Our company just closed our regional office permanently

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mathwhiz
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Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by mathwhiz » Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:54 pm

We are now all 100% remote work from home employees. I'm happy to have my job but a little anxious about how this set up will play out long term for the organization and my career. I think promotion options will now be further consolidated in the home office where people will still meet and congregate and new job listings will be hoarded. All the new homeless virtual employees will be left with scraps and probably let go through attrition as the years pass.

This all happened so fast. The bean counters saw productivity has not declined with a 100% work from home model and shedding expensive real estate looks very attractive right now. The old saying..."let no crisis go to waste." I'm of course happy I still have a job and feel good in the short term but the medium to long term looks very cloudy. I'm not sure how being a 100% work from home employee will affect my career. Has anyone here had this experience? Are promotions and upward mobility severely limited?

On a macro scale, this could have a devastating impact in expensive metro areas as companies look to move out into the suburbs where people drive and don't use public transit or simply close the regional offices all together. I think this is going to be a trend. Wall Street will demand it.

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arcticpineapplecorp.
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by arcticpineapplecorp. » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:03 pm

yeah, i heard a podcast a few weeks ago (can't remember which, maybe econtalk with Russ Roberts interviewing Tyler Cowen?) and they talked about the genie out of the bottle, but from their perspective it was the employers that wouldn't like it and the employees would be fighting for it (like, why continue commuting an hour to work when I can work from home)??

the upside is, you could live anywhere, not within commuting distance. I have a friend who works/lives in PA but his company is based in Alaska. The only downside is he works later into the night (like 8pm) because of the time difference.

I've thought this could be very disruptive for employment over the long run. If the work can be done remotely, what's to say it can't be offshored to a cheaper labor force in another country at a favorable exchange rate?

scary times.
Last edited by arcticpineapplecorp. on Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:07 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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mw1739
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by mw1739 » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:05 pm

Yes my company has been doing the same for the last 2 years. Many employees at my company travel often so it made little sense for desks to sit empty 50-75% of the time. Even in the larger regional offices we’ve been consolidating locations and reducing floor space. It doesn’t seem to hurt promotion opportunity at least at my company because so many jobs can be done remotely that it doesn’t matter where you sit.

strafe
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by strafe » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:06 pm

Count your blessings that you’re still employed.

The bigger the shift toward virtual work, the less likely your concerns will be realized. Plenty of people already work remotely with successful careers. Too early to be catastrophizing.

Regarding your last point, I think you’re right. If people are no longer forced by their jobs to live in hyper-urbanized areas, they will find more pleasant (and safer) places to live.

adamthesmythe
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by adamthesmythe » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:14 pm

Back when the working at home employee was rare, I think there was more risk to working at home.

Now- I'm not so sure. It's going to cost employers more to have an on-site employee than before, what with (at least for the near term) more space per employee and maybe cost of PPE, temperature monitoring, etc.

I suspect there will be a lot less in-person interaction than before, again, at least for a while.

I for one applaud the likely demise of cubicle farms and shared desks.

BV3273
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by BV3273 » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:16 pm

mathwhiz wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:54 pm
We are now all 100% remote work from home employees. I'm happy to have my job but a little anxious about how this set up will play out long term for the organization and my career. I think promotion options will now be further consolidated in the home office where people will still meet and congregate and new job listings will be hoarded. All the new homeless virtual employees will be left with scraps and probably let go through attrition as the years pass.

This all happened so fast. The bean counters saw productivity has not declined with a 100% work from home model and shedding expensive real estate looks very attractive right now. The old saying..."let no crisis go to waste." I'm of course happy I still have a job and feel good in the short term but the medium to long term looks very cloudy. I'm not sure how being a 100% work from home employee will affect my career. Has anyone here had this experience? Are promotions and upward mobility severely limited?

On a macro scale, this could have a devastating impact in expensive metro areas as companies look to move out into the suburbs where people drive and don't use public transit or simply close the regional offices all together. I think this is going to be a trend. Wall Street will demand it.
I think more companies will start moving to WFH for most employees. The cost savings are huge and if productivity is not hindered I don’t see much of an issue.

McGilicutty
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by McGilicutty » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:24 pm

The company I worked for announced today that we would be working from home next month even though our state is opening back up for business. So management is warming up to WFH more than I expected. Hopefully we'll go full-time WFH in the future too.

As for promotions, what stage of your career are you in? Did your company typically promote from within? I'm in the latter stage of my career and basically just looking to hold onto the job I have until I retire in a few years, but earlier in my career the best way to get a promotion or a significant pay rise was by switching companies. Most of my peers seemed to have the same experiences. Relying on the current company you work for to give you a promotion has never worked well in my experience regardless of whether you work from home or not.

