Why retire?

Non-investing personal finance issues including insurance, credit, real estate, taxes, employment and legal issues such as trusts and wills
Barcelonasteve
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Re: Why retire?

Post by Barcelonasteve »

I want to have nothing to do and all day to do it. :sharebeer
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ofcmetz
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Re: Why retire?

Post by ofcmetz »

multiham wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:10 pm Here are the reasons I have a retirement countdown clock:
  • No more worries about losing job, downsizing, or the latest consultant "hot" trend of the year
    No more Icebreakers to get to know people (This alone is worth retiring)
    No more getting in a plane, train, car, unless I want to
    No more open environment to deal with at work
    Not planning of waking up at 5:30 AM unless I want to
    Mid-Day workout to get me fit again
    No more meetings!
    No more touchpoints/showcasing necessary to survive at work
    Deadlines - What Deadlines!
    No more planning time off around projects instead of when I want to go
    No more having to deal with many people I would never talk to if it wasn't required for work
    Ability to do what I want, when I want, with who I want (Priceless)
Very nice list there.
Never underestimate the power of the force of low cost index funds.
manatee2005
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Re: Why retire?

Post by manatee2005 »

randomguy wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 8:35 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:58 pm
randomguy wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:22 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:21 pm This is a ridiculous question.

If given the choice, people would rather do anything instead of going to work. How is that so hard to understand?
You picked the wrong career if you are getting that little satisfaction from your job. I would much rather develop software than scrub the bath tub, cut grass, go clothes shopping, visit my MIL, laundry, watching Fox news, and a zillion other things.

But I might rather do those things for 10 hours per week than spent 80 hours/ working. If I could work say 24/hr week, retirement wouldn't be very appealing.
Nice straw man. You have to do all of those things regardless of whether you work or not (cleaning the bath, cutting grass, buying clothes). But because you work, you have to do those things in the little free time you have for yourself, that's why they suck even more.

If you didn't have to work, you could get your chores done and still have plenty of time for leisure activities.

I can't believe I have to explain this.
Or I could go to work and hire some to do my laundry, scrub the tub, change my oil, cut the grass and so on. I do have to visit my MIL though.
You pay someone to do your laundry and cut your grass?
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warner25
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Re: Why retire?

Post by warner25 »

friar1610 wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 4:36 pmI can't think of one profession in which I know people (medicine,teaching, accounting, sales, the military, etc.) where I haven't heard essentially the same complaint over the years...
I've been thinking and saying the same thing. Whenever someone inquires about any career field here at Bogleheads, the responses are overwhelmingly negative, and these are often higher status, higher income fields - nevermind all the lower status, lower income jobs out there. If the OP and a handful of others love going to work everyday so much that they can't understand the desire for retirement, they are truly blessed, and they seem to be in the minority even among their peers.
MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Why retire?

Post by MathIsMyWayr »

warner25 wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 1:23 am
friar1610 wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 4:36 pmI can't think of one profession in which I know people (medicine,teaching, accounting, sales, the military, etc.) where I haven't heard essentially the same complaint over the years...
I've been thinking and saying the same thing. Whenever someone inquires about any career field here at Bogleheads, the responses are overwhelmingly negative, and these are often higher status, higher income fields - nevermind all the lower status, lower income jobs out there. If the OP and a handful of others love going to work everyday so much that they can't understand the desire for retirement, they are truly blessed, and they seem to be in the minority even among their peers.
Complaining about a job does not mean sitting at home idling away is a better use of your time. Yes, you may have some quality time occasionally. But you have to be motivated to fill most of your time with meaningful activities. If a guy equates working with slaving passively only for money, will he suddenly take charge of his life after the chain is broken?
Starfish
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Re: Why retire?

Post by Starfish »

randomguy wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:22 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:21 pm This is a ridiculous question.

If given the choice, people would rather do anything instead of going to work. How is that so hard to understand?
You picked the wrong career if you are getting that little satisfaction from your job. I would much rather develop software than scrub the bath tub, cut grass, go clothes shopping, visit my MIL, laundry, watching Fox news, and a zillion other things.

But I might rather do those things for 10 hours per week than spent 80 hours/ working. If I could work say 24/hr week, retirement wouldn't be very appealing.
I am not sure what is point here.
The point for FI is defined by most people as the point where you at least maintain the lifestyle you have.
The idea that you prefer to work the job you have instead of doing something worse it's a truism, but we are talking about doing something better than work.
It's only sad that there are many people who do not have anything else they like enough except work. I mean from the millions of hobbies, activities and knowledge in the world how can you not find at least 100 things you would prefer to do? and by prefer I don't even mean liking more over long term, but only prefer because is something else.
The choice should not be between working and watching TV, but between working and climbing Torres del Paine, reading good literature, learning how to play guitar, free diving, rebuilding a car, touring the world by motorcycle, preparing for Ironman, working for a startup with a very interesting project but not much hope to make money, teaching.
randomguy
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Re: Why retire?

Post by randomguy »

Starfish wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 2:13 am
randomguy wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:22 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:21 pm This is a ridiculous question.

If given the choice, people would rather do anything instead of going to work. How is that so hard to understand?
You picked the wrong career if you are getting that little satisfaction from your job. I would much rather develop software than scrub the bath tub, cut grass, go clothes shopping, visit my MIL, laundry, watching Fox news, and a zillion other things.

But I might rather do those things for 10 hours per week than spent 80 hours/ working. If I could work say 24/hr week, retirement wouldn't be very appealing.
I am not sure what is point here.
The point for FI is defined by most people as the point where you at least maintain the lifestyle you have.
The idea that you prefer to work the job you have instead of doing something worse it's a truism, but we are talking about doing something better than work.
It's only sad that there are many people who do not have anything else they like enough except work. I mean from the millions of hobbies, activities and knowledge in the world how can you not find at least 100 things you would prefer to do? and by prefer I don't even mean liking more over long term, but only prefer because is something else.
The choice should not be between working and watching TV, but between working and climbing Torres del Paine, reading good literature, learning how to play guitar, free diving, rebuilding a car, touring the world by motorcycle, preparing for Ironman, working for a startup with a very interesting project but not much hope to make money, teaching.
The point was simply that the idea that people want to do anything but work is absurd. You would have to picked a really horrible job for that to be remotely true.


