Gave all personal info to phone scammer

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Topic Author
emdeefive
Posts: 22
Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2014 2:05 am

Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by emdeefive » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:04 pm

Gave following info to phone scammer today:

- name, address
- mother's name
- last 4 social security num
- current address, place of employment, job title
- car info
- drivers license #
- passport number
- bank account num account balance for two banks where I have checking accounts, one with a lot of money in it

How can I ensure my money isn't stolen? Majority of my money is in vanguard (and some others, existence of these not revealed). I'm most concerned that they will use all of this info to get a phone agent to let them wire money out of my accounts.

I already called one bank to alert them and they disabled online access. Not sure that will help if scammer calls them.
Last edited by emdeefive on Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.

runner3081
Posts: 2675
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2016 3:22 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by runner3081 » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:12 pm

Yikes. How?

Very sorry. I don't have much to add, other than good luck.

May want to change bank account numbers, at a minimum.

ericmc
Posts: 30
Joined: Sat Feb 20, 2016 1:24 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by ericmc » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:17 pm

Put a freeze on your credit with the credit agencies.

mptfan
Posts: 5719
Joined: Mon Mar 05, 2007 9:58 am

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by mptfan » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:17 pm

runner3081 wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:12 pm
Yikes. How?
Better yet, why?

User avatar
whodidntante
Posts: 7114
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2016 11:11 pm
Location: outside the echo chamber

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by whodidntante » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:19 pm

For maximum protection, pick from among the following.
Freeze your credit.
Freeze your chexsystems and early warning reports.
Get a new job.
Take up martial arts.
Close your bank accounts.
Move.
Sell your car.
Move out of state so you can get a new license.
Have your mother change her name.
Move to Thailand.

yogesh
Posts: 457
Joined: Thu Oct 11, 2012 6:20 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by yogesh » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:20 pm

Enable 2FA, lockdown money transfers, setup credit monitoring, use mint like instant notifications for credit/debit transactions, change checking accounts or banks, watch for identity theft in addition to money transfers.
Emergency: FDIC | Taxable: VTMFX | Retirement: TR2040

Silk McCue
Posts: 3830
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2016 7:11 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by Silk McCue » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:21 pm

So very sorry.

From another post you are only 31. How did this happen? Please describe the scam call that would cause you to give out all of that information.

You need to put a freeze on your credit bureaus immediately. Change passwords on every account and don’t reuse a single one elsewhere, update challenge questions with fictitious answers and write those answers down.

Call your cellular provider and find out how to put a SIM lock on your phone to keep it from being duplicated and used to commit fraud against you.

This is your only job tomorrow.

Cheers

HomeStretch
Posts: 3465
Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2018 3:06 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by HomeStretch » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:22 pm

If you haven’t already, set up an account at SSA.gov to prevent someone else from doing so.

Not sure if you can get an IRS PIN code to deter someone else from filing a fraudulent return with your name.

Consider freezing your credit.

Close your compromised bank accounts and open new ones.

Enable additional security (like a pass code) for your mobile phone so the scammer can’t port your phone # over. Add nomorobo to your phone to help weed out scammers and don’t answer calls from numbers you don’t recognize.

Sic Vis Pacem
Posts: 90
Joined: Mon Sep 04, 2017 8:25 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by Sic Vis Pacem » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:23 pm

This is a bad situation, but manageable. You're not the first person this had happened to. Now, you've got a bit of work in front of you and you need to start right now. This is a start, but you really should seek out information from sources familiar with identity theft outside this forum.

For the banks: can you initiate a transfer to any accounts that were not disclosed? If so, do so immediately. Then proceed.

Call each of your financial institutions to alert them to what happened. Ask to speak to the fraud department, and see if you can put an automatic hold on any transfers over $XXX (this varies by your tolerance and the institution).

Call Vanguard. Fraud department. Freeze all sales/transfers.

Freeze your credit with all of the major bureaus.

Cancel and reissue your credit cards. You need to unfreeze your credit to do this. Freeze, thaw, freeze.

Change all of your passwords. All of them. Start with your email account, as that can often be a method of obtaining access to other accounts.

Goodluck, godspeed.
Last edited by Sic Vis Pacem on Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:39 pm, edited 1 time in total.

MathWizard
Posts: 3715
Joined: Tue Jul 26, 2011 1:35 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by MathWizard » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:31 pm

Guys, lighten up.

