Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

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Topic Author
CobraKai
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Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm

I know some make a large salary in exchange for working long hours.

Let's assume that you are paid enough to work a 40 hour work week and not much more than that.

Case in point, my boss (former colleague who was recently promoted) has been contacting me more and more during my time off (off day or vacation day). It's not major, maybe a text here or there, but it can disrupt my day if I'm sitting there for an hour remoting in and communicating back and forth to find there is no problem.

Most recently, the issues that were texted are not what I would call "critical" or an "emergency". Maybe I was too helpful for a time as we did recently have some issues that only I could fix and I made myself available. Now he seems to be texting me more often with questions or issues that are not critical. We have an on call rotation but these texts are not on my "on call" weeks.

I also find that I've been staying over more often as of late. An hour or two here and there adds up!

I think perhaps it's time to request comp time since I am not paid any extra for responding to these calls and texts. Would it be out of line to approach my boss with this idea?

rage_phish
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by rage_phish » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:05 pm

I don’t return calls or texts outside of business hours but I’m non exempt and have a boss who wants us paid for every single hour we work

KlangFool
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by KlangFool » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:08 pm

OP,

Just say no! If you do not know how to say no and set a boundary, it will never end. It is not the issue of comp time either. Even if you get it, do you like to be continuously interrupted in your vacation?

This is the difference between a true professional and others. Unless and until you know how to say no, you would never be respected as a true professional.

KlangFool

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whodidntante
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by whodidntante » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:10 pm

CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm

I think perhaps it's time to request comp time since I am not paid any extra for responding to these calls and texts. Would it be out of line to approach my boss with this idea?
It depends on the culture. You can maybe get away with long lunches, getting your car worked on, doctor's appointments, ducking out early, and other consideration on lean days.

But you could also just not do things that you consider too burdensome.

Afty
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by Afty » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:10 pm

I wouldn't try to charge him for the time, that isn't going to go well. I would ask him not to contact you on your days off, or alternatively set the expectation beforehand that you will not be reachable on a vacation day. There are many legitimate reasons one might not be within cell reception on a vacation day.

runner3081
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by runner3081 » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:11 pm

Unfortunately, it is the expectation at my workplace (email evenings, weekends, etc - in fact, I have a conference call tomorrow morning (SAT). I put up with it now, but I always have a choice to leave if I want.

The one place I do draw the line is PTO > 1 days. In those cases, I am not connected to work at all. Single days off, still on email.

Comp time isn't a thing where I work and I wouldn't ask for it due to that.

rjbraun
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by rjbraun » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm

I take it he texts you on a device issued by your employer (as opposed to your personal phone). What would happen if you just ignored the text and replied only when you are back in the office?

As for staying late in the office an extra hour or two, did he tell you not to leave until you finished some specific project, or is it your choice to work late?

Finally, as for requesting to charge comp time unless you particularly want to be earning comp time I would suggest just ignoring the texts while out of the office and not staying late to finish work unless you have been specifically told to. On the other hand if you want to earn comp time I guess I would first ascertain whether your boss wants or expects you to be responsive when you're out. If he says yes, then I guess you could bring up the comp time angle -- assuming comp time is generally offered where you work.
Last edited by rjbraun on Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:16 pm, edited 1 time in total.

MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by MathIsMyWayr » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm

If you are an exempt employee, there is not much for you to do about it.

sambb
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by sambb » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:16 pm

i also wonder if people have to pay back money for the time at work they have social conversations or surf the internet, etc. I guess it cuts both ways.

KlangFool
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by KlangFool » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:16 pm

MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
If you are an exempt employee, there is not much for you to do about it.
I disagreed. I do not take the call and answer my email on my off day.

KlangFool

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:19 pm

KlangFool wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:08 pm
OP,

Just say no! If you do not know how to say no and set a boundary, it will never end. It is not the issue of comp time either. Even if you get it, do you like to be continuously interrupted in your vacation?

This is the difference between a true professional and others. Unless and until you know how to say no, you would never be respected as a true professional.

KlangFool
When I'm on a week long vacation, I'll usually check emails once a day and answer only if necessary. On off days and long weekends, I've been giving them more slack as of late. We had some issues that only I was familiar with, I was a bit too responsive/available, and now he seems to be taking advantage of that. I've gotten texts on my last 3-4 off days (one of which was a vacation day). Gotta push back now or it's going to continue. This is a guy who I've worked with for years and he KNOWS I don't like to be bothered. Maybe he resents the hours he has to work as manager but he did take the promotion.

MathIsMyWayr
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by MathIsMyWayr » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:24 pm

KlangFool wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:16 pm
MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
If you are an exempt employee, there is not much for you to do about it.
I disagreed. I do not take the call and answer my email on my off day.

KlangFool
Well, it goes both ways. The employer does not track my time at work or check my work mostly, but expects me to meet the mutually set expectations. The key is "expectation."

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:24 pm

whodidntante wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:10 pm
It depends on the culture. You can maybe get away with long lunches, getting your car worked on, doctor's appointments, ducking out early, and other consideration on lean days.

But you could also just not do things that you consider too burdensome.
That is true but when I compare the number of hours that I spend on that stuff versus the number of hours I've donated for no extra pay, there are definitely significantly more hours spent on the latter, as of late.

The culture under a previous manager was that we're paid for 40 hour work week. Things changed over time and now this boss will work extra hours and make himself available 24/7 and seems to be trying to get others to do the same.

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:26 pm

Afty wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:10 pm
I wouldn't try to charge him for the time, that isn't going to go well. I would ask him not to contact you on your days off, or alternatively set the expectation beforehand that you will not be reachable on a vacation day. There are many legitimate reasons one might not be within cell reception on a vacation day.
Do I owe him the specific reason or explanation? Base in point, last time I took a vacation day, I was asked if I was going out of town. I think what he meant to ask is whether I'd be available. Do I owe him an excuse when I don't get back to him right away? I am not sure it is any of his business how I spend my day off.

