When to give notice

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tommyjr
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When to give notice

Post by tommyjr » Sun Sep 08, 2019 4:37 pm

I have been offered a position at a new company that I will be accepting early next week. We are still figuring out a few salary details but I would take what has already been offered. New job to start on 10/14. I think date could be made earlier but not later. I'm a little reticent to try to change anything else as I've negotiated pretty hard for higher salary and more PTO.

Current job requires 2 weeks of notice in employee handbook. Also states that you may not be asked to complete the two weeks notice but that you will be paid. I am a salaried professional, employee at will.

I want my last day to be 10/4 for two principal reasons. The first is that I have a client deadline on Monday 9/30 and I work with people I respect (my supervisor, junior team members, and client). I want to do right by them. They would be [in trouble -- moderator oldcomputerguy] without me. Second, in the employee handbook it says that if you are employed for at least one day in a month that your benefits continue until the end of the month. Benefits start on day one of new job. I want to avoid paying COBRA.

My supervisor's boss is a real [deleted -- moderator oldcomputerguy]. He is very petty and will likely not take this well and I think there is a decent chance that he will not have me work the resignation period. I also am going to a competitor making this more likely.

Question 1: If I give two weeks notice on 9/20 that my last day will be 10/4 and they tell me not to come back, do you think that my benefits will terminate at end of September? I worry since I don't know if my last day of service will be viewed as the day they send me home or 10/4 the day I give as my last in my resignation.

I am somewhat uncomfortable giving only two weeks notice. There is a new project that I have been assigned and its work is ramping up. They want me to schedule travel to meet with a new client after I know that I won't any longer be employed. They also want me to do a lot of client setup work - much of which would be wasted if I do it and then someone else has to take over. And the people who will end up getting hosed by this are those that I have a lot of respect for as well as the new client. They would also expect me to book travel and incur expenses for a trip that I know I won't be taking. I wouldn't incur the expenses as they would go on a corporate card but there would still be cancellations and just general waste.

I want to leave with more class than my supervisor's boss has ever shown me.

Question 2: Would you consider giving notice as soon as new job is officially accepted and background check is passed still with 10/4 as last day?

Although I hate to waste the money, I can afford to pay the COBRA. I could probably start new job earlier than the 14th and even if I couldn't I can afford to miss a couple weeks of pay if it became necessary.

Any thoughts on what you would do in this situation would be appreciated. Thank you.

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David Jay
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Re: When to give notice

Post by David Jay » Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:14 pm

Welcome to the forum!

You have to operate consistent with your principles, regardless of your boss’s boss reaction. Disregard him and do what you think appropriate.

Sometimes it costs you money to do what you feel is right. Do it anyway, you will respect yourself.
Prediction is very difficult, especially about the future - Niels Bohr | To get the "risk premium", you really do have to take the risk - nisiprius

Silk McCue
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Re: When to give notice

Post by Silk McCue » Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:19 pm

See this thread re: Cobra 60 day retroactive coverage

viewtopic.php?t=237837#p3718108

Cheers

stlutz
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Re: When to give notice

Post by stlutz » Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:21 pm

I would read the regs. on how electing COBRA coverage works. Note the amount of time you have to select the coverage and that the coverage would be retroactive to the date your employment terminated.

https://www.dol.gov/sites/dolgov/files/ ... nsumer.pdf

Personally I would resign as soon as I accepted the new job. How long will it be before you can take two uninterrupted weeks off again?

Plus, if you're doing to a competitor, not resigning immediately would considered unethical in many industries.

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whodidntante
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Re: When to give notice

Post by whodidntante » Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:32 pm

I would give two weeks notice as this is the custom. I would not give more notice since you do not trust your manager but I might start quietly buttoning things up if I had more time. If your manager takes it personally and wants you gone before lunch, that is his option. Go respectfully. Try not to let it sour your entire experience working there, which probably had some positives.

