Anyone retire in their 30s?

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Nathan Drake
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Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm

This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Last edited by Nathan Drake on Sun Aug 18, 2019 10:54 am, edited 1 time in total.

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plantingourpennies
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by plantingourpennies » Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:33 pm

I FIRED a little over a year ago at 36.

It's been a good year. Stress is a repetitive injury and it takes some rehab to get rid of the bad mental habits you've probably accumulated.

Having said that, I'm getting bored and am starting to talk with friends about starting a business, joining a startup, etc. If the right opportunity came up in a big company, i'd probably take it.

My guess is that anybody who has the drive to put together a couple million in net worth by their mid 30's will be happier retiring to something rather than from something. AFter a while this stuff has to more to do with lifestyle design than withdraw rates.

Hope this helps.

Topic Author
Nathan Drake
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:48 pm

Yeah I envision working in an individual contributor capacity where I work from home and can have the flexibility to work when I want and pick up projects here and there.

Not sure how easy something like that is to find. I’d just want something to cover expenses while my nest egg grows.

FireSekr
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by FireSekr » Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:54 pm

I was feeling that way for the last year or two, until I got a job working at a startup. It’s not a small company at this point, but it’s still in a high growth phase and I believe in the product and the people. It has reinvigorated my motivation and I’m much happier in my new role than I was at my previous employer.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by plantingourpennies » Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:04 pm

Remote work seems to be pretty feasasable in the current hiring environment (read: economy), particularly for tech workers.

I don't have hard technology skills (coding, QA, networking, platform administration) but there are a number of roles that I'm qualified for that offer remote work. Technical writer, project manager, many types of sales roles and Business Analyst. Fire up your favorite job site and just search for "remote" or "work from home."

Don't look at this as "retired," just think of it as taking a sabbatical while you find something more interesting.

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scubadiver
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by scubadiver » Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:05 pm

This is one of those threads where I really wish my wife was on the forum. She can honestly write that she came to America as a refugee when she was 9 and was a millionaire before 40, having quit her job when she was 28.

Of course, her being a stay at home mom allowed me to pursue some interesting career opportunities and the family has done well financially as a result. And she didn't become a millionaire till long after she had quit her job, but those are all just details. :o

In fairness, she will probably return to work within the next three years, not that we need the money.

EDIT: Having been through this myself, I understand the OP's frustration. That said, it's not clear to me what he wants to get out of this thread. If the OP were to pose a serious question, I'll craft a more serious response.

Scubadiver
Last edited by scubadiver on Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:42 pm, edited 2 times in total.

Trader Joe
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Trader Joe » Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:05 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Not me. I love to work. New money is no longer needed.

Topic Author
Nathan Drake
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:11 pm

Trader Joe wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:05 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Not me. I love to work. New money is no longer needed.
What do you love about your work? I think this has to be the exception

Trader Joe
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Trader Joe » Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:11 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:11 pm
Trader Joe wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:05 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Not me. I love to work. New money is no longer needed.
What do you love about your work? I think this has to be the exception
I love everything about my work. I can guarantee you that I am not an exception.

Topic Author
Nathan Drake
Posts: 453
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:16 pm

Trader Joe wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:11 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:11 pm
Trader Joe wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:05 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Not me. I love to work. New money is no longer needed.
What do you love about your work? I think this has to be the exception
I love everything about my work. I can guarantee you that I am not an exception.
So most people love everything about their work? I find this hard to believe

Congrats on loving everything about your work but I find most careers are stressful, monotonous grinds

HEDGEFUNDIE
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:19 pm

I think this is a mindset issue.

OP, don’t sweat the small stuff. It’s all small stuff.

bernoulli
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by bernoulli » Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:32 pm

I like pretty much everything about my work too.

JBTX
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by JBTX » Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:52 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:16 pm
Trader Joe wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:11 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:11 pm
Trader Joe wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 4:05 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Not me. I love to work. New money is no longer needed.
What do you love about your work? I think this has to be the exception
I love everything about my work. I can guarantee you that I am not an exception.
So most people love everything about their work? I find this hard to believe

Congrats on loving everything about your work but I find most careers are stressful, monotonous grinds
I don't think this an uncommon feeling for someone in the 20s or 30s. I felt that way. You may have to go through a change to figure things out. A long break, either intentional or unintentional, sometimes gives perspective. To some degree it is addressing the grass is greener perception.

