trustee duties when grantor passes

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freckles01
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trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by freckles01 » Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:16 pm

i am trustee for my dad's (grantor) irrevocable trust. he passed recently.

i've notified and sent death certificates (where required) to social security, the state, medicare/supplemental/dental insurances, bank account and utilities.

family, friends and beneficiaries were all notified.

all funeral/burial expenses were charged to my personal cc. my dad didn't have much in his bank account. the expenses will be deducted from the trust and beneficiaries are aware.

i've read (online) to keep his checking account open for 45 days- to wait for any checks to clear? if he has no outstanding checks to clear, is it ok to close it earlier?


Questions-
when is the irrevocable trust closed- after disbursement?

who closes/how is the irrevocable trust closed- attorney?

tax return for the trust and timing of trust disbursement to beneficiaries.

the trust did not generate enough interest to file a tax return last year but will this year. mostly in 12 and 14 month cds with ally ending sometime in 2020- they will be closed early, minus penalties.

do i run a dummy tax return using 2018 software to estimate taxes for 2019 or is it filed early? i don't want the beneficiaries to wait longer than necessary but not sure what is the usual timeline for settling a trust.

i will file his personal tax return next year when i do my own.

is there anything else i need to do or am missing?

thank you in advance.

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FIREchief
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by FIREchief » Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm

freckles01 wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:16 pm
Questions-
when is the irrevocable trust closed- after disbursement?

who closes/how is the irrevocable trust closed- attorney?
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
I am not a lawyer, accountant or financial advisor. Any advice or suggestions that I may provide shall be considered for entertainment purposes only.

Gill
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Gill » Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:39 pm

FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
freckles01 wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:16 pm
Questions-
when is the irrevocable trust closed- after disbursement?

who closes/how is the irrevocable trust closed- attorney?
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
To protect yourself as trustee you should obtain final receipts and releases from all beneficiaries of the trust. Upon receipt of these, preparation of the final tax returns and disbursement of the assets the trust is closed.
Gill
Cost basis is redundant. One has a basis in an investment | One advises and gives advice | One should follow the principle of investing one's principal

Broken Man 1999
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Broken Man 1999 » Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:43 pm

You might be able to cash out the CDs with no penalty of early withdrawal. I believe I have seen that if it were a brokered CD. Perhaps Ally does the same.

Worth a check.

Broken Man 1999
“If I cannot drink Bourbon and smoke cigars in Heaven than I shall not go. " -Mark Twain

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One Ping
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by One Ping » Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:22 pm

Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:39 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
To protect yourself as trustee you should obtain final receipts and releases from all beneficiaries of the trust. Upon receipt of these, preparation of the final tax returns and disbursement of the assets the trust is closed.
Gill
Gill, a question. What happens if one has a recalcitrant/lazy beneficiary who never sends the trustee the release. I fear I may have this situation in the future.

Can the trustee include in the notice requesting release something like "If the attached release is not signed and provided to the trustee within six weeks of the date of receipt of this notice, trustee assumes beneficiary releases trustee from any further responsibilities related to said trust."

Seems like this should be sent with "signed return receipt requested" so you know when they got it. Also, seems like there should be something in there allowing for a legitimate request for action from the beneficiary, but it hurts my head how to construct the language right now.

One Ping
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bsteiner
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by bsteiner » Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:33 pm

It depends on the terms of the trust. In most cases nothing changes upon the grantor's death except the taxpayer identification number. Sometimes a 1-pot trust divides into separate trusts for each child upon the grantor's death.

Gill
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Gill » Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:41 pm

One Ping wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:22 pm
Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:39 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
To protect yourself as trustee you should obtain final receipts and releases from all beneficiaries of the trust. Upon receipt of these, preparation of the final tax returns and disbursement of the assets the trust is closed.
Gill
Gill, a question. What happens if one has a recalcitrant/lazy beneficiary who never sends the trustee the release. I fear I may have this situation in the future.

