Teaching jobs

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BradJ
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Teaching jobs

Post by BradJ » Mon May 27, 2019 1:29 pm

My wife just received her Masters degree in teaching, with a certification in both Math and Science. She has 10 years experience in running a small business, substituted at all the local schools and made a strong impression during her internship (not to mention graduated with a 4.0 while working full time), but despite all this has had a hard time securing employment. Has anyone else had issues getting their first teaching job? We are dumbfounded, mostly due to the fact she did everything “right”.

Small Savanna
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Small Savanna » Mon May 27, 2019 1:41 pm

Are you only looking at public schools? She might also want to consider private schools.

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BradJ
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by BradJ » Mon May 27, 2019 1:44 pm

She has applied at any and all opportunities, both private and public.

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willthrill81
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by willthrill81 » Mon May 27, 2019 1:47 pm

Are others being chosen over her for the positions she's applying for? If so, has she tried to determine what distinguishes those who get these positions from her?
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mnnice
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by mnnice » Mon May 27, 2019 2:05 pm

Sometimes a master’s is a liability in looking for a starting teaching job. Why pay an untested person for a master’s degree when you can hire a person with just a bachelors?

Some licensures are just easier to get a job in than others. Math is usually an easier area.
Last edited by mnnice on Mon May 27, 2019 2:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.

NMBob
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by NMBob » Mon May 27, 2019 2:06 pm

Perhaps a cash strapped school district may choose to avoid the higher pay of a masters degree and hire the teacher with only a bachelors for many classroom jobs.

On the other hand, usually it seems it is hard for districts to find math and perhaps physics and chemistry teachers.

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fortfun
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by fortfun » Mon May 27, 2019 2:09 pm

It should be super easy to find a math teaching position and relatively easy to find a science teaching position. Is this in a highly desirable school district? If so, she may need to look outside of that school district for her first job.
Last edited by fortfun on Mon May 27, 2019 2:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

anonenigma
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by anonenigma » Mon May 27, 2019 2:10 pm

It may be too early to find a job. Positions open up (retirements, etc.) at the end of the school year, which is coming up. Watch the certificated HR websites of geographically appropriate districts and see if they have openings beginning in a couple of weeks. More openings will be posted in the summer as staffing needs become evident. Good luck.

Godot
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Godot » Mon May 27, 2019 2:11 pm

BradJ wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 1:29 pm
My wife just received her Masters degree in teaching, with a certification in both Math and Science. She has 10 years experience in running a small business, substituted at all the local schools and made a strong impression during her internship (not to mention graduated with a 4.0 while working full time), but despite all this has had a hard time securing employment. Has anyone else had issues getting their first teaching job? We are dumbfounded, mostly due to the fact she did everything “right”.
How long has she been applying, to how many positions, and in how many states?
“There is man in his entirety, blaming his shoe when his foot is guilty.” ― Samuel Beckett, Waiting for Godot

NMBob
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by NMBob » Mon May 27, 2019 2:17 pm

anonenigma wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 2:10 pm
It may be too early to find a job. Positions open up (retirements, etc.) at the end of the school year, which is coming up. Watch the certificated HR websites of geographically appropriate districts and see if they have openings beginning in a couple of weeks. More openings will be posted in the summer as staffing needs become evident. Good luck.
Good point. I was told last week by a student teacher just graduating from college that she was told most teachers will not inform the district they are leaving until after the school year.

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fortfun
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by fortfun » Mon May 27, 2019 2:24 pm

NMBob wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 2:17 pm
anonenigma wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 2:10 pm
It may be too early to find a job. Positions open up (retirements, etc.) at the end of the school year, which is coming up. Watch the certificated HR websites of geographically appropriate districts and see if they have openings beginning in a couple of weeks. More openings will be posted in the summer as staffing needs become evident. Good luck.
Good point. I was told last week by a student teacher just graduating from college that she was told most teachers will not inform the district they are leaving until after the school year.
In my district, most of these decisions are shared by mid April and most of the jobs are posted in late April and May. Retirements must be reported to the state pension by early May (I believe).

mbres60
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by mbres60 » Mon May 27, 2019 2:28 pm

In my area teachers have til July 1 to submit resignations.

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BradJ
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by BradJ » Mon May 27, 2019 2:30 pm

Thank you to all who have replied. She has applied for about four jobs, two of which were in a desirable school district.

