Mutual Fund Appreciation Between Two Dates

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michaelc55
Posts: 105
Joined: Tue May 15, 2007 8:24 pm

Mutual Fund Appreciation Between Two Dates

Post by michaelc55 »

Hi Everyone,
It's been a while since I've been on this site, but I have a question that I'm hoping this helpful community may be able to answer:

I'm trying to get a dollar amount of appreciation for a fund based on a historical date and today's date (for a mutual fund)

For example, I'd like to calculate the question: "I contributed $5,000 to VFINAX on July 1, 2020 -- what would that investment be worth (on paper) today?"

Does anyone know of a calculator or site I can use to do a calculation like this?

Thanks so much!
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Electron
Posts: 2135
Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 8:46 pm

Re: Mutual Fund Appreciation Between Two Dates

Post by Electron »

Here is a Morningstar Growth of $10K chart of VFINX starting on 7-01-19.

Move your cursor along the chart and you can see the values on different dates.

http://quotes.morningstar.com/chart/fun ... A%5B%5D%7D
Electron
like2read
Posts: 26
Joined: Wed Jan 22, 2020 5:30 pm

Re: Mutual Fund Appreciation Between Two Dates

Post by like2read »

Adding to Electron's reply about Morningstar....the subscription version of Morningstar will allow you to do exactly what you ask. Just like on the link he sent for VFINX, you would enter your mutual fund name and on the chart view click "custom". You can then enter specific dates and it will return info for that time period.

You may want to check with your local library - ours here has online Morningstar subscription available.

l2r
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Electron
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Joined: Sat Mar 10, 2007 8:46 pm

Re: Mutual Fund Appreciation Between Two Dates

Post by Electron »

I should have mentioned some of the additional features on the Morningstar charts. If you click on Growth, there are additional options to view Price and Rolling Returns. You can also add Benchmarks and other Mutual Funds to the chart for comparison. On the right side of the chart you can select from a variety of different time periods or specify custom dates.

Calculating Total Return requires an accurate database because you need the NAV of the fund on the date of every purchase or reinvestment and you need the dollar amount per share for every distribution.

If the time period is relatively short, it is not difficult to do the calculations yourself. All you need to do is make a hypothetical purchase of some number of shares and then reinvest each distribution which results in additional shares. Those calculations require the distribution amount per share and the reinvestment NAV. The current value of the fund can then be determined from the number of shares and NAV. These calculations assume that taxes are either deferred or paid from other assets.
Electron
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