Credit Card information stolen

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Topic Author
Calhoon
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:29 pm

Credit Card information stolen

Post by Calhoon » Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:02 pm

Woke up this morning to a text from my credit card company telling me that during the night there had been suspicious activity on my card. Someone had purchased 2000 dollars worth of equipment from a an online retailer. The weird thing was they used my credit card number, my wife's cell number, my daughter's name, and our billing address. Seemed like they had an awful lot of information on me. Little disturbing.

Aside from blocking the transactions and discontinuing that one card, are there any other steps I should be taking? Should I be concerned/doing anything with bank accounts, retirement accounts, etc?

greenback
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Jun 29, 2018 2:42 pm

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by greenback » Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:08 pm

Personally I would:

- Change all passwords
- Enable multi-tier authentication on all accounts
- Ask other CC companies to re-issue a new number (if even possible)
You shouldn’t retire until your money starts making more money than you made in your best year.

HomeStretch
Posts: 2930
Joined: Thu Dec 27, 2018 3:06 pm

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by HomeStretch » Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:08 pm

A lot of info is available online from voting records, etc. But if any one of the three of you uses social media, you might want to eliminate personal data like birth dates, etc. and make your profiles private, if not already.

Might be a good idea to change account passwords on financial accounts if you use the same one as the breached card.

batpot
Posts: 852
Joined: Thu Jul 11, 2013 8:48 pm

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by batpot » Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:09 pm

Do you have your credit frozen? If not you should.
Do you have 2 factor authentication setup on all of your financial, cell phone, and email accounts? If not you should.

Also use a password manager like keepass, and use a different password for every important login.

Credit card theft in and of itself is pretty much inevitable, and of little consequence to you, the card holder.

Topic Author
Calhoon
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:29 pm

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by Calhoon » Fri Oct 04, 2019 8:48 pm

thanks for the input everyone.

MikeG62
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Joined: Tue Nov 15, 2016 3:20 pm
Location: New Jersey

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by MikeG62 » Sat Oct 05, 2019 6:47 am

Calhoon wrote:
Fri Oct 04, 2019 1:02 pm
Woke up this morning to a text from my credit card company telling me that during the night there had been suspicious activity on my card. Someone had purchased 2000 dollars worth of equipment from a an online retailer. The weird thing was they used my credit card number, my wife's cell number, my daughter's name, and our billing address. Seemed like they had an awful lot of information on me. Little disturbing.

Aside from blocking the transactions and discontinuing that one card, are there any other steps I should be taking? Should I be concerned/doing anything with bank accounts, retirement accounts, etc?
Agree they had a lot of information on you. How did you know they had all this information?

I would do exactly what batpot has suggested - freeze all of your credit reports (including your Chexsystems and maybe even your Innovis accounts) - as they appear to know more than they should and may be able to use the information to steal your identity.

Two factor authentication is another good idea as is using a password manager with strong software generated passwords.
Real Knowledge Comes Only From Experience

WhaleMan
Posts: 13
Joined: Sun Feb 10, 2019 9:26 pm

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by WhaleMan » Sat Oct 05, 2019 7:02 am

Agree with above.

Consider some credit alert service too if it gives you peace of mind. Mine caught someone trying to start credit card and trying create a cell phone account under my ID.

Overall not sure if it worth the money, as most months/years nothing occurs. However, the once in-a-while event where it catches something early is worth the cost to me.

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F150HD
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Joined: Fri Sep 18, 2015 7:49 pm

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by F150HD » Sat Oct 05, 2019 4:14 pm

if you haven't already you should consider freezing your credit at all the major bureaus among other places do a forum search this has been discussed in multiple threads

Horsefly
Posts: 506
Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2015 8:13 am
Location: Colorado, mostly

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by Horsefly » Sat Oct 05, 2019 6:02 pm

Some time ago I had a similar fraud happen as did to the OP. My Fidelity 2% card was used to pay for $4800 worth of yard landscaping and maintenance at a property in Oregon. We live in Colorado, and - although we travel quite a bit - haven't been to Oregon in 10 years. The bank caught the error and shut off the card, but I decided to do my own investigation anyway. I called the company that did the work. The guy was very forthcoming. He sent me a screenshot of the text session with the person who used the card. She gave my card number, expiration, CCV, home address, and my cell phone number (which wasn't the number he/she was texting from). Turns out the work was being done at the request of a realtor who was getting ready to list the property.

I filed police reports in both Oregon and in my home county. Remember, this SHOULD have been an easy case to find a bad guy: The work was being done for a realtor, whose sign was going up in the yard. The realtor or one of their employees is the one that called the company and gave them my card number. Nevertheless, I couldn't get anyone to do anything to try and catch the creep.

Granted the whole fraud didn't cost me a cent. Still, it bothered me that the credit card company didn't really try to pursue anything, and two sheriff offices didn't consider $4800 worth chasing, even if it was a relatively easy case.

Oh, and I already had my credit reports frozen long before all this happened. I still think it is a great idea.

Katietsu
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Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by Katietsu » Sat Oct 05, 2019 6:24 pm

Is it possible that at some point an order or service was paid for using your credit card for your daughter’s benefit with your wife’s cell phone # provided as a contact? I am sure this kind of thing with a mix of name and numbers has probably happened at some point in my household. Alternatively, if I had your credit card number and address, I could easily find a name and cell number associated with that address from any number of companies for pennies.

Basically everyone I know has had a fraudulent credit card transaction pop up every few years. I have never had it go any farther than that. Personally, I would just make sure you are doing the things we all should. Keep credit frozen, using unique secure passwords etc. And accept that this will happen again .