There are plenty of things I like doing besides work. But I only work 40 hours/week and take 4 weeks of vacation. That is plenty of time to get plenty of hours of golf, running, reading, travel, and so on in. And yeah work is pretty high on my fun activity list. I did it for free as a kid and can't see stopping. Getting paid doesn't change the inherent satisfaction from solving problems and building things.

You find it sad that people can't find 100 things they would rather do than work. I find sad that people can't find anything they are really passionate about in the millions of jobs out there that they can make a career out of? Think of the millions of jobs out there for people and you can't find a single one that is in your top 100 things to do?

The issue is people have different ways of viewing work. If your value is only from a paycheck, then yeah quit. If your feel your work is productive and leading to a better world, you get that satisfaction to go along with a paycheck. For an analogy, think about how people view exercise. Half the world things of it as a chore that you only do so you are not a fat slob. The other half enjoys the effort of trying to run farther, lift more, and to push your body. It isn't a chore but the highlight of the day. The fact that you don't become a fat slob is just an incidental benefit. Same exact activity. Two different ways of viewing it. Neither one is really right or wrong but it is hard for either side to understand how the others feel.

For work the problem for a lot of people is that 40 hours is just a bit too much. Let them work 24 or even 32 hours and the levels of satisfaction with work skyrocket according to most studies. But there are a lot of professions where that isn't much of an option. 2 people working 24 hours often is less efficient than 1 person working 40. Or the overhead of only working 20 hours instead of 40 results in zero profits. When the labor market gets tight we always hear about companies adding flexibility and trying to keep people in the market but those type of things always seem to be the first to go when the market softens.
basspond
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Re: Why retire?

Post by basspond »

I have been to numerous funerals in the last couple of years for dear friends and relatives that were 63 or younger.
vested1
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Re: Why retire?

Post by vested1 »

calvin+hobbes wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 8:24 pm From one physician to another (if you are indeed a physician), getting embroiled in a lawsuit that has little to no merit can be extremely stress provoking, anxiety inducing and make you view your interactions with patients in a whole new light. It hasn’t happened to me personally but I know of others whose view of work became tainted.
My thoughts exactly. I was not sufficiently intelligent, financially supported, nor driven enough to be a physician. I did however have aspirations and a somewhat naive belief in the basic kindness and compassion of my fellow human beings. Would that the world was as we wish it was, but alas, those kumbaya moments are fleeting and divorced from reality.

The passage of time erodes that faith in a homogenous society when you come to realize that some individuals just enjoy being mean. When one such person is in a position to make your life miserable, they will do so simply because they can. Greed, and an overestimation of their importance is almost always the culprit.

Hope for the best, plan for the worst.
vested1
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Re: Why retire?

Post by vested1 »

EddyB wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:38 am
reln wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 1:08 am
nydoc wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:23 pm Hi everyone,
This forum is primarily focused on a comfortable secure retirement and many members look forward to early retirement. At my age of 38, I do not see why should I aim for a retirement at 50, 55 or 60. I feel good at my work and life seems comfortable.
My question is- what changes happen with age or career that make retirement an attractive goal?
Answers will help me plan more critically for the retirement.
Thank you.
Retirement is a funny idea. What would a retired lion or elephant look like?
What would a retired plow horse look like?
I don't know, but I'm pretty sure he'd be smiling.
carolinaman
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Re: Why retire?

Post by carolinaman »

Unladen_Swallow wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 8:24 pm Here are reasons many retire and not work until they pass:

1. Love their job, but need time to do other things they love as well.
2. They don't like their job enough to continue working if they don't need to
3. Their health suffers
4. Cognitive ability decreases. They are not as good at their job as they need to be.
5. They were laid off
6. They might want to work, but they don't get any work.


Finally, there are many in the world who work until their last day, not just because they need to, but because they want to (and are able to). Good for them!
+1. Good list. I would add one more, bad manager. You can have a great job and then one day you get a new manager and that job becomes a living hell.
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oldcomputerguy
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Re: Why retire?

Post by oldcomputerguy »

Several off-topic posts were removed. Please keep the discussion centered on the OP's original question.
"I’ve come around to this: If you’re dumb, surround yourself with smart people; and if you’re smart, surround yourself with smart people who disagree with you." (Aaron Sorkin)
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CyclingDuo
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Re: Why retire?

Post by CyclingDuo »

nydoc wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:23 pmThis forum is primarily focused on a comfortable secure retirement and many members look forward to early retirement. At my age of 38, I do not see why should I aim for a retirement at 50, 55 or 60. I feel good at my work and life seems comfortable.
My question is- what changes happen with age or career that make retirement an attractive goal?
Answers will help me plan more critically for the retirement.
Most don't start work until they are 22-25
Most retire around age 62-65

That's about 40-45 minimum freebie years of not working. :beer

What about the working career?

How many hours in a year? = 8760*
40 hours of work per week = 2080 hours a year (2 weeks of paid vacation of course are included)
8 hours of sleep a night = 2920 hours a year
Remaining freebie hours a year = 3760 hours (10.3 hours per day to do with what you want to do)

*Non leap year. This year being a leap year adjusts all numbers.

When looking at the numbers alone and forgetting all the mundane elements people keep bringing up about the work years, it just simply doesn't look that bad on paper. 40-45 years of not working (birth to age 22 + retirement years). About 10 hours of free time each day during the working years (non sleeping and non working hours).

We'll take it. :sharebeer

Obviously you save and invest at least 15-20% of your income year in and year out throughout your working career to help fund the non-working years we call retirement (which is really just a long unemployment phase of our life). You get one journey, and one journey only. So enjoy it all along the way...
"Save like a pessimist, invest like an optimist." - Morgan Housel
capran
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Re: Why retire?

Post by capran »

We were very happy with or working the school system, especially since we had summers to travel via a small sailboat. But the friends were raving about travel in Mexico, so in 09 took a cruise to Cabo, PV and Mazatlán. Cruises not our thing. So over the next three years went to 6 different all inclusives on the Caribbean side of Mexico (winter and spring break). Felt closer to our style. Then work started not being as much fun due to changes in administration, and friends started having life changing illnesses and so pulled the work plug at 62 and 59. Now there's time to do extra things, like renting a condo for 2 months to winter in Mexico, a fall trip of 4-6 weeks to hike in the South West, as well as continue living aboard our sailboat in the summer. If there's nothing you want to do, then work may be that continuing activity. But we can see as we get older, the time to experience the travel we like is dwindling.
michaeljc70
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Re: Why retire?

