Help with difficult work situation

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davehica
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Help with difficult work situation

Post by davehica »

Hello Bogleheads - I was very recently notified that one of my peers is being promoted and that I will now be reporting in to her. We’ve been friends and peers for almost 6 years, built our department together, and I’m not quite sure how to proceed. Up until this week, I expected to have a long(er) career with the company and had no plans to leave. Some additional details:

1) She absolutely deserves the promotion. I knew it was coming but assumed they would change her title and leave our current reporting structure in place. My current boss acknowledged that this wasn’t an ideal situation and that I’m on a path to the same promotion as the company continues to grow.

2) I will be taking one of her direct reports, increasing my workload and responsibility, for which I was given a 5% salary increase.

3) I have been with the company more than 15 years and consistently receive stellar reviews and feedback up and down the organization.

So, I’m trying to figure out how to proceed. Part of me wants to give 2 weeks notice first thing Tuesday morning, but the boglehead in me won’t let me quit until I have another job secured. Here are the remaining options I’ve laid out:

1) Communicate my discontent, continue working until I find another job and leave as soon as possible.

2) Suck it up/wait it out. I’m not sure how feasible this option is (I know myself well and I don’t think I will be able to hide my true feelings about the situation).

3) Refuse the 5% increase and new direct report and continue working until I can find another job.

4) Tell my current boss that I’m not comfortable with the new reporting structure and see what happens.

Anyone else been through this or have any thoughts/suggestions?
sailaway
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by sailaway »

I am not sure what the problem is.

You say she deserves the promotion, but perhaps you thought you deserved it more?

Or you don't respect her enough to report to her? Or you think she is going to go on a power trip?

It doesn't seem logical to quit your job in anger when you haven't even given the new situation a try. Start by taking a close look at that anger because nothing you mention seems particularly out of place. People take on new responsibilities with promotions and the relative position of coworkers shifts. Most people handle this smoothly and the kind of resentment you are expressing usually only comes out when it perceived as unfair.
dbr
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by dbr »

Sure. I worked in a group from which one of our peers was promoted to manager of the group. He was one of the best managers we ever had. A couple of years later he moved on and the person they brought in from somewhere else was one of the worst managers we ever had.

I don't understand where there is a problem here. Can you elucidate on what is so upsetting to you?
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Chan_va
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Chan_va »

Reporting to a peer can be upsetting and awkward for a bit but you soon get over it.

You have two choices. If you decide that this is the time to look internally or externally, start that search. Or commit to your role if you like it. Either way, be 100% supportive of your new boss, and do all you can to make her transition a success. Whatever you do, don’t project toxicity or negativity at work. She will really appreciate and need your help during this time.
Dottie57
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Dottie57 »

I had a younger co-worker who became a manager. He was not good at first - he assumed everyone wanted to be a type A personality. His attitude created problems. I had him a second time as a manager and he was a better manager. Your co-worker will need to hone new skills. Helping this person may help you get the same promotion.
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snackdog
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by snackdog »

Quitting your job out of spite and jealousy? Seems overly dramatic.
Longdog
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Longdog »

I agree with those who are trying to understand the problem, or at least understand that the problem is significant enough to look elsewhere. Is there resentment going on? Do you not believe she will be a good manager? Suppose you were promoted to the same level in 6 months - would it have been worth it to you to suffer through whatever issue you anticipate?
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Doom&Gloom
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Doom&Gloom »

snackdog wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 12:24 pm Quitting your job out of spite and jealousy? Seems overly dramatic.
+1

Seems like you want to teach somebody a lesson.

Roll with the new structure for a while and see how it works out. You might be surprised. If not, you can always walk out the door if you think that will make you feel better.
Dyloot
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Dyloot »

I've been on the opposite side of this situation. My colleague, another senior on the team, was after the promotion but I was ultimately selected. We didn't interview for the job--I was pulled aside by my director and told I was being given the opportunity.

It was a huge shock for my colleague, who immediately told me and numerous members of our team that he would be looking elsewhere. He was hurt and not at all happy about reporting to me--a colleague, not a boss.

In the end, he got over it. I treated him like a senior, and followed his recommendations more often than not. I acknowledged his successes in team meetings and discussed his challenges privately with him. I gave him great reviews.

Was it hard? Sure it was. But it all worked out.

This is a long way of me suggesting that you put aside the emotional response for now and see what happens. You can still leave in 3 months, or 6 months, or in 1 year. Who knows? Maybe it turns out you absolutely love working for this friend and colleague.
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jabberwockOG
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by jabberwockOG »

Doom&Gloom wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 12:36 pm
snackdog wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 12:24 pm Quitting your job out of spite and jealousy? Seems overly dramatic.
+1

Seems like you want to teach somebody a lesson.