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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Mon May 27, 2019 2:36 pm

BradJ wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 2:30 pm
Thank you to all who have replied. She has applied for about four jobs, two of which were in a desirable school district.
Sometimes you have to teach in an undesirable school district, to get your foot in the door so to speak.
"One should invest based on their need, ability and willingness to take risk - Larry Swedroe" Asking Portfolio Questions

rj342
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by rj342 » Mon May 27, 2019 2:38 pm

In our area at least, it is considered a mistake to only do the formal application through the school districts central office with whatever their bureaucratic whims are. You also take resumes around in person to different schools you are interested in, and try to make an appointment with the principal or an asst principal at least. In the summer with kids out it should be easier to get to actually see someone. She might need to settle for what they call an interim job here, where someone is hired at full pay for an extended period to actually teach (not just sub) while a tenured teacher is out part of the year for a baby, etc.

New teachers, at least without good connections or good luck, may be expected to earn their dues at a less desirable school in the system for a couple years first. She should be prepared for that.

My wife retired last year after 28yrs in public system, now teaching for a few more years parochial schools (we're Catholic). Pay is a good bit less, but she was burnt out between worsening issues w kids (and often their parents) and ever increasing bureaucratic stupidity imposed from above by ppl who haven't been in a classroom on 20 years, if ever.
Last edited by rj342 on Mon May 27, 2019 2:43 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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fortfun
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by fortfun » Mon May 27, 2019 2:42 pm

BradJ wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 2:30 pm
Thank you to all who have replied. She has applied for about four jobs, two of which were in a desirable school district.
It might be worth doing some mock interviews with experienced teachers (if you know any). Also, her cooperating teacher may be very helpful securing her first job. Did she have a good experience with her cooperating teacher?

MrBobcat
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by MrBobcat » Mon May 27, 2019 2:47 pm

BradJ wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 1:29 pm
My wife just received her Masters degree in teaching, with a certification in both Math and Science. She has 10 years experience in running a small business, substituted at all the local schools and made a strong impression during her internship (not to mention graduated with a 4.0 while working full time), but despite all this has had a hard time securing employment. Has anyone else had issues getting their first teaching job? We are dumbfounded, mostly due to the fact she did everything “right”.
It can take a while especially if you're limited in where you can apply.

Determined
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Determined » Mon May 27, 2019 3:37 pm

Four interviews is not that many. There will be new jobs open as the domino effect kicks in. Math and science is definitely a better area than English or History. Connections mean a lot in many districts. If nothing pans out this year, she should commit to substituting in her preferred district or two. Become known and reliable. A long term substitute position is also helpful. In my area, you get a per diem teacher salary after so many days. Best of luck.

fru-gal
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by fru-gal » Mon May 27, 2019 3:56 pm

My field isn't teaching, but when I was looking for jobs, applying for only four would never have occurred to me.

Perhaps teaching is like working for Megacorp, where sending a resume to HR is equivalent to throwing it into the wastebasket, and what she should do is send to principals a personal letter saying something about herself, including her resume, and asking for an appointment to discuss any openings and saying if there are none if she can get advice as someone starting out.

If she gets an appointment, she should learn about that school before it.

What happened about jobs at the schools she substituted at?

Quaestner
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Quaestner » Mon May 27, 2019 5:30 pm

It may be worth it for her to make the rounds at schools with her resume and try to connect with an administrator. She could follow up at the school later. Don't just apply at the district level, make your interest known at the school level. Unanticipated job changes happen during the summer, and it helps to be the right person at the right time fresh in an administrator's mind. School's want to hire the best candidates (teachers that will fit in and will not be a source of headaches later). The individual school typically doesn't care about the salary - their budget isn't "hurt" by choosing a teacher with an advanced degree - that's a district issue. The individual school often makes the hiring request through the district. Sometimes this takes a long time as the district deals with "must hires" - teacher who are already in the system and transferring.

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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by sschullo » Mon May 27, 2019 5:42 pm

Well, this is very interesting! Math and science teachers are always in demand in less-prestigious schools. As others have said, keep looking and she will find a position. And then come back to tell us how terrible the 403(b) is.
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dbr
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by dbr » Mon May 27, 2019 6:43 pm

Don't most districts post job openings online? That might even be a requirement. These are public agencies.