Post by michaeljc70 »

H-Town wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 8:29 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:21 pm This is a ridiculous question.

If given the choice, people would rather do anything instead of going to work. How is that so hard to understand?
It depends. For some situations, it’s extremely difficult to step away from the position of power although they have already achieved financial independence. Power is an addictive drug.
I don't know if this has been mentioned, but frankly some people have no hobbies or interests outside of work. Some people can only get satisfaction from their work.
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Rowan Oak
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Re: Why retire?

Post by Rowan Oak »

HomerJ wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 1:18 am
SCV_Lawyer wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 7:35 pm
sport wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 7:12 pm One important answer to this question is STRESS. Every job has some level of stress, some more than others. Even the requirement to be at work on time causes stress. Commuting is stressful. Management causes stress, and customers (patients) cause stress. Co-workers and colleagues can cause stress. Retirement is a freedom from all of these work-related stressors. Living a mostly stress free life is a wonderful existence. Stress is not only unpleasant, it is bad for your health, both mental and physical. I have been retired for 15 years and have absolutely no desire to ever go back to work.
I think this is my main motivator. I'm a partner in BigLaw and am typically running numerous transactions, each in the 9 to 10 digit dollar amounts. I'm responsible and accountable to the clients, responsible for overseeing associates and staff and have client development, mangerial and administrative obligations. I work with clients on both coasts, so I am up very early and in bed often late. That adds up to a fair amount of stress. I once heard someone say, "I don't hate my job, I just hate work." That sums it up for me. I work with great people, have mostly good clients and am fortunate to have grown into very generous comp. I don't dread going to work, but there are a 1,000 other things I would rather be doing. And I'm getting tired of the daily stress and the daily grind. Fortunately, I am down to a few years left, planning on being done by 54.
I agree... I like my job a lot, but I'm responsible for some backups at my job, and there are times when I wake up in the middle of night, thinking I forgot to backup something important. If the place burns down, will we be able to recover?

It would be nice not to wake up in the middle of night, worrying about something at work.
I agree with this. It's the worry that I have become very tired of not so much the actual work. As a small business owner it's all on me and no matter how much I prepare for all the things that could go wrong it still keeps me up at night.
“If you can get good at destroying your own wrong ideas, that is a great gift.” – Charlie Munger
EddyB
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Re: Why retire?

Post by EddyB »

randomguy wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 8:35 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:58 pm
randomguy wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:22 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:21 pm This is a ridiculous question.

If given the choice, people would rather do anything instead of going to work. How is that so hard to understand?
You picked the wrong career if you are getting that little satisfaction from your job. I would much rather develop software than scrub the bath tub, cut grass, go clothes shopping, visit my MIL, laundry, watching Fox news, and a zillion other things.

But I might rather do those things for 10 hours per week than spent 80 hours/ working. If I could work say 24/hr week, retirement wouldn't be very appealing.
Nice straw man. You have to do all of those things regardless of whether you work or not (cleaning the bath, cutting grass, buying clothes). But because you work, you have to do those things in the little free time you have for yourself, that's why they suck even more.

If you didn't have to work, you could get your chores done and still have plenty of time for leisure activities.

I can't believe I have to explain this.
Or I could go to work and hire some to do my laundry, scrub the tub, change my oil, cut the grass and so on. I do have to visit my MIL though.
True. Maybe I should hire someone to take the extended off-grid trips I'd like to do, too.
student
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Re: Why retire?

Post by student »

michaeljc70 wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:34 am
H-Town wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 8:29 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:21 pm This is a ridiculous question.

If given the choice, people would rather do anything instead of going to work. How is that so hard to understand?
It depends. For some situations, it’s extremely difficult to step away from the position of power although they have already achieved financial independence. Power is an addictive drug.
I don't know if this has been mentioned, but frankly some people have no hobbies or interests outside of work. Some people can only get satisfaction from their work.
I agree. Many of my colleagues (college professors) have little/no bobbies or outside interests (myself included). I suppose we can 1/3 retire by not teaching in the summer.
multiham
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Re: Why retire?

Post by multiham »

CyclingDuo wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:38 am
nydoc wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:23 pmThis forum is primarily focused on a comfortable secure retirement and many members look forward to early retirement. At my age of 38, I do not see why should I aim for a retirement at 50, 55 or 60. I feel good at my work and life seems comfortable.
My question is- what changes happen with age or career that make retirement an attractive goal?
Answers will help me plan more critically for the retirement.
Most don't start work until they are 22-25
Most retire around age 62-65

That's about 40-45 minimum freebie years of not working. :beer

What about the working career?

How many hours in a year? = 8760*
40 hours of work per week = 2080 hours a year (2 weeks of paid vacation of course are included)
8 hours of sleep a night = 2920 hours a year
Remaining freebie hours a year = 3760 hours (10.3 hours per day to do with what you want to do)

*Non leap year. This year being a leap year adjusts all numbers.

When looking at the numbers alone and forgetting all the mundane elements people keep bringing up about the work years, it just simply doesn't look that bad on paper. 40-45 years of not working (birth to age 22 + retirement years). About 10 hours of free time each day during the working years (non sleeping and non working hours).

We'll take it. :sharebeer

Obviously you save and invest at least 15-20% of your income year in and year out throughout your working career to help fund the non-working years we call retirement (which is really just a long unemployment phase of our life). You get one journey, and one journey only. So enjoy it all along the way...
I am a numbers guy and love the way you think! However, for me, the numbers don't work for the following reasons:
  • Get up at 5:30 AM M-F so I can leave house by 6:15
    Get to work at 7
    Work to at least 6 and most nights 7 or 8
    Get home most nights around 7:45
    Stay up until midnight so I have some time to myself with family
    Repeat unless I need to travel which just adds to the time working
    Work on Sunday night (2 hours) so I am ready for Monday
This gives me about 4 hours a weekday where I am not working or sleeping. If I could flip this and work 4 hours per day, I would not be counting down to retirement.
sailaway
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Re: Why retire?

Post by sailaway »

student wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:55 am
michaeljc70 wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:34 am
H-Town wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 8:29 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:21 pm This is a ridiculous question.