While I'm sure you make important contributions, the company and your colleagues will likely do just fine once you are no longer around, after they make appropriate adjustments. Once you give notice, you might be required to spend those two weeks doing documentation and training instead of business as usual.

What benefits are you concerned about? You aren't going to be able to make payroll contributions to a 401k, etc. You might be eligible for a PTO bank payout depending on state law. You can use COBRA for health insurance.

Thegame14
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Re: When to give notice

Post by Thegame14 » Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:34 pm

you don't even owe the company two weeks notice, it is a "courtesy". would they let you know two weeks ahead of them firing you??? Nope, we have adopted an employer friendly environment where everything is in the employer's favor and they have taken away all reasons for loyalty and now have the nerve to complain about employees not being loyal. So unless they want to go back to guaranteed employment contracts with true defined benefit real pensions, not defined contributions or horrible 401K with a small match of less than 10%, then they don't deserve anything.

Worse you could be the "nice guy" and give a month notice and be told that is your last day and be out a month of salary and benefits, and no one would know about it, vs they say employees shouldn't "burn bridges", but the same actions when an employer do it is just accepted as normal.

I would do whatever is in your best interest as you are the only person who is looking out for you...

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whodidntante
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Re: When to give notice

Post by whodidntante » Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:34 pm

stlutz wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:21 pm
Plus, if you're doing to a competitor, not resigning immediately would considered unethical in many industries.
That's a good point.

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LadyGeek
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Re: When to give notice

Post by LadyGeek » Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:40 pm

Welcome! stlutz is giving good advice.

First things first. Do nothing until you have the new company's offer in writing and a start date confirmed.

As for travel, I would book the travel as you normally would. When you resign, cancel the reservations. People cancel reservations all the time. Let the company eat the cancellation fees (if any). Instead of resigning, suppose you got sick and had to cancel. Would you be concerned? Not really, the company would take care of it. This is no different.

Be sure to cancel your corporate credit card yourself when you resign. First, confirm there is a zero balance. Then, cancel. A lot of companies prefer that they cancel the card. However, any discrepancies can be attached to your personal credit. It's in your own interest to ensure that does not happen.

When I resigned from my last job, I gave an end date on a Sunday so I would have the weekend covered by my insurance. On my last day, HR changed the date to Friday (2 days earlier). Why? Employment at will works in both directions. There was nothing I could do about it. HR humor, I suppose.
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bhough
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Re: When to give notice

Post by bhough » Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:50 pm

I would only give two weeks notice. I would give notice only after you have already moved anything of value to you out of your office and off of your computer. (desktop and laptop).

Everyone is replaceable. You will be seen as an enemy/spy in their midst if you are going to a competitor and they don't want you potentially sabotage their clients or their work.

I know you are trying to be nice, but you are being a little naive to even think about this.

Agree with having a signed contract in hand prior to giving two weeks notice. Would also make sure that your emergency fund has 6 months in it, that all of your bills are paid, gas is in the car, etc. You could go to this new job and they could file bankruptcy the first day you are there.

Take any books out of your office one by one in your bag. Slip the picture of your wife on your desk into your bag quietly the day before you send the notice. Get anyone's email you care about before you tell them. If you have a company phone, they may be able to access it, so download your contacts before you do this.

Good luck!

cherijoh
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Re: When to give notice

Post by cherijoh » Sun Sep 08, 2019 7:05 pm

tommyjr wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 4:37 pm
I have been offered a position at a new company that I will be accepting early next week. We are still figuring out a few salary details but I would take what has already been offered. New job to start on 10/14. I think date could be made earlier but not later. I'm a little reticent to try to change anything else as I've negotiated pretty hard for higher salary and more PTO.

Current job requires 2 weeks of notice in employee handbook. Also states that you may not be asked to complete the two weeks notice but that you will be paid. I am a salaried professional, employee at will.