If you can't make your current job palatable, or find different opportunities at your company, you may consider:

- an extended leave of absence - a friend of mine got burnt out, took a leave, got a pilots license but figured out being a pilot as an occupation wasn't for him. Went back to his old job and worked there almost 20 more years. Still flies as a hobby.

- look for different job. This may or may not fix things, but it gives you different perspective


I'm now in my 50s and I like my current job. And I am not career oriented at all. I don't love it, but like it. As with any job it has its days.

Also it is hard to enjoy your job if you mainly measure success by promotions, money or internal recognition.

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fortfun
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by fortfun » Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:58 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Consider something else that you might enjoy more. Or, call it quits. Just make sure you have some meaningful way to occupy your time. i.e. volunteer doing something you enjoy, etc. According to, "A successful/secure retirement" a higher percentage of men commit suicide after retiring because they don't have purpose any longer.

mcraepat9
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by mcraepat9 » Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:58 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Best friend did this at 31 about 5 years ago from a well known hedge fund. Had very modest expenses etc. just like you. Did not have millions. Was sick of the grind. Within two years he developed a debilitating illness that required him to (attempt to) go back to work given the high medical costs. He has been unable to get work. He is currently living on his mom's couch and is looking into Medicaid and SNAP benefits.
Amateur investors are not cool-headed logicians.

Topic Author
Nathan Drake
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 6:00 pm

mcraepat9 wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:58 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Best friend did this at 31 about 5 years ago from a well known hedge fund. Had very modest expenses etc. just like you. Did not have millions. Was sick of the grind. Within two years he developed a debilitating illness that required him to (attempt to) go back to work given the high medical costs. He has been unable to get work. He is currently living on his mom's couch and is looking into Medicaid and SNAP benefits.
What was his illness?

ThankYouJack
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by ThankYouJack » Sat Aug 17, 2019 6:34 pm

I hit my number in my 30s. I’ve since reduced work to 5-20 hours a week just doing the parts of my job I enjoy most. I had the original goal to FIRE but now that I enjoy my work, I could see working part time forever.

OP, if you dread working for a megacorp why not try working for a small business? I much prefer working for a small company. Also, how close are you to being FI? Why not take a chance with your work to try to find something you enjoy?

EddyB
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by EddyB » Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:01 pm

mcraepat9 wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:58 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Best friend did this at 31 about 5 years ago from a well known hedge fund. Had very modest expenses etc. just like you. Did not have millions. Was sick of the grind. Within two years he developed a debilitating illness that required him to (attempt to) go back to work given the high medical costs. He has been unable to get work. He is currently living on his mom's couch and is looking into Medicaid and SNAP benefits.
A colleague of mine, in a notoriously demanding job, died (apparently of a heart attack) while working at home one weekend. She was 32.

Topic Author
Nathan Drake
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:28 pm

ThankYouJack wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 6:34 pm
I hit my number in my 30s. I’ve since reduced work to 5-20 hours a week just doing the parts of my job I enjoy most. I had the original goal to FIRE but now that I enjoy my work, I could see working part time forever.

OP, if you dread working for a megacorp why not try working for a small business? I much prefer working for a small company. Also, how close are you to being FI? Why not take a chance with your work to try to find something you enjoy?
I probably have about 5 years before I’m solidly FI. Right now I’m at lean FI.

I think working for a small company, or for myself, would be a lot nicer. I’ve really grown to dislike all the red tape of a megacorp. Very bureaucratic, not a lot of creativity.

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AerialWombat
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by AerialWombat » Sat Aug 17, 2019 8:18 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:28 pm
Right now I’m at lean FI.
Very, very few people on this forum would encourage you to take the plunge on a lean FI number. But if you’re really that miserable, do it. I personally think it’s better than some of the alternatives, such as heart attack or suicide.

Take some time to go “find yourself”. I did that in my mid-30’s, and it was the best time of my life. At 41, I work less than half time and make more money than I ever have before, so don’t let anybody tell you that lean FI or a sabbatical can’t be had.
“Life doesn’t come with a warranty.” -Michael LeBoeuf

Topic Author
Nathan Drake
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:21 pm

AerialWombat wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 8:18 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:28 pm
Right now I’m at lean FI.
Very, very few people on this forum would encourage you to take the plunge on a lean FI number. But if you’re really that miserable, do it. I personally think it’s better than some of the alternatives, such as heart attack or suicide.

