Anyone retire in their 30s?

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Wannaretireearly
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Wannaretireearly » Mon Aug 26, 2019 12:31 am

visualguy wrote:
Sun Aug 25, 2019 6:21 pm
wubdemil wrote:
Sun Aug 25, 2019 1:30 pm
I have not read every post but I encourage some of you who are a "burnout" and 1) have good savings, and 2) have Masters or higher degree to consider teaching at a community college. At an instructor at a cc, you will be teaching only 9 months of the year (minus winter break that often lasts a month) and you can come/leave work whenever you want (as long as you show up to class and occasional meetings on time.) You will be earning north of $50k plus generous benefits. Added benefit: this is it will give your life some structure. My $0.02 advice.
Teaching at a CC is far from easy, though... Also, it's a pretty time-consuming job when you add up everything you need to do. You have to prepare your lectures. There are assignments, grading, office hours, etc. The ratio of pay to the amount of work in these jobs isn't good. I would just keep working longer in my original profession unless I suddenly found that teaching CC is my calling.
Any other options? I've always envied the coach/trainers that have passed thru our org. Seems self sufficient and pick and choose when/who you take a gig for...hmmmm
Buy Low, Sell High

stoptothink
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by stoptothink » Mon Aug 26, 2019 8:06 am

visualguy wrote:
Sun Aug 25, 2019 6:21 pm
wubdemil wrote:
Sun Aug 25, 2019 1:30 pm
I have not read every post but I encourage some of you who are a "burnout" and 1) have good savings, and 2) have Masters or higher degree to consider teaching at a community college. At an instructor at a cc, you will be teaching only 9 months of the year (minus winter break that often lasts a month) and you can come/leave work whenever you want (as long as you show up to class and occasional meetings on time.) You will be earning north of $50k plus generous benefits. Added benefit: this is it will give your life some structure. My $0.02 advice.
Teaching at a CC is far from easy, though... Also, it's a pretty time-consuming job when you add up everything you need to do. You have to prepare your lectures. There are assignments, grading, office hours, etc. The ratio of pay to the amount of work in these jobs isn't good. I would just keep working longer in my original profession unless I suddenly found that teaching CC is my calling.
Have never taught at a CC, but was adjunct at a local U on the side up until this past year. The pay per hour is terrible, it might be under minimum wage for adjuncts at some universities when you calculate all the time you need to spend prepping and grading. I always thought it would be something I'd do after I retired from the day job, but having done it for 4yrs, I got it out of my system. Nowhere near as fun or rewarding as I thought it would be, and the pay is a joke.

SRenaeP
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by SRenaeP » Mon Aug 26, 2019 11:03 am

wubdemil wrote:
Sun Aug 25, 2019 1:30 pm
I have not read every post but I encourage some of you who are a "burnout" and 1) have good savings, and 2) have Masters or higher degree to consider teaching at a community college. At an instructor at a cc, you will be teaching only 9 months of the year (minus winter break that often lasts a month) and you can come/leave work whenever you want (as long as you show up to class and occasional meetings on time.) You will be earning north of $50k plus generous benefits. Added benefit: this is it will give your life some structure. My $0.02 advice.
Is this truly realistic anymore? A lot of colleges have been shifting more and more of the course load to adjunct personnel. I briefly considered teaching at the local CC as a semi-retirement gig. However, you only get paid $2000-3000 per course per semester. It seems like a lot of work for relatively low pay and no benefits.

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Noobvestor
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Noobvestor » Mon Aug 26, 2019 10:51 pm

surfstar wrote:
Sun Aug 18, 2019 9:57 am
Trader Joe wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:11 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:11 pm
Trader Joe wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:05 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Not me. I love to work. New money is no longer needed.
What do you love about your work? I think this has to be the exception
I love everything about my work. I can guarantee you that I am not an exception.
Really?
Donate all of your income, beyond your standard living expenses. Work for free. Put your money where your mouth is.
[you ARE an exception - realize that, and be happy about it]
That's quite a leap. You're assuming this person has definite, fixed ongoing expenses (most don't). You're assuming they can work forever (most can't). Loving one's work doesn't have to mean doing it for free. I love pet sitting, and do that for free, in part because I have other income. My work is stressful at times, thrilling at times, often both at the same time. I love most things about it too, and one of those is money.

Back to the main topic, though: when I launched my first business years ago, it was out of fear of working forever in a typical company setting, climbing a ladder, etc.... So I gave myself a few months to make my own biz profitable enough to scrape by with roommates and eating ramen noodles. Honestly, fear was as much a motivator as aspiration - so if you hate your work, let it drive you to work harder at something you enjoy.

With success, I swore I'd never work for anyone else again, then I came across an opportunity to be part of something bigger and took it. Overall, it's been a great change of pace - I enjoyed being nomadic and self-directed, but now I enjoy colleagues and other things I missed while doing my own thing. I'm also learning things doing projects that I probably never would have gotten to do through my own endeavors individually.

