Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Non-investing personal finance issues including insurance, credit, real estate, taxes, employment and legal issues such as trusts and wills
Post Reply
Topic Author
HEDGEFUNDIE
Posts: 3560
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:06 pm

Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Sun May 05, 2019 2:36 pm

I work for a publicly traded tech company that has been in rocket ship mode. Stock price has increased 5x over the past 12 months.

I joined the company 6 months ago. My total annual compensation at the time of hire was $225k. With the recent stock run-up, that figure is now up to $250k. I have also performed exceptionally, with multiple executive stakeholders lauding my work to my management.

I am on a very small team. One of my teammates (same level, same background, same responsibilities) joined the company 10 months before me. Assuming she received the same comp package as me upon joining, her total comp is close to $400k by now (and even that is a conservative estimate assuming no raises or more shares, only appreciation of the shares originally granted).

My company reviews compensation for all employees every six months for raises, promotions, and “pay equity”. My first review cycle is fast approaching.

Normally I would not ask for anything with such a short amount of time under my belt. But with such a disparity in compensation between members on the team, I wonder if I should make an argument for more RSUs. I don’t expect to get to parity with my coworker, but a 60% pay disparity for essentially identical work seems a bit extreme.

Has anyone been in this position before and succeeded in a compensation negotiation? How did you go about it?

Zombies
Posts: 62
Joined: Sat Jul 15, 2017 6:22 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by Zombies » Sun May 05, 2019 2:49 pm

A few thoughts here —

- it can’t hurt to ask. Let’s assume you’re performing well for argument’s purposes — asking for more RSUs could have no effect, could put you on a short list for some additional equity grant in the future, or could garner you something. If a manager held that against you, they’re petty and you don’t want to work for them. Again, this is predicated on you being valuable at work, as otherwise this is pointless.

- I have no idea what your company does for “pay equity,” but I imagine that’s about gender equity and pay band normalization — people below the median get higher raises for the same performance than people above the median for that level. This almost never includes RSUs.

- I would not use the argument about other folks’ RSUs at all. Would you ask for an RSU cut if the company stock went down and you were thus not as affected as other people? If the company rockets and you’ve been there awhile, your reward is RSU appreciation. At FANG, the previous RSU grants are in the past, and performance determines current and future grants. There’s never any resizing based on similar levels with different grants due to time at the company.

- Some companies respond well to counter offering (Google will offer significantly more comp to keep you if you’re a star), whereas others as a policy refuse to do anything (Facebook). If your company does counters, getting another job offer is your quickest way to pay raises within your company.

User avatar
TomatoTomahto
Posts: 9434
Joined: Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:48 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by TomatoTomahto » Sun May 05, 2019 2:56 pm

The employee who joined 10 months before you presumably was accepting a riskier job than you did. As in so many things, risk and reward go together. I’ll bet you’re doing better than people who signed up last week.
Okay, I get it; I won't be political or controversial. The Earth is flat.

User avatar
mrspock
Posts: 498
Joined: Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:49 am
Location: Vulcan

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by mrspock » Sun May 05, 2019 3:22 pm

Here are my thoughts, as I was (am?) on a rocket ship as well:

1. Joining earlier is worth more because there is intrinsically more risk, especially if somebody left a cushy mega-corp job for the scrappy startup. Your coworker, through chance or choice, took more risk and is now reaping the rewards. In a young company, 10 months earlier is a pretty big deal.

2. This knife can cut both ways. Whenever my colleagues complain about stock based comp, I always ask: if the price were going in the opposite direction, what would your position be? When it’s drops, people want more stock to compensate, oddly nobody offers to give any back when it goes higher than expected.

3. Don’t worry about what’s others are making... work hard, with honor, and let the chips fall where they may. Yes, there will be spots where you are under paid at times, but you will also be over paid at times, it will come out in the wash. Live your own story... life is happier that way.