If given the choice, people would rather do anything instead of going to work. How is that so hard to understand?
It depends. For some situations, it’s extremely difficult to step away from the position of power although they have already achieved financial independence. Power is an addictive drug.
I don't know if this has been mentioned, but frankly some people have no hobbies or interests outside of work. Some people can only get satisfaction from their work.
I agree. Many of my colleagues (college professors) have little/no bobbies or outside interests (myself included). I suppose we can 1/3 retire by not teaching in the summer.
As if you would use that for something besides research?
student
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Re: Why retire?

Post by student »

sailaway wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:58 am
student wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:55 am
michaeljc70 wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:34 am
H-Town wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 8:29 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:21 pm This is a ridiculous question.

If given the choice, people would rather do anything instead of going to work. How is that so hard to understand?
It depends. For some situations, it’s extremely difficult to step away from the position of power although they have already achieved financial independence. Power is an addictive drug.
I don't know if this has been mentioned, but frankly some people have no hobbies or interests outside of work. Some people can only get satisfaction from their work.
I agree. Many of my colleagues (college professors) have little/no bobbies or outside interests (myself included). I suppose we can 1/3 retire by not teaching in the summer.
As if you would use that for something besides research?
lol. You got me. I am trying very hard to not do too much over the weekend. So yes, I need to learn to take it easy. I suppose the reason is we view research as fun.
randomguy
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Re: Why retire?

Post by randomguy »

EddyB wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:55 am
randomguy wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 8:35 pm

Or I could go to work and hire some to do my laundry, scrub the tub, change my oil, cut the grass and so on. I do have to visit my MIL though.
True. Maybe I should hire someone to take the extended off-grid trips I'd like to do, too.
I would pay people to take those trips for me:) You need to know who you are and what you options are. I get a lot more satisfaction working 1 hour and then spending 1 hour going running (2 satisfying activities) than I do spending 1 hour doing yard work and another hour cleaning the house (2 things that are chores that you just do because they need to be done). If the first option leaves me up a net 50 bucks or so, why wouldn't I take it?Your situation might be different. If . I wanted to hike the Appalachian Trail takes which takes like 6+ months, I I would have to retire to do that. But I just don't have many 24/7 goals that last 6 months in my life. I have a ton of ones that take a couple hours per day which is easy to fit in around work.
michaeljc70
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Re: Why retire?

Post by michaeljc70 »

randomguy wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 6:22 pm
manatee2005 wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 11:21 pm This is a ridiculous question.

If given the choice, people would rather do anything instead of going to work. How is that so hard to understand?
You picked the wrong career if you are getting that little satisfaction from your job. I would much rather develop software than scrub the bath tub, cut grass, go clothes shopping, visit my MIL, laundry, watching Fox news, and a zillion other things.

But I might rather do those things for 10 hours per week than spent 80 hours/ working. If I could work say 24/hr week, retirement wouldn't be very appealing.
I developed software and while I was doing that I enjoyed it. The problem was (and this is across many different jobs over many years) that the percent of my time doing that was not that much. Time went to useless meetings, mundane peripheral tasks, sitting around with nothing to do, time between phases, etc. Then there were things that I was to blame for like taking jobs (I was a contractor) because the people knew me and the money was good but not exactly the work I wanted to be doing.
Last edited by michaeljc70 on Mon Jan 20, 2020 11:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
visualguy
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Re: Why retire?

Post by visualguy »

In the cases of the retirees that I know, the reason for retirement was that they didn't really have a reasonable choice. None of them retired truly voluntarily. The ones who stopped working and didn't end up getting another job didn't really have the option of continuing to work due to reasons such as health, workplace changes, eroded skills, inability to find work, etc.

Not saying there aren't people who retire truly by choice, but I'm yet to meet personally anyone who had a viable option to continue working, but decided to retire. It's sometimes presented as a voluntary decision, but when you dig deeper, you realize that it really wasn't - things changed in a way that made continuing not viable.
mark39
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Re: Why retire?

Post by mark39 »

[quote=atlblaze post_id=4963279 time=1579395189 user_id=155235

I'm 31 now. I've been at my job for around 10 years. There's aspects of it that I love, and many would consider it a "dream job" -- but it's also a grind.... and parts of it I hate. I cant' imagine doing this for another 34ish years (when I'm 65). Heck, I can barely imagine doing it for another 10!
[/quote]

I can barely imagine getting through each day. Heck, I'm off today and can barely get through it because I have to go back tomorrow.

Most people in the world hate their jobs and that's why they want to retire. If you are one of the lucky ones then appreciate that as much as possible while still saving and investing. Nobody knows what the future holds. You're life can change in an instant.

Thank your lucky stars everyday for the position you are in right now.
johnra
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Re: Why retire?

Post by johnra »

multiham wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:10 pm Here are the reasons I have a retirement countdown clock:
  • No more worries about losing job, downsizing, or the latest consultant "hot" trend of the year
    No more Icebreakers to get to know people (This alone is worth retiring)
    No more getting in a plane, train, car, unless I want to
    No more open environment to deal with at work
    Not planning of waking up at 5:30 AM unless I want to
    Mid-Day workout to get me fit again
    No more meetings!
    No more touchpoints/showcasing necessary to survive at work
    Deadlines - What Deadlines!
    No more planning time off around projects instead of when I want to go
    No more having to deal with many people I would never talk to if it wasn't required for work
    Ability to do what I want, when I want, with who I want (Priceless)
This is a lot of negatives. I would think you would want to retire to something, not away from something.
Last edited by johnra on Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
KineticSync
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Re: Why retire?

Post by KineticSync »

For me it's come down to control of time. I'm an engineer and have managed to find a great niche where the creative work still offsets the corporate insanity and I get to build things and play with expensive toys. But...plan time off months in advance, then fight to protect that time because product plans or customer requirements constantly change, then spend part of that vacation on Skype dealing with the same stress and issues. No spontaneity--it's a nice day and we'd like to go hiking but...meetings, no vacation days, etc. Companies have gotten so lean and efficient that there's no slack--no extra bandwidth to handle the work when someone's out. So we're never off duty, the stress never abates, and we live life in planned-months-in-advance little slices.

My wife and I have had a long, long list of things we intend to do "someday". We're 63. We've recently said goodbye to many people, some a decade younger than us, also full of life and full of plans, who suddenly ran out of somedays. And this is what changed things for us--those vibrant, full of life people, and their plans, just went into the ground one day, and the world moved on. They were ultimately responsible for actualizing the lives they wanted and they thought they had plenty of time.
multiham
Posts: 331
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Re: Why retire?