Roll with the new structure for a while and see how it works out. You might be surprised. If not, you can always walk out the door if you think that will make you feel better.
100% agree. Roll with the change. Your new boss might be the best thing that ever happened to you and your career or it may not be great. Hard to tell until you try out the new role. Be positive and supportive and give it minimum of 6-9 months and then if it looks bad find a better job and cheerfully move on. Despite all the BS and lip service, almost nothing about working as a salaried employee for any company especially large companies is remotely fair or equitable.
bloom2708
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by bloom2708 »

If you are that confident you can get a new job with similar pay and responsibilities, then quit.

In this environment adding additional female/minority managers is very common. If you are equals, then I would be nothing but happy for her and just keep doing your best. Do the right thing. Every day.

I think you are "doing it" wrong. Your strategy/feelings do not sound like a fun way to go about work/career/life balance. :|
Last edited by bloom2708 on Sat Feb 16, 2019 2:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Annabel Lee
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Annabel Lee »

Your company recognizes it's not ideal for you as well - which is why they gave you the 5% raise.

I would accept the increase/new role and re-evaluate in 6 months.

Talented people who have your tenure in an organization are difficult to find. If you roll with the new assignment, it's very possible you'll be considered for a different leadership role in very short order (depending on the size of the company).
SrGrumpy
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by SrGrumpy »

davehica wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 11:51 am My current boss acknowledged that this wasn’t an ideal situation and that I’m on a path to the same promotion as the company continues to grow.
Ask for a firmer timeline, or get that in writing. Beyond that, be a good soldier for your new colleague/boss and hopefully you'll earn kudos.

One of my colleagues/friends became my boss. He is/was a good guy, but HIS boss was the devil - and our friendship was destroyed (as was my career).
dbr
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by dbr »

One thing I know about managers is that they are a dime a dozen and rollover at a fearful rate. Keep doing your job don't worry about this.
jminv
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by jminv »

I would take the 5% raise, do the job, and meanwhile find a new opportunity that comes with a promotion elsewhere. It’s a good time to make a switch. Complaining won’t do anything and what they’re telling you about a future promotion sounds like ‘maybe, one day...’ which is probably just to smooth ruffled feathers. You’ve been there for 15 years anyway so they probably don’t think you’ll jump ship. Quitting won’t ‘show them’ either since everyone is more or less replaceable in the medium term, whether we like to think so or not. Find a new position elsewhere, stay on good terms with everyone at work, and you might even keep a good relationship with your colleague. Quitting out of anger wouldn’t do anything for you and wouldn’t hurt them.
mariezzz
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by mariezzz »

Have you never worked with this person in a situation where she took the lead on a project to which you also contributed? In that situation, she was effectively the person you were reporting to on that project.

In a good supervisory situation, the relationship really should be like the one I describe above. Do you have reason to think she'll become power hungry or unwilling to credit you for the work you've done?

Given what you describe, your response doesn't seem rational. I suggest digging deep within yourself to try to understand why you're reacting the way you are. Your response has the potential to sabotage both you, and your relationship with your (new) supervisor.

It seems like the company did everything they could to make this fair, short of promoting you and not her. A 5% raise is more than some get when they are promoted. What would you have thought if you had been promoted, and she had reacted in this way?
dbr
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by dbr »

Also, a 5% raise is huge. I just can't understand the problem here.

It is typical in most organizations that there are fewer promotions and raises than there may be qualified employees to receive them. Someone has to go first. Getting in a snit because you weren't first is uncalled for. Getting along with whomever it is you report to is a fundamental skill the lack of which is immediate disqualification from further advancement.
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Kenkat
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Kenkat »

There’s a sting involved here that I get - someone else was picked before you were. You finished second, not first. It hurts. But as you said, she was deserving, and you were specifically told that you were still in line for something in the future. So - what to do?

I would give it some time - let the sting of this settle down a bit. See how you feel after a few months. If you are still feeling the same way, start looking for a new position. You may find things are working out once you get used to this. I have learned over time that I value the work I am doing over the relative position of my job in the organization. I don’t want to be CEO; there’s other people that are better at that than me. Keep this person as an ally; they can help you in the future - be genuinely happy for their success - they deserved the promotion even if you did as well.
dbr
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by dbr »

One sure fire result is that leaving or working with a negative attitude will blow whatever opportunity is in the wings for you.
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Fallible »

davehica wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 11:51 am ...
So, I’m trying to figure out how to proceed. Part of me wants to give 2 weeks notice first thing Tuesday morning, but the boglehead in me won’t let me quit until I have another job secured. Here are the remaining options I’ve laid out:

1) Communicate my discontent, continue working until I find another job and leave as soon as possible.
...
What exactly is your discontent, i.e., a discontent so serious that you may leave what seems like a good company where you have a good future?
"Yes, investing is simple. But it is not easy, for it requires discipline, patience, steadfastness, and that most uncommon of all gifts, common sense." ~Jack Bogle
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8foot7
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by 8foot7 »

I sure would enjoy that 5% raise for six months or maybe even a year and would let this shake out a bit. I get that you're upset she was picked over you, but perhaps there was something that made her a slightly better fit for this particular role and they have you in mind for a new group that's coming up, or something like that. There are always pieces in play you don't know about.
cherijoh
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by cherijoh »

sailaway wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 11:58 am I am not sure what the problem is.