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:29 pm

runner3081 wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:11 pm
Unfortunately, it is the expectation at my workplace (email evenings, weekends, etc - in fact, I have a conference call tomorrow morning (SAT). I put up with it now, but I always have a choice to leave if I want.

The one place I do draw the line is PTO > 1 days. In those cases, I am not connected to work at all. Single days off, still on email.

Comp time isn't a thing where I work and I wouldn't ask for it due to that.
I don't bother to respond to emails on off days unless my boss sends a text and requests a response.

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:35 pm

rjbraun wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
I take it he texts you on a device issued by your employer (as opposed to your personal phone). What would happen if you just ignored the text and replied only when you are back in the office?
Yes it is an employer-issued device.

That's a good question, I have never tried that. Might be worth a try. :)
rjbraun wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
As for staying late in the office an extra hour or two, did he tell you not to leave until you finished some specific project, or is it your choice to work late?
He did not tell me I had to stay over, but not staying over would likely mean someone would have called when I was off, or I might have been asked the next day why a certain situation wasn't addressed.
rjbraun wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
Finally, as for requesting to charge comp time unless you particularly want to be earning comp time I would suggest just ignoring the texts while out of the office and not staying late to finish work unless you have been specifically told to. On the other hand if you want to earn comp time I guess I would first ascertain whether your boss wants or expects you to be responsive when you're out. If he says yes, then I guess you could bring up the comp time angle -- assuming comp time is generally offered where you work.
Maybe I should not answer (unless critical) and if he makes an issue of it it THEN I bring up the comp time idea. There is no official comp time policy. He has allowed employers to leave early when working several hours over though. He works earlier hours and is gone if I stay over so he doesn't know unless I tell him or send an e-mail at that time.

J295
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by J295 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:05 am

There are reasonable strategies for dealing with this, and one would be a direct conversation with your boss to determine expectations.

What is appropriate will of course depend upon your salary and benefits, the work you perform, the company culture, etc.

mountains
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by mountains » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:14 am

J295 wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:05 am
There are reasonable strategies for dealing with this, and one would be a direct conversation with your boss to determine expectations.

What is appropriate will of course depend upon your salary and benefits, the work you perform, the company culture, etc.
This. You need to have conversation with your boss about the expectations (both ways). Then you need to decide what you are willing to accept and what not. If you feel that your compensation doesn't reflect the expectations on your time, you should bring that up and ask for a raise (assuming you are not hourly). But (again assuming you are not hourly) I wouldn't "charge" for time or per off-hours contact. Agree on expectations and compensation package. And of course, you also need to decide if you'd be willing to walk if your boss doesn't budge.

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:44 am

mountains wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:14 am
J295 wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:05 am
There are reasonable strategies for dealing with this, and one would be a direct conversation with your boss to determine expectations.

What is appropriate will of course depend upon your salary and benefits, the work you perform, the company culture, etc.
This. You need to have conversation with your boss about the expectations (both ways). Then you need to decide what you are willing to accept and what not. If you feel that your compensation doesn't reflect the expectations on your time, you should bring that up and ask for a raise (assuming you are not hourly). But (again assuming you are not hourly) I wouldn't "charge" for time or per off-hours contact. Agree on expectations and compensation package. And of course, you also need to decide if you'd be willing to walk if your boss doesn't budge.
I am not hourly. I am hesitant to ask for more money because that could encourage more demands on my free time (i.e. "hey we're paying him good money so he should be obligated to us 24/7"). I'd rather retain my current salary and the work/life balance that is slowly changing. That said, perhaps it is time we have a one on one to go over this. I know I've had more and more work and responsibility thrown onto my plate over the years with no significant raise (above cost of living) or promotion (which I don't really want anyway). My boss and I used to be on the same level and I think he may be regretting his promotion, or at least a bit envious that others aren't working as many hours as he is or being plugged in as much as he is. That is not really my problem though. If all else fails, you're suggesting find a new ob and THEN walk, and not walk before finding a new job, right? :)

Iridium
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by Iridium » Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:39 am

What would be the reaction if you simply texted back "Can it wait until Monday?" That way, everyone is up front about what is going on. If he says "Yes", then you didn't ignore him and you are not potentially missing a non obvious emergency. If the answer is "No", then the third time it happens to you within 2 months, you are quite justified to setup a meeting with him, where the topic of conversation is that on-call procedures evidently aren't working work, because the project keeps having emergencies that on-call is not resolving. Not only does that interfere with completing your personal obligations, it makes the company vulnerable, should you simply be unavailable at a time when you have made no commitment to be available.

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Watty
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by Watty » Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am

Before I retired I worked in IT and was on a rotating "on call" schedule and would also sometimes get calls when I was not on call.
CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm
Most recently, the issues that were texted are not what I would call "critical" or an "emergency".
In reading your post one big question I have is that if you are maybe being sent emails and texts just to get the question in the que so that you can handle it when you get back into the office.

Is it possible that they are not really expecting an immediate response to many of these emails and texts?

The best thing to do would be to talk with your boss how to identify things that are urgent and not.

One solution would be to just set your phone so that it is silent for emails and texts and have someone actually call you is there is an urgent problem.

I have not done it but I would think you could set your phone only give you an audible alert when you got an email or text that contains the word "urgent". If everyone knows that anything without the word urgent in the subject line can wait until the next business day then that could save a lot of problems.

Most likely your manager will be more reluctant to actually say "urgent" unless it really is.

CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm
We have an on call rotation but these texts are not on my "on call" weeks.
:oops:

This makes it simple. Just forward the text or email to the person that is on call along with a note that says something like, "Joe is on call this week, let me know if he is not able to handle this and needs some help"

Copy the person who sent it so that they know who should be handling it. Pretty soon any emails will be more like "We have a problem, Joe who is on call has tried this things to fix it but we still need some help."