Take some time to go “find yourself”. I did that in my mid-30’s, and it was the best time of my life. At 41, I work less than half time and make more money than I ever have before, so don’t let anybody tell you that lean FI or a sabbatical can’t be had.
How does one work less and make more

That is not possible in my chosen career

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WoodSpinner
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by WoodSpinner » Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:34 pm

OP,

Have you visited the Mr. Money Mustache forum? You might find more kindred spirits and lot’s of practical advice.

WoodSpinner

EddyB
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by EddyB » Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:41 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:21 pm
AerialWombat wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 8:18 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:28 pm
Right now I’m at lean FI.
Very, very few people on this forum would encourage you to take the plunge on a lean FI number. But if you’re really that miserable, do it. I personally think it’s better than some of the alternatives, such as heart attack or suicide.

Take some time to go “find yourself”. I did that in my mid-30’s, and it was the best time of my life. At 41, I work less than half time and make more money than I ever have before, so don’t let anybody tell you that lean FI or a sabbatical can’t be had.
How does one work less and make more

That is not possible in my chosen career
What’s your career?

Topic Author
Nathan Drake
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:48 pm

EddyB wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:41 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:21 pm
AerialWombat wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 8:18 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 7:28 pm
Right now I’m at lean FI.
Very, very few people on this forum would encourage you to take the plunge on a lean FI number. But if you’re really that miserable, do it. I personally think it’s better than some of the alternatives, such as heart attack or suicide.

Take some time to go “find yourself”. I did that in my mid-30’s, and it was the best time of my life. At 41, I work less than half time and make more money than I ever have before, so don’t let anybody tell you that lean FI or a sabbatical can’t be had.
How does one work less and make more

That is not possible in my chosen career
What’s your career?
Technical - Engineering

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kramer
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by kramer » Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:08 pm

I can relate to what you are feeling. I got a late start (started college at age 23) and started my first real full-time job at age 29 (engineering) in Silicon Valley with a graduate degree from a top university. I loved my job for almost one decade and I was a star at work (same company whole way with different roles). Then I got burned out and I just couldn't recover, something I never would have predicted. I retired at age 41. I had enough saved to retire (now mid-50s, permanently retired) and travel the world and also had enough things to pursue to keep life interesting. I never worked for money again.

However, looking back with the benefit of hindsight, I should have changed jobs as soon as I burned out. I could also have taken a long vacation first with all the vacation time I had accumulated on my job. And then retire at age 43 to 45, depending on how well my second job was going. And I could have relocated for that new job, something I was also thinking about.

I don't regret what I did, but I do think I should have tried something different. Once I was out of the tech world for over a year, there was pretty much no way I was going back. Also, the Great Recession came at that time so it would have been difficult even if I wanted to do that.

The point is, you have a lot of money saved, and it is OK to take other options, even if they are riskier or pay less. I just plowed forward on my job because I was making so much money and had fear about pursuing other options despite my burnout.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by willthrill81 » Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:18 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?
It depends on several factors, but if you're as disenchanted with your career as you seem to be, I'd say that a one or two year long sabbatical might be a good idea. Yes, with 2% withdrawals covering your essential spending, history says that you would be fine to retire now. However, Paula Pant, one of the key figures in the FIRE community, has personally met hundreds of people who have FIREd, most of them around your age, yet only knows one who literally retired (i.e. stopped earning any income at all beyond portfolio withdrawals). People in their 30s almost universally seem to feel the strong need to do something productive, and that 'something' almost invariably turns into an income of some sort. But if you wanted to go do pro bono work for a charity for the rest of your life, you could.

After taking a year or two off, you may get a really good idea what direction you want to take with your life. It might be in a related field, or it might be doing something entirely different. That's the beauty of FIRE, though; it's not really about retirement. It's about independence.
“It's a dangerous business, Frodo, going out your door. You step onto the road, and if you don't keep your feet, there's no knowing where you might be swept off to.” J.R.R. Tolkien,The Lord of the Rings

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:32 pm

kramer wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:08 pm
I can relate to what you are feeling. I got a late start (started college at age 23) and started my first real full-time job at age 29 (engineering) in Silicon Valley with a graduate degree from a top university. I loved my job for almost one decade and I was a star at work (same company whole way with different roles). Then I got burned out and I just couldn't recover, something I never would have predicted. I retired at age 41. I had enough saved to retire (now mid-50s, permanently retired) and travel the world and also had enough things to pursue to keep life interesting. I never worked for money again.