4. Focus on what you can control: how you spend and invest your money. Many of my colleagues joined earlier and were instant millionaires years before me... now I’ve caught up or passed many because I was smarter with my money.
Last edited by mrspock on Sun May 05, 2019 4:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Dottie57
Posts: 7001
Joined: Thu May 19, 2016 5:43 pm
Location: Earth Northern Hemisphere

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by Dottie57 » Sun May 05, 2019 3:28 pm

mrspock wrote:
Sun May 05, 2019 3:22 pm
Here are my thoughts, as I was (am?) on a rocket ship as well:

1. Joining earlier is worth more because there is intrinsically more risk, especially if somebody left a cushy mega-corp job for the scrappy startup. Your coworker, through chance or choice, took more risk and is now reaping the rewards. In a young company, 10 months earlier is a pretty big deal.

2. This knife can cut both ways. Whenever my colleagues complain about stock based comp, I always ask: if the price were going in the opposite direction, what would your position be? When it’s drops, people want more stock to compensate, oddly nobody offers to give any back when it goes higher than expected.

3. Don’t worry about what’s others are making... work hard, with honor, and let the chips fall where they may. Yes, there will be spots where you are under paid at times, but you will also be over paid at times, it will come out in the wash. Live your own story... life happier that way.

4. Focus on what you can control: how you spend and invest your money. Many of my colleagues joined earlier and were instant millionaires years before me... now I’ve caught up or passed many because I was smarter with my money.
This.

2commaBH
Posts: 69
Joined: Mon May 29, 2017 9:23 am
Location: SFBA

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by 2commaBH » Sun May 05, 2019 3:35 pm

I don't think it's wrong to ask for more compensation when you have earned it, but I don't think 6 months is the right time to do so. Perhaps if your role had changed significantly (shifting from individual contributor to manager, etc).

When asking for more compensation, I think it it most effective to focus on your own performance - "so and so gets paid more" is not persuasive and may actually have a negative impact.

My rule of thumb is never to ask for more compensation (more usually follows great performance without asking) unless I'm extremely confident the answer will be yes.

edge
Posts: 3440
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 7:44 pm
Location: NY

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by edge » Sun May 05, 2019 4:23 pm

It’s pretty off color to ask the company to compensate you because people who joined before you enjoyed more of a positive run on the stock.

It’s 50:50 after 6 months of you will be categorized as ‘too new’, or not. I suggest you highlight your contributions to try to shed the ‘too new’ designation.

Frankly - you should have negotiated this (comp eligibility) when you joined. Might be water under the bridge.

phxjcc
Posts: 179
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2018 3:47 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by phxjcc » Sun May 05, 2019 11:05 pm

Op:
You are guilty of a false equivalency.

Your co worker’s total compensation is higher because she has RSUs or options that have appreciated in value.

Otherwise, Mr Bezos owes me a LOT of money because I have to buy his stock at 2,000 and he got it for 1.

riverguy
Posts: 496
Joined: Sun May 23, 2010 10:33 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by riverguy » Mon May 06, 2019 4:46 am

Stock is up 5x in 12 months, you joined 6 mo ago and your total comp is only up 10%? Sounds like you did not negotiate very well or wanted more cash than stock when you signed on.

TheOscarGuy
Posts: 933
Joined: Sat Oct 06, 2012 1:10 pm
Location: Where I wanna be.

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by TheOscarGuy » Wed May 08, 2019 7:25 am

HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Sun May 05, 2019 2:36 pm
I work for a publicly traded tech company that has been in rocket ship mode. Stock price has increased 5x over the past 12 months.

I joined the company 6 months ago. My total annual compensation at the time of hire was $225k. With the recent stock run-up, that figure is now up to $250k. I have also performed exceptionally, with multiple executive stakeholders lauding my work to my management.

I am on a very small team. One of my teammates (same level, same background, same responsibilities) joined the company 10 months before me. Assuming she received the same comp package as me upon joining, her total comp is close to $400k by now (and even that is a conservative estimate assuming no raises or more shares, only appreciation of the shares originally granted).

My company reviews compensation for all employees every six months for raises, promotions, and “pay equity”. My first review cycle is fast approaching.

Normally I would not ask for anything with such a short amount of time under my belt. But with such a disparity in compensation between members on the team, I wonder if I should make an argument for more RSUs. I don’t expect to get to parity with my coworker, but a 60% pay disparity for essentially identical work seems a bit extreme.

Has anyone been in this position before and succeeded in a compensation negotiation? How did you go about it?
No way to tell if she began at the same compensation level as you did. You can ask her, and maybe that makes the conversation regarding your compensation easier if she agrees. In her position, I would not though, be comfortable sharing my salary.

What you are asking is roughly 60% after joining a company 6 months prior. I am unaware of how companies in silicon valley do this, but I would imagine it would be received seriously.

HornedToad
Posts: 1013
Joined: Wed May 21, 2008 12:36 am

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by HornedToad » Wed May 08, 2019 8:00 am

The companies view is that both of you are above target compensation since the stock has gone up so much and you should be happy for the success and increased
Comp, not complaining that someone else who joined earlier and benefitted from lower stock prices makes more than you.

AWS bakes into their model 15% expected stock growth per year for target comp but that’s very unusual.

You don’t have a chance here. Focus on delivering value and earning a raise, not relative salary

bltn
Posts: 562
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2017 9:32 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by bltn » Wed May 08, 2019 8:08 am

After only six months, at this first review, I would let my work speak for itself and not say anything. See what the company does. If there is no increase in compensation, at the next six month review, if your status is still above average for your group, then a request for a pay raise might be made.
I m not a tech person, but knowing companies in general, if I foresaw a long career with this company, that s what I would do.

softwaregeek
Posts: 248
Joined: Wed May 08, 2019 8:59 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by softwaregeek » Fri May 10, 2019 10:10 pm

OK, I have been in this situation before. I was previously at a rocketship post-IPO startup as a junior manager and now am at a Top-Tier VC funded pre-IPO startup as senior technical.

My recommendation is to download an anonymous chat application called Blind. it is primarily used by Silicon Valley engineers to discuss compensation anonymously.

Ask your question there. You will get 10 answers.

That being said, typically most top tier tech companies in Silicon valley companies do refreshers once a year for top performers. Many of these programs are kept confidential.

At my prior company (small but well regarded high performing tech), as a top performing manager/Sr manager, I was generally granted annual RSU refreshers worth 50% of my base salary, vesting over four years. So my total comp increased massively as I got four years of stock refreshers, AND the stock went up about 5x when I was there.

Assuming you are a top performer, your annual base pay ought to be in the 5% range, unless you get promoted.

As your seniority increases, more of your pay will be variable.

Topic Author
HEDGEFUNDIE
Posts: 3560
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:06 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Fri May 10, 2019 11:17 pm

softwaregeek wrote:
Fri May 10, 2019 10:10 pm
OK, I have been in this situation before. I was previously at a rocketship post-IPO startup as a junior manager and now am at a Top-Tier VC funded pre-IPO startup as senior technical.

My recommendation is to download an anonymous chat application called Blind. it is primarily used by Silicon Valley engineers to discuss compensation anonymously.

Ask your question there. You will get 10 answers.

That being said, typically most top tier tech companies in Silicon valley companies do refreshers once a year for top performers. Many of these programs are kept confidential.

At my prior company (small but well regarded high performing tech), as a top performing manager/Sr manager, I was generally granted annual RSU refreshers worth 50% of my base salary, vesting over four years. So my total comp increased massively as I got four years of stock refreshers, AND the stock went up about 5x when I was there.

Assuming you are a top performer, your annual base pay ought to be in the 5% range, unless you get promoted.

As your seniority increases, more of your pay will be variable.
So it sounds like in a typical non-promotion year I can expect $30k/yr compensation increase, assuming no stock appreciation.

That works for me. I'll "rest and vest", as they say on Blind.

softwaregeek
Posts: 248
Joined: Wed May 08, 2019 8:59 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by softwaregeek » Sat May 11, 2019 12:42 am

One last thing. When you get promoted in tech, generally base increase is small. In my field, base salary between 7 year IC and senior manager is only about 35 percent. However, total comp was about 80 percent more. Director is where the real money starts.

sfnerd
Posts: 143
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 1:16 am

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by sfnerd » Sat May 11, 2019 2:38 am

Tech exec here. Your boss will be thinking about your comp as base + bonus + grant amount. They probably won't adjust for where the stock has gone when comparing for equality. If Jill is making the same as you, according to comp at grant time but is making more due to share appreciation, and your performance is the same, he/she would probably just see her as capturing upside of joining early, as other posters have said.

However, if you're killing it, asking for more is definitely a possibility. Personally, I'd wait for the 1 year mark, or the natural performance cycle to discuss this. If you really want to mention it now, what I would suggest would be to lightly mention it, in order to prepare your manager to give you more in the usual cycle. Something like, "hey, I know it's early, but with the company doing so well and my performance being pretty good, I'd love a chance to capture as much upside as I can; I normally would wait to even mention this, but I want to be open so you can act, if possible".

Topic Author
HEDGEFUNDIE
Posts: 3560
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:06 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Sat May 11, 2019 8:54 am

sfnerd wrote:
Sat May 11, 2019 2:38 am
Tech exec here. Your boss will be thinking about your comp as base + bonus + grant amount.
Grant amount at the time of grant or the time of vest?

In other words, if at my one year mark my vesting shares bring my total comp to 300 for the preceding 12 months, would my boss still offer me a raise and refreshers based on the original 225 or the new 300? If the latter, I probably shouldn’t expect much of an increase at all?

softwaregeek
Posts: 248
Joined: Wed May 08, 2019 8:59 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by softwaregeek » Sat May 11, 2019 10:50 am

Time of grant. Typically managers have a discretionary pool to distribute so suck up nicely.

sfnerd
Posts: 143
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 1:16 am

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by sfnerd » Sun May 12, 2019 8:29 am

HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Sat May 11, 2019 8:54 am
sfnerd wrote:
Sat May 11, 2019 2:38 am
Tech exec here. Your boss will be thinking about your comp as base + bonus + grant amount.
Grant amount at the time of grant or the time of vest?

In other words, if at my one year mark my vesting shares bring my total comp to 300 for the preceding 12 months, would my boss still offer me a raise and refreshers based on the original 225 or the new 300? If the latter, I probably shouldn’t expect much of an increase at all?
Grant amount. I almost never look at the market value. Usually your raise would be on the original issued compensation package. Remember that usually the grant price is effectively the cost that the company bears, as they usually purchase, issue, or hedge against that amount.

Topic Author
HEDGEFUNDIE
Posts: 3560
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:06 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Sun May 12, 2019 8:31 am

sfnerd wrote:
Sun May 12, 2019 8:29 am
HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Sat May 11, 2019 8:54 am
sfnerd wrote:
Sat May 11, 2019 2:38 am
Tech exec here. Your boss will be thinking about your comp as base + bonus + grant amount.
Grant amount at the time of grant or the time of vest?

In other words, if at my one year mark my vesting shares bring my total comp to 300 for the preceding 12 months, would my boss still offer me a raise and refreshers based on the original 225 or the new 300? If the latter, I probably shouldn’t expect much of an increase at all?
Grant amount. I almost never look at the market value. Usually your raise would be on the original issued compensation package. Remember that usually the grant price is effectively the cost that the company bears, as they usually purchase, issue, or hedge against that amount.
Awesome, thanks!

staythecourse
Posts: 6993
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 9:40 am

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by staythecourse » Sun May 12, 2019 8:36 am

HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Sun May 05, 2019 2:36 pm
I work for a publicly traded tech company that has been in rocket ship mode. Stock price has increased 5x over the past 12 months.

I joined the company 6 months ago. My total annual compensation at the time of hire was $225k. With the recent stock run-up, that figure is now up to $250k. I have also performed exceptionally, with multiple executive stakeholders lauding my work to my management.

I am on a very small team. One of my teammates (same level, same background, same responsibilities) joined the company 10 months before me. Assuming she received the same comp package as me upon joining, her total comp is close to $400k by now (and even that is a conservative estimate assuming no raises or more shares, only appreciation of the shares originally granted).

My company reviews compensation for all employees every six months for raises, promotions, and “pay equity”. My first review cycle is fast approaching.

Normally I would not ask for anything with such a short amount of time under my belt. But with such a disparity in compensation between members on the team, I wonder if I should make an argument for more RSUs. I don’t expect to get to parity with my coworker, but a 60% pay disparity for essentially identical work seems a bit extreme.

Has anyone been in this position before and succeeded in a compensation negotiation? How did you go about it?
Doesn't sound like you have to do anything does it? If they have regular meetings and one of the issues revolves around compensation then you just have to mention are you being compensated in the same range as other folks with the same experience, responsibilities, and successes. They seem to have a good system in place to handle these issues.

Good luck.
"The stock market [fluctuation], therefore, is noise. A giant distraction from the business of investing.” | -Jack Bogle

sfnerd
Posts: 143
Joined: Tue Apr 08, 2014 1:16 am

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by sfnerd » Sun May 12, 2019 8:41 am

No problem. It makes intuitive sense, because if they raised the dollar amount of your grant to match the market, you'd have surging compensation costs, and they would only go up. This would crush most companies in a downturn.

RSUs and other equity vehicles are great because they really give companies the ability to give employees exposure to company performance at a reasonable cost.

Topic Author
HEDGEFUNDIE
Posts: 3560
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:06 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Tue May 21, 2019 10:58 pm

UPDATE: Just spoke with my boss during my first six month review. No change in compensation, but he did say very complimentary things about my work and told me to expect a promotion to Sr Manager at our next six month check in. Asking around, I’m expecting that to be a $50k bump which would bring me to $300k.

On the other hand, I’ve been passively replying to recruiters on LinkedIn for Sr Manager/Director jobs that pay around $350k.

So I guess my decision is this:

1. Stay where I am now for a likely (but not guaranteed) promotion in six months. Know that I am making ~$50k less than my market value, but hopefully make that up by deepening my relationships at the company and getting on the “high performer” track.

2. Pursue the higher paying jobs more seriously, chase the money now knowing that the tech gold rush could end at any time. This would be my third job in less than two years, my seventh job since starting my career 12 years ago.

Thoughts?

Wannaretireearly
Posts: 754
Joined: Wed Mar 31, 2010 4:39 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by Wannaretireearly » Tue May 21, 2019 11:15 pm

Can you provide a bit more detail on the type of work you do? I'm in a similar industry, longer tenure.

One thing is it can get tougher to have a good network established the more senior you go. So, when you do have that it's a good thing. Seems your developing well where you are.

You may realize the total comp bump is bigger than you expect. The bonuses and stock awards have broad ranges at the senior levels. I.e. senior bosses can give/reward more.

Good luck. I would stay where you are, especially with short tenure. Do you enjoy the work and balance currently? What do you like and dislike?
Buy Low, Sell High

HornedToad
Posts: 1013
Joined: Wed May 21, 2008 12:36 am

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by HornedToad » Tue May 21, 2019 11:16 pm

HEDGEFUNDIE wrote:
Tue May 21, 2019 10:58 pm
UPDATE: Just spoke with my boss during my first six month review. No change in compensation, but he did say very complimentary things about my work and told me to expect a promotion to Sr Manager at our next six month check in. Asking around, I’m expecting that to be a $50k bump which would bring me to $300k.

On the other hand, I’ve been passively replying to recruiters on LinkedIn for Sr Manager/Director jobs that pay around $350k.

So I guess my decision is this:

1. Stay where I am now for a likely (but not guaranteed) promotion in six months. Know that I am making ~$50k less than my market value, but hopefully make that up by deepening my relationships at the company and getting on the “high performer” track.

2. Pursue the higher paying jobs more seriously, chase the money now knowing that the tech gold rush could end at any time. This would be my third job in less than two years, my seventh job since starting my career 12 years ago.

Thoughts?
A few thoughts.

When you are at a rocketship, you stay there and benefit from the rapid career growth as the company expands and compensation increase as the stock skyrockets. It also doesn't hurt being at a company with brand recognition of success for your resume.

Second, you've job hopped a lot and at some point it'll hurt you and this seems like a reasonable company to do a ~3 year stint and show growth and stability. Job hopping in tech is generally fine, but 7 jobs within 12 years will get you removed from consideration at times and having a recent job with stability would help.

That said, if it's truly $350k in liquid TC and not paper money then it might be worth one more switch. But you'd need to really believe in the company vs rocketship

softwaregeek
Posts: 248
Joined: Wed May 08, 2019 8:59 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by softwaregeek » Tue May 21, 2019 11:24 pm

Many people suggest hopping, hopping, hopping.

I frankly would probably toss your resume. I need to know that the guys I hire are going to ride with me.

For what it's worth, I'm Director at a Sequoia-backed startup.

Edit: Don't burn bridges. Silicon Valley is about people. This industry is highly cyclical. You do t he same work as those other people? When the cycle turns, don't be the one voted off the island. This is a small industry and reputation carries a lot of weight. And we will know your reputation. Before someone extends you an offer, they will do a backdoor reference. We're going to be calling people who might know you. You might not know it, but we're going to be hitting up linkedin, and our buddies linkedins. I've sometimes not made offers before because of it.

For what it's worth, my job offer came from personal call from the senior exec, who I had worked for previously at another company. It was substantially above market. When the cycle turns, it's good to have friends.

phxjcc
Posts: 179
Joined: Thu Aug 23, 2018 3:47 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by phxjcc » Tue May 21, 2019 11:47 pm

softwaregeek wrote:
Tue May 21, 2019 11:24 pm
Many people suggest hopping, hopping, hopping.

I frankly would probably toss your resume. I need to know that the guys I hire are going to ride with me.

For what it's worth, I'm Director at a Sequoia-backed startup.

Edit: Don't burn bridges. Silicon Valley is about people. This industry is highly cyclical. You do t he same work as those other people? When the cycle turns, don't be the one voted off the island. This is a small industry and reputation carries a lot of weight. And we will know your reputation. Before someone extends you an offer, they will do a backdoor reference. We're going to be calling people who might know you. You might not know it, but we're going to be hitting up linkedin, and our buddies linkedins. I've sometimes not made offers before because of it.

For what it's worth, my job offer came from personal call from the senior exec, who I had worked for previously at another company. It was substantially above market. When the cycle turns, it's good to have friends.
As a retired CT/IO, I agree.

At some point, like now, someone will review your resume and determine that you are not a fit for the team to build their killer app—because if you get a better offer right before the release date (that will yield level 2 funding) you will bolt for more money.

Topic Author
HEDGEFUNDIE
Posts: 3560
Joined: Sun Oct 22, 2017 2:06 pm

Re: Compensation negotiation strategy (rocket ship tech)

Post by HEDGEFUNDIE » Wed May 22, 2019 12:41 am

All the replies resonate with me, I’ll stop responding on LinkedIn.

Thanks for talking me off the ledge guys. Sometimes it’s hard to stay focused on the long term in a frothy environment like this.

Post Reply