What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

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Bob Sacamano
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What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by Bob Sacamano »

my company gives 2 weeks. today i heard of a friend who has 4 months! both seem to be at opposite ends of the spectrum. sure, 2 weeks is "nice", but is it "good"?
AlohaJoe
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Re: What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by AlohaJoe »

2 weeks is not good. 14 weeks is good.

https://www.npr.org/sections/goatsandso ... nity-leave
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whodidntante
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Re: What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by whodidntante »

Two weeks is good. At my company, the paternity leave is you can use your vacation days however you want.
stoptothink
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Re: What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by stoptothink »

My friend's company gives 6 months and he lasted about 6 weeks before he willingly went back to work. My company offers 2 weeks, I took 4 days when my son was born. I understand you are there to support your wife as she simultaneously recovers and cares for a newborn, but (at least in my case) there wasn't exactly a whole lot for me to do. My wife pretty much told me to go back to work.
erictiger12
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Re: What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by erictiger12 »

My megacorp has 8 weeks. But when I started 20 years ago, it was zero.
HornedToad
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Re: What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by HornedToad »

6 weeks. Use within 12 months of birth and can be split

Then can take ~3weeks after birth and another 3 weeks after maternity leave ends or later in the year for more family bonding
EddyB
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Re: What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by EddyB »

HornedToad wrote: Thu Sep 05, 2019 6:49 pm 6 weeks. Use within 12 months of birth and can be split

Then can take ~3weeks after birth and another 3 weeks after maternity leave ends or later in the year for more family bonding
The standard in my industry has relatively recently become 3 months, which may also be split into two stretches in the first year after the birth.
Random Poster
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Re: What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by Random Poster »

Good to me would be one year.

Realistically good to me would be six months.

Actually good to me would be three months.

More common to me is 2 to 4 weeks.
ArchibaldGraham
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Re: What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by ArchibaldGraham »

I would consider 3-4 months as good, 4-6 weeks as standard, and less than that as a little sad (but I understand it is not uncommon). Longer than 4 months does exist (e.g. Netflix) but is very rare in America. I am a HUGE proponent of generous parental leave policies after recently having a baby, and going through the experience with both of us having generous (by American standards) parental leave policies.
stoptothink wrote: Thu Sep 05, 2019 6:39 pm My friend's company gives 6 months and he lasted about 6 weeks before he willingly went back to work. My company offers 2 weeks, I took 4 days when my son was born. I understand you are there to support your wife as she simultaneously recovers and cares for a newborn, but (at least in my case) there wasn't exactly a whole lot for me to do. My wife pretty much told me to go back to work.
This does not resonate with my experience at all. It is not uncommon for it to take 4+ weeks for the woman to physically recover enough to be able to contribute around the house beyond simply taking care of the baby. Hard to cook and clean and run errands when you are physically torn up, (seemingly) always breastfeeding, and severely sleep deprived. Can't imagine how hard it is for mother's who do not have help during that period although the help does not necessarily need to come from the father.

Also, it is often not required that you take the paternity leave immediately after the baby is born. I took much of my leave when my wife returned to work. It made her transition back a lot easier and provided valuable (at least to me) bonding time. I really felt like I knew my child only after being on point for full time care for several months. I believe this also likely benefits the baby although I am not sure that is verifiable. For 2 working parent households, at an absolute minimum there is possibility for some financial relief by being able to stagger parental leaves and care for baby yourself for longer and delay daycare/nanny, which takes a major dent in the budget of many families.
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Re: What do you think is considered a "good" Paternity Leave policy?

Post by LadyGeek »

This thread has run its course and is locked (not personal nor actionable). General comment threads are off topic in the forums with "Personal" in the title. See: A reminder that non-investing general comment threads are OT
- It must be personal. In other words, you must be asking about your own situation. You can also ask on behalf of someone specific, such as a family member.

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