Post by multiham »

johnra wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:13 pm
multiham wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:10 pm Here are the reasons I have a retirement countdown clock:
  • No more worries about losing job, downsizing, or the latest consultant "hot" trend of the year
    No more Icebreakers to get to know people (This alone is worth retiring)
    No more getting in a plane, train, car, unless I want to
    No more open environment to deal with at work
    Not planning of waking up at 5:30 AM unless I want to
    Mid-Day workout to get me fit again
    No more meetings!
    No more touchpoints/showcasing necessary to survive at work
    Deadlines - What Deadlines!
    No more planning time off around projects instead of when I want to go
    No more having to deal with many people I would never talk to if it wasn't required for work
    Ability to do what I want, when I want, with who I want (Priceless)
This is a lot of negatives. I would think you would want to retire to something, not away from something.
Please note the very last all encompassing statement. What I want, when I want, with who I want.
Starfish
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Re: Why retire?

Post by Starfish »

CyclingDuo wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:38 am
nydoc wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:23 pmThis forum is primarily focused on a comfortable secure retirement and many members look forward to early retirement. At my age of 38, I do not see why should I aim for a retirement at 50, 55 or 60. I feel good at my work and life seems comfortable.
My question is- what changes happen with age or career that make retirement an attractive goal?
Answers will help me plan more critically for the retirement.
Most don't start work until they are 22-25
Most retire around age 62-65

That's about 40-45 minimum freebie years of not working. :beer

What about the working career?

How many hours in a year? = 8760*
40 hours of work per week = 2080 hours a year (2 weeks of paid vacation of course are included)
8 hours of sleep a night = 2920 hours a year
Remaining freebie hours a year = 3760 hours (10.3 hours per day to do with what you want to do)

*Non leap year. This year being a leap year adjusts all numbers.

When looking at the numbers alone and forgetting all the mundane elements people keep bringing up about the work years, it just simply doesn't look that bad on paper. 40-45 years of not working (birth to age 22 + retirement years). About 10 hours of free time each day during the working years (non sleeping and non working hours).

We'll take it. :sharebeer

Obviously you save and invest at least 15-20% of your income year in and year out throughout your working career to help fund the non-working years we call retirement (which is really just a long unemployment phase of our life). You get one journey, and one journey only. So enjoy it all along the way...
My math looks a little different.
Childhood and college years were awesome but that is water under the bridge.
Years after a certain age have very little value. Maybe even 0 or negative, depending on health.
A lot of things one can do only when in reasonable shape. Sure, some people run marathons in their 80, but plenty get cancer at 50. So we cannot really rely on climbing mountains at 67 or even find the stamina to travel in more adventurous places. It's possible, just less probable.

10h a day of time left are actually much less when you include commuting and various chores from preparing taxes to showering, from preparing for work to wring emails sometimes during the weekend. And it's too fragmented. There are things you can do 2h a day when dark outside, but many are not possible.

So in my 40s I am thinking that, if I am lucky, I have maybe 20 active years left. Not very active though, I am already less active that 10 years ago. Every year am destroying 5% of that.
rj342
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Re: Why retire?

Post by rj342 »

Cheez-It Guy wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 7:16 pm This question is sort of ridiculous. Does the OP really think everyone has a comfortable life and loves their job? This is a humblebrag, or someone who cannot relate to others, or both.
To me this is somewhat like young people who are 22 or 25 and make blanket statements about never having kids (not 'not now', 'not ever'). Life happens, people change, often in a certain direction (there is after all human nature)) and it is a certain sort of hubris say something like that with finality so prematurely.

I wasn't thinking about retiring at all except in the abstract (yes, saving what I could) -- but a big career kick in the crotch at 52 that I am not likely to fully recover from changed my mindset over the last few years. Now ( just turned 55) getting to the situation where can slow down if not stop, sooner than later, is a lot more attractive.
Old Guy
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Re: Why retire?

Post by Old Guy »

I retired in my early 70s for three reasons.

1. I was worn out from listening to people’s tales of woe and grief.
2. Intellectual slippage.
3. Had more than enough money.
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AerialWombat
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Re: Why retire?

Post by AerialWombat »

moneywise3 wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 10:13 pm You just transition to doing different things - it is impossible for any human being to stop doing things altogether.
True, but it is a goal worth aiming for.
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warner25
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Re: Why retire?

Post by warner25 »

randomguy wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:37 amI find sad that people can't find anything they are really passionate about in the millions of jobs out there that they can make a career out of? Think of the millions of jobs out there for people and you can't find a single one that is in your top 100 things to do?
I think it's not about being able to find something; it's about being able to make a change, in practical terms. I mentioned in another thread that it takes a long-term commitment to establish yourself in many career fields, but it's hard to know how you'll feel about something over the long-term before you do it. You spend ~10 years in school and training and getting your first few years of experience. By then, maybe you realize that it's not what you expected, or the profession or industry changes in some fundamental way, or your personal circumstances change (go from being single to married with kids)... You can't keep job-hopping and career-changing until you find something you love, never knowing if the grass is really greener elsewhere. I basically chose my career at 16, and it sounds like you did too; the probability of getting it right at that age seems low. At some point, you have to stay-the-course to get some ROI, and achieving FIRE before trying something else is the best option for most of us.
randomguy wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:37 amFor work the problem for a lot of people is that 40 hours is just a bit too much.
And in many professions, just 40 hours a week would be a dream.
michaeljc70 wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 11:25 amI developed software and while I was doing that I enjoyed it. The problem was (and this is across many different jobs over many years) that the percent of my time doing that was not that much.
Yes! I think many people actually do enjoy their core job function, and all they really want is to be left alone to do their job, but working with others in any organization requires substantial overhead. I remember reading someone's description (and unfortunately I can't find it now to give proper credit) of the problem with taking another job in retirement for fun. It went something like this:

"Maybe you like working on cars, so you think it will be fun to take a job as a mechanic in retirement. You look forward to the satisfaction of diagnosing tricky problems, using expensive tools, and getting jobs done. At first it's great, but then management starts putting pressure on you to work faster, maybe take shortcuts that you disagree with, and increase your time and effort trying to up-sell customers to increase revenue. Then there are some complaints and management starts requiring everyone to sit through lectures on professional workplace conduct and do team building activities. Eventually, because you're a responsible, skilled, experienced professional, management starts trying to push more and more management work onto you. You end up getting involved in schedules and evaluations and hiring and payroll issues, and you're spending almost none of your time working with tools under the hood of a car anymore. So you say forget it, I don't need the money, and go back to being retired."
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AerialWombat
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Re: Why retire?