I want my last day to be 10/4 for two principal reasons. The first is that I have a client deadline on Monday 9/30 and I work with people I respect (my supervisor, junior team members, and client). I want to do right by them. They would be [in trouble -- moderator oldcomputerguy] without me. Second, in the employee handbook it says that if you are employed for at least one day in a month that your benefits continue until the end of the month. Benefits start on day one of new job. I want to avoid paying COBRA.
I'm retired now, but where I last worked you were normally walked out the door the same day if you said you were resigning to take another job -especially if it was to work for a competitor (which was most often the case). A guy I worked with (who was in IT supporting our team) tried to give 2 weeks notice and his manager told him "I'll pretend I didn't hear that - if you give your notice to me now, today will be your last day". So he waited 2 weeks and gave his 2 week notice. They walked him out the door that day and he started the new job the following Monday. (He was paid for the 2 week notice).

So when it came time for me to announce my retirement, I was also ambivalent on when to give notice. We had a variable comp payout in February and you had to be employed in order to receive that, so I knew I'd at least wait until then to give my notice. I finished up a big project and announced my pending retirement at a one-on-one meeting with my manager in early-March. He asked me when I wanted to leave - I told him sooner rather than later and suggested 4 weeks out, but he was on vacation that week so I agreed to stay an additional week. Obviously the situation was different since I didn't have a starting date for a new job.

As far as COBRA goes, you have up to 60 days to sign up for it. So for a gap as short as yours will be, I don't know that I would even bother since you can sign up for COBRA retroactively.
Even if you enroll in COBRA on the last day that you are eligible, your coverage is retroactive to the date you lost your employer-sponsored health plan.

COBRA beneficiaries have 60 days to decide whether they want COBRA coverage. If you enroll in COBRA before the 60 days are up, your coverage is then retroactive, as long as you pay the retroactive premiums. This means that if you incur medical bills during your "election period," you can retroactively — and legally — elect COBRA and have those bills covered.

Pomegranate
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Re: When to give notice

Post by Pomegranate » Sun Sep 08, 2019 7:23 pm

tommyjr wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 4:37 pm


Current job requires 2 weeks of notice in employee handbook. Also states that you may not be asked to complete the two weeks notice but that you will be paid.
Oh that's so sweet. Tell them that your family handbook requires 1 day notice max.

In the modern world there is 0 loyalty from employers. It's not uncommon to hear situations like 'New employer revoked my offer 1 day before the start date', 'On day 1 they were surprised I showed up in the office because the project was cancelled a week before', 'Employer issued hiring freeze a week before my start date', 'The background check is taking 5 weeks and counting instead of 1 week and I'm loosing money because I already left my previous employer' and so on.
Do whatever works better for you, your vision, your morale, your family. Period

multiham
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Re: When to give notice

Post by multiham » Sun Sep 08, 2019 7:25 pm

I really appreciate that you are trying to do the right thing. With that said, please do not worry about how your company feels. You want to go out with class and dignity, but you need to think about yourself. I live by the words that an HR representative told me about 20 years ago. He said "You work in an employment at will environment. When you receive your paycheck every 2 weeks, the company has no further obligation to you and you have no obligation to them".

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Stinky
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Re: When to give notice

Post by Stinky » Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:32 pm

Welcome to the Forum! Glad that you found us.
whodidntante wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 6:32 pm
I would give two weeks notice as this is the custom. I would not give more notice since you do not trust your manager but I might start quietly buttoning things up if I had more time. If your manager takes it personally and wants you gone before lunch, that is his option. Go respectfully. Try not to let it sour your entire experience working there, which probably had some positives.

While I'm sure you make important contributions, the company and your colleagues will likely do just fine once you are no longer around, after they make appropriate adjustments. Once you give notice, you might be required to spend those two weeks doing documentation and training instead of business as usual.
I agree with this.

Two weeks is the honorable thing to do. Don't give more than two weeks - no person is irreplaceable enough that more than two weeks are needed. And make darned sure that you have the new offer in hand, in writing, before you give notice.