Con men can be good at eliciting information.

Yes, call CC companies, and say your information has been stolen, and you need new cards issued
and sent to your address, and tell that that is has not changed in the last year.

Enable multifactor on bank account, preferably in person. Enable it on all retirement accounts.

I don'y know if you can get another SS number or a new driver's license number. I'd check on it.
Passport number?

Topic Author
emdeefive
Posts: 22
Joined: Tue Dec 09, 2014 2:05 am

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by emdeefive » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:48 pm

> Passport number?

Yes, forgot that one, updated original post. Also, it was bank account balance, not bank account number.

Katietsu
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Joined: Sun Sep 22, 2013 1:48 am

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by Katietsu » Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:49 pm

This scenario happened to my mother. Her banks were able to put a fraud alert and add a special passphrase that must given for phone transactions.

EricJ
Posts: 17
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2008 3:28 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by EricJ » Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:17 am

If the bad guys know the identity of the bank that holds your big cash, you might want to move the cash to a different bank. You might consider using a bank that is not one of the big national banks because the bad guys just might try randomly to use your info at the biggest consumer banks. They might need your full SSN, but chances are it's available on the dark web along with half the adult population (thanks Equifax). What makes you vulnerable is they know you have money and may know where it is.

One of the biggest U.S. banks has very gullible phone reps that allowed impersonators to reset my online password and change my address and phone numbers numerous times over several months, even with fraud alerts and 2 factor authentication in place. I think that the call center representatives worried more about customer satisfaction scores than security.

Watch your email and paper mail carefully for notifications that your contact info has been updated.

If a bad guy impersonates you, and the bank falls for it, that's probably recoverable after much time and effort. But I would not volunteer that you played a role by sharing data, because that could change liability, or at least cause the bank to fight you on it. Tell them you believe you are a victim of identity theft and leave it at that.

Worry about your cash and brokerage accounts first. That's your money at risk. Worry about credit theft next... that's the bank's money, but still paperwork hell.
As far as requesting new credit cards, I don't see how that's needed now.

Good luck.

MotoTrojan
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Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by MotoTrojan » Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:22 am

Also curious how.

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Cubicle
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Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by Cubicle » Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:29 am

I don't know if its legal to do so, but I'd report my license & passport as "lost". The hope being they can void the number, or at least slow the bad guys down.

Silk McCue
Posts: 3830
Joined: Thu Feb 25, 2016 7:11 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by Silk McCue » Fri Dec 06, 2019 8:19 am

emdeefive wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:48 pm
> Passport number?

Yes, forgot that one, updated original post. Also, it was bank account balance, not bank account number.
For the benefit of others please share with us what the nature of the scam was. The depth and breadth of the information you shared must have occurred because of some extremely compelling story, opportunity, offer or demand.

Cheers

wolf359
Posts: 1962
Joined: Sun Mar 15, 2015 8:47 am

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by wolf359 » Fri Dec 06, 2019 8:55 am

To the OP, this is similar in scope to the Equifax breach, in which almost all personal information was compromised. There have been multiple other identity theft breaches since.

The response is similar, and you can use the identity theft breach checklists to protect yourself.

There is an ongoing discussion here: viewtopic.php?t=282893
The first post is updated with the suggestions in the thread, providing a comprehensive list of steps to take.

If you observe any active attempt to commit fraud, file a police report. This changes the scope and tenor of the responses. Instead of you taking preventative measures, you are now directly attempting to combat someone actively committing fraud.

lawman3966
Posts: 1173
Joined: Sun Aug 10, 2008 12:09 pm
Location: Tacoma WA

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by lawman3966 » Fri Dec 06, 2019 9:16 am

I'm not the OP, but am posting to explain how one scammer nearly got some vital information from me in 2017, in case it's helpful to others.

I was visiting Canada, and had just taken a series of Uber rides. As has happened to me on other occasions where my credit card usage pattern changed abruptly, I received an email notice stating that due to unexpected and out-of-character card usage, my card access was being temporarily halted until I cleared the issue up.

As I recall, the email looked just like others I'd received from that credit issuer. The message invited me to click a link within the message and/or to call an 800 number to confirm that the recent purchases were indeed authorized.