Post by AerialWombat »

^^^^^This reminded me of a famous story:


A businessman was at the pier of a small coastal Mexican village when a small boat with just one fisherman docked. Inside the small boat were several large yellowfin tuna. The businessman complimented the Mexican on the quality of his fish and asked how long it took to catch them. The Mexican replied only a little while.

The businessman then asked why he didn’t stay out longer and catch more fish? The Mexican said he had enough to support his family’s immediate needs. The businessman then asked, but what do you do with the rest of your time? The Mexican fisherman said, “I sleep late, fish a little, play with my children, take a siesta with my wife, Maria, stroll into the village each evening where I sip wine and play guitar with my amigos; I have a full and busy life, señor.”

The businessman scoffed, “I am a Harvard MBA and I could help you. You should spend more time fishing and with the proceeds buy a bigger boat. With the proceeds from the bigger boat you could buy several boats; eventually you would have a fleet of fishing boats. Instead of selling your catch to a middleman, you would sell directly to the processor and eventually open your own cannery. You would control the product, processing and distribution. You would need to leave this small coastal fishing village and move to Mexico City, then LA and eventually New York City where you would run your expanding enterprise.”

The Mexican fisherman asked, “But señor, how long will this all take?” To which the businessman replied, “15-20 years.” “But what then, señor?” The businessman laughed and said, “That’s the best part! When the time is right you would announce an IPO and sell your company stock to the public and become very rich. You would make millions.” “Millions, señor? Then what?” The businessman said, “Then you would retire. Move to a small coastal fishing village where you would sleep late, fish a little, play with your kids, take a siesta with your wife, stroll to the village in the evenings where you could sip wine and play your guitar with your amigos.”
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HomerJ
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Re: Why retire?

Post by HomerJ »

randomguy wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:37 amFor work the problem for a lot of people is that 40 hours is just a bit too much. Let them work 24 or even 32 hours and the levels of satisfaction with work skyrocket according to most studies. But there are a lot of professions where that isn't much of an option. 2 people working 24 hours often is less efficient than 1 person working 40. Or the overhead of only working 20 hours instead of 40 results in zero profits. When the labor market gets tight we always hear about companies adding flexibility and trying to keep people in the market but those type of things always seem to be the first to go when the market softens.
Man, I would work until I was 70-75 if I could work 3 days a week at 50% pay (and be guaranteed to keep such a job until 70-75).

But that job isn't easy to get... so I'll work full time until 55 and retire.
A Goldman Sachs associate provided a variety of detailed explanations, but then offered a caveat, “If I’m being dead-### honest, though, nobody knows what’s really going on.”
JediMisty
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Re: Why retire?

Post by JediMisty »

nydoc wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:23 pm Hi everyone,
This forum is primarily focused on a comfortable secure retirement and many members look forward to early retirement. At my age of 38, I do not see why should I aim for a retirement at 50, 55 or 60. I feel good at my work and life seems comfortable.
My question is- what changes happen with age or career that make retirement an attractive goal?
Answers will help me plan more critically for the retirement.
Thank you.
That is exactly the way I felt at 38. Now at 61, my health is still great and I can't say my job is bad. It's just that I see friends and colleagues either become disabled or worse, and I am looking forward to my retirement. Life is short. As my grandmother told me, "the older you get, the faster it goes". It slowly has sunk in. YMMV
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CyclingDuo
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Re: Why retire?

Post by CyclingDuo »

multiham wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:57 am
CyclingDuo wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 8:38 am
nydoc wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:23 pmThis forum is primarily focused on a comfortable secure retirement and many members look forward to early retirement. At my age of 38, I do not see why should I aim for a retirement at 50, 55 or 60. I feel good at my work and life seems comfortable.
My question is- what changes happen with age or career that make retirement an attractive goal?
Answers will help me plan more critically for the retirement.
Most don't start work until they are 22-25
Most retire around age 62-65

That's about 40-45 minimum freebie years of not working. :beer

What about the working career?

How many hours in a year? = 8760*
40 hours of work per week = 2080 hours a year (2 weeks of paid vacation of course are included)
8 hours of sleep a night = 2920 hours a year
Remaining freebie hours a year = 3760 hours (10.3 hours per day to do with what you want to do)

*Non leap year. This year being a leap year adjusts all numbers.

When looking at the numbers alone and forgetting all the mundane elements people keep bringing up about the work years, it just simply doesn't look that bad on paper. 40-45 years of not working (birth to age 22 + retirement years). About 10 hours of free time each day during the working years (non sleeping and non working hours).

We'll take it. :sharebeer

Obviously you save and invest at least 15-20% of your income year in and year out throughout your working career to help fund the non-working years we call retirement (which is really just a long unemployment phase of our life). You get one journey, and one journey only. So enjoy it all along the way...
I am a numbers guy and love the way you think! However, for me, the numbers don't work for the following reasons:
  • Get up at 5:30 AM M-F so I can leave house by 6:15
    Get to work at 7
    Work to at least 6 and most nights 7 or 8
    Get home most nights around 7:45
    Stay up until midnight so I have some time to myself with family
    Repeat unless I need to travel which just adds to the time working
    Work on Sunday night (2 hours) so I am ready for Monday
This gives me about 4 hours a weekday where I am not working or sleeping. If I could flip this and work 4 hours per day, I would not be counting down to retirement.
You are correct in pointing out that each person will have their own unique daily numbers as well as choices (career, where to live in relationship to the office, how many hours to devote to bringing in income, choice of spouse, number of children, etc...). Some have a longer commute. Some don't. Some work outside of the standard 40 hour work week (longer or shorter). Some don't. Some bring work home and spend time doing it in the evening or on the weekend. Some don't. Some sleep 8 hours. Some don't. Some choose careers that have summers off. :mrgreen: Some don't. :shock:

Our household chose to pursue the path more akin to the 8 hours of work a day routine, 8 hours of recreation, and 8 hours of rest. Plus we get summers off, 2-4 weeks in December/January off, and 10 days for Spring Break off.

Remember from history when Robert Owen coined the phrase “Eight hours labor, eight hours recreation, eight hours rest,” dividing the day into three equal eight-hour parts?

Interesting to look at the history of the work day in the US at this link...