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Kenkat
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by Kenkat » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:29 pm

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:03 pm
I've thought this could be very disruptive for employment over the long run. If the work can be done remotely, what's to say it can't be offshored to a cheaper labor force in another country at a favorable exchange rate?
Always a good reason to try to keep your skills unique and/or specialized and not a commodity. For example, Industry or company knowledge PLUS technical skills is much harder to replace.

Scatterbrain
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by Scatterbrain » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:34 pm

I’m interested to see how this affects wages and urbanization in the long run. When employers learn they don’t necessarily need local talent it could easily snowball into more offshoring and contract work.

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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by Olemiss540 » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:35 pm

It sure sounds like you are hunting/focused on the negatives of this outcome, why not ask yourself how this could be a positive?

1.) If you do not get promoted due to not being in your HQ, what are the chances you would have been promoted by being at a regional office space?

2.) Possibly the additional office time due to lack of worthless face to face meetings and interactions will make you much more productive and more likely to be promoted.

3.) Possibly this paradigm shift will result in improved work life balance which may be more important than climbing the corporate ladder.
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by abuss368 » Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:37 pm

I think a shift may be underway that the could be long term in nature for the commercial office sector.
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by go_mets » Wed Apr 29, 2020 8:20 pm

Scatterbrain wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:34 pm
I’m interested to see how this affects wages and urbanization in the long run. When employers learn they don’t necessarily need local talent it could easily snowball into more offshoring and contract work.
And hopes of onshoring back manufacturing may also be a pipedream.
Keep facilities overseas and let the other countries worry about it.

.

ARoseByAnyOtherName
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by ARoseByAnyOtherName » Wed Apr 29, 2020 9:10 pm

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:03 pm

I've thought this could be very disruptive for employment over the long run. If the work can be done remotely, what's to say it can't be offshored to a cheaper labor force in another country at a favorable exchange rate?
The time difference, for one.

You ever experience how slow things move when you’re working with people who are 12 hours different from you?

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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by MishkaWorries » Wed Apr 29, 2020 9:57 pm

mathwhiz wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 6:54 pm

I think more companies will start moving to WFH for most employees. The cost savings are huge and if productivity is not hindered I don’t see much of an issue.
Just wait until companies decide they can save money on expensive real estate and money on expensive personnel and benefits.

Why not outsource the white collar jobs to India and Philippines? Accountants, lawyers, engineers, programmers (the few remaining US employees), HR, etc, etc will join their blue collar citizens on the never to end unemployment line.
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HomerJ
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by HomerJ » Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:22 pm

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:03 pm
yeah, i heard a podcast a few weeks ago (can't remember which, maybe econtalk with Russ Roberts interviewing Tyler Cowen?) and they talked about the genie out of the bottle, but from their perspective it was the employers that wouldn't like it and the employees would be fighting for it (like, why continue commuting an hour to work when I can work from home)??

the upside is, you could live anywhere, not within commuting distance. I have a friend who works/lives in PA but his company is based in Alaska. The only downside is he works later into the night (like 8pm) because of the time difference.

I've thought this could be very disruptive for employment over the long run. If the work can be done remotely, what's to say it can't be offshored to a cheaper labor force in another country at a favorable exchange rate?

scary times.
Time difference for one...
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by go_mets » Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:28 pm

ARoseByAnyOtherName wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 9:10 pm
arcticpineapplecorp. wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:03 pm

I've thought this could be very disruptive for employment over the long run. If the work can be done remotely, what's to say it can't be offshored to a cheaper labor force in another country at a favorable exchange rate?
The time difference, for one.

You ever experience how slow things move when you’re working with people who are 12 hours different from you?
Do the CEOs care about the time difference now?
Manufacturing is done in China and programming is done in India.

What speaks loudest is $ and that will override "slowness".
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CurlyDave
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by CurlyDave » Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:30 pm

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:03 pm

...I've thought this could be very disruptive for employment over the long run. If the work can be done remotely, what's to say it can't be offshored to a cheaper labor force in another country at a favorable exchange rate?...
One issue that will keep jobs in the US is simply language. It is more difficult to fully understand someone on the phone than in person because there are no visual clues. Add in English spoken in a foreign accent, or even a foreign manner and it is even harder.

Back when I worked at megacorp when they bought computers for the entire workforce, one of the negotiating points was that all telephone support was going to be done by native English speakers based in the US. OTOH if an individual bought one of the same computers, their support was based in India.