Can the trustee include in the notice requesting release something like "If the attached release is not signed and provided to the trustee within six weeks of the date of receipt of this notice, trustee assumes beneficiary releases trustee from any further responsibilities related to said trust."

Seems like this should be sent with "signed return receipt requested" so you know when they got it. Also, seems like there should be something in there allowing for a legitimate request for action from the beneficiary, but it hurts my head how to construct the language right now.

One Ping
This was figured out long ago. The beneficiary is asked to sign the receipt and release before receiving final distribution. I never saw one refuse but we were always prepared to suggest they come to the office and we could exchange check and release simultaneously.
Gill
Cost basis is redundant. One has a basis in an investment | One advises and gives advice | One should follow the principle of investing one's principal

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prudent
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by prudent » Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:49 pm

I have a beneficiary who I already know won't sign a release either when the time comes. Not because of any actual issue, just one of those people who won't sign anything if there's nothing in it for them plus an irrational fear that something will come back to bite them - even if all the other beneficiaries sign an identical document. If I dared to make signing contingent on getting the final distribution it would make them even more paranoid.

Gill
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Gill » Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:53 pm

prudent wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:49 pm
I have a beneficiary who I already know won't sign a release either when the time comes. Not because of any actual issue, just one of those people who won't sign anything if there's nothing in it for them plus an irrational fear that something will come back to bite them - even if all the other beneficiaries sign an identical document. If I dared to make signing contingent on getting the final distribution it would make them even more paranoid.
If you don’t get a receipt and release you leave yourself open to later claims by the beneficiary against you personally.
Gill
Cost basis is redundant. One has a basis in an investment | One advises and gives advice | One should follow the principle of investing one's principal

bsteiner
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by bsteiner » Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:55 pm

Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:41 pm
...
The beneficiary is asked to sign the receipt and release before receiving final distribution. I never saw one refuse but we were always prepared to suggest they come to the office and we could exchange check and release simultaneously.
Another solution that we've occasionally used is for the executors or trustees to send the checks to us and the beneficiaries to send the receipts and releases to us to hold in escrow until we send the checks to the beneficiaries.

NotWhoYouThink
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:58 pm

Questions-
when is the irrevocable trust closed- after disbursement?
May sound like a dumb question, but what does the trust document say about disbursement? Does it say "disburse to these individuals equally free of trust" or does it say "set up trusts for these individuals and fund them equally" or does it say something else?

Lee_WSP
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Lee_WSP » Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:06 pm

FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
freckles01 wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:16 pm
Questions-
when is the irrevocable trust closed- after disbursement?

who closes/how is the irrevocable trust closed- attorney?
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
Not exactly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_against_perpetuities

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One Ping
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by One Ping » Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:21 pm

Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:41 pm
One Ping wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:22 pm
Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:39 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
To protect yourself as trustee you should obtain final receipts and releases from all beneficiaries of the trust. Upon receipt of these, preparation of the final tax returns and disbursement of the assets the trust is closed.
Gill
Gill, a question. What happens if one has a recalcitrant/lazy beneficiary who never sends the trustee the release. I fear I may have this situation in the future.

Can the trustee include in the notice requesting release something like "If the attached release is not signed and provided to the trustee within six weeks of the date of receipt of this notice, trustee assumes beneficiary releases trustee from any further responsibilities related to said trust."

Seems like this should be sent with "signed return receipt requested" so you know when they got it. Also, seems like there should be something in there allowing for a legitimate request for action from the beneficiary, but it hurts my head how to construct the language right now.

One Ping
This was figured out long ago. The beneficiary is asked to sign the receipt and release before receiving final distribution. I never saw one refuse but we were always prepared to suggest they come to the office and we could exchange check and release simultaneously.
Gill
That makes sense.