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/05/03/how-the ... -work.html

In demanding, competitive industries like tech and finance, professionals work in excess of 60 hours a week as a rule, and are available constantly by smartphone. A recent Bloomberg Businessweek story highlighted American factories where employees work upwards of 12 hours a day, six or seven days a week.

In a time when Americans are working more than ever before and taking less time off, it’s helpful to see how the U.S. arrived at its “standard” workday.


Just looking at individual choices....

Have you chosen to work M-F from 7 AM to 6, 7, or 8 PM? Have you chosen to work 2 hours on Sunday night? Have you chosen to live 45 minutes from your place of employment? Is it all a requirement to maintain your position and current lifestyle?

Choosing to work 11-13 hours a day (55-65 hours per week at the office) may or may not fit for each individual and their goals. Choosing a job in a location that has a 45 minute commute may or may not fit each individual's wants and needs.

If somebody said (when accounting for the years before we work and the years in retirement after we stop working)...

"Hey, you are going to be working for a total of half of your life"

...it still doesn't seem like that bad of a deal at all for what we get in return (income, housing, food, toys, vacations/travel, saving/investing for the future years, etc...) whether we are counting the hours, days or years in the greater journey we all go through from birth to death.

Although most would call it absurd to view it this way, however if we went with the number of 60 working hours per week, that's 60 hours x 52 weeks = 3120 hours a year. 3120 hours a year x 30 years = 93,600 hours. Those working hours all combined equals 10.68 years. The remaining hours (sleep and remaining free time each day) x 30 years = 169,200 hours. Those hours all combined equals 19.31 years.

Striving to find the balance between career and home that allows one to travel through the working years portion of life's journey in a physically and mentally healthy way for those decades seems to be a large driver of individual choice that cannot be decoupled from the cost of living, lifestyle, goals, and family. Looking at the history of the working week link I posted above is eye opening to compare modern times with those of other points in US history.

Whatever the unique numbers are for each individual, run them and see what you come up with. Although we all work plenty of hours, there are more hours in our lives during the working years that are non-working hours than there are of working hours. Moving to include the years before we begin our working careers and the years afterwards results in an interesting view of how many actual hours we work in our lives compared to the remaining hours...
"Save like a pessimist, invest like an optimist." - Morgan Housel
StealthRabbit
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Re: Why retire?

Post by StealthRabbit »

If I were age 38, (at the moment), I would look around at the health of my USA patients and the condition of the USA medical and healthcare systems and wonder in amazement what could it possibly be like in 30 more yrs.


Then I would find a way to get somewhere that better fits my vision of what / where I would like to be in 30 yrs. (NZ might be a good spot to o research, but they too will change)

USA has made it very difficult to enjoy and retire and sustain the health and well-being of my family through the changes it brought me in the last 30 yrs.

By age 38, I had already retired 2x. And was home with my family (living international).

Retire early, retire often.

It's great to stay home with your family and go back to work when they are well raised and gone.

I had plenty of friends who did not make it to Retirement, or even age 50. My own dad became disabled at age 49 and I cared for him for the next 32 years. Stuff happens that you can not even remotely fathom.
OldBallCoach
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Re: Why retire?

Post by OldBallCoach »

In my line of work ( coaching football ) one is given the option of retiring on a somewhat regular basis when the team you coach does not meet the expections of the folks that write the checks...( usually boosters in college and the owner in the NFL ). We always joke that you are either just fired or working towards your next firing. It wasnt until I had plenty on money in the mattress and my family financially secure that I really enjoyed what I did for a living as much as I do now. I truly love coaching and consulting and will do it as long as the good lord (and by that I mean God, not Roger Goodell or the NCAA ) will allow me too. I have seen way too many of my friends retire and basically sit around and do nothing and die...I guess if one has some great hobbies or a vision to do something else by all means, retire. To me the goal of being FI is to do what YOU want to do...retire? cool...work? cool...just do YOUR thing..In my case I am lucky that my wife agrees 100%. Best of luck in whatever you decide...
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Orbuculum Nongata
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Re: Why retire?

Post by Orbuculum Nongata »

nydoc wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:23 pm Hi everyone,
This forum is primarily focused on a comfortable secure retirement and many members look forward to early retirement. At my age of 38, I do not see why should I aim for a retirement at 50, 55 or 60. I feel good at my work and life seems comfortable.
My question is- what changes happen with age or career that make retirement an attractive goal?
Answers will help me plan more critically for the retirement.
Thank you.
For 19 years I worked for a company that was run engineers. Absolutely loved my job and a culture focused on problem solving. We got bought out by a larger competitor that was run by attorneys. After one year I tired of a culture that focused on regulations and all the stifling reasons a particular problem could not be solved. It wasn’t an isolated buyout. The industry had changed out of necessity and the reality was that it would never again be what it once was. Somewhat unexpectedly retired nearly 4 years ago at the age of 49. Have been enjoying a life I never thought I could would.

Happy for you to feel good at work and have a comfortable life. That very well may last your entire career. If it does, I would see little reason to retire early.
I think I can > I believe I can > I did
mak1277
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Re: Why retire?

Post by mak1277 »

randomguy wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:37 am
The point was simply that the idea that people want to do anything but work is absurd. You would have to picked a really horrible job for that to be remotely true.
The problem (for me) isn't the job...it's that I don't want to work.

If you told me I could make money doing my favorite hobby, but I had to do it 5 days a week for at least 8 hours a day, then I guarantee that within a year, I would start to hate it and it would no longer be my favorite hobby. It would be work.

I want to retire so I can do what I want, when I want, and for how long I want. I don't want to have ANY obligations.

Edit to add: Someone mentioned hiking the Appalachian Trail earlier in this thread. Now, I absolutely love hiking/backpacking...but I have no desire to hike the AT because I don't want to feel obligated to hike every day, rain or shine, for 4-6 months. That just doesn't sound appealing to me even though I love backpacking.
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cookymonster
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Re: Why retire?

Post by cookymonster »

There's lots of stuff I like to do - hike, bicycle, play kickball, eat pizza, play volleyball, swim, travel, read books, ski, watch sports, play board games, lay on the beach, and read the bogleheads forum. If there are any jobs out there that will pay me to do these things, I'll sign up in a heartbeat. But the real jobs that someone will pay me real money to do aren't that much fun. There's a reason we can't all be zookeepers and pro athletes. If we all could do what we wanted and get paid for it, we wouldn't have any ditch diggers or waste management workers.
lostdog
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Re: Why retire?