However, looking back with the benefit of hindsight, I should have changed jobs as soon as I burned out. I could also have taken a long vacation first with all the vacation time I had accumulated on my job. And then retire at age 43 to 45, depending on how well my second job was going. And I could have relocated for that new job, something I was also thinking about.

I don't regret what I did, but I do think I should have tried something different. Once I was out of the tech world for over a year, there was pretty much no way I was going back. Also, the Great Recession came at that time so it would have been difficult even if I wanted to do that.

The point is, you have a lot of money saved, and it is OK to take other options, even if they are riskier or pay less. I just plowed forward on my job because I was making so much money and had fear about pursuing other options despite my burnout.
That last comment really resonates with my current situation. I’m just burned out and kind of “done” with any sort of corporate role, disillusioned with its rigid culture and work/life balance, and lack of meaningful incentives for exceptional performance. For a few years I’ve started to resent working so hard in order to mostly line the pockets of executives and shareholders. Other roles and positions in the company do not interest me as they require even more 24/7 dedication to the company.

All that said, I feel that working a few more years would place me in a much more financially secure position, so I’m inclined to stick with it in order to to never need to work for money again.

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market timer
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by market timer » Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:23 pm

I left the grind at age 34. After a few months, I decided retirement wasn't how I wanted to spend the rest of my days. I focused on a few things I enjoy doing: solving hard problems, learning new things, teaching, and mentoring. So I've tried to structure my second career around these activities while building in enough flexibility to enjoy the stuff early retirees like to brag about--mainly, spending time with family and enjoying things like travel. Having a decent nest egg means you can take some risks and make trade-offs (time vs. money).

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:27 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:32 pm
kramer wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:08 pm
I can relate to what you are feeling. I got a late start (started college at age 23) and started my first real full-time job at age 29 (engineering) in Silicon Valley with a graduate degree from a top university. I loved my job for almost one decade and I was a star at work (same company whole way with different roles). Then I got burned out and I just couldn't recover, something I never would have predicted. I retired at age 41. I had enough saved to retire (now mid-50s, permanently retired) and travel the world and also had enough things to pursue to keep life interesting. I never worked for money again.

However, looking back with the benefit of hindsight, I should have changed jobs as soon as I burned out. I could also have taken a long vacation first with all the vacation time I had accumulated on my job. And then retire at age 43 to 45, depending on how well my second job was going. And I could have relocated for that new job, something I was also thinking about.

I don't regret what I did, but I do think I should have tried something different. Once I was out of the tech world for over a year, there was pretty much no way I was going back. Also, the Great Recession came at that time so it would have been difficult even if I wanted to do that.

The point is, you have a lot of money saved, and it is OK to take other options, even if they are riskier or pay less. I just plowed forward on my job because I was making so much money and had fear about pursuing other options despite my burnout.
That last comment really resonates with my current situation. I’m just burned out and kind of “done” with any sort of corporate role, disillusioned with its rigid culture and work/life balance, and lack of meaningful incentives for exceptional performance. For a few years I’ve started to resent working so hard in order to mostly line the pockets of executives and shareholders. Other roles and positions in the company do not interest me as they require even more 24/7 dedication to the company.

All that said, I feel that working a few more years would place me in a much more financially secure position, so I’m inclined to stick with it in order to to never need to work for money again.
Why not look for a different job at a smaller company with a product / service you believe in?

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market timer
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by market timer » Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:28 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:32 pm
That last comment really resonates with my current situation. I’m just burned out and kind of “done” with any sort of corporate role, disillusioned with its rigid culture and work/life balance, and lack of meaningful incentives for exceptional performance.
Most people think of their job as a game where they try to maximize income or title by producing as much value as possible. What if you instead thought of your job as a game where you try to minimize the number of hours you had to work in order to provide sufficient value to justify your continued employment? The reward for exceptional efficiency is more time to use as you please.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:36 pm

market timer wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:28 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:32 pm
That last comment really resonates with my current situation. I’m just burned out and kind of “done” with any sort of corporate role, disillusioned with its rigid culture and work/life balance, and lack of meaningful incentives for exceptional performance.
Most people think of their job as a game where they try to maximize income or title by producing as much value as possible. What if you instead thought of your job as a game where you try to minimize the number of hours you had to work in order to provide sufficient value to justify your continued employment? The reward for exceptional efficiency is more time to use as you please.
That’d be nice, I wish I could go part time, but there’s a 40 hr minimum wall that’s not avoidable.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Nathan Drake » Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:39 pm

HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:27 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:32 pm
kramer wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:08 pm
I can relate to what you are feeling. I got a late start (started college at age 23) and started my first real full-time job at age 29 (engineering) in Silicon Valley with a graduate degree from a top university. I loved my job for almost one decade and I was a star at work (same company whole way with different roles). Then I got burned out and I just couldn't recover, something I never would have predicted. I retired at age 41. I had enough saved to retire (now mid-50s, permanently retired) and travel the world and also had enough things to pursue to keep life interesting. I never worked for money again.

However, looking back with the benefit of hindsight, I should have changed jobs as soon as I burned out. I could also have taken a long vacation first with all the vacation time I had accumulated on my job. And then retire at age 43 to 45, depending on how well my second job was going. And I could have relocated for that new job, something I was also thinking about.

I don't regret what I did, but I do think I should have tried something different. Once I was out of the tech world for over a year, there was pretty much no way I was going back. Also, the Great Recession came at that time so it would have been difficult even if I wanted to do that.

The point is, you have a lot of money saved, and it is OK to take other options, even if they are riskier or pay less. I just plowed forward on my job because I was making so much money and had fear about pursuing other options despite my burnout.
That last comment really resonates with my current situation. I’m just burned out and kind of “done” with any sort of corporate role, disillusioned with its rigid culture and work/life balance, and lack of meaningful incentives for exceptional performance. For a few years I’ve started to resent working so hard in order to mostly line the pockets of executives and shareholders. Other roles and positions in the company do not interest me as they require even more 24/7 dedication to the company.

All that said, I feel that working a few more years would place me in a much more financially secure position, so I’m inclined to stick with it in order to to never need to work for money again.
Why not look for a different job at a smaller company with a product / service you believe in?
Maybe so, but I think I’d need direct ownership of my work to feel genuinely satisfied at this point. And working for a smaller company has some of the same drawbacks as a larger one.

Truth be told my minimalism also has me skeptical of the value of most businesses which has lessened my enthusiasm for consumer products.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by AerialWombat » Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:46 pm

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 9:21 pm

How does one work less and make more?
Own the company.
“Life doesn’t come with a warranty.” -Michael LeBoeuf

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by otinkyad » Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:51 pm

I don’t understand trying to limp through 60 years of a frugal retirement. Get a new job. It doesn’t have to be part time to be better. Working 40 hours a week at an interesting job isn’t a grind.

“Far and away the best prize that life has to offer is the chance to work hard at work worth doing.” —Theodore Roosevelt

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Sun Aug 18, 2019 12:57 am

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:39 pm
Truth be told my minimalism also has me skeptical of the value of most businesses which has lessened my enthusiasm for consumer products.
The hottest thing in tech right now is not consumer, it’s developer tools.

Twilio, Pagerduty, Stripe, Elastic... that’s where the growth is.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by mcraepat9 » Sun Aug 18, 2019 1:06 am

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 6:00 pm
mcraepat9 wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:58 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Best friend did this at 31 about 5 years ago from a well known hedge fund. Had very modest expenses etc. just like you. Did not have millions. Was sick of the grind. Within two years he developed a debilitating illness that required him to (attempt to) go back to work given the high medical costs. He has been unable to get work. He is currently living on his mom's couch and is looking into Medicaid and SNAP benefits.
What was his illness?
I don’t know the exact name, but it was mistaken for things like legionnaires, Lyme disease and a few others before it was finally nailed down - a ton of doctors, second, third, fourth opinions.
Amateur investors are not cool-headed logicians.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by flyingaway » Sun Aug 18, 2019 4:03 am

I worked for 7 years after college and didn't like my job from the beginning. So I went back to school to get a Ph.D. and got a teaching and research job and loved it for about 10 years.
So you might want to pursue a higher degree if that helps.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by NearlyRetired » Sun Aug 18, 2019 4:38 am

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 3:04 pm
This place is extremely conservative it seems, financially. But I was curious if anyone had just called it quits from the corporate grind much younger than normal? In my 20s, I was very motivated and engaged to learn as much as I could at my career. Now, moving into management the environment has become a bit of a pressure cooker and the just just feels like going through the motions.