Anyway, I think you've gotten a good range of perspectives in this thread - my best advice is to try and think beyond the box you feel trapped in, take a break and try something new. This is much easier typed than done. Staying open to and looking for other options can be an exercise in self-discovery as well, leading you places you never expected to go. Got vacation days? Put 'em into a block and use 'em to get away and think.
"In the absence of clarity, diversification is the only logical strategy" -= Larry Swedroe

Westcoaster7
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Westcoaster7 » Tue Aug 27, 2019 12:52 am

OP, are you married? Have kids? Plan on having kids? Didn’t see this mentioned in a brief scan of the thread (may have missed it), but it’s important. If kids enter the picture, your “modest expenses” will go up, and could fluctuate, making it tough to say whether you have saved enough. And then you’ll be reluctant to do anything to the extent it hurts your ability to provide for your family’s needs. Just something to keep in mind. Sounds like you’ll keep your foot in the door, perhaps by continuing to work as an individual contributor if you can find the right position. I think that’s wise.

Sam1
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Sam1 » Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:02 am

I can’t imagine how different the world could be in your 30s versus your 80s. It seems extremely risky. We could have major changes in our tax structure, a war that actually affects most Americans, extreme global warming, etc. Plenty of things can happen that are outside of your control. There are plenty of decent jobs where you don’t need to be miserable and quit working in your 30s. I would be incredibly stressed out knowing in my 30s I had a lump sum of money that had to last me another 50-60 years!!

But I enjoy my job and make a relatively high salary. I don’t plan on giving this up anytime soon. Instead I try to limit my time at work, work from home a lot, and go on nice vacations with my family.

basspond
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by basspond » Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:37 am

I didn’t retire in my 30’s(mid 50’s for me) but in my early twenties my goal was to retire when I did. You need to find something outside of work that has meaning. It will be difficult to get any real personal satisfaction if all you have is work.

SRenaeP
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Joined: Tue Jan 19, 2010 9:05 pm

Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by SRenaeP » Tue Aug 27, 2019 12:30 pm

Sam1 wrote:
Tue Aug 27, 2019 6:02 am
I can’t imagine how different the world could be in your 30s versus your 80s. It seems extremely risky. We could have major changes in our tax structure, a war that actually affects most Americans, extreme global warming, etc. Plenty of things can happen that are outside of your control. There are plenty of decent jobs where you don’t need to be miserable and quit working in your 30s. I would be incredibly stressed out knowing in my 30s I had a lump sum of money that had to last me another 50-60 years!!
This! I'm pretty close to FI and am starting to feel really nervous about RE (despite desiring/planning for it). As things currently stand, I should have a pension and SS coming in later down the line but the thought of my pile of money having to last the ~20 years until then is scaring me.

Marlago35
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Marlago35 » Tue Aug 27, 2019 1:41 pm

Timely and interesting thread. I am 'retiring' from my 15 year career in a few weeks. I am 37, married, 2 kids under 6. I gave 12 week notice back in July and have been transitioning out for the last 8 weeks.

My career focus has always been about trying to take on more responsibility and trying to move upwards, and fortunately I have never been through a layoff or a firing. I have changed companies several times for better titles and pay, but have felt the pull of leaving the always-on corporate/consultant culture behind for at least the past 5 years. I'm relatively senior at my company and while the internal culture and pay is good enough, the demands of clients and bosses never end. As others have mentioned, there are emails, texts, calls and meetings that can pop up at any time - day or night, weekday or weekend. You can never truly relax or unplug and the work never ends. While my hours pale in comparison to some others on BH, a guaranteed 55 hour work week (including commute) away from my home, wife and kids has been enough to make me tap out. Some people can do it and thrive, just not me.

I will be leaving the data tech/consulting world behind and venturing into the general contracting / home building business. I am under no illusions about how different and hard the work will be (have done it on the side for a while) and how I'll likely never get back to my consultant salary level unless I get really lucky, but I'm OK with that. Hopefully this venture will succeed and I won't need to go back to a job, but I will if I need to.

I am excited about what's coming next / nervous about losing the safety net of a bi-weekly paycheck/401k match/other benefits. My wife happily works at her job, and her company offers health care. That was a significant enabling factor. It took a lot of soul-seaching, conversations with her and our families and a ton of time on BH/FIRE blogs to get the confidence and courage that I could do this too. A high savings rate and close eye on expenses helped accelerate the decision by a few years. I'm going to volunteer for the first time in over a decade - coaching my son's soccer team this fall. Hoping to spend more time getting back in shape, re-establishing a lot of neglected relationships and doing stuff that I want to do when I want to do it.

Good luck with your decision, PM me with any specifics.

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