If they don't sign it, it's like they are dead. They don't get it and it goes to the next in line ... all the way down (that's the way ours is set up, anyway.) There is also what I call a "No Bitc_ing" clause in there, too. They complain, they lose their share.
"Re-verify our range to target ... one ping only."

bayview
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by bayview » Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:42 pm

prudent wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:49 pm
I have a beneficiary who I already know won't sign a release either when the time comes. Not because of any actual issue, just one of those people who won't sign anything if there's nothing in it for them plus an irrational fear that something will come back to bite them - even if all the other beneficiaries sign an identical document. If I dared to make signing contingent on getting the final distribution it would make them even more paranoid.
With respect, irrational fears are that person’s problem, not yours.

I would just tell them that this is how it works: signature in exchange for disbursement, and if they balk, let them know that their share will go to the next in line. Maybe give them a heads-up so they can gnaw on it and drive their SO insane.
One Ping wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:21 pm
...There is also what I call a "No Bitc_ing" clause in there, too. They complain, they lose their share.
Exactly. My mom has this in her trust and Will. I’m bending over backwards to do everything right in these last years of her life, and I’m happy to explain my actions if requested. But I’m not going to make life even more complicated by indulging hand-wringers and pearl-clutchers.

Besides, the other beneficiaries are my kids, and they know how far to push, and no farther. :D
The continuous execution of a sound strategy gives you the benefit of the strategy. That's what it's all about. --Rick Ferri

Spirit Rider
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Spirit Rider » Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:26 pm

Lee_WSP wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:06 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
Not exactly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_against_perpetuities
Common law is just that. Default precedence unless overridden by modern precedence or enacted laws. Almost half the states effectively allow the benefit of perpetual trusts, by either outright repealing the law or extending the waiting period to 90 - 365 years. Even in half the states with constitutional prohibitions against perpetuities there are workarounds.

Gill
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Gill » Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:36 pm

Spirit Rider wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:26 pm
Lee_WSP wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:06 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
Not exactly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_against_perpetuities
Common law is just that. Default precedence unless overridden by modern precedence or enacted laws. Almost half the states effectively allow the benefit of perpetual trusts, by either outright repealing the law or extending the waiting period to 90 - 365 years. Even in half the states with constitutional prohibitions against perpetuities there are workarounds.
Aren’t you talking about different things? I didn’t think this post had anything to do with the rule against perpetuities but rather the termination of a trust for lack of assets.
Gill
Cost basis is redundant. One has a basis in an investment | One advises and gives advice | One should follow the principle of investing one's principal

Spirit Rider
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Spirit Rider » Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:42 pm

Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:36 pm
Spirit Rider wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:26 pm
Lee_WSP wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:06 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
Not exactly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_against_perpetuities
Common law is just that. Default precedence unless overridden by modern precedence or enacted laws. Almost half the states effectively allow the benefit of perpetual trusts, by either outright repealing the law or extending the waiting period to 90 - 365 years. Even in half the states with constitutional prohibitions against perpetuities there are workarounds.
Aren’t you talking about different things? I didn’t think this post had anything to do with the rule against perpetuities but rather the termination of a trust for lack of assets. Gill
I was not responding to the issues about trust termination, but the interjection of the rule against perpetuities.

Gill
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Gill » Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:45 pm

Spirit Rider wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:42 pm
Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:36 pm
Spirit Rider wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:26 pm
Lee_WSP wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:06 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
Not exactly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_against_perpetuities
Common law is just that. Default precedence unless overridden by modern precedence or enacted laws. Almost half the states effectively allow the benefit of perpetual trusts, by either outright repealing the law or extending the waiting period to 90 - 365 years. Even in half the states with constitutional prohibitions against perpetuities there are workarounds.
Aren’t you talking about different things? I didn’t think this post had anything to do with the rule against perpetuities but rather the termination of a trust for lack of assets. Gill
I was not responding to the issues about trust termination, but the interjection of the rule against perpetuities.
What did this discussion have to do with the RAP? Also, what do you mean by precedence?
Gill
Cost basis is redundant. One has a basis in an investment | One advises and gives advice | One should follow the principle of investing one's principal