This might be a bit passive aggressive but when there is an after hours problem then do not be slow to actually call the people involved. For example if your manager sends you an urgent looking text on the weekend then call him up to go over it. You might want to wait 15 or 20 minutes to call them so that when you do call it will be more of an interruption for them.

The problem with texts and emails it is way too easy for other people to pass off the work to you.

If they know that if they ring the after hours "fire alarm" that will result in them getting more phone calls and a maybe a conference call that will eat up their time people will be sure that it is a real urgent problem.

We had a problem tracking system where every issue should have had a ticket number. Our management and upper management kept a pretty close eye on this and it was not good for there to be too many tickets for a group. One thing that I did was that whenever there was an after hours problem I would make sure that it was assigned a ticket number even if I had to enter it myself. We had a call center and if they called me after hours I would insist that they open a ticket before I would talk to them, even I was was listening on the phone while they entered the ticket number. They quickly learned to create a ticket before they called me.

Insisting on having open call tickets on all calls did a couple of things;
1) It eliminated a lot of calls because the person did not want to open a ticket.
2) It helped identify some training and system issues.
3) In my weekly status reports and annual reviews I could identify how many tickets I had handled.
4) If I was running behind on some other project being able to identify the other tickets I was working on help identify why there was a delay.

If you have a similar ticket tracking system then start using it for pretty much everything
CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm
I think perhaps it's time to request comp time since I am not paid any extra for responding to these calls and texts. Would it be out of line to approach my boss with this idea?
That is very unlikely to work unless you already use comp time frequently. Most companies don't since it can set them up to have employees reclassified as hourly and require overtime pay.

If it was a vacation day though and you worked 2 hours then you might be able to only record the vacation day as 6 hours of vacation instead of 8.

It really ticked my manager off but I was close to retiring so I didn't really care but one thing I would do if I was up with a call at 3:00 AM was to set my alarm clock for later and send an email saying that I would be in the office at 10:00 AM(or whatever) because I was up late with a call. Occasionally I would be scheduled to be in some early meeting that I would also send an email letting them know that I would not be in it unless it was rescheduled. I would do this even if it only took me 15 minutes to fix the problem since it would take me awhile to get back to sleep. I think that she may have talked to HR about this and they may have explained that since I was exempt that made this a tricky situation.

Like I said it ticked my manager off and she did not like it so I can't really recommend it but the funny thing was that the call center figured out how to handle a lot more of the calls when it was my "on-call" week since they knew that there would be lot more visibility when they called me in the middle of the night. More than once I had a conversation that whet something like this;

"Why are you coming in at 10:00 AM this morning?"
"Because I was up at 3:00 AM handling a call."
"What was the problem?"
"The call center did not read the instructions."
or
"We need to make that part of the system more bullet proof."

Often the person at the call center would get additional training(or talked to), or there would be a project to improve a known problem with the system.
CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm
Let's assume that you are paid enough to work a 40 hour work week and not much more than that.
Maybe it is time to start looking for another job.

smitcat
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by smitcat » Sat Nov 09, 2019 6:47 am

CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:35 pm
rjbraun wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
I take it he texts you on a device issued by your employer (as opposed to your personal phone). What would happen if you just ignored the text and replied only when you are back in the office?
Yes it is an employer-issued device.

That's a good question, I have never tried that. Might be worth a try. :)
rjbraun wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
As for staying late in the office an extra hour or two, did he tell you not to leave until you finished some specific project, or is it your choice to work late?
He did not tell me I had to stay over, but not staying over would likely mean someone would have called when I was off, or I might have been asked the next day why a certain situation wasn't addressed.
rjbraun wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
Finally, as for requesting to charge comp time unless you particularly want to be earning comp time I would suggest just ignoring the texts while out of the office and not staying late to finish work unless you have been specifically told to. On the other hand if you want to earn comp time I guess I would first ascertain whether your boss wants or expects you to be responsive when you're out. If he says yes, then I guess you could bring up the comp time angle -- assuming comp time is generally offered where you work.
Maybe I should not answer (unless critical) and if he makes an issue of it it THEN I bring up the comp time idea. There is no official comp time policy. He has allowed employers to leave early when working several hours over though. He works earlier hours and is gone if I stay over so he doesn't know unless I tell him or send an e-mail at that time.
"Yes it is an employer-issued device."
Why would your company issue a device to reach an employee? Does everyone get one? If no ... then which ones get the devices and which ones do not?
Is it a requirement of your job description and/or employment agreement to carry this device for specific hours of the day? Is it required to be carried on days off and/or vacation days?
What does the job description and/or company manual say about the expectations of being issued these devices?

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LiveSimple
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by LiveSimple » Sat Nov 09, 2019 7:10 am

It depends, if you own the process or product then occasional call during the off time is needed.
Sometime this is better rather someone else takes a decision for you and you have to come and correct or live with that decision for a long time.

I do prefer short call during my time off, than someone making a decision in my absence, within my process area.

Yes it takes a time of vacation or the mood, but okay.

stoptothink
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by stoptothink » Sat Nov 09, 2019 7:30 am

whodidntante wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:10 pm
CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm

I think perhaps it's time to request comp time since I am not paid any extra for responding to these calls and texts. Would it be out of line to approach my boss with this idea?
It depends on the culture. You can maybe get away with long lunches, getting your car worked on, doctor's appointments, ducking out early, and other consideration on lean days.
I'm not punching a clock and ~90% of employees at my company aren't either. I work from home 1.5 days a week, workout in the middle of the day (or whenever I want really) when I'm at the office, I even bring my kids sometimes when my wife is traveling; that level of autonomy doesn't come for free. In exchange for having a ton of freedom, when my boss texts me at 9pm on a Sunday, I better get what he wants done.

