg, competition was getting severe & the practice was dwindling due to my non availability at the hospital. I was practicing part time while on disability income(Road Accident), when I quit in 2015 at age 59.
When my disability income was needed to pay the office overheads I finally quit a 25yr solo practice. I let the Malpractice, DEA, Board Re certifications & license lapse.

After some travelling, gardening & relaxing with friends & family, I got bored at home & got the License reinstated from the inactive retired status & presently volunteer once a week in a primary care free clinic.,

I pay $350 for Fl License & although I have gone for a couple of conferences, I got the required 40 CMEs this time around during Covid, free of cost on line. I have refused offers of private practice part time jobs as there is no need/want for money but I do want to continue volunteering as that fills a need for some satisfaction, & gives me some thing to do. I did not have many hobbies while I worked & find it difficult to reinvent myself now.
We do not stop laughing because we grow old, we grow old because we stop laughing !!
mhalley
Posts: 8517
Joined: Tue Nov 20, 2007 6:02 am

Re: Retired physicians (but others ok too. ;))

Post by mhalley »

I mostly wrote rx for my wife who is a horrible patient and hated going to the dr. We are in the process of divorce right now, so that need is going away so will most likely not renew next renewal date.
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