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JMacDonald
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by JMacDonald » Mon May 27, 2019 6:58 pm

Here is my suggestion: She should start being a substitute teacher again. When she subs a school that she likes, talk to the principal at the school that she is interested in a full time position if something opens up. Give the principal a business card with contact information.

Principals are the ones that do the hiring. Teaching position become available for a variety of reasons during the school year. If that position opens up and she is available, she may get the job.

The advantage of doing this is that she gets to see the school and the principal gets to see her.
Best Wishes, | Joe

Ron Ronnerson
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Ron Ronnerson » Mon May 27, 2019 9:21 pm

I’m a mid-career teacher and am currently sitting in on interviews to help our principal make hiring decisions. There can be a lot of different circumstances involved with vacancies. Some great suggestions have already been made to improve the odds of being hired such as establishing a connection at the school level.

We interviewed a teacher just last week and he came across as way too intense despite having an impressive resume. I would bet he is not really aware of the way he’s coming across. In his case, he would likely benefit from getting feedback about his interviewing skills. I’m not saying that your wife is not interviewing well (as I really have no idea), but it could be helpful to get feedback nonetheless.

Additionally, in some situations, the district requires schools to hold interviews but the staff at the school already has (largely) decided who they intend to fill the vacancy. They must go through the motions and conduct interviews but they really know beforehand who will get the job. Often it is someone with established ties to the school such as a current teacher without tenure who must be automatically released at the end of the school-year and can be rehired at a later date, or a student teacher who recently worked at the school, or someone who has subbed at the school quite a bit. I would cast a wide net and apply to lots of positions as it can be a numbers game.

Your wife has certification in two subject areas that are both in demand during a time of near full employment. Additionally, many areas have a teacher shortage right now and are having a hard time filling the openings. I would not give up hope after four interviews; many new teachers are hired in the summer. In the current climate, I would apply to school districts that I wanted to teach in for the long term. The pay and working conditions can be quite different in districts near one another.

Aku09
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Aku09 » Mon May 27, 2019 10:19 pm

Teaching is a tough field to get a job in. My wife is a teacher and just went back into the field after being a stay at home mom for several years. First year she applied for several spots and didn’t even get an interview. Took a couple of online masters courses (still has her bachelors) and applied again. Went in person and talked to every principal and handed out her resume and made follow up calls. Interviews went very well, but never got a job from them.

Just so happened a school district was hiring about 2 weeks before school starts for 2 openings that she heard about. Went and got an application in person and sat in the parking lot to fill it out and they came out to her car and interviewed her immediately and gave her the job then. It is in a small school district (she has the entire 4th grade and had 16 or so students at the first of the year) and they have trouble with retention due to poor leadership. It’s about a 45 minute commute each way so there is that aspect of it as well. My wife is happy doing it though so that’s the important thing. Pay is terrible (around 36k) but it’s like that in all the schools around here. Good thing is job security is pretty much guaranteed.

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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by texasdiver » Mon May 27, 2019 10:36 pm

Science teacher here.

First, there is no national or even statewide market for teachers. It is 100% local and depends largely on the desirablilty of the community.

If you have a teaching license and can fog a mirror you can easily land teaching jobs in places like rural Texas or many rural areas of the country that are beyond commuting distances of larger cities.

On the other hand, if you want to teach in some sort of lifestyle mecca city, especially one with a university, then you will find intense competition. In meccas where young single people flock to, finding teaching jobs as an outsider can be near impossible. I'm talking about places like Boulder CO, Bend OR, Santa Fe NM, Madison WI, etc. There are tons of teachers in those places who are working as baristas or ski instructors or tutors looking for that one opening. I know teachers who live in Bend OR who have taught for 20 years driving out to teaching jobs in more distant small towns hoping for something to come up in the Bend school district and it never has for them.

In popular urban areas like where I live in the Portland area the close-in districts can be extremely competitive and newer teachers basically have to drive and drive until they get hired. Kind of like the real estate maxim of driving until you qualify. I've had teacher friends who live in Portland who have 40 mile commutes out to small rural schools because that is the closest they could find. Then they slowly ratchet closer and closer over the years.