On Wednesday I got a text from my boss about an hour after I had gotten home that the medical staff and several players from an NBA team were on their way to tour our campus and that obviously meant that the company's head exercise scientist (me) should be there. My wife was at school so I packed my kids some dinner in my backpack and we walked down the street to my office. My kids hung out with some NBA players for a few hours and got home just before mommy did, in time for bed. The fact that my boss knew he could text me and I'd be there is the reason I have been given the opportunities that I have.

I rarely actually work (otherwise might have a different definition of what this means) more than 40hrs in a week, but my willingness to get things done when they need to get done has been one of the primary reasons I have moved up the ladder. I am not necessarily working more hours than others, but I'm in upper management while others (with similar level of education and experience) are my employees or individual contributors elsewhere because they aren't willing to answer an email/text when they are "off".

smitcat
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by smitcat » Sat Nov 09, 2019 7:31 am

KlangFool wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:16 pm
MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
If you are an exempt employee, there is not much for you to do about it.
I disagreed. I do not take the call and answer my email on my off day.

KlangFool
A very good point to review the choices here - none of them are 'right' or 'wrong'.
Possibilities of avoiding the call(s) include
Positives
- no distractions on time off
- no loss of 'personal' time
- no need to carry device

Negatives
- your project or program can be altered in your absence perhaps generating more work
- you may not be an appropriate choice for key company initiatives
- your company device is really not required and may be removed
- other company staff will be utilized for their skills when you are not available
- these items will restrict the ability to rise within a company and career
- these items will be considered during slow periods and/or staff reductions

Fortunately - we are all able to make these decisions repeatedly based upon the exact specific issues at that company and with our personal life and goals at that time.

mark39
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by mark39 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 7:58 am

These are my observations from a similar situation. Keep in mind I haven’t figured much out yet.

Exempt supervisor im a 24 hour operation. There are three people above me still (managers). All paperwork signed and verbally confirmed states 40 hours a week is required minimum. I have an office issued cell phone and most of our communication is done by email. I get at least 400 emails a day. It’s quite maddening even on off days.

I am expected to respond to emails on off time or off days when necessary. Necessary isn’t clearly defined but I check my phone several times a day simply because they pile up if I don’t.

Regarding the 40 hours a week: it’s technically true but my boss finds it unthinkable you would consider working under 45 a week and really expects 50+.

I have tried only responding to emails during my work hours. That’s okay, but sometimes I just want to get things done and if a quick email or two will moved things along then I will just take care of it. So, it’s a toss-up which is better. Kind of depends on the issue at hand.

I have also tried to not let the expectation be that I will be working more than 40 hours a week. My boss brings it up all the time but there is essentially nothing he can do about it. I don’t argue and will work extra when required but I’m not spending my own time just so I can say I was there for 50 hours. IMO, an employee that can get the same amount of work done in less time is a better employee. But, as Office politics go, sticking around to schmooze and act busy are a better way to get ahead. Okay fine, I won’t get agreed. I suppose that’s my choice.

I would guess I spend 3-4 hours a week during my off time (after hours, days off, vacation days, etc.) checking emails, answering texts and calls. I am also to be available 24/7/365 in case of emergencies.

I think it depends on your pull at your specific workplace. I am not in a position where I can just go tell my boss “The pore employment paperwork says this, you told me this, and I’m only doing this.” I sort of have to play the game and give a little, take a little.

Mr. Rumples
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by Mr. Rumples » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:04 am

There are specific statutes governing situations like this under FLSA, federal labor law, and in some states, state and even local law.

Questions to ask: is the position exempt or non-exempt under federal law (and in some states by state and even local law), is movement restricted (for example, even if not at work, must the person be assessable by phone/cell phone/text -meaning the person might not be able to go hiking/boating or mow the lawn), does it restrict the use of alcohol so a beer can't be consumed, how much time are we talking about per year.

Frankly, the person requesting the assistance is putting the company at some legal liability if push comes to shove which is why most companies have a written policy regarding this type of thing.

Here is now I handled it as an administrator. For myself, though in a salaried position, I expected to work a 50 hour week. In addition, I expected calls on off hours. I expected at times to go into the office on a weekend. It was no big deal since I loved my job. On the other hand, for those non-exempt employees, they were paid 1 hour of salary for every 8 hours they were on call and then if they had to work, they switched to their hourly rate. If they came in early or stayed late, for non-exempt, they went over 40 hours, they were given time and a half off in "comp time." Exempt employees who had to stay late were given straight "comp time." This was all on the books and really not difficult to administer. Of course, I have been retired 10 years and I guess things have changed.

It was important to me to know who needed off hour help, not only to see if people knew their job, but to keep track of how the agency was being administered and if customer demands and expectations were being met.

https://webapps.dol.gov/elaws/whd/flsa/ ... enEr80.asp

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Tamarind
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by Tamarind » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:10 am

Some companies expect a quick response to every communication including outside business hours. This drives me nuts and I would about working for those places. I prefer those that recognize email and text as asynchronous communication tools.

I read email once or twice on off-days, but there is no expectation that I answer. I do more work and work-related travel on weekends now that at prior jobs, but that's my choice to chase a billable hours bonus and my manager does not require others on the team to do so.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by ClevrChico » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:15 am

I would happily devote some extra time to help out a boss. It seems like a small investment to gain some "executive air cover".

As other mentioned, get some time back with the occasional long lunch, leaving early on Friday's, etc. if the culture allows it. A lot of places are fine with this.