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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by HawkeyePierce » Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:32 pm

go_mets wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:28 pm
Manufacturing is done in China and programming is done in India.
The 1.3 million software developers in the US probably disagree with that statement. :!:

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/Computer-and-In ... lopers.htm

SpaceMonkey
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by SpaceMonkey » Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:39 pm

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:03 pm
yeah, i heard a podcast a few weeks ago (can't remember which, maybe econtalk with Russ Roberts interviewing Tyler Cowen?) and they talked about the genie out of the bottle, but from their perspective it was the employers that wouldn't like it and the employees would be fighting for it (like, why continue commuting an hour to work when I can work from home)??
I absolutely hate working from home and I don't think I'm the only one. I don't know what the net result will be, but I don't think a dramatic shift toward WFH is going to be simple for companies to navigate from a recruiting standpoint for a lot of mid to late-career white collar jobs.

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mathwhiz
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by mathwhiz » Wed Apr 29, 2020 11:02 pm

SpaceMonkey wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:39 pm
I absolutely hate working from home and I don't think I'm the only one. I don't know what the net result will be, but I don't think a dramatic shift toward WFH is going to be simple for companies to navigate from a recruiting standpoint for a lot of mid to late-career white collar jobs.
I would have preferred they reduced the office footprint by 50%-75% and kept some office space for a small percentage of people who prefer the office environment as well as meeting rooms for training or important business. They could have had a mix of full time telework employees, 3 or 4 day a week telework, 1 or 2 day telework or a small percentage that go to work everyday because it suits them better. You are right. Not everyone is suited to full time telework and won't like it. But as everyone says, "Be lucky you have a job!" and they are not wrong.

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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by FireSekr » Wed Apr 29, 2020 11:03 pm

About 50% of my company was remote workers prior to the pandemic, me being one of them. Some of our most senior executives work remotely in states with no clients. People whom have been promoted recently have equally been those who work from home and those working in a physical office.

Working from home vs. going to the office in my company has little bearing on someone's career prospects. Their effectiveness at their role is the primary driver. Another thing in common is that they're visible across the organization. Working from home does not make that harder, in fact I feel like it makes it easier to get the right type of visibility.

What do I mean? People confuse visibility with being recognized for their work. Showing up to an office and getting lunch with people certainly keeps you visible, but it doesn't showcase your accomplishments in and of itself. People who work remotely and are able to share their successes to others via zoom conferences or other means are more strategic about what they reveal about themselves, and are able to tout their accomplishments to the right people at the right time.

Its not just about getting face time. It's about strategically using the visibility you have, and working remotely helps you become more efficient at doing so.
Last edited by FireSekr on Wed Apr 29, 2020 11:51 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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mathwhiz
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by mathwhiz » Wed Apr 29, 2020 11:05 pm

I think some manufacturing may come back but it will be through laws and mandates by the government. The coronavirus has showed that too much of our supply chain in important pharmaceuticals, PPE, testing reagents, ventilators are tied up in an overseas supply chain that is a national security risk.
go_mets wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 8:20 pm
Scatterbrain wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:34 pm
I’m interested to see how this affects wages and urbanization in the long run. When employers learn they don’t necessarily need local talent it could easily snowball into more offshoring and contract work.
And hopes of onshoring back manufacturing may also be a pipedream.
Keep facilities overseas and let the other countries worry about it.

.

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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by White Coat Investor » Thu Apr 30, 2020 1:12 am

One reason it didn't bother me to spend so much time, money, and effort on our new home office was that I thought it would add significant value to the house as I felt it likely that any future buyer would be doing a significant amount of work from home. The trend is definitely going that way.
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by DonIce » Thu Apr 30, 2020 2:58 am

Personally for any job that I've ever done, seen anyone do, or can imagine doing, the productivity of working from home is a tiny fraction of the productivity that can be achieved by working on site. Zombie companies that think they can have everyone work from home and still get anything done are gonna be disrupted big time by companies that can move 10x faster since their employees can actually communicate and collaborate effectively.

ARoseByAnyOtherName
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by ARoseByAnyOtherName » Thu Apr 30, 2020 6:31 am

go_mets wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:28 pm
programming is done in India
Go ask Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and other top tech US tech companies how much of the software development for their products is done in India.

I’ll wait.