Hopefully your employer will also treat you with respect and dignity. But that's not in your control. All that you control is yourself, and you can go out with your head held high regardless of your employer's reaction.
It's a GREAT day to be alive - Travis Tritt

Pudge
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Re: When to give notice

Post by Pudge » Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:35 pm

Because you are leaving to go work for a competitor, expect that the moment you give your 2 weeks notice, that you will be expected to leave the office immediately and turn in your badge, laptop, or any other company-related items. That means that you need to have your desk cleaned of all personal effects before you give notice.

That doesn't mean that you can steal confidential data, such as customer lists, contacts, or other proprietary information. You don't want to jeopardize your future by stealing proprietary information from your employer, and doing so would cross a major business ethics line that is never worth the risk legally or morally. Just be ready to go as far as personal effects are concerned when you do give notice.

Secondly, give them the 2 weeks notice. Yes, you are an at-will employee, but it is a small world, and professionalism and reputation still matter. Don't leave on a bitter note, and do not complain about the company, your colleagues, or your managers. Your letter should be kind, professional, and express gratitude for the opportunity. Keep an open door and never burn bridges. You never know when these business relationships could potentially matter at a later date.

If they want to give you an exit interview, say nothing negative. Instead, make glowing compliments and focus on the positive. In the era of social scores, social media, and the like, you don't want to unnecessarily put a target on your back. Even if the negative feedback you would give were truthful and potentially even helpful, it won't matter. The purpose of the exit interview is to bury you and your reputation. Don't give them that opportunity. Your main goal is to preserve your reputation and keep all business relationships intact, all while exiting with grace, professionalism, and tact.

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Re: When to give notice

Post by LadyGeek » Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:46 pm

^^^ Excellent points.

I should also point out there is no expectation of privacy in the workplace. Your internet activity is monitored and logged. Usernames and passwords for outside personal business are logged in the clear (google "employer decryption"). Stop all use of company computers for personal business. Period. Otherwise, it will be used as excuse to terminate you with cause.

Your resignation letter is just that. You are leaving. Explanations on why should be done in person. Or not. Don't give them ammo to use against you.

Here's what I call my "3, 6, 9,... I resign" letter. It's a fine-tuned version that's worked well for me over many years. Send it to your manager. Done.

==========================
Subject: Notice of resignation

To whom it may concern,

This is to inform you that I am resigning my position effective (insert date here). My last day in the office will be (insert date here).

Regards,

tommyjr
==========================
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vtjon02
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Re: When to give notice

Post by vtjon02 » Mon Sep 09, 2019 3:29 pm

Excellent advice in this thread. Just try to leave with class. Give two weeks notice after all hurdles (background check, personal effects removed, computer scrubbed, phone ready to be surrendered, etc) are cleared. In your exit interview don't say anything bad. Even if your supervisor's boss is awful and you have loads of documentation just give a different reason for leaving. Say you found a better opportunity and that you wish them well.

Hopefully they will ask you to leave on the spot. You'll get paid and have a vacation. Maybe you can even start at new job earlier and collect double pay!

I know that you have a client and a team that depends on you and that the deadline that you spoke about will probably make them work harder in the short term to cover your absence. You clearly want to do right by them. If the boss doesn't allow you to so be it - you tried.

All the best at your new job. Hit the ground running.

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greg24
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Re: When to give notice

Post by greg24 » Mon Sep 09, 2019 4:01 pm

Given all that you've mentioned, I would give notice on 10/1, with your last day of work being 10/11. Not quite two weeks, but it sounds like they'll walk you out that day either way.

I haven't seen a case where more than two weeks notice helped anyone. Everyone is replaceable. Projects will continue despite your absence.