I helped out a colleague that technically wasn't in my area or my problem over a holiday. It was maybe two hours of my time. I was granted a $2k bonus for that. Worth it.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by dekecarver » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:29 am

First thing to do is determine if your expectation and your boss's expectation is clearly understood and not assumed; often expectations are not clear especially when one side thinks, how could it be anything else but clear. Once you answer that question you may have to set parameters or make a choice. I've found the discussion to be pretty straight forward especially when there is mutual respect and a mutual understanding of the purpose and objective of the after-hours contact. I take no calls or emails after hours, however if I receive a text which is very infrequent, I respond based on the communication in the text, and sometimes this involves providing specific info or "I'll touch base with you on ... unless you need to talk now". Work life is so much easier and satisfying when you have a good working relationship with your superior and helping your boss out can go a long ways; especially when its mutual.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by stoptothink » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:41 am

ClevrChico wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:15 am
I would happily devote some extra time to help out a boss. It seems like a small investment to gain some "executive air cover".

As other mentioned, get some time back with the occasional long lunch, leaving early on Friday's, etc. if the culture allows it. A lot of places are fine with this.

I helped out a colleague that technically wasn't in my area or my problem over a holiday. It was maybe two hours of my time. I was granted a $2k bonus for that. Worth it.
You have to know your employer. I happily work on my days off and after hours because it generally is when I get the greatest ROI on my work (paid in new opportunities, bigger bonuses), but at my two previous jobs: not a chance. There were no new opportunities or bonuses to be had.

This past summer I stuck my head out and offered to help my boss with an "after hours" project that nobody wanted a thing to do with. I worked a bit at home for a few weeks and my part was completed end of July. Found out a few weeks ago that I will be getting a bonus when it is completed (likely before the end of the year) and a share of the royalties every quarter for the foreseeable future. Not to mention, it will really help my boss and his partners (other 3 owners of the company) are very aware that I offered to help when nobody else would.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by MikeG62 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:55 am

smitcat wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 7:31 am
KlangFool wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:16 pm
MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
If you are an exempt employee, there is not much for you to do about it.
I disagreed. I do not take the call and answer my email on my off day.

KlangFool
A very good point to review the choices here - none of them are 'right' or 'wrong'.
Possibilities of avoiding the call(s) include
Positives
- no distractions on time off
- no loss of 'personal' time
- no need to carry device

Negatives
- your project or program can be altered in your absence perhaps generating more work
- you may not be an appropriate choice for key company initiatives
- your company device is really not required and may be removed
- other company staff will be utilized for their skills when you are not available
- these items will restrict the ability to rise within a company and career
- these items will be considered during slow periods and/or staff reductions

Fortunately - we are all able to make these decisions repeatedly based upon the exact specific issues at that company and with our personal life and goals at that time.
I agree with Smitcat here. The potential negatives are likely to far outweigh the positives.

When I worked, I considered myself available to respond to inquiries from my boss at any time. If it was important enough for my boss to be dealing with out of the office, then by definition it was important enough for me to deal with too.
Real Knowledge Comes Only From Experience

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by Jags4186 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:02 am

I have a company issued cell phone. Nobody at my company knows my personal cell phone, except perhaps the person who interviewed/hired me and has since left the company. At 6PM on Friday I put the work cell phone on silent, attach it to the charger, and don’t look at it until Monday morning.

I recommend you do the same.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by Lee_WSP » Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:10 am

CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:26 pm
Afty wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:10 pm
I wouldn't try to charge him for the time, that isn't going to go well. I would ask him not to contact you on your days off, or alternatively set the expectation beforehand that you will not be reachable on a vacation day. There are many legitimate reasons one might not be within cell reception on a vacation day.
Do I owe him the specific reason or explanation? Base in point, last time I took a vacation day, I was asked if I was going out of town. I think what he meant to ask is whether I'd be available. Do I owe him an excuse when I don't get back to him right away? I am not sure it is any of his business how I spend my day off.
He also pays your salary, gives you a job, and pays for all that stuff you get to use. The alternative to having a paternalistic (and I use the term benignly) is to strike it out on your own.

The best resolution is going to be a negotiated settlement. You two need to come to terms on what the relationship is supposed to be going forward.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by beyou » Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:28 am

General advice from strangers with a different career, boss and employer is not going to help. You need to evaluate your boss, job and company and decide what works.

I look at this both as a boss and having a boss too. And my approach with my bosses was to understand or ask criticality. Do what is needed/critical and give yourself time off another day/time to take care of your needs. I dont ask for comp time. My assumption is that if I am expected to be available 24hrs, I can also take time off 24 hrs/day as needed. If I need to leave early, come in late, WFH, I don’t ASK I just do. I let people know who need to know, but I am not asking. That is the bargain i made in my head, nobody has ever pushed back.

As a boss, I expect they will do what is needed and urgent for the job, and they can also deal with urgent personal issues during business hours without taking a full vacation day nor begging for permission. I never asked HR, they don’t need to know, we do what is fair and allows both the employer and employee get what they need when they need it. This may not work with your boss/employer, can’t say this is for everyone.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by michaeljc70 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:41 am

CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:24 pm
whodidntante wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:10 pm
It depends on the culture. You can maybe get away with long lunches, getting your car worked on, doctor's appointments, ducking out early, and other consideration on lean days.

But you could also just not do things that you consider too burdensome.
That is true but when I compare the number of hours that I spend on that stuff versus the number of hours I've donated for no extra pay, there are definitely significantly more hours spent on the latter, as of late.

The culture under a previous manager was that we're paid for 40 hour work week. Things changed over time and now this boss will work extra hours and make himself available 24/7 and seems to be trying to get others to do the same.
Are you a salaried worker? Were you told you only needed to work 40 hours a week when hired? I'd hardly call it a donation if you are a salaried worker. Some people work 80 hours a week and don't get an extra penny.