You say she deserves the promotion, but perhaps you thought you deserved it more?

Or you don't respect her enough to report to her? Or you think she is going to go on a power trip?

It doesn't seem logical to quit your job in anger when you haven't even given the new situation a try. Start by taking a close look at that anger because nothing you mention seems particularly out of place. People take on new responsibilities with promotions and the relative position of coworkers shifts. Most people handle this smoothly and the kind of resentment you are expressing usually only comes out when it perceived as unfair.
+1

I agree the OP needs to do some soul searching about his reaction which IMO seems excessive.

I have had 5 or 6 peers promoted to be my manager over the course of my career. With the exception of the first one, I was more than fine with working directly for my former peers.

The first one was a tough situation, because I was less than a year out of college when it happened. The company did an external search for a while and only promoted my new boss when they didn't find a qualified outside candidate -- and of course the whole team knew it. On top of that, his direct boss would bypass him and come directly to me for details of my projects. In retrospect I don't think the big boss had been a supporter of his promotion. I took a transfer to get out of that awkward situation.

My next peer-promoted-to-boss was my favorite all-time manager and we still stay in touch to this day. She actually had two stints as my boss, the second after they had gotten rid of the "junior" manager role (i.e, with 2 - 3 direct reports) and she came back a few bosses later as what would previously have been my second-level manager. She was great at going to bat for her direct reports and gave me a lot of autonomy as an individual contributor. Before she moved to a new role the first time, she had asked if I was interested in the management track. I told her no, so I had no qualms when I had two back-to-back former peers promoted to be my boss in succession. Which is a big difference from the OP's situation, since he obviously coveted the job his former peer got.
dbr
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by dbr »

One could also take the approach that getting promoted into management can be a consignment to hell.

That peer of mine I previously mentioned moved on actually to early retirement. The management gig was just a step up on the way to a long planned step out. He laughed all the way to the bank and the rest of us cheered him on to a well deserved outcome.
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leeks
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by leeks »

davehica wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 11:51 am Hello Bogleheads - I was very recently notified that one of my peers is being promoted and that I will now be reporting in to her...
1) She absolutely deserves the promotion.
....
I also don't see what the problem is.
If you had gotten the promotion instead of her, would you have expected her to quit in a huff. Why?
Global100
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Global100 »

Be a class act. Continue to do amazing work for the company (while looking outside the organization). When/if another position arises, thank them for all the opportunities they've provided for you and offer to help with the transition as much as possible. Leave on great terms so they might welcome you back if you find it necessary.
Last edited by Global100 on Sat Feb 16, 2019 2:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.
z91
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by z91 »

Sounds like OP wanted the promotion and is bitter enough to quit over it.

Get to your head straight, OP. You're willing to quit your job because of that? Sounds pretty spiteful. All those years of stellar reviews and relationships will be down the drain IMO.

Wait it out. If you truly hate it and don't see them promoting you anytime soon, then find a new job first, then leave.
cpumechanic
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by cpumechanic »

The last 15 years I worked, I had 6 or 7 or maybe 8 (I lost count) different managers. I was told that one of the managers put my name on the layoff list.. was told to find someone else to layoff, but re-submitted my name to the VP for layoff. The VP then put HIS name on the layoff list and he was let go. VP told me this in confidence several years after the fact.

He was a co-worker when he was promoted... and was #2 of 6 or 7 others. He was also an arrogant jerk.
At least 3 of the 6 or 7 were laid off over the years for various transgressions having little to do with job execution or team performance. They just rubbed the wrong VP the wrong way, and when layoff time came the ended up on the list.

As each manager was removed over the years it became an inside joke that as a very senior engineer I was "Hard" on my managers. All I could do was laugh along and do my job.

The management "track" at my megacorp was matched by a technical "track" and I was happy with the salary, and benefits and reduced stress of solving technical problems, and leaving the "management" to others.

I got used to the circus of management changes, and it never hurt my career, and most of them knew me as someone who could help them solve problems (which I did).. so my advice is as others have suggested to you

Just ride out the change for 6 months or a year (after 15 years on the job that is a small adder).. you will either decide all is well, or you will learn that rookie managers are not for you, and move on. (I only had one really bad one and you can see above how that worked out.)