There's no big benefit for working more, either...Raises are pretty standard, promotions few and far between. There's nothing to learn other than the peculiarities of a given project (which aren't very interesting). The job mainly boils down to leading projects and mentoring others to accomplish work with more demanding schedules and budgets. I spend a lot of time at work, and what little free time I have is essentially in recovery mode from the stressors of the week. The non-stop barrage of emails, workers asking for help, and meetings has made me feel a bit burned out with a state of mind that is cluttered and constantly distracted with the day-to-day of corporate life that makes emergencies out of every situation. Going into my career, I was a pretty relaxed person, but now it has caused a tremendous amount of stress and anxiety which I feel is chipping away at my health.

I just don't really see any point after you've saved enough. No, I don't have millions saved up, but my living expenses are modest. What if you had saved up enough in your 30s such that a 2% SWR covered basic living expenses, and up to a 4% could be used for discretionary spending?

Anyone have similar thoughts to my own after working at a megacorp for so long? I honestly don't know how the people with 30+ years of experience do it.
Go contracting - that way you earn some decent money, you never get involved in politics, you leave your work at work, you do the doing, and you can change jobs every six months or so, which keeps it fresh.
To err is to be human, to really mess up, use a computer

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by mesmer » Sun Aug 18, 2019 5:40 am

I’m in my 30s and I’m leaving my main job that I’ve had out of grad school for almost a decade. I first joined a small business on a very reduced capacity 4 years ago, transitioned to my own small business 2 years ago, and moved to a less demanding role in the same company 1.5 years ago while continuing to grow my business. None of the moves made a difference for my burnout— it just got worse. I imagine that I will be recovering for a while after leaving and not able to work to my full capacity. I am not even close to FI so I am taking a huge risk. If a recession hits, I may have to relocate or go back to the same type of work. Luckily I do think in my field I would remain employable in a recession since it’s a somewhat recession-proof (and not very high paying) field. A major issue for me was health insurance and I have that figured out now for the first 9 months of working for myself. Then I will have to re-evaluate things if this coverage (through a spouse who normally doesn’t have jobs qualifying for healthcare) ends. I should note I am also making this move while my spouse has had an almost year-long streak of unemployment. It’s definitely a risk and I’m going in eyes open. Luckily I’ve been told I am welcome to return to my previous positions (they’ve had multiple openings annually for the past decade since it’s such a high burnout job). I really hope I never have to use that option. I have really been liking the autonomy of working for myself and enjoying the work itself quite a bit too.

OP, you sound very burned out. It is often hard to make big decisions from that place, and also not hard in certain ways. It is also very difficult to apply for and start another job in that frame of mind. I’d consider a leave of absence or long vacation first and then perhaps applying for another job that’s less demanding even if it pays less. For my temperament and savings, I needed to have my side business going and the health insurance (albeit temporarily) to make the jump. For you it might be different. I’m of the opinion that life is too short to be miserable at work for most of your waking hours.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by terran » Sun Aug 18, 2019 7:13 am

willthrill81 wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:18 pm
It depends on several factors, but if you're as disenchanted with your career as you seem to be, I'd say that a one or two year long sabbatical might be a good idea. Yes, with 2% withdrawals covering your essential spending, history says that you would be fine to retire now. However, Paula Pant, one of the key figures in the FIRE community, has personally met hundreds of people who have FIREd, most of them around your age, yet only knows one who literally retired (i.e. stopped earning any income at all beyond portfolio withdrawals). People in their 30s almost universally seem to feel the strong need to do something productive, and that 'something' almost invariably turns into an income of some sort. But if you wanted to go do pro bono work for a charity for the rest of your life, you could.
This is a common trope in the early retirement community, but I think there's some serious selection bias going on. How many happily retired people who have no interest in working or starting businesses are going on Paula Pant's podcast or walking up to her at conferences? The early retirees who make themselves visible are starting businesses, etc. We have no idea what the early retirees who don't make themselves visible are up to.

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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by raoul » Sun Aug 18, 2019 7:20 am

At last, someone who makes sense regarding retiring from the insanity out there. If one scans many comments here regarding retirement one would think these people are all multi-millionaires who have millions put away for retirement. The world I live in doesn't require anything close to that in order to retire. The key word is 'modest'. Live modestly and you can be very comfortable. Thanks for posting. I was going to quit this forum until I read what you wrote..