Anything you do at this point will probably not make your boss happy. I guess you could point out that you are not the person on call next time. Maybe don't respond for hours and then respond saying you were "disconnected" since it wasn't your on call period.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by KyleAAA » Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:44 am

I’ve worked at several companies that had on-call pay. It is usually a few hundred $$$ per week and you get paid whether or not there is an off hours incident. Some companies have something similar where if you need to log in to respond to an incident after hours you get a stipend, even if you aren’t on call. I’ve also worked places where you didn’t get anything extra. I prefer the former.

I’d just set a clear expectation that I’m unavailable except in emergency. It sounds like there just isn’t good knowledge share in your group and the manager relies on one person for everything. That is the manager’s job to mitigate, so don’t cover up the problem.
Last edited by KyleAAA on Sat Nov 09, 2019 2:01 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by tibbitts » Sat Nov 09, 2019 10:59 am

This is a judgement you have to make based on overall compensation. If you have flexibility in hours and have somewhat unofficial comp time, then that seems resonable, but only you know your situation.

From a business standpoint it's a vulnerability to have only one person be able to resolve problems, but at most small or even some large organizations, that's the reality. So you might have a discussion about that - maybe some processes are too complicated, you need more documentation or training, or even just more or different staff.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Sat Nov 09, 2019 11:34 am

Iridium wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:39 am
What would be the reaction if you simply texted back "Can it wait until Monday?" That way, everyone is up front about what is going on. If he says "Yes", then you didn't ignore him and you are not potentially missing a non obvious emergency. If the answer is "No", then the third time it happens to you within 2 months, you are quite justified to setup a meeting with him, where the topic of conversation is that on-call procedures evidently aren't working work, because the project keeps having emergencies that on-call is not resolving. Not only does that interfere with completing your personal obligations, it makes the company vulnerable, should you simply be unavailable at a time when you have made no commitment to be available.
That is a good question to ask. Only concern is that he still might be conditioned to expect prompt responses. Unless I'm on call, I don't really care to be carrying my phone everywhere and be glued to it 24/7.

The latest question he asked me could have been answered by reaching out to someone outside the department that was on-site at the time. It was not necessary to contact me. Perhaps he thought that would be more convenient to him and he wants to test to see how available I am moving forward. He is relatively new at his job (although not in the department) and his boss is new as well.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by KlangFool » Sat Nov 09, 2019 11:39 am

CobraKai wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 11:34 am
Iridium wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:39 am
What would be the reaction if you simply texted back "Can it wait until Monday?" That way, everyone is up front about what is going on. If he says "Yes", then you didn't ignore him and you are not potentially missing a non obvious emergency. If the answer is "No", then the third time it happens to you within 2 months, you are quite justified to setup a meeting with him, where the topic of conversation is that on-call procedures evidently aren't working work, because the project keeps having emergencies that on-call is not resolving. Not only does that interfere with completing your personal obligations, it makes the company vulnerable, should you simply be unavailable at a time when you have made no commitment to be available.
That is a good question to ask. Only concern is that he still might be conditioned to expect prompt responses. Unless I'm on call, I don't really care to be carrying my phone everywhere and be glued to it 24/7.

The latest question he asked me could have been answered by reaching out to someone outside the department that was on-site at the time. It was not necessary to contact me. Perhaps he thought that would be more convenient to him and he wants to test to see how available I am moving forward. He is relatively new at his job (although not in the department) and his boss is new as well.
CobraKai,

<<Perhaps he thought that would be more convenient to him and he wants to test to see how available I am moving forward.>>

It is your fault to condition him to your responsiveness. It is a relationship. You need to set the boundary if your boss could not or would not set the boundary.

KlangFool

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by marcopolo » Sat Nov 09, 2019 11:41 am

KlangFool wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:16 pm
MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
If you are an exempt employee, there is not much for you to do about it.
I disagreed. I do not take the call and answer my email on my off day.

KlangFool
[Comment removed by moderator oldcomputerguy]

It should not be a regular expectation, nor used for mundane issues. But, in a modern economy, the business runs 24/7. Occasionally, issues will come up in off hours. Professionals step up when such need arises. At least that has been my experience.
Last edited by marcopolo on Sat Nov 09, 2019 11:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
Once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by MillennialFinance19 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 11:42 am

runner3081 wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:11 pm
Unfortunately, it is the expectation at my workplace (email evenings, weekends, etc - in fact, I have a conference call tomorrow morning (SAT). I put up with it now, but I always have a choice to leave if I want.

The one place I do draw the line is PTO > 1 days. In those cases, I am not connected to work at all. Single days off, still on email.

Comp time isn't a thing where I work and I wouldn't ask for it due to that.
I'm with you 100%. If I'm off for a day, I will take calls, texts, and check email 2-3 times. If I'm doing anything that lasts more than 15 minutes, I charge it as working hours instead of PTO. If I'm off on an actual "VACATION" no one is reaching me.

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:02 pm

Watty wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am
Before I retired I worked in IT and was on a rotating "on call" schedule and would also sometimes get calls when I was not on call.

In reading your post one big question I have is that if you are maybe being sent emails and texts just to get the question in the que so that you can handle it when you get back into the office.
If that's the case, he can send me an e-mail as I don't usually respond to them unless I am in the office (or the boss contacts me via phone or text and asks me to respond).
Watty wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am
Is it possible that they are not really expecting an immediate response to many of these emails and texts?

The best thing to do would be to talk with your boss how to identify things that are urgent and not.
That could be the case in some of the more recent instances. He has sent me texts on my week off vacations, and I would only check my phone once a day (otherwise keeping it turned off) and get back to him the next day. He seems satisfied with that. On normal off days or one off vacation days (especially if on a regular business day), not so sure. I usually keep my phone on but not always on me.

He has texted me issues that only I could resolve and seemed urgent at the time. Other texts have been simple questions that he could have gotten from other sources, or waited until I was back in the office. Good idea though. I guess it cannot hurt to bring it up and ask him what his expectations are. I'm just a bit concerned that my increased availability in recent weeks (for issues only I could resolve) is setting a new precedent and he feels that I'm available all the time now.
Watty wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am
One solution would be to just set your phone so that it is silent for emails and texts and have someone actually call you is there is an urgent problem.