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FIREchief
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by FIREchief » Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:52 pm

Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:36 pm
Spirit Rider wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:26 pm
Lee_WSP wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:06 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
Not exactly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_against_perpetuities
Common law is just that. Default precedence unless overridden by modern precedence or enacted laws. Almost half the states effectively allow the benefit of perpetual trusts, by either outright repealing the law or extending the waiting period to 90 - 365 years. Even in half the states with constitutional prohibitions against perpetuities there are workarounds.
Aren’t you talking about different things? I didn’t think this post had anything to do with the rule against perpetuities but rather the termination of a trust for lack of assets.
Gill
Thanks Gill. I was scratching my head about what I was missing.

I understand your previous response from the perspective of an independent trustee, but I was thinking more in line with a situation where a person is either serving as their own trustee or as trustee for a family member. If such a trust is emptied of assets, and final tax documents are processed, is there really legal action required to "close" the trust?
I am not a lawyer, accountant or financial advisor. Any advice or suggestions that I may provide shall be considered for entertainment purposes only.

Gill
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Location: Florida

Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Gill » Sat Jul 06, 2019 7:00 pm

FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:52 pm
Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:36 pm
Spirit Rider wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 6:26 pm
Lee_WSP wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 5:06 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
Not exactly.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rule_against_perpetuities
Common law is just that. Default precedence unless overridden by modern precedence or enacted laws. Almost half the states effectively allow the benefit of perpetual trusts, by either outright repealing the law or extending the waiting period to 90 - 365 years. Even in half the states with constitutional prohibitions against perpetuities there are workarounds.
Aren’t you talking about different things? I didn’t think this post had anything to do with the rule against perpetuities but rather the termination of a trust for lack of assets.
Gill
Thanks Gill. I was scratching my head about what I was missing.

I understand your previous response from the perspective of an independent trustee, but I was thinking more in line with a situation where a person is either serving as their own trustee or as trustee for a family member. If such a trust is emptied of assets, and final tax documents are processed, is there really legal action required to "close" the trust?
There really is nothing further to be done with an inter vivos trust. With a testamentary trust most states require the closing documents to be filed with the court whereupon the court discharges the trustee.
Gill
Cost basis is redundant. One has a basis in an investment | One advises and gives advice | One should follow the principle of investing one's principal

Topic Author
freckles01
Posts: 116
Joined: Sun Aug 10, 2008 4:43 pm

Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by freckles01 » Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:37 pm

NotWhoYouThink wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:58 pm
Questions-
when is the irrevocable trust closed- after disbursement?
May sound like a dumb question, but what does the trust document say about disbursement? Does it say "disburse to these individuals equally free of trust" or does it say "set up trusts for these individuals and fund them equally" or does it say something else?
the trust documents says to disburse free of trust to 2 individual and to set up a special needs trust for 2 other

Topic Author
freckles01
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by freckles01 » Sun Nov 17, 2019 1:42 pm

Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:41 pm
One Ping wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 4:22 pm
Gill wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:39 pm
FIREchief wrote:
Sat Jul 06, 2019 3:34 pm
My understanding is that a trust never really "dies," it just reaches a point where there are zero assets (and thus nothing for a trustee to do or for a beneficiary to benefit from). Hopefully one of the experts will confirm. See my signature.
To protect yourself as trustee you should obtain final receipts and releases from all beneficiaries of the trust. Upon receipt of these, preparation of the final tax returns and disbursement of the assets the trust is closed.
Gill
Gill, a question. What happens if one has a recalcitrant/lazy beneficiary who never sends the trustee the release. I fear I may have this situation in the future.

Can the trustee include in the notice requesting release something like "If the attached release is not signed and provided to the trustee within six weeks of the date of receipt of this notice, trustee assumes beneficiary releases trustee from any further responsibilities related to said trust."