You don't tell us what state or city you live in. Some hints. Be open to part-time positions, at least to start. Sometimes those are hard to fill. A district may only have budget and need for a 0.4 postion or 0.6 position. But the next year it might be full time. Continuing to sub is a possibility. It isn't quite the door-opener that people who haven't worked in schools might think that it is. At every school I have ever worked at the sub pool is managed by one of the office secretaries and you don't really ever have any contact with administrators when subbing. It isn't like in a traditional office environment where if you are temping you might be "seen" and can prove your worth and so forth. In teaching you are behind closed doors in a classroom and administrators never notice what is going on in your room unless there is some problem. But subbing is a good way to actually literally get your foot in the door of the school where you can actually meet teachers and adminstrators. But you have to make the effort. You should also talk to adminstrators and other teachers about medium and long-term science subbing positions. Often teachers go out on extended leave for whatever reason (maturnity leave, illness, travel, etc.) and the school needs a qualified sub who can step in for a month or two. So make it known to other science teachers and especially the secretary in charge of the sub pool that you are interested in any long-term math or science sub opportunities that they might have.

GenXer
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by GenXer » Mon May 27, 2019 10:44 pm

texasdiver wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 10:36 pm
Science teacher here.

First, there is no national or even statewide market for teachers. It is 100% local and depends largely on the desirability of the community.

If you have a teaching license and can fog a mirror you can easily land teaching jobs in places like rural Texas or many rural areas of the country that are beyond commuting distances of larger cities.

On the other hand, if you want to teach in some sort of lifestyle mecca city, especially one with a university, then you will find intense competition. In meccas where young single people flock to, finding teaching jobs as an outsider can be near impossible. I'm talking about places like Boulder CO, Bend OR, Santa Fe NM, Madison WI, etc. There are tons of teachers in those places who are working as baristas or ski instructors or tutors looking for that one opening. I know teachers who live in Bend OR who have taught for 20 years driving out to teaching jobs in more distant small towns hoping for something to come up in the Bend school district and it never has for them.

In popular urban areas like where I live in the Portland area the close-in districts can be extremely competitive and newer teachers basically have to drive and drive until they get hired. Kind of like the real estate maxim of driving until you qualify. I've had teacher friends who live in Portland who have 40 mile commutes out to small rural schools because that is the closest they could find. Then they slowly ratchet closer and closer over the years.

You don't tell us what state or city you live in. Some hints. Be open to part-time positions, at least to start. Sometimes those are hard to fill. A district may only have budget and need for a 0.4 position or 0.6 position. But the next year it might be full time. Continuing to sub is a possibility. It isn't quite the door-opener that people who haven't worked in schools might think that it is. At every school I have ever worked at the sub pool is managed by one of the office secretaries and you don't really ever have any contact with administrators when subbing. It isn't like in a traditional office environment where if you are temping you might be "seen" and can prove your worth and so forth. In teaching you are behind closed doors in a classroom and administrators never notice what is going on in your room unless there is some problem. But subbing is a good way to actually literally get your foot in the door of the school where you can actually meet teachers and administrators. But you have to make the effort. You should also talk to administrators and other teachers about medium and long-term science subbing positions. Often teachers go out on extended leave for whatever reason (maternity leave, illness, travel, etc.) and the school needs a qualified sub who can step in for a month or two. So make it known to other science teachers and especially the secretary in charge of the sub pool that you are interested in any long-term science sub opportunities that they might have.
High school teacher (not science) here. Agree completely with everything in this post.

texasdiver
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by texasdiver » Mon May 27, 2019 10:53 pm

JMacDonald wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 6:58 pm
Here is my suggestion: She should start being a substitute teacher again. When she subs a school that she likes, talk to the principal at the school that she is interested in a full time position if something opens up. Give the principal a business card with contact information.

Principals are the ones that do the hiring. Teaching position become available for a variety of reasons during the school year. If that position opens up and she is available, she may get the job.

The advantage of doing this is that she gets to see the school and the principal gets to see her.
As a sub it is pretty hard to actually meet and interact with principals at a school. They are busy and aren't ever going to see what you are doing. It isn't like an office environment where people actually see you. A better strategy is to invest in getting to know all the science and math teachers in the school you are subbing at. Chew the fat in the break room, offer to help out with stuff during your prep periods. Find out when they are doing work days and show up and help out with inventories and such. If a chem teacher is doing a big lab prep before or after school, poke your head in and help out. Basically try to be a team player. Then when they do need someone permanent or part time or even long-term sub, everyone will already know and like you.