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dm200
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Re: When to give notice

Post by dm200 » Mon Sep 09, 2019 4:14 pm

Pudge wrote:
Sun Sep 08, 2019 8:35 pm
Because you are leaving to go work for a competitor, expect that the moment you give your 2 weeks notice, that you will be expected to leave the office immediately and turn in your badge, laptop, or any other company-related items. That means that you need to have your desk cleaned of all personal effects before you give notice.
Yes - this was the common practice (whether it was known or not whether you were going to a competitor) when I was employed by a IT related division MegaCorp. Unlike what was a common practice of most other such employers, the day you were walked out was your last day of pay.

Since you do not know what your employer will or will not do, I cannot see any way of knowing what your last day of employment will be.

Just make an educated "guess" - and be prepared whatever they choose to do or not do.

Good Luck.

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Re: When to give notice

Post by Jeff P » Mon Sep 09, 2019 4:52 pm

You could always say you are retiring instead.

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Re: When to give notice

Post by Capsu78 » Mon Sep 09, 2019 5:58 pm

Procedural reminder- Turn in your notice in person, via a written document that spells out the exact date YOU are resigning on. SIL worked for a great boss and just walked in and informed him he was resigning in 2 weeks. Boss said "I understand...yada yada". He goes back to his desk and the bosses boss shows up, says "...Your done effective immediately", walked him out and submitted to HR that he had resigned that day. He petitioned his manager that he was giving notice for 2 weeks from now but did not have a written document that stated such.
His vindictive bosses boss, who was so new to her position that she didn't even know who he was, just that he was exiting submitted everything as that day. He argued his case for hours but Mega Corp had already processed him out, even though he had business still in the internal pipeline.
He finally gave up on battling it and chalked it off to "tuition" for learning that even if you have a great manager, the ones above may be less so.
He started up his new position, came back from training and got a call from his "great manager" who said "I wore them down...they resubmitted your paperwork, corrected it to the date they had discussed and paid him through that date...only after the legal department reviewed it and over ruled the bosses boss.

rich126
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Re: When to give notice

Post by rich126 » Mon Sep 09, 2019 6:31 pm

I've never given more than 2 weeks notice. On the one hand once I have a new job lined up I lose interest in the current one. Also I usually try to time things where I'm in a lull so it isn't all that important (or it seems that way to me). I've also given noticed but told them I could leave sooner and in some cases I did leave earlier, once in a week, another time within a couple of days (I was in between contracts). And usually I prefer to take a few weeks off between jobs to rest and have a nice vacation.

As others have mentioned, the health insurance isn't an issue.

SxSW
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Re: When to give notice

Post by SxSW » Sun Sep 22, 2019 11:34 am

Ask the Headhunter is a very informative site regarding job searches, leaving your employer, salary negotiation, etc. Here is a good article on the process of giving notice. He also has E-books which go more in depth, and I do recommend them. Regarding exit interviews, his advice is to decline to do one. Why? Because it only has the potential to hurt you, and will never help you. If you give positive feedback, then you give up the right to say otherwise if a lawsuit comes up later and you actually have some grievances that you kept to yourself. If you complain, you come across as disgruntled. It's a no-win situation for employees. And as others have said, don't give notice until you have the new offer in writing. There are some real horror stories linked within the article below.

https://www.asktheheadhunter.com/tag/exit-interview

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tommyjr
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Re: When to give notice

Post by tommyjr » Sun Sep 22, 2019 4:14 pm

I wanted to thank everybody for the kind and sage advice. This forum is incredibly helpful and I plan to post more in the future.

I gave notice on Friday and was prepared to be walked out the door. Conversation with supervisor went well and was respectful. I went back to my desk and continued working. Maybe 5 minutes later my computer shut down and I was locked out. My supervisor's boss had apparently heard and didn't want me around. So I have two paid weeks off! While I feel bad for members of my team who will have to finish my work on the project that is due shortly, the decision was out of my hands.