Seems like this should be sent with "signed return receipt requested" so you know when they got it. Also, seems like there should be something in there allowing for a legitimate request for action from the beneficiary, but it hurts my head how to construct the language right now.

One Ping
This was figured out long ago. The beneficiary is asked to sign the receipt and release before receiving final distribution. I never saw one refuse but we were always prepared to suggest they come to the office and we could exchange check and release simultaneously.
Gill
i am writing an email to all beneficiaries (including myself) a copy of the trust, last account statements, estimate of 2019 tax and remaining balance of trust.

do i need to ask them to agree via reply email and then/if they do send another email with a receipt and release form before final distribution?

special needs trust will be opened once they reply to the first email

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freckles01
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes- beneficiary headaches

Post by freckles01 » Sun Nov 17, 2019 2:17 pm

i'm back due to beneficiary drama

some history- 4 siblings in total, sibling A has received $$$ throughout the 30+ years as "loans" including a business loan where our dad served as guarantor. Sibling A defaulted on the business loan and dad paid it off. total is at least 130K+, theres a few other "loans" that i do not have paperwork on. i've given "loans" as well and was never paid back.

sibling B,C,D did not receive any loans.
Sibling B (me) serves as trustee. years ago, dad gifted me $$$ to buy a condo for extended family- another can of worms but the condo is not part of the trust estate and in my name only. all siblings know this.

the trust says to divide remaining trust funds to beneficiaries equally- sibling A is very upset as the amount isn't very large, was expecting just over 6 figures and it will not be close to that but in total (loans plus inheritance), sibling A will have received more than B,C and D.

the condo has appreciated and i plan to sell it and divide it between sibling B,C and D so that (hopefully) we receive somewhat close to what sibling A received, not accounting for interest over 30+ years.

am i crazy to think thats the fairest for all siblings?

Lee_WSP
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by Lee_WSP » Sun Nov 17, 2019 3:09 pm

Why haven't you engaged legal counsel to help you sort through this?

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plannerman
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes- beneficiary headaches

Post by plannerman » Sun Nov 17, 2019 10:01 pm

freckles01 wrote:
Sun Nov 17, 2019 2:17 pm
i'm back due to beneficiary drama

some history- 4 siblings in total, sibling A has received $$$ throughout the 30+ years as "loans" including a business loan where our dad served as guarantor. Sibling A defaulted on the business loan and dad paid it off. total is at least 130K+, theres a few other "loans" that i do not have paperwork on. i've given "loans" as well and was never paid back.

sibling B,C,D did not receive any loans.
Sibling B (me) serves as trustee. years ago, dad gifted me $$$ to buy a condo for extended family- another can of worms but the condo is not part of the trust estate and in my name only. all siblings know this.

the trust says to divide remaining trust funds to beneficiaries equally- sibling A is very upset as the amount isn't very large, was expecting just over 6 figures and it will not be close to that but in total (loans plus inheritance), sibling A will have received more than B,C and D.

the condo has appreciated and i plan to sell it and divide it between sibling B,C and D so that (hopefully) we receive somewhat close to what sibling A received, not accounting for interest over 30+ years.

am i crazy to think thats the fairest for all siblings?
Maybe. What does the trust say about adjusting each beneficiary's share based on previous loans? If it's silent, I think sibling A is entitled to 25% of the residual estate not--what you think may be fair.

plannerman

MrsBDG
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Re: trustee duties when grantor passes

Post by MrsBDG » Mon Nov 18, 2019 3:38 pm

It seems to me the condo is entirely separate from the estate transactions. If you look at the estate alone and sibling A is unhappy with the value of the estate, what is their point? Mom and Dad should have spent less so sibA would get more?

If SibA knows about the condo plan, is that the cause of dissension? What was Dad's plan for the condo? Anything in writing?

We know nothing of the emotions, but I'd not be inclined to baby sibA with any gifts not set out for them. I have seen several estate plans where large loans to one kid end up being charged against the ultimate inheritance.

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