Juice3
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by Juice3 » Thu Apr 30, 2020 7:11 am

HawkeyePierce wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:32 pm
go_mets wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:28 pm
Manufacturing is done in China and programming is done in India.
The 1.3 million software developers in the US probably disagree with that statement. :!:

https://www.bls.gov/ooh/Computer-and-In ... lopers.htm
https://www.computerworld.com/article/2 ... -2017.html

I also wonder about how this data consolidated. Where do you think the Scrum Masters, Analysts and the like are counted or are they?

simas
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by simas » Thu Apr 30, 2020 8:02 am

arcticpineapplecorp. wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 7:03 pm

I've thought this could be very disruptive for employment over the long run. If the work can be done remotely, what's to say it can't be offshored to a cheaper labor force in another country at a favorable exchange rate?

scary times.
not really. it was always that way - vast majority of white collar work (basically when you are not physically operating any equipment) could be done remotely and always was. the solution was always the same , competition is global, and it is fact of life.

I never understood the entitlement or fears related to this in 25+ years of IT career ...

go_mets
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by go_mets » Thu Apr 30, 2020 9:04 am

ARoseByAnyOtherName wrote:
Thu Apr 30, 2020 6:31 am
go_mets wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:28 pm
programming is done in India
Go ask Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and other top tech US tech companies how much of the software development for their products is done in India.

I’ll wait.
Please supply me with the data.
I'll wait.

Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc are not the be-all-end-all of software.

No one sees what is going on with the small businesses and what they are doing.


15 years ago I interviewed at a small company that made specialty equipment used in labs.
The software was contracted out to gig workers in Eastern Europe.

10 years ago I interviewed at a small company that sold some sort of web-based application.
The work was contracted out to India.

5 years ago I interviewed at a small company that sold specialty hardware that needed software.
That software work was done in India.

The only companies that did anything in-house was DoD related companies such as Lockheed Martin, L-3, and Sarnoff.
.

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Kenkat
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by Kenkat » Thu Apr 30, 2020 9:54 am

My experience with IT outsourcing is not so much that development (programming) work has been fully outsourced offshore but rather it has been supplemented with offshore resources. On an individual level, jobs have moved - if you were a heads down tell me what to code and I’ll code it developer, your job either went offshore or you are at risk. But for the people who’ve stepped up their game, there’s plenty of jobs still here in the US. It is becoming a more multi-cultural workforce with people from India, Russia, Ukraine, China, etc. mixed in with the “traditional” US workers, but I really enjoy that mix - just another long line of immigration that is the history of this country (the US).

We are able to do more projects using a hybrid approach where onshore resources work with offshore resources to do more work at a lower overall cost. If we had to do all of the development onshore, it would probably be too expensive and we would end up doing fewer projects. But we can effectively ramp up our capacity with this approach.

What I don’t think has worked very well is companies that completely outsource all of the development functions offshore. Maybe some have pulled this off, but a lot have backtracked to a hybrid model based on poor results with the full outsource model.

Maybe smaller companies are different as complexity is probably lower but I still would bet there are people filling roles onshore at those companies as well that may not be obvious looking from the outside in.

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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by ARoseByAnyOtherName » Fri May 01, 2020 7:17 am

go_mets wrote:
Thu Apr 30, 2020 9:04 am
ARoseByAnyOtherName wrote:
Thu Apr 30, 2020 6:31 am
go_mets wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:28 pm
programming is done in India
Go ask Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and other top tech US tech companies how much of the software development for their products is done in India.

I’ll wait.
Please supply me with the data.
I'll wait.
Sure! Hat tip to HawkeyePierce who posted this earlier in the thread:
https://www.bls.gov/ooh/Computer-and-In ... lopers.htm

According to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics, in the United States:
  • 1,365,500 people were employed as Software Developers in 2018.
  • The median pay was $105,590 per year.
  • Employment of software developers is projected to grow 21 percent from 2018 to 2028, much faster than the average for all occupations. Software developers will be needed to respond to an increased demand for computer software.
So you are clearly utterly wrong when you say "programming is done in India".

Additionally, I know firsthand that all the companies I listed do significant software development in the United States.
go_mets wrote:
Thu Apr 30, 2020 9:04 am
No one sees what is going on with the small businesses and what they are doing.


15 years ago I interviewed at a small company that made specialty equipment used in labs.
The software was contracted out to gig workers in Eastern Europe.

10 years ago I interviewed at a small company that sold some sort of web-based application.
The work was contracted out to India.

5 years ago I interviewed at a small company that sold specialty hardware that needed software.
That software work was done in India.

The only companies that did anything in-house was DoD related companies such as Lockheed Martin, L-3, and Sarnoff.
Just because you've only seen software development happen in India and Eastern Europe you think all software development in the US is done there?

Well the data proves you are wrong, case closed.

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Watty
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by Watty » Fri May 01, 2020 10:33 am

If full time remote working becomes more common then the completion for jobs will not just be from places like India but also less expensive areas within the US.

Before I retired I was a software developer and the east coast company I worked for had an contract programmer that they used that was in Iowa but he was paid Iowa wages so they loved using him even though the company was not in a real expensive city.