If they start opening new credit or filing a tax return in my name, I will be more concerned. Fortunately, these things have not happened to me.

criticalmass
Posts: 1320
Joined: Wed Feb 12, 2014 10:58 pm

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by criticalmass » Sat Oct 05, 2019 10:20 pm

Horsefly wrote:
Sat Oct 05, 2019 6:02 pm
Some time ago I had a similar fraud happen as did to the OP. My Fidelity 2% card was used to pay for $4800 worth of yard landscaping and maintenance at a property in Oregon. We live in Colorado, and - although we travel quite a bit - haven't been to Oregon in 10 years. The bank caught the error and shut off the card, but I decided to do my own investigation anyway. I called the company that did the work. The guy was very forthcoming. He sent me a screenshot of the text session with the person who used the card. She gave my card number, expiration, CCV, home address, and my cell phone number (which wasn't the number he/she was texting from). Turns out the work was being done at the request of a realtor who was getting ready to list the property.

I filed police reports in both Oregon and in my home county. Remember, this SHOULD have been an easy case to find a bad guy: The work was being done for a realtor, whose sign was going up in the yard. The realtor or one of their employees is the one that called the company and gave them my card number. Nevertheless, I couldn't get anyone to do anything to try and catch the creep.

Granted the whole fraud didn't cost me a cent. Still, it bothered me that the credit card company didn't really try to pursue anything, and two sheriff offices didn't consider $4800 worth chasing, even if it was a relatively easy case.
I doubt Elan/US Bank took the hit for $4800. They would have charged it back to the merchant/landscaper eventually. Assuming his story was accurate, it's quite likely he went after the property owner, or if smart, just placed a lien on the property. I'm not one to usually defend the real estate agency industry, but I doubt it was the real estate agents or their employee who initiated the actual fraud. They probably obtained the credit card number from an owner or shady property manager, or someone else looking after the property, and may have no reason to assume it was stolen.

The sheriffs weren't interested in pursuing the case for you because it wasn't your money and you suffered no loss. If the victim (likely the landscaper) pressed charges, then they would have had more responsibility to act.

Topic Author
Calhoon
Posts: 126
Joined: Wed Feb 16, 2011 1:29 pm

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by Calhoon » Sun Oct 06, 2019 7:49 am

Katietzu -- I wonder if it was the case that the information was somehow grabbed off an online transaction. My wife noted that for one of my daughter's school sports they were using a new online retailer. Here we had the combination of my credit card, my daughter's name, and my wife's phone number.
The card had just been opened four months ago so it had somewhat limited use. In the same token, I had just gotten a new phone number within the year so my number hasn't been out there that long.

Thought it was interesting that when I called the computer company where the 2000 charge was made they couldn't tell me anything about the transaction...'but I finally got from the guy's hinting that he could confirm information so it was like a game of Guess Who. Was my name on the transaction? Was my wife's name on the transaction? Was it a woman? Was it (my daughter's name)?

Am going through changing account numbers. Will have to check my credit service. I was part of that Equifax thing earlier this year (which could be part of it as well...but when I tested using the Equifax fraud tool my daughter's name came up clean and that still wouldn't explain the phone number) where as part of the settlement I needed to get a new credit service.

Horsefly
Posts: 506
Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2015 8:13 am
Location: Colorado, mostly

Re: Credit Card information stolen

Post by Horsefly » Sun Oct 06, 2019 8:16 am

criticalmass wrote:
Sat Oct 05, 2019 10:20 pm
Horsefly wrote:
Sat Oct 05, 2019 6:02 pm
Some time ago I had a similar fraud happen as did to the OP. My Fidelity 2% card was used to pay for $4800 worth of yard landscaping and maintenance at a property in Oregon. We live in Colorado, and - although we travel quite a bit - haven't been to Oregon in 10 years. The bank caught the error and shut off the card, but I decided to do my own investigation anyway. I called the company that did the work. The guy was very forthcoming. He sent me a screenshot of the text session with the person who used the card. She gave my card number, expiration, CCV, home address, and my cell phone number (which wasn't the number he/she was texting from). Turns out the work was being done at the request of a realtor who was getting ready to list the property.

I filed police reports in both Oregon and in my home county. Remember, this SHOULD have been an easy case to find a bad guy: The work was being done for a realtor, whose sign was going up in the yard. The realtor or one of their employees is the one that called the company and gave them my card number. Nevertheless, I couldn't get anyone to do anything to try and catch the creep.

Granted the whole fraud didn't cost me a cent. Still, it bothered me that the credit card company didn't really try to pursue anything, and two sheriff offices didn't consider $4800 worth chasing, even if it was a relatively easy case.
I doubt Elan/US Bank took the hit for $4800. They would have charged it back to the merchant/landscaper eventually. Assuming his story was accurate, it's quite likely he went after the property owner, or if smart, just placed a lien on the property. I'm not one to usually defend the real estate agency industry, but I doubt it was the real estate agents or their employee who initiated the actual fraud. They probably obtained the credit card number from an owner or shady property manager, or someone else looking after the property, and may have no reason to assume it was stolen.

The sheriffs weren't interested in pursuing the case for you because it wasn't your money and you suffered no loss. If the victim (likely the landscaper) pressed charges, then they would have had more responsibility to act.
You may be right on some of that. One thing though. I asked the landscaper why he wasn't interested in pursuing it, since the bank may come after him for the fraudulent charge, and he said he didn't care because he had insurance for that. In fact, he said the same thing had happened a few years before, and he didn't lose anything. So it remains that no one was motivated to get the bad guy, so the bad guy probably just keeps being bad.

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