I was contacted by Human Resources and benefits and pay were explained, but with the caveat that I had to first give an exit interview. It sounded slightly illegal and abusive but I decided to do it and not fight. I wrote down this sentence on a piece of paper and answered every single question using it: "I found a position that gives me better short and long term opportunities with a significant increase in pay and a significantly more attractive benefits package." Every single question for more than 30 minutes. It got very old. Felt like I was pleading the fifth amendment.

I am moving up my start date at new job by one week (I was giving notice with a paid week in between jobs), so I should effectively receive double pay for that week now.

The advice I received was excellent and I really truly appreciate it.

Regards,
Tommy

cherijoh
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Re: When to give notice

Post by cherijoh » Sun Sep 22, 2019 4:52 pm

tommyjr wrote:
Sun Sep 22, 2019 4:14 pm
I wanted to thank everybody for the kind and sage advice. This forum is incredibly helpful and I plan to post more in the future.

I gave notice on Friday and was prepared to be walked out the door. Conversation with supervisor went well and was respectful. I went back to my desk and continued working. Maybe 5 minutes later my computer shut down and I was locked out. My supervisor's boss had apparently heard and didn't want me around. So I have two paid weeks off! While I feel bad for members of my team who will have to finish my work on the project that is due shortly, the decision was out of my hands.

I was contacted by Human Resources and benefits and pay were explained, but with the caveat that I had to first give an exit interview. It sounded slightly illegal and abusive but I decided to do it and not fight. I wrote down this sentence on a piece of paper and answered every single question using it: "I found a position that gives me better short and long term opportunities with a significant increase in pay and a significantly more attractive benefits package." Every single question for more than 30 minutes. It got very old. Felt like I was pleading the fifth amendment.

I am moving up my start date at new job by one week (I was giving notice with a paid week in between jobs), so I should effectively receive double pay for that week now.

The advice I received was excellent and I really truly appreciate it.

Regards,
Tommy
Good for you.

Your response to the exit interview reminded me of a former colleague, Mike, who had to testify in a patent infringement case. He was an engineer and as most people know, engineers like to explain things - usually in more detail than the listener wants! :wink: He had been prepped by the company's lawyers that the only responses he should give were "Yes", "No", I do not recall", and "Can you please explain the question?" Mike stuck with the "script" and he reported that he thought that the opposing counsel was going to pop a blood vessel he was getting so frustrated with Mike's measured responses.

Good luck with the new job.

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dm200
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Re: When to give notice

Post by dm200 » Mon Sep 23, 2019 8:56 am

tommyjr wrote:
Sun Sep 22, 2019 4:14 pm
I wanted to thank everybody for the kind and sage advice. This forum is incredibly helpful and I plan to post more in the future.
I gave notice on Friday and was prepared to be walked out the door. Conversation with supervisor went well and was respectful. I went back to my desk and continued working. Maybe 5 minutes later my computer shut down and I was locked out. My supervisor's boss had apparently heard and didn't want me around. So I have two paid weeks off! While I feel bad for members of my team who will have to finish my work on the project that is due shortly, the decision was out of my hands.
I was contacted by Human Resources and benefits and pay were explained, but with the caveat that I had to first give an exit interview. It sounded slightly illegal and abusive but I decided to do it and not fight. I wrote down this sentence on a piece of paper and answered every single question using it: "I found a position that gives me better short and long term opportunities with a significant increase in pay and a significantly more attractive benefits package." Every single question for more than 30 minutes. It got very old. Felt like I was pleading the fifth amendment.
I am moving up my start date at new job by one week (I was giving notice with a paid week in between jobs), so I should effectively receive double pay for that week now.
The advice I received was excellent and I really truly appreciate it.
Regards,
Tommy
In my opinion, you were fortunate to be paid for the two weeks that you did not work. While paying the two weeks in such cases is common, you cannot depend on it. At former MegaCorp employer, in the area I worked in (IT focus), when most employees gave two weeks notice, they were walked out the door and that day was the last day of pay for them. I came as an unpleasant "surprise" for many such employees. Eventually, the word got around and most such employees were prepared. Occasionally, though, depending on all the details - some employees actually worked for those two weeks.