The hiring process at every district I have ever worked at is quite regimented. They all use the same application software and all go through the same public announcement process for openings. Then HR will forward all the qualified applicants to the principal who will do the interview process, usually with a collection of teachers on the interview committee and maybe an assistant principal or counselor or whomever they can get. Some schools like to have a consistent interview team for all applicants. Others are more informal and whoever the principal can get to participate for whatever interview is who they have. Being known by the other teachers is a big plus if you are actually good and well liked. But it can be the opposite if you are difficult or some sort of gadfly. I've had subs hanging around a department looking for long-term employment that no one liked and everyone tried to avoid.

And WHATEVER you do, follow the lesson plans of the teacher for whom you are subbing to the best of your ability. Nothing drives a teacher more crazy than leaving a bunch of lesson plans and then have a sub do someting completely different. I've had subs drag out all the expensive science equipment, getting into the chemical stockroom and spend all day doing fun demos, lighting things on fire, blowing things up, etc. They don't tend to get asked back.

Another hint, leave email class notes rather than printed notes after you sub for classes. Most subs just leave handwritten notes about how the day went. I would always bring my own laptop and look up the email of the teacher for whom I was subbing. Then send them a nice email about how the day went and point out that you are math/science qualified and happy to do more for them next time. When you are a full time teacher the sub you get is usually completely random. Might be some 75 year old retired music teacher who knows nothing about science. So you never can count on them actually being able to teach full lessons. So it is always great to encounter subs who can actually teach your subject. Some teachers like to get into back and forth email conversations about their classes and will remember you next time. Then when you are back in the same school, try to drop by and say hi to the teachers for whom you have subbed so you can both put faces to the names and so forth.
Last edited by texasdiver on Mon May 27, 2019 11:18 pm, edited 1 time in total.

donall
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by donall » Mon May 27, 2019 11:02 pm

I am assuming you are talking about a high school position. Does your wife have any coaching experience? Does she have experience with coding or robotics? These are areas that make a candidate stand out in the math and science areas. Being eligible or certified to teach Physics is also valuable. Computer skills are an absolute must.

In desirable districts, it helps to know the teachers, staff, and administrators.

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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Doom&Gloom » Tue May 28, 2019 12:08 am

Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 2:36 pm
BradJ wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 2:30 pm
Thank you to all who have replied. She has applied for about four jobs, two of which were in a desirable school district.
Sometimes you have to teach in an undesirable school district, to get your foot in the door so to speak.
+1

Perhaps she is overestimating how valuable the masters degree is for the positions she is considering and setting her sights too high to establish a foothold???

CFM300
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by CFM300 » Tue May 28, 2019 12:10 am

texasdiver wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 10:36 pm
First, there is no national or even statewide market for teachers.
For independent schools there's NAIS and Carney Sandoe, among others.

Wenonah
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Wenonah » Tue May 28, 2019 12:46 am

Lots of great thoughts here--I just retired and have been on many interview teams and love getting people jobs.
1. Does she know what all of her recommendation letters say? Some colleges tell students they need "closed" files so the candidate can't look at them, but no administrator cares about that. Check all of your letters and references to make sure they are good.
2. Most people need to get a job in a smaller district before the desirable one.
3. Subbing is a great idea; ALWAYS clean up the desk and the room and leave a class by class typed up note about what you got accomplished in each period.
4. Also, some jobs are posted, but only because they legally have to be. Many times, the principal already knows who he/she wants to hire.
5. Of course you will get to know the principal! The teachers will keep requesting you and then you end up seeing the principal in the office, at assemblies, after school; he/she knows what the teachers and students think about you.
6. Yes, always follow the lesson plans unless you have a better way of explaining something or you got permission to have some wiggle room.
7. Again, there's nothing wrong with taking a position in a grade or subject or even district you "think" you don't want. I started out refusing to do anything but high school, but have loved my many years in middle school. Don't close any doors.
8. And yes, in some districts it is still early. Keep at it. Good luck! Congratulations to your wife on getting her masters.

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BradJ
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by BradJ » Tue May 28, 2019 6:21 am

I appreciate all the great advice and have communicated it to my wife. There were tons of questions asked, so I will do my best to answer:

She is certified in middle school, no coaching experience, and had a great relationship with the teacher and district where she did her internship.