I have not done it but I would think you could set your phone only give you an audible alert when you got an email or text that contains the word "urgent". If everyone knows that anything without the word urgent in the subject line can wait until the next business day then that could save a lot of problems.
Good idea. Just have to make sure people don't abuse it!
Watty wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am
Most likely your manager will be more reluctant to actually say "urgent" unless it really is.
That may not stop people outside the department from if they catch wind of this. Then again, if it is urgent, my boss will text or call.
Watty wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am
CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm
We have an on call rotation but these texts are not on my "on call" weeks.
:oops:

This makes it simple. Just forward the text or email to the person that is on call along with a note that says something like, "Joe is on call this week, let me know if he is not able to handle this and needs some help"

Copy the person who sent it so that they know who should be handling it. Pretty soon any emails will be more like "We have a problem, Joe who is on call has tried this things to fix it but we still need some help."

This might be a bit passive aggressive but when there is an after hours problem then do not be slow to actually call the people involved. For example if your manager sends you an urgent looking text on the weekend then call him up to go over it. You might want to wait 15 or 20 minutes to call them so that when you do call it will be more of an interruption for them.

The problem with texts and emails it is way too easy for other people to pass off the work to you.

If they know that if they ring the after hours "fire alarm" that will result in them getting more phone calls and a maybe a conference call that will eat up their time people will be sure that it is a real urgent problem.
The problem is that these most recent issues could not be resolved by the on call person as I am the only one who has the skillset to assist.
Watty wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am
We had a problem tracking system where every issue should have had a ticket number. Our management and upper management kept a pretty close eye on this and it was not good for there to be too many tickets for a group. One thing that I did was that whenever there was an after hours problem I would make sure that it was assigned a ticket number even if I had to enter it myself. We had a call center and if they called me after hours I would insist that they open a ticket before I would talk to them, even I was was listening on the phone while they entered the ticket number. They quickly learned to create a ticket before they called me.

Insisting on having open call tickets on all calls did a couple of things;
1) It eliminated a lot of calls because the person did not want to open a ticket.
2) It helped identify some training and system issues.
3) In my weekly status reports and annual reviews I could identify how many tickets I had handled.
4) If I was running behind on some other project being able to identify the other tickets I was working on help identify why there was a delay.

If you have a similar ticket tracking system then start using it for pretty much everything
Good idea! It is sometimes a struggle to get people to open tickets. This is a separate issue, even when on site, and is a never ending battle. I have done what you have and required tickets to be open, but some of my colleagues don't seem to place a priority on this. In other words, someone else in my department might help someone without requiring a ticket. People will then think they don't have to open tickets.
Watty wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am
CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm
I think perhaps it's time to request comp time since I am not paid any extra for responding to these calls and texts. Would it be out of line to approach my boss with this idea?
That is very unlikely to work unless you already use comp time frequently. Most companies don't since it can set them up to have employees reclassified as hourly and require overtime pay.

If it was a vacation day though and you worked 2 hours then you might be able to only record the vacation day as 6 hours of vacation instead of 8.
Good idea to document this. If I do stay over, or work on an off day, I try to remember to add to my time sheet.
Watty wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am
It really ticked my manager off but I was close to retiring so I didn't really care but one thing I would do if I was up with a call at 3:00 AM was to set my alarm clock for later and send an email saying that I would be in the office at 10:00 AM(or whatever) because I was up late with a call. Occasionally I would be scheduled to be in some early meeting that I would also send an email letting them know that I would not be in it unless it was rescheduled. I would do this even if it only took me 15 minutes to fix the problem since it would take me awhile to get back to sleep. I think that she may have talked to HR about this and they may have explained that since I was exempt that made this a tricky situation.

Like I said it ticked my manager off and she did not like it so I can't really recommend it but the funny thing was that the call center figured out how to handle a lot more of the calls when it was my "on-call" week since they knew that there would be lot more visibility when they called me in the middle of the night. More than once I had a conversation that whet something like this;

"Why are you coming in at 10:00 AM this morning?"
"Because I was up at 3:00 AM handling a call."
"What was the problem?"
"The call center did not read the instructions."
or
"We need to make that part of the system more bullet proof."

Often the person at the call center would get additional training(or talked to), or there would be a project to improve a known problem with the system.
I have gotten late night calls and have thought about doing something similar. It's only fair IMO. If I'm up for two hours, working on an issue, and it takes me two hours to get back to sleep, I'm pretty much worthless the next day anyway. When I accepted the job way back when, on call was not part of it. I had that thrown into my lap after our department was gutted and we became a skeleton crew.
Watty wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 1:45 am
CobraKai wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:03 pm
Let's assume that you are paid enough to work a 40 hour work week and not much more than that.
Maybe it is time to start looking for another job.
Perhaps it is time. It just seems like my responsibilities have slowly increased for years, yet no significant pay raise (outside of basic COL) or promotion. It makes me think that perhaps I'm being taken advantage of. It's difficult to get anything done, even when on site, because I am constantly being interrupted (people with issues, newer co-workers that need help, etc).

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:14 pm

smitcat wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 6:47 am
"Yes it is an employer-issued device."
Why would your company issue a device to reach an employee? Does everyone get one? If no ... then which ones get the devices and which ones do not?
Is it a requirement of your job description and/or employment agreement to carry this device for specific hours of the day? Is it required to be carried on days off and/or vacation days?
What does the job description and/or company manual say about the expectations of being issued these devices?
Everyone in the department gets one. There are no set rules other than our weekly on call. As stated, I am getting more and more calls when not "on call"

I guess that's part of the problem. There are no written rules or an "agreement".