Jags4186
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Re: When to give notice

Post by Jags4186 » Mon Sep 23, 2019 9:01 am

This doesn’t seem very difficult. On Monday 9/30 walk into your bosses office and tell him Friday 10/11 will be your last day.

If they let you go early then you get two weeks off. Who cares what their reaction is?

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Re: When to give notice

Post by Trader Joe » Mon Sep 23, 2019 9:07 am

tommyjr wrote:
Sun Sep 22, 2019 4:14 pm
I wanted to thank everybody for the kind and sage advice. This forum is incredibly helpful and I plan to post more in the future.

I gave notice on Friday and was prepared to be walked out the door. Conversation with supervisor went well and was respectful. I went back to my desk and continued working. Maybe 5 minutes later my computer shut down and I was locked out. My supervisor's boss had apparently heard and didn't want me around. So I have two paid weeks off! While I feel bad for members of my team who will have to finish my work on the project that is due shortly, the decision was out of my hands.

I was contacted by Human Resources and benefits and pay were explained, but with the caveat that I had to first give an exit interview. It sounded slightly illegal and abusive but I decided to do it and not fight. I wrote down this sentence on a piece of paper and answered every single question using it: "I found a position that gives me better short and long term opportunities with a significant increase in pay and a significantly more attractive benefits package." Every single question for more than 30 minutes. It got very old. Felt like I was pleading the fifth amendment.

I am moving up my start date at new job by one week (I was giving notice with a paid week in between jobs), so I should effectively receive double pay for that week now.

The advice I received was excellent and I really truly appreciate it.

Regards,
Tommy
Congratulations on your new opportunity. You did great.

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Raymond
Posts: 1465
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 6:04 am

Re: When to give notice

Post by Raymond » Mon Sep 23, 2019 12:52 pm

Congratulations and good luck at the new job!

What was the reaction of the HR person when every one of your answers was the same? :D
"Ritter, Tod und Teufel"

sschoe2
Posts: 449
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2017 4:42 pm

Re: When to give notice

Post by sschoe2 » Tue Sep 24, 2019 10:44 am

Allow me to be the contrarian. I'd give no notice if the company has a history of firing people who give notice. 2 weeks is a courtesy and immediate termination is becoming increasingly common among companies so you have to use your judgement is to whether they are worthy of the courtesy and whether they can be trusted to honor it.

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dm200
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Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 2:21 pm
Location: Washington DC area

Re: When to give notice

Post by dm200 » Tue Sep 24, 2019 12:34 pm

sschoe2 wrote:
Tue Sep 24, 2019 10:44 am
Allow me to be the contrarian. I'd give no notice if the company has a history of firing people who give notice. 2 weeks is a courtesy and immediate termination is becoming increasingly common among companies so you have to use your judgement is to whether they are worthy of the courtesy and whether they can be trusted to honor it.
Yes! As I previously posted, that was the common practice of a prior MegaCorp employer. And - the day you gave notice was your last day on the job and the last paid day of work.

I would not call it "firing", though.

Many decades ago, the MegaCorp that was commonly known for walking employees out the door the day they gave two weeks notice was IBM. IBM, though, did pay such employees for those two weeks. IBM was known for its "efficiency" in removing any and all trace of such folks that day. Depending on the time of day notice was given, such folks often had their last check in hand as they were walked out. Names on offices were removed and the next workday - the answer to the question " Where is DM200 today?" was "DM200 WHO??"

The only IBM folks in those days who worked until their last day - and it was known when they were leaving - were those who entered Military Service. Not so common today, but back in those days - there was this thing called the Military draft - and a significant percentage of men in their early 20's either were drafted or chose to "voluntarily" enter military service.

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