My wife is not leaning on Masters to be a one way ticket for the job, but is frustrated that she took all the right steps and is still having issues securing employment. When she substituted most of the schools asked the staffing agency to make her the first call before anyone else.
One thing she does lack is the ability to sell herself in interviews. She worked 10 years with her family, so she’s still learning about “corporate” life. Don’t laugh to hard at the thought of schools being corporate, because they have a lot in common.

jeffarvon
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by jeffarvon » Tue May 28, 2019 6:49 am

Disclaimer: my experience and observations.

You mention applying for jobs. There can be hundreds of applications for one job arriving at HR.

One primary path to a job is to get through the HR filter and get invited for a building interview (usually 6-8ish candidates).

Does your wife have a good relationship with the program director (or similar title) where she got her education degree? Area district HR folks will often contact the local universities' teacher-ed program directors for recommendations. Cultivate that relationship.
"Enough is as good as a feast" - Mary Poppins

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BL
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by BL » Tue May 28, 2019 7:04 am

Lots of good suggestions above. Check out every school and sub as needed.

Don't overlook adjunct positions in area community colleges. Your Master's makes you a good candidate there as well.

jpelder
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by jpelder » Tue May 28, 2019 7:16 am

High School Science Teacher here. It's always hard for a new teacher to get hired. Here in my district (Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools), we're still in the "transfer period", where current district employees are applying for jobs at other schools in the district. While applications are open for outside candidates, principals understandably prefer to hire experienced teachers with good references. When I got my first job 5 years ago, I was not hired until the end of June. When I was hired at my current school a year ago, I didn't even have an interview until the beginning of May, and wasn't approved to transfer until the end of May. And this is in a state and district that is desperate for teachers (especially Science and Math). I don't know what the job market is like where you are, but around here, a science or math candidate will almost always get hired eventually. But it may not happen until June or July.
She just needs to keep applying. If she could have the principal that she worked with look over her resume and tell her if anything needs to be changed to make her more appealing, that may be helpful, too.

tbahadur
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by tbahadur » Tue May 28, 2019 7:45 am

Almost similar case, wife just received her Masters degree in teaching with a middle school certification in Math. She did great in her student teaching and the principal of school recommended her for a Math position in another school in the same district. She breezed through the interviews with the principal/ administrator. I would suggest reaching out to the principal of the school where your wife did student teaching esp. if she made a strong impression during her student teaching. One thing i do find odd is, based on interest shown by recruiters in the school career fair, it appears that there are a lot more schools trying to fill Math/Science teaching positions as against K-6. This is in NJ, not sure about other states.

bg5
Posts: 82
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by bg5 » Tue May 28, 2019 11:36 am

IN SW Michigan you would get hired in a minute as we have a huge shortage of teachers. I teach (off now because of baby) and have been working for 15 years and make 80K a year in a great school district.

Bottom line is put in as many applications as possible and when you get an interview make sure you do some research on the school and practice interviewing (with spouse or by yourself) so that you are prepared.

Subbing in alot of buildings and get to know the principals. Eventually ask the principal if they could see you working in that building sometime and if not move on to the next building.

paramedic
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by paramedic » Tue May 28, 2019 11:42 am

Can she get certified for high school math or science? There is much more of a shortage in high school STEM.

Middle school math and science isn't nearly as short staffed.

A Master's degree won't help much with securing a first teaching job.

I'm a former teacher. Feel free to PM me with any other questions, if you'd like.

-mike

Thegame14
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Thegame14 » Tue May 28, 2019 11:48 am

BradJ wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 1:29 pm
My wife just received her Masters degree in teaching, with a certification in both Math and Science. She has 10 years experience in running a small business, substituted at all the local schools and made a strong impression during her internship (not to mention graduated with a 4.0 while working full time), but despite all this has had a hard time securing employment. Has anyone else had issues getting their first teaching job? We are dumbfounded, mostly due to the fact she did everything “right”.
the one thing she didn't "do right" is get a degree in a potentially LOW demand job. Almost every single unemployed female I know has a teaching degree and almost every male I know who is unemployed is a lawyer. These were traditional gender biased fields most young women were told to be teachers and men to be lawyers and the fields got overrun with too many people getting the degree, and with teachers, VERY low turnover, once they have tenure most teachers keep their jobs for 30 years. For lawyers many companies are going towards mandatory arbitration and companies making you sign away rights to sue.