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Cheez-It Guy
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Cheez-It Guy » Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:09 am

I’m 35, and reading the original post was a bit like looking in the mirror, to be honest. I’ve been working for the same company in a variety of jobs since graduation 13 years ago. I like most elements of my work (technical role), but it has grown to be too much, and it’s not fun anymore. It never stops, and there is no catching up and no one to whom to delegate. It’s a really crappy feeling to both start and finish every day in the hole. Some of the older set here may not fully understand how oppressive the “always on, always connected” conditions of the modern workplace can be. There is no end of the day for a salaried worker. A constant barrage of E-Mails, phone calls, texts, and meeting invites. Colleagues around the world so that E-Mails are sent from all time zones at all times of day and night. Open office floor plan creates the most distracting workplace possible. As someone else mentioned previously, I find I use my weekends just mentally recovering and dreading going back to work. I don’t mind hard work in the least, but this is really working on me mentally. On some ways, I find myself envious of the shift workers who can just work their hours, and then go home and leave it for someone else.

I think about some form of retirement frequently. I’ve given it over a year to see if it was a passing phase. I still have the same feelings, and they’ve possibly intensified. I have a moderate compensation with an extremely high savings rate coupled with extremely low expenses in a low cost of living area. No debt. The math doesn’t lie. I probably could retire tomorrow and die with a higher balance than what I started with. I also think I would be good at further minimizing expenses during market downturns to give things time to recover. My food and transportation expenses would also be reduced if I wasn’t working. While I don’t like to think about, I will likely have some future inheritance as well, and a partial Social Security benefit if that even still exists (neither really factor in to my planning).

I find myself wondering what I am working for at all. It’s added stress. I would like to prioritize other things in life. Just this past week, I learned of a colleague who I’d guess is in his early 40s and not outwardly unhealthy having a heart attack while on vacation with his family. Thankfully, he survived, but now has three stents and is at home recovering. I can feel the stress working on my body, and I see many relatively older workers with chronic health issues constantly taking time off work to go to one doctor another. I don’t want to end up that way at that early an age. I could also reduce my environmental footprint considerably by not commuting or traveling for business.

There are other things I’d like to prioritize in life. I have lots of interests and hobbies (many of which are also free or quite low cost), so I don’t think I’d be bored. I think I’d seek volunteer or community education opportunities. I wouldn’t be opposed to local low-stress part-time work to cover insurance. My parents are also aging, and I want to be in a position to help them stay independent and stay at home as long as they can. Eventually, I assume I will become executor of their estate, and I cannot imagine managing all of that with proper duty and care while maintaining a full-time job. I see them aging more every time I visit. Thankfully, they are still very happy and healthy compared to their peer group, but I now somewhat resent my job keeping me two hours away. Time doesn’t stop.

Maybe I will work a few more years, but honestly, why? Societal expectations? Risk aversion? Do I really need 100% chance of success on those retirement calculators, or is 95+% good enough? These are rhetorical questions.

sman
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by sman » Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:28 am

Yes, you can do it. I managed to retire in my 30s.

I quit a stressful corporate career at age 20. I changed career paths to something less stressful to accommodate my personality type. My new career salary and life-long earning potential significantly dropped than my aforementioned stressful corporate job, but I was okay with it. I had lots of down time at my new job, so I kept myself busy by reading, investing, and refining my business plans. I continued living a minimalist lifestyle since my teens, grew my own food, saved, invested, and started some businesses. My businesses I started allowed me to work from home and not conflict with my other working hours. Ten years later, I quit my job to run my businesses part-time. I now spend maybe 4-hours a week running my businesses but don't have to. Because the people in my industry share similar interests and hobbies, and because the products I make indirectly save lives. My businesses provides me with some emotional fulfillment, but I wouldn't lose any sleep if I had to give it all up. There are some weeks I have no desire to spend any time tending to my businesses.