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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by michaeljc70 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:18 pm

I agree that it might be time to look for a new job. If your boss contacts you because you are more capable than your co-workers and yet you just get COL raises, there is a disconnect. Unless the co-workers are making much less. If you really like the job then I would have a discussion with your boss about the issue. Maybe he just thinks you don't mind and respond the quickest so he just always goes to you.

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:27 pm

Mr. Rumples wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:04 am
There are specific statutes governing situations like this under FLSA, federal labor law, and in some states, state and even local law.

Questions to ask: is the position exempt or non-exempt under federal law (and in some states by state and even local law), is movement restricted (for example, even if not at work, must the person be assessable by phone/cell phone/text -meaning the person might not be able to go hiking/boating or mow the lawn), does it restrict the use of alcohol so a beer can't be consumed, how much time are we talking about per year.

Frankly, the person requesting the assistance is putting the company at some legal liability if push comes to shove which is why most companies have a written policy regarding this type of thing.

Here is now I handled it as an administrator. For myself, though in a salaried position, I expected to work a 50 hour week. In addition, I expected calls on off hours. I expected at times to go into the office on a weekend. It was no big deal since I loved my job. On the other hand, for those non-exempt employees, they were paid 1 hour of salary for every 8 hours they were on call and then if they had to work, they switched to their hourly rate. If they came in early or stayed late, for non-exempt, they went over 40 hours, they were given time and a half off in "comp time." Exempt employees who had to stay late were given straight "comp time." This was all on the books and really not difficult to administer. Of course, I have been retired 10 years and I guess things have changed.

It was important to me to know who needed off hour help, not only to see if people knew their job, but to keep track of how the agency was being administered and if customer demands and expectations were being met.

https://webapps.dol.gov/elaws/whd/flsa/ ... enEr80.asp
There is no written policy that I am aware of.
The position is salaried. I am not sure if it's exempt or non-exempt. It's an IT support position (although I wear a number of hats). According to this, it is exempt:

https://www.nechtriallaw.com/computer-h ... uirements/

That's copied from a law firm so it may not be accurate.

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:32 pm

ClevrChico wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:15 am
I would happily devote some extra time to help out a boss. It seems like a small investment to gain some "executive air cover".

As other mentioned, get some time back with the occasional long lunch, leaving early on Friday's, etc. if the culture allows it. A lot of places are fine with this.

I helped out a colleague that technically wasn't in my area or my problem over a holiday. It was maybe two hours of my time. I was granted a $2k bonus for that. Worth it.
And I have helped him on many occasions. There is being helpful and there is also being taken advantage of. Even though my responsibilities and available outside of work has slowly increased over the years, I have not gotten anything out of it (raises, promotions, or the like). To his credit, he is okay if I need to come in later or leave early if I find myself in a bind. However, when comparing the number of "credited" hours that I've received (leave early/come in late/etc) to the hours that I've given, the company is ahead. In other words, if there was comp time, I'd probably have a few extra vacation days from the past 4-5 months or so. I know, there are people that work long hours, but I don't get paid to work long hours. I recall a previous boss saying that we're paid for a 40 hour work week.

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:38 pm

dekecarver wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 8:29 am
First thing to do is determine if your expectation and your boss's expectation is clearly understood and not assumed; often expectations are not clear especially when one side thinks, how could it be anything else but clear. Once you answer that question you may have to set parameters or make a choice. I've found the discussion to be pretty straight forward especially when there is mutual respect and a mutual understanding of the purpose and objective of the after-hours contact. I take no calls or emails after hours, however if I receive a text which is very infrequent, I respond based on the communication in the text, and sometimes this involves providing specific info or "I'll touch base with you on ... unless you need to talk now". Work life is so much easier and satisfying when you have a good working relationship with your superior and helping your boss out can go a long ways; especially when its mutual.
Good points. I will have to schedule a one-on-one with him and find out his expectations. It could be that I'm misinterpreting the urgency, but he has texted me early in the morning when he knew I would be in later in the day, which means it probably can't wait.

And I hate to say this...it could be the cynic in me but I wonder if he is playing a passive aggressive game. He's not happy with the extra hours that he has had to spend since being promoted. I can recall two instances in recent months in which co-workers balked when he asked them to stay a couple hours over, and then he made a remark in response such as "try working my schedule" or "I'm doing it so why shouldn't you?". He did take the promotion though and perhaps there is some "buyer's remorse", so to speak. That is something he needs to address with HIS superiors and not take out on his subordinates, right?

Dottie57
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by Dottie57 » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:38 pm

MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:24 pm
KlangFool wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:16 pm
MathIsMyWayr wrote:
Fri Nov 08, 2019 11:13 pm
If you are an exempt employee, there is not much for you to do about it.
I disagreed. I do not take the call and answer my email on my off day.

KlangFool
Well, it goes both ways. The employer does not track my time at work or check my work mostly, but expects me to meet the mutually set expectations. The key is "expectation."
This was mostly true for me. But expectations kept increasing each year. During the year I would get small bonuses of 1.5k to 3k. EOY bonus was very good the last 5-8 yrs I worked. Grateful for buyout in 2018. Happily retired.

Fyi, company did not pay for cell phone, so I never gave personal # put.

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CobraKai
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Re: Do you charge your employer for the time that you spend working on your off days?

Post by CobraKai » Sat Nov 09, 2019 12:43 pm

Jags4186 wrote:
Sat Nov 09, 2019 9:02 am
I have a company issued cell phone. Nobody at my company knows my personal cell phone, except perhaps the person who interviewed/hired me and has since left the company. At 6PM on Friday I put the work cell phone on silent, attach it to the charger, and don’t look at it until Monday morning.

I recommend you do the same.
How have your co-workers and/or boss(es) responded? Let's say they call or text you when your phone is off and you don't respond until Monday.

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