What she does have going is her degree at least is STEM, most of the ones I know are all early education and special ed, everyone wants to teach little kids, not HS. Also other big factor is most unemployed teachers is due to not wanting to teach in a "bad area" my sister tried for 2 plus years to teach near where we grew up, ended up having to go to an inner city to get a job, bars on the walls type of school. She is going to have to wait out a job locally in a good school for a long time, or take a inner city job.

Slapshot
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Location: SE Mass.

Re: Teaching jobs

Post by Slapshot » Tue May 28, 2019 11:51 am

This time of year most school officials are up to their ears in end of school issues and don't have time to handle job interviews. Over the summer is when most hiring occurs. So don't overstress the current situation. When I was hired, albeit many years ago, I received minimal response. Then a couple of weeks before the school year began, I had my pick of a number of good opportunities.
This time, like all times, is the best of times if we but know what to do with it.

renue74
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by renue74 » Tue May 28, 2019 2:47 pm

My wife was a career changer who moved into teaching in her early 30s. She has a math undergrad degree (and later on got 2 additional education masters degrees).

Math is a critical needs area in our state, as I would assume it is with most states. 14 years ago when she did this, she went into a state program and basically after so many weeks of "teacher boot camp," she was preliminarily certified. (She had to take some other courses during her first year to be certified)

She told me that sometimes it's difficult for these types of teachers to get a job because principals don't want to take a chance on a professional who just moved into teaching. I don't know the %, but I think those folks have a higher failure rate than 1st time teachers out of college.

The comment above about continuing to substitute is a good one. As long as you get in front of principals and get your name out as someone wanting a full time teaching position, that's good.

Also, summers are good times to get a job. As summer progresses, principals may become more desperate to hire. Our local middle school is losing 11 teachers this year...which is about 30% of the school! (some due to retirement, job changers, etc.)

My wife wants to go into administration and has been interviewing. Those jobs are much less available. I think she's had 3 interviews and no offer. Sometimes it just takes time.

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CyclingDuo
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by CyclingDuo » Tue May 28, 2019 11:43 pm

BradJ wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 1:29 pm
My wife just received her Masters degree in teaching, with a certification in both Math and Science. She has 10 years experience in running a small business, substituted at all the local schools and made a strong impression during her internship (not to mention graduated with a 4.0 while working full time), but despite all this has had a hard time securing employment. Has anyone else had issues getting their first teaching job? We are dumbfounded, mostly due to the fact she did everything “right”.
Keep applying! One must spread the net far and wide. June is just around the corner and lots of hires take place in the summer months.

Do you live in a populated or more rural area?
"Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time." ~ Steven Wright

kfitz1313
Posts: 79
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by kfitz1313 » Wed May 29, 2019 5:34 am

I didn't see anything about where you live, what you (the spouse) do, or what you're willing to do for her to teach. I can say that my wife and I have both taught overseas for years and love it. Go where you're treated best. If your local city and state don't want you then move. Move to another city or state or country. I do think everyone above is valid in telling you to just give it time. Four applications is not very many at all.

P.S. If you're out of the US for 330 days a year then you get to pay zero federal taxes and generally zero state taxes. You often will receive better healthcare and your rent is usually either paid by the school or you receive a stipend.

As an example we lived in Korea Dubai Singapore and now Afghanistan. We've never paid rent and we've always had zero taxes or 4% in Singapore. The healthcare was better in Korea and Singapore but we've worked for American companies in Dubai and Afghanistan so nothing special.

flyingaway
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by flyingaway » Wed May 29, 2019 6:45 am

BradJ wrote:
Tue May 28, 2019 6:21 am
I appreciate all the great advice and have communicated it to my wife. There were tons of questions asked, so I will do my best to answer:

She is certified in middle school, no coaching experience, and had a great relationship with the teacher and district where she did her internship.

My wife is not leaning on Masters to be a one way ticket for the job, but is frustrated that she took all the right steps and is still having issues securing employment. When she substituted most of the schools asked the staffing agency to make her the first call before anyone else.
One thing she does lack is the ability to sell herself in interviews. She worked 10 years with her family, so she’s still learning about “corporate” life. Don’t laugh to hard at the thought of schools being corporate, because they have a lot in common.
Has she done any interviews yet? I think if one can teach, one should be OK with interviews. Both are interactions with other people.