I have a smaller house and older car than some of my employees. My biggest expense is my hobby/entertainment/travel fund, followed by utilities, property taxes, car fund. The rest goes into my investments. I spend most of my days with my significant other, family, friends, working in my garden, working out, reading, doing my hobbies, travelling, etc. We're going to be starting our own family soon, and I can't wait to be a full-time parent.

msk
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by msk » Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:38 am

Retired 20 years, now aged 75. This past year has been rather boring. Spending more and more time on BH! Bucket list finished a decade ago. Too lazy even to pursue my old hobbies. Seen the world, etc. Been around twice. Health and wealth fine. Be careful as to what you wish for. I am not keen for another 20 years of this boredom. Fortune teller 57 years ago told me I'll marry 3x (so far only twice), have 4 kids (correct till date), die at 95... Really retire at 30? At least plan a round the world sailing trip or something. That ought to take a few years, but you will still be left with vacancies during 40s, 50s, etc. Past month I have been designing a couple of new houses to build on vacant land I own. Lifelong hobby that delivered 10 buildings so far. But I've had enough of tenants! Perhaps this time just build and sell...

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Cheez-It Guy
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Cheez-It Guy » Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:54 am

^^How did you have a stressful corporate career to quit at age 20 when most people destined for the corporate world are still a couple years from graduating college at that age?

NearlyRetired
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by NearlyRetired » Sun Aug 18, 2019 9:16 am

Cheez-It Guy wrote:
Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:09 am
A constant barrage of E-Mails, phone calls, texts, and meeting invites. Colleagues around the world so that E-Mails are sent from all time zones at all times of day and night.
Totally agree, and since being called on Boxing day about a problem I have a work phone and a private phone. Some of my colleagues have software on their personal phone to get work emails/text, but that just keeps you switched on. You have to be ruthless with your time. Ultimately your "salary" is a contract for you to provide a certain amount of your time for a figure. Do any more than that "pro bono" then you are devaluing your worth.
To err is to be human, to really mess up, use a computer

scrabbler1
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by scrabbler1 » Sun Aug 18, 2019 9:26 am

I semi-retired in my 30s (38) and fully retired 7 years later, at 45. That was 11 years ago, and it has ben great being retired for the last 11 years. :happy

sman
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Joined: Sat Aug 17, 2019 5:37 am

Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by sman » Sun Aug 18, 2019 9:29 am

Cheez-It Guy wrote:
Sun Aug 18, 2019 8:54 am
^^How did you have a stressful corporate career to quit at age 20 when most people destined for the corporate world are still a couple years from graduating college at that age?
I was home schooled from middle school until freshman year of high school. I tested out of a lot of the courses, and decided to take a reduced class load. While attending, I took some courses that allowed me to obtain technical certifications. I also worked while attending high school. So I had a decent head start on my resume, and with networking opportunities.

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Cheez-It Guy
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by Cheez-It Guy » Sun Aug 18, 2019 9:34 am

I see. So that wasn’t a typo.

CppCoder
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Re: Anyone retire in their 30s?

Post by CppCoder » Sun Aug 18, 2019 9:52 am

Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:36 pm
market timer wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 11:28 pm
Nathan Drake wrote:
Sat Aug 17, 2019 10:32 pm
That last comment really resonates with my current situation. I’m just burned out and kind of “done” with any sort of corporate role, disillusioned with its rigid culture and work/life balance, and lack of meaningful incentives for exceptional performance.
Most people think of their job as a game where they try to maximize income or title by producing as much value as possible. What if you instead thought of your job as a game where you try to minimize the number of hours you had to work in order to provide sufficient value to justify your continued employment? The reward for exceptional efficiency is more time to use as you please.
That’d be nice, I wish I could go part time, but there’s a 40 hr minimum wall that’s not avoidable.
I think your problem is one of perspective. In your original post, you talk about transitioning to management, overworking, and a pressure cooker environment. When I transitioned to management, I found the job to be much easier and less stressful than the technical engineering work I was doing. You just have to embrace a new mindset. First, you must delegate. Don't act like an individual contributor anymore. Accept that others do *all* the work, and you enable them (through coaching, setting strategy, etc.). Second, it's only a pressure cooker and stressful if you let it be. You need to stop caring. The best advice I got transitioning to a management role was from a senior person in the company. He said, "You are going to encounter a lot of problems in this job, ones you didn't even know existed. Just remember, they are mega corp's problems, not yours."

In returning to market timer's comment, yes, you have to physically be there 40 hours per week, but unless you have a horrible, horrible culture, no one pays attention to what you're doing for those hours as long as you get everything done. If you really want to check out and retire in place, you can. You must not have been in mega corp's management very long if you haven't realized how hard it is to get rid of people. I've seen people going on their second decade of phoning it in...

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