That eliminated a lot of the time zone, language, and cultural problems that can happen when when you outsource projects overseas. Occasionally he was also able fly in for a few days when he needed to.

He was likely as good as the programmers that were local but we really only used him for projects that had already been designed and laid out, he was not used for things that required much analysis and design.

Those seemed to be a lot more difficult to do remotely.

Software development is also a lot different than most other jobs so I would be careful about generalizing with what can be done with remote workers with software development to assume it can be done with other jobs too.

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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by DonIce » Fri May 01, 2020 10:43 am

go_mets wrote:
Thu Apr 30, 2020 9:04 am
ARoseByAnyOtherName wrote:
Thu Apr 30, 2020 6:31 am
go_mets wrote:
Wed Apr 29, 2020 10:28 pm
programming is done in India
Go ask Google, Facebook, Microsoft, and other top tech US tech companies how much of the software development for their products is done in India.

I’ll wait.
Please supply me with the data.
I'll wait.

Google, Facebook, Microsoft, etc are not the be-all-end-all of software.

No one sees what is going on with the small businesses and what they are doing.


15 years ago I interviewed at a small company that made specialty equipment used in labs.
The software was contracted out to gig workers in Eastern Europe.

10 years ago I interviewed at a small company that sold some sort of web-based application.
The work was contracted out to India.

5 years ago I interviewed at a small company that sold specialty hardware that needed software.
That software work was done in India.

The only companies that did anything in-house was DoD related companies such as Lockheed Martin, L-3, and Sarnoff.
.
Don't know about random anecdotal experience from 10 years ago, but the current breakdown is like this:

Companies where software is a profit center do it here. Doing it locally gives you way better results, resulting in more profit.

Companies where software is a cost center offshore it. If software is just a bothersome need for the company, they'd rather cut costs, and don't even understand how much worse their software is than it could be, and probably don't care.

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Watty
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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by Watty » Fri May 01, 2020 10:46 am

DonIce wrote:
Thu Apr 30, 2020 2:58 am
Personally for any job that I've ever done, seen anyone do, or can imagine doing, the productivity of working from home is a tiny fraction of the productivity that can be achieved by working on site. Zombie companies that think they can have everyone work from home and still get anything done are gonna be disrupted big time by companies that can move 10x faster since their employees can actually communicate and collaborate effectively.
+1

There is a reason that FAANG companies are willing pay insane salaries for software developers to live and work in expensive places like the Bay Area when they could be based in a much less expensive area if remote working worked well.

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Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by EddyB » Fri May 01, 2020 1:10 pm

Watty wrote:
Fri May 01, 2020 10:33 am
If full time remote working becomes more common then the completion for jobs will not just be from places like India but also less expensive areas within the US.
Which is bad for some, but good for others. I have now spent more than half of my career working from home, the past several years 500 miles from my employee's nearest office. My industry has been reluctant to embrace work-from-home arrangements; I am an exception because of rare expertise, but I have stayed with an employer that knows and trusts me, and clearly limited my career growth to prioritize living where I want (I have passed up other jobs that would have paid more and been more senior, because I didn't want to make the move). I would be very excited to see an acceleration in willingness to accommodate full-time remote work.

BeneIRA
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Joined: Sat Nov 29, 2014 8:43 pm

Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by BeneIRA » Fri May 01, 2020 1:27 pm

My company was closing down and consolidating regional offices for the past few years. They realized their real estate cost was a very large expense and that work could be done just as well with fewer offices and more workin from home. I am surprised more companies haven't realized that their offices in downtown New York, Chicago, LA, Boston, etc don't pay them the dividends that they expect.

The issue of being outsourced looms very large, I must admit. The average work could vary greatly between rural Iowa, New York, San Francisco, Manila, etc, though. If a company can get the exact same work for 1/10 the cost, of course they'll do it. In my experience, though, it's not so simple. Nothing ever is.

Jess Saying
Posts: 7
Joined: Fri Apr 10, 2020 11:42 am

Re: Our company just closed our regional office permanently

Post by Jess Saying » Fri May 01, 2020 8:43 pm

We're talking about regional divergence. The major corporations in expensive metro areas already have outsourced a huge amount of work, but instead of sending all of it to India, they (NYC, San Francisco, Seattle) send some of the cheaper stuff to Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Milwaukee, wherever, and kept the high end stuff because you can only find the specialized skillsets to handle the work in those "superstar" cities.

I'm sure they'd love to be able to relocate all operations to Cedar Falls and pay less in office space, but the work force wouldn't follow (like in the Peregrine Financial episode of American Greed).

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