The mistake: I called the number in the email instead of calling the one on the card itself. The email included one legit number and one fake one. As I recall, the real number was difficult to access from Canada as I was outside of the "free calling" range for that 800 number. I believe that I ended up calling the other 800 line for that reason.

The receptionist asked for my info. I was half-way through providing my SS number when something clicked, and I hung up. I then called a tel # on my card itself and discovered that I'd called a fraudulent number.

Luckily, my credit info was already frozen at all three reporting agencies. Nevertheless, I spent much of the day pestering my credit card companies to do what they could to prevent any unauthorized charges. To my knowledge, the bad guys never got a cent from me.

The how and why: in brief, the scam was more sophisticated than anything I'd heard about. This wasn't a total stranger calling me from an unidentified number with an offer for a free cruise. Instead, the email at issue arrived only a few minutes after a real charge occurred, and the body of the message referred to that charge, thereby establishing credibility.

The lessons: whatever else happens, only call telephone numbers present on the original credit card. Never take the easy route by clicking on a link embedded into an email. Don't assume that because an email refers to a recent purchase, the email is legit. There are crooks who somehow get inside info on such transactions. It seems reasonable to me to keep one's credit frozen as a default condition, rather than only on special occasions. One can always temporarily unfreeze one's credit when needed.

I avoided losing any money because of the event (to my knowledge), but went through a good bit of anxiety because of it.

carolinaman
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Location: North Carolina

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by carolinaman » Fri Dec 06, 2019 9:30 am

Change accounts at banks and disable online access.

Make sure Vanguard and similar accounts have 2 factor authentication.

Freeze your credit with credit agencies

Change passwords and whereever your mother's maiden name is included in security questions, change it.

I am sorry that this happened to you. [OT comment removed by admin LadyGeek] Hopefully you learn from this and avoid any lapses in the future.

glock19
Posts: 133
Joined: Thu May 03, 2012 9:49 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by glock19 » Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:03 pm

emdeefive wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:48 pm
> Passport number?

Yes, forgot that one, updated original post. Also, it was bank account balance, not bank account number.

Emdeefive, I think I got an escape plan for you. Find a high profile criminal to testify against. This will get you into the Witness Protection Plan. Should solve all your problems. I think it also might be to your best interest to get rid of your phone.

Eno Deb
Posts: 114
Joined: Sun Feb 03, 2019 4:08 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by Eno Deb » Fri Dec 06, 2019 4:05 pm

No reason to panic. Most of this information (such as address, employment, car registration information) can be easily obtained by scammers anyway, bank account numbers are known by everybody you ever gave a check, and massive lists of SSNs are being traded in the dark corners of the Internet. I don't see what anyone could do with your passport number.

Freeze your credit files at the 4 big bureaus if you haven't yet to prevent opening of credit lines in your name, as well as Chex Systems to block new checking accounts. If you remember having used your mother's maiden name as a security question on any online account, change it (and make it a habit to never use true answers for these kind of security questions). I don't think there is a need to switch bank accounts, change passwords etc. if that's all you have revealed.

silverostrich787
Posts: 11
Joined: Fri May 10, 2019 6:52 am

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by silverostrich787 » Fri Dec 06, 2019 8:26 pm

Sorry to hear this. Would you share the details of the scam call, please? It's sad to know that there are still some people like you who felt victim to these scams. I have read similar scams reported by people at http://whycall.me since years ago. I really hope that you won't lose your money. People above have suggested many good tips.

dcw213
Posts: 158
Joined: Sun Dec 16, 2012 3:04 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by dcw213 » Sat Dec 07, 2019 4:30 pm

Thank you very much for the below post, it is a tremendously helpful actual scenario to help us all not get too comfortable with our email text relationships with financial institutions. I consider myself pretty defensive but I could see myself falling for the below scenario in the moment. I am surprised to see the scolding of the OP for carelessness. It could happen to anyone. To paraphrase the Mike Tyson quote, "Everyone has a plan, until they get punched in the mouth."
lawman3966 wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 9:16 am
I'm not the OP, but am posting to explain how one scammer nearly got some vital information from me in 2017, in case it's helpful to others.

I was visiting Canada, and had just taken a series of Uber rides. As has happened to me on other occasions where my credit card usage pattern changed abruptly, I received an email notice stating that due to unexpected and out-of-character card usage, my card access was being temporarily halted until I cleared the issue up.