Post by lostdog »

I love summer activities. Fishing, kayaking, biking, the gym to stay in shape and hanging with family and friends. That alone takes up my Spring, summer and early Fall. This beats out sitting in a cubicle or office any day.

In the winter I'm at the gym, house chores, learning how to code at freecodecamp.com, play world of Warcraft with my in game friends and hang out with my friends. This still beats out sitting in a cubicle or office all day.
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BogleFanGal
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Re: Why retire?

Post by BogleFanGal »

KineticSync wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 12:20 pm My wife and I have had a long, long list of things we intend to do "someday". We're 63. We've recently said goodbye to many people, some a decade younger than us, also full of life and full of plans, who suddenly ran out of somedays. And this is what changed things for us--those vibrant, full of life people, and their plans, just went into the ground one day, and the world moved on. They were ultimately responsible for actualizing the lives they wanted and they thought they had plenty of time.
Of the many terrific and thought-provoking responses on this thread, this one's particularly compelling and reminds me of a quote I keep on my desktop screen. Think I may have read it in another BH thread some time ago:

The Dalai Lama, when asked what surprised him most about humanity, he said:
“Man.
Because he sacrifices his health in order to make money.
Then he sacrifices money to recuperate his health.
And then he is so anxious about the future that he does not enjoy the present;
the result being that he does not live in the present or the future;
he lives as if he is never going to die, and then dies having never really lived.”
"Life would be infinitely happier if we could only be born at the age of eighty and gradually approach eighteen." Mark Twain
EnjoyIt
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Re: Why retire?

Post by EnjoyIt »

I think a better question is, if you have the money to live well, then why work?
A time to EVALUATE your jitters: | https://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=79939&start=400#p5275418
FrankLUSMC
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Re: Why retire?

Post by FrankLUSMC »

JoeRetire wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 11:42 am
EddyB wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 9:38 am
reln wrote: Sun Jan 19, 2020 1:08 am
nydoc wrote: Sat Jan 18, 2020 6:23 pm Hi everyone,
This forum is primarily focused on a comfortable secure retirement and many members look forward to early retirement. At my age of 38, I do not see why should I aim for a retirement at 50, 55 or 60. I feel good at my work and life seems comfortable.
My question is- what changes happen with age or career that make retirement an attractive goal?
Answers will help me plan more critically for the retirement.
Thank you.
Retirement is a funny idea. What would a retired lion or elephant look like?
What would a retired plow horse look like?
Glue.
Or in Eastern Europe..... tartar yep
trueson1
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Re: Why retire?

Post by trueson1 »

In a nutshell - freedom!
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VictoriaF
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Re: Why retire?

Post by VictoriaF »

JediMisty wrote: Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:57 pm That is exactly the way I felt at 38. Now at 61, my health is still great and I can't say my job is bad. It's just that I see friends and colleagues either become disabled or worse, and I am looking forward to my retirement. Life is short. As my grandmother told me, "the older you get, the faster it goes". It slowly has sunk in. YMMV

"The older you get, the faster it goes" is an empirical observation, it's not a cause-and-effect. The psychological reason for the time to seem running faster is that you have fewer landmark events. At a younger age, important events are plentiful: new groups of friends, new romantic partners, new jobs, travel to new places, trying new activities. At an older age, the life is usually stabilized and formerly new experiences have become familiar experiences.

- If you work at an older age, your life is more stable and less eventful, and you perceive time running ever faster.
- If you are retired, you have control of your life, and you can incorporate new events and experiences that would make your life seeming slower, i.e., happier.

Before I retired, I was aware of this psychological quirk and tried to prepare for it. For the early months of my retirement life, I have created three ambitious plans. I have accomplished only one of them: walking el Camino de Santiago. The other two have evolved into other activities.

Apart from the three initial plans, I was trying activities that I have not had time for while I was working, traveling to new places, and being open to new experiences. Several of my current activities were completely unanticipated while I was working, including comedy and meetings of online groups other than the Bogleheads.

Comedy is my current passion. I have taken close to twenty improv classes and several stand-up classes. I developed two stand-up sets in 2017 and 2018, respectively. In the end of 2019, I traveled to New York City twice to take stand-up workshops and develop two new sets. Now, I am taking another stand-up class in D.C. and working on a new set that I'll perform in a public show on Sunday, January 26th. I also applied for a festival and for a competition and now I am waiting for responses. For the competition called The World Series of Comedy I may be selected to travel to other states, including Portland, OR; Greenville, SC; Boston, MA; and Sarasota, FL. To be clear, I might not get into any of these places; or I might.

Being a comic, and particularly a traveling comic, is very eventful. New places, new people, new problems, new triumphs -- it's almost like the college years. But I also have significant advantages over other comics. I have time and money to travel to any club that will want to see me. I also don't think twice before paying a $65 application fee or coming to open mics that require 2 drinks minimum. Yesterday night, at an open mic in a pub, I paid $46 for a meal and a drink while other comics were choosing the cheapest beer and snacks. The organizers welcomed me to come back next Monday.

In addition to doing things, I also keep track of my key events. My life in retirement seems much slower (i.e., better) than in the years before I retired.

Victoria
Last edited by VictoriaF on Tue Jan 21, 2020 12:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.
WINNER of the 2015 Boglehead Contest. | Every joke has a bit of a joke. ... The rest is the truth. (Marat F)
PhillyPhan
Posts: 83
Joined: Wed Nov 28, 2012 9:35 am

Re: Why retire?

Post by PhillyPhan »

This post could be renamed, why voluntarily retire? Since a fair number of folks are pushed into retirement for an assortment of reasons outside of their control, the decision is involuntary.

This post got me thinking and about 50 percent of my managers throughout my career have been displaced from their role and the organization. Viewing this first hand has changed my view of a number of things and makes me want to become financially independent. I would imagine a large percentage of corporate workers do not have a say in when they retire. Having someone tell you when it is time to exit is a tough pill to swallow, but is just reality.
bloom2708
Posts: 8164
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 2:08 pm
Location: Fargo, ND

Re: Why retire?

Post by bloom2708 »

Once you have "enough" money, time > more money.

If you don't set a goal (like retiring at some point) you will certainly not hit it voluntarily.

If it is forced on you and you are not ready...well, that is what we prepare for.
"We are here to provoke thoughtfulness, not agree with you." Unknown Boglehead
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