Topic Author
BradJ
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by BradJ » Wed May 29, 2019 8:30 am

kfitz1313 wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 5:34 am
I didn't see anything about where you live, what you (the spouse) do, or what you're willing to do for her to teach. I can say that my wife and I have both taught overseas for years and love it. Go where you're treated best. If your local city and state don't want you then move. Move to another city or state or country. I do think everyone above is valid in telling you to just give it time. Four applications is not very many at all.

P.S. If you're out of the US for 330 days a year then you get to pay zero federal taxes and generally zero state taxes. You often will receive better healthcare and your rent is usually either paid by the school or you receive a stipend.

As an example we lived in Korea Dubai Singapore and now Afghanistan. We've never paid rent and we've always had zero taxes or 4% in Singapore. The healthcare was better in Korea and Singapore but we've worked for American companies in Dubai and Afghanistan so nothing special.
I work in utilities, specifically energy markets. We live in Arkansas, and reside in a growing area that has a high ranking school district.

coachd50
Posts: 165
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by coachd50 » Wed May 29, 2019 9:11 am

BradJ wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 1:29 pm
My wife just received her Masters degree in teaching, with a certification in both Math and Science. She has 10 years experience in running a small business, substituted at all the local schools and made a strong impression during her internship (not to mention graduated with a 4.0 while working full time), but despite all this has had a hard time securing employment. Has anyone else had issues getting their first teaching job? We are dumbfounded, mostly due to the fact she did everything “right”.
A few things.

1) What do you mean by "just received"? Weeks? Months? A Year?
You must realize that in many places, the hiring aspect of teaching is quite different than other professions/jobs because of the seasonal aspect. In many places, the district doesn't advertise jobs until "Job Fair" events. For example, my district (55 schools) just posted about 180 jobs (probably 50 of them special education) for the "job fair", which is where the hiring for the upcoming year will be. These things happen after the school year (my area starts in Early August, ends late May). I would bet that right now most places across the country still have 3+ or so weeks left of school so there isn't really going to be any hiring done until then.

2) Related to #1 is that the seasonal aspect of teaching, and the importance of continuity for the entire school year really makes education a "who you know" profession. Those doing the hiring are much more inclined to hire someone they know, rather than an unknown because of the absolute disaster a bad hire can create.

3) What did she do "right"

dbr
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by dbr » Wed May 29, 2019 9:18 am

It sure sounds like this is all about timing.

I know one friend who took the second choice opening because they would hire in the summer and ignored the first choice opening because they said it wouldn't be decided until October when all the competing openings would have been filled.

I suspect many teachers who retire or resign may not have actually committed completely until the end of the year and after that districts have to handle all the placements due to transfers.

rj342
Posts: 292
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Re: Teaching jobs

Post by rj342 » Wed May 29, 2019 9:47 am

BradJ wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 8:30 am
I work in utilities, specifically energy markets. We live in Arkansas, and reside in a growing area that has a high ranking school district.
The advice to move, particularly internationally, for what is presumably the secondary income is a bit disconnected from reality.

FWIW I did have a friend from high school who did the international thing, teaching English in Poland in the mid 90s after USSR broke up, then 2000s in Taiwan then China. Of course living that life he never had a family of his own. He died a year ago w colon cancer, fortunately able to come home before the end.

Potentially a GREAT experience for a single person for a few years wanting to avoid cubicle life.

rj342
Posts: 292
Joined: Tue Apr 30, 2019 12:21 pm

Re: Teaching jobs

Post by rj342 » Wed May 29, 2019 9:49 am

flyingaway wrote:
Wed May 29, 2019 6:45 am
BradJ wrote:
Tue May 28, 2019 6:21 am
I appreciate all the great advice and have communicated it to my wife. There were tons of questions asked, so I will do my best to answer:

She is certified in middle school, no coaching experience, and had a great relationship with the teacher and district where she did her internship.

My wife is not leaning on Masters to be a one way ticket for the job, but is frustrated that she took all the right steps and is still having issues securing employment. When she substituted most of the schools asked the staffing agency to make her the first call before anyone else.
One thing she does lack is the ability to sell herself in interviews. She worked 10 years with her family, so she’s still learning about “corporate” life. Don’t laugh to hard at the thought of schools being corporate, because they have a lot in common.
Has she done any interviews yet? I think if one can teach, one should be OK with interviews. Both are interactions with other people.
I taught 6 years in university (instructor not prof). There is a big difference between speaking in front of peers/superiors vs those below you in status, until you get used to it.

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