As I recall, the email looked just like others I'd received from that credit issuer. The message invited me to click a link within the message and/or to call an 800 number to confirm that the recent purchases were indeed authorized.

The mistake: I called the number in the email instead of calling the one on the card itself. The email included one legit number and one fake one. As I recall, the real number was difficult to access from Canada as I was outside of the "free calling" range for that 800 number. I believe that I ended up calling the other 800 line for that reason.

The receptionist asked for my info. I was half-way through providing my SS number when something clicked, and I hung up. I then called a tel # on my card itself and discovered that I'd called a fraudulent number.

Luckily, my credit info was already frozen at all three reporting agencies. Nevertheless, I spent much of the day pestering my credit card companies to do what they could to prevent any unauthorized charges. To my knowledge, the bad guys never got a cent from me.

The how and why: in brief, the scam was more sophisticated than anything I'd heard about. This wasn't a total stranger calling me from an unidentified number with an offer for a free cruise. Instead, the email at issue arrived only a few minutes after a real charge occurred, and the body of the message referred to that charge, thereby establishing credibility.

The lessons: whatever else happens, only call telephone numbers present on the original credit card. Never take the easy route by clicking on a link embedded into an email. Don't assume that because an email refers to a recent purchase, the email is legit. There are crooks who somehow get inside info on such transactions. It seems reasonable to me to keep one's credit frozen as a default condition, rather than only on special occasions. One can always temporarily unfreeze one's credit when needed.

I avoided losing any money because of the event (to my knowledge), but went through a good bit of anxiety because of it.

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Stinky
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Location: Sweet Home Alabama

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by Stinky » Sat Dec 07, 2019 8:19 pm

lawman3966 wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 9:16 am
I'm not the OP, but am posting to explain how one scammer nearly got some vital information from me in 2017, in case it's helpful to others.

I was visiting Canada, and had just taken a series of Uber rides. As has happened to me on other occasions where my credit card usage pattern changed abruptly, I received an email notice stating that due to unexpected and out-of-character card usage, my card access was being temporarily halted until I cleared the issue up.

As I recall, the email looked just like others I'd received from that credit issuer. The message invited me to click a link within the message and/or to call an 800 number to confirm that the recent purchases were indeed authorized.

The mistake: I called the number in the email instead of calling the one on the card itself. The email included one legit number and one fake one. As I recall, the real number was difficult to access from Canada as I was outside of the "free calling" range for that 800 number. I believe that I ended up calling the other 800 line for that reason.

The receptionist asked for my info. I was half-way through providing my SS number when something clicked, and I hung up. I then called a tel # on my card itself and discovered that I'd called a fraudulent number.

Luckily, my credit info was already frozen at all three reporting agencies. Nevertheless, I spent much of the day pestering my credit card companies to do what they could to prevent any unauthorized charges. To my knowledge, the bad guys never got a cent from me.

The how and why: in brief, the scam was more sophisticated than anything I'd heard about. This wasn't a total stranger calling me from an unidentified number with an offer for a free cruise. Instead, the email at issue arrived only a few minutes after a real charge occurred, and the body of the message referred to that charge, thereby establishing credibility.

The lessons: whatever else happens, only call telephone numbers present on the original credit card. Never take the easy route by clicking on a link embedded into an email. Don't assume that because an email refers to a recent purchase, the email is legit. There are crooks who somehow get inside info on such transactions. It seems reasonable to me to keep one's credit frozen as a default condition, rather than only on special occasions. One can always temporarily unfreeze one's credit when needed.

I avoided losing any money because of the event (to my knowledge), but went through a good bit of anxiety because of it.
Great story! Thanks for posting.

I expect that your series of events would have fooled a lot of people.
It's a GREAT day to be alive - Travis Tritt

Cheryl604
Posts: 133
Joined: Sat May 24, 2014 12:24 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by Cheryl604 » Sat Dec 07, 2019 8:29 pm

One thought that I had: file a police report. In my jurisdiction, it's relatively easy to file a police report online for identity theft. It's reviewed online and approved by an officer at the precinct, and you are emailed a report with a case number and the reporting officer's name. Then, if something were to happen, you have the police report showing the date that your identity was stolen/reported. There is also a report you can file out on the FTC website for victims of identity theft. It does ask for financial ramifications, but it's actually a form that you can add to as fraud occurs, and I think you could start one now.

Several years ago I was a victim of identity theft - I think they somehow got the info from a doctor's office. I filed a police report as soon as I found out even though I only had one fraudulent account notification that actually ended up costing me nothing. Over the years, I've had other accounts pop up, and each time I've been able to present the police report as evidence that it was a known issue. It has helped tremendously in getting fraudulent accounts removed.

Cheryl

Trader Joe
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Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by Trader Joe » Sat Dec 07, 2019 8:30 pm

emdeefive wrote:
Thu Dec 05, 2019 10:04 pm
Gave following info to phone scammer today:

- name, address
- mother's name
- last 4 social security num
- current address, place of employment, job title
- car info
- drivers license #
- passport number
- bank account num account balance for two banks where I have checking accounts, one with a lot of money in it

How can I ensure my money isn't stolen? Majority of my money is in vanguard (and some others, existence of these not revealed). I'm most concerned that they will use all of this info to get a phone agent to let them wire money out of my accounts.

I already called one bank to alert them and they disabled online access. Not sure that will help if scammer calls them.
Why would you voluntarily give out all of your personal information?

biscuits
Posts: 58
Joined: Tue Nov 13, 2018 8:24 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by biscuits » Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:43 am

Thanks to the OP and to lawman3966 for his chilling story of a sophisticated scam. I can certainly imagine myself falling for that one, particularly when travelling, and this is a cautionary tale I will not forget!

Good luck to OP.

stockrex
Posts: 74
Joined: Sat Mar 09, 2019 6:28 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by stockrex » Sun Dec 08, 2019 12:25 pm

When CC #s they will ONLY ask you if you shopped at xyz for $xx.xx

Op,

1. Immediately go to transunion website and put a FREE credit freeze as you are victim of id theft likely.
2. Close the back accounts and put fraud alert on them.
3. Move $$ to new account
4. Is you Drive lic # same as social? if not you are good, you could reach out to state dmv and see what remedy they suggest (look online)

please don't wait on any of these.

OnTrack
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Joined: Wed Jan 20, 2016 11:16 pm

Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by OnTrack » Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:12 pm

Cubicle wrote:
Fri Dec 06, 2019 12:29 am
I don't know if its legal to do so, but I'd report my license & passport as "lost". The hope being they can void the number, or at least slow the bad guys down.
I wouldn't report the license and passport as lost. What if there actually is a fraud that occurs. You don't want to be the one lying to authorities.

There was a breach of passport data at Marriott:
"As noted in the newest release published on January 4th, 2019, “Marriott now believes that approximately 5.25 million unencrypted passport numbers were included in the information accessed by an unauthorized third party...."
https://www.idtheftcenter.org/what-to-d ... -breached/
The article said it was very important to report a lost passport to the State Department as an urgent matter. The article did not consider it so urgent to replace the passport due to a breached number. It did suggest the victim could replace the passport early but he or she may have to provide a reason why it is being replaced early. All new US passports will have a new number.

OnTrack
Posts: 578
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Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by OnTrack » Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:26 pm

Per FTC website: https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/blog/2019/ ... rauds-2018
- "We collected more than 1.4 million fraud reports, and people said they lost money to the fraud in 25% of those reports. People reported losing $1.48 billion (with a ‘b’) to fraud last year – an increase of 38% over 2017."
- "Younger people reported losing money to fraud more often than older people. Let that sink in. ..."

As others have said, please share the technique the scammer used to convince you to provide this information so readers of this thread are aware of the scam. I know that con men/women are professionals who can be very convincing. Everyone needs to be vigilant to avoid getting scammed.

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GerryL
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Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by GerryL » Sun Dec 08, 2019 8:48 pm

OP,
Please note that when asked to provide your mother’s maiden name for authentication, you don’t have to use her actual maiden name — in most situations. My mother’s maiden name is very common, so I started using a different name many years ago. You may want to revisit accounts where you have provided this personal info and change it.

GenawithanE
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Re: Gave all personal info to phone scammer

Post by GenawithanE » Sun Dec 08, 2019 11:45 pm

I may have missed it in the various replies, but another piece of advice is to file your tax return as soon as you can next year. You want to be the first one to file your return so they don't have a change to file a fraudulent refund return with your information.

Get a password manager before you change all those passwords, and be sure you use DIFFERENT, COMPLEX passwords for each account. I use Lastpass and love it but there are many out there.

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