Good luck.

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stoptothink
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by stoptothink »

Yeah, I'm with everybody else: what's the problem? Get over yourself. I was in a similar situation about a decade ago when a colleague, who I was WAY more qualified than and had been a WAY better performer than, was promoted to director without even interviewing when the former director was fired. She was a friend of the VP, period. It was a quick punch to the ego, but after being annoyed for a few days I realized that nothing had changed; I had no problem with my colleague and my job was still the same. In fact, we became pretty good friends when I began reporting to her, and she was very dependent on me for help running the program so I learned some new skills. Ultimately I left because I was offered a much better opportunity, but my work satisfaction actually improved when she was promoted (and I didn't get any raise).

This may be the thing that tells you it may be a good time to start evaluating your opportunities elsewhere, but for now, it sounds like you just got a raise and all you have to do is be happy for a colleague you actually believe is competent.
sbaywriter
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by sbaywriter »

Option #5
Pretend the situation was reversed. What would you do if you were her boss? How would you want her to act toward you ? You might find you can reverse your present negative point of view. Perhaps you might want to congratulate her and let her know you will be doing your best to continue your successful performance while reporting to her.

And then, as others say, see how it goes, but try to make it go well.
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Kenkat
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Kenkat »

dbr wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 2:17 pm One could also take the approach that getting promoted into management can be a consignment to hell.
This is how I feel about management positions!
StandingRock
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by StandingRock »

Just roll with it for now and maybe keep an eye on the job market. If you've been there for 15 years there must be something you like about the company.
sergio
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by sergio »

Whatever you do, you should wait a few weeks before doing it . Take some time to calm down . I've been in a few situations where there was a brutal "sting" , but after some time realized that I was overreacting. I am sure glad I didn't make any major decisions until I calmed down!
dbr
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by dbr »

I think this whole scene should be seen as good news. It means the company is growing and promoting people up. The OP is on the ladder. The bad news would be that expected promotions are not happening and no one is moving.
panine
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by panine »

bloom2708 wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 12:50 pm If you are that confident you can get a new job with similar pay and responsibilities, then quit.

In this environment adding additional female/minority managers is very common. If you are equals, then I would be nothing but happy for her and just keep doing your best. Do the right thing. Every day.

I think you are "doing it" wrong. Your strategy/feelings do not sound like a fun way to go about work/career/life balance. :|
What does "in this environment" mean?
quantAndHold
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by quantAndHold »

Stuff happens. Over the course of a 30-40 year career, something like this will probably happen several more times. The company obviously likes you and thinks you have potential, because they wouldn’t have given you the raise otherwise.

What a lot of people don’t understand is that it isn’t just about your work product. Your corporate overlords are also looking at how you handle situations like this. Do you pitch in and act like a team player, or do you go off to your corner to sulk? Your long term career will depend in part on how you handle difficult situations.

If you were expecting to get this promotion and didn’t get it, you might look at why she was promoted before you. The correct answer is probably not political, or because she’s a woman, or because somebody likes her better. Judging by your reaction to this news, I would be looking at whether they think you have the emotional maturity to manage a group like this.
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DesertDiva
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by DesertDiva »

Congrats! You can take the raise and invest it. Find something ouside of work that makes you happy.
Ollie123
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Ollie123 »

Agree with others that I don't quite "get" why this is a concern.

If you think you are ready and were hoping you would get it...I kinda get it, but that just seems within the normal spectrum of disappointments we all have in life and something to get over without doing anything drastic. If there is something about her being a manager...I'd give her a chance.

It sounds like the two of you worked closely together and are on good terms. Personally, if I am not the one getting a promotion I would LOVE for it to be a close colleague/friend. Now I have a supervisor who already knows me and trusts me so won't me up my butt 24/7, as well as an ally in "leadership" the next time I want to make a move.

That said, if this is just about you itching to climb the ladder and you are ready for a move...nothing wrong with looking elsewhere.
deanmoriarty
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by deanmoriarty »

I’ll be less calm than the other folks who replied to you: it sucks, you deserved that promotion for all the years you put into the company, and you didn’t get it (yet).

What to do? Keep doing stellar work, but immediately start interviewing outside the organization, treat it as a catalyst event for something you should have done periodically anyway, and make a plan to interview with a few good companies over the next few months.

If you have a massive offer coming back, compared to your current total compensation and benefits, then just happily quit with a smile on your face.

If the offers you instead get are comparable, lower, or marginally higher than your current one, then you know you don’t have it too bad and you are a valuable employee to your company, despite the promotion.

Ultimately your market value outside your organization is purely what should drive your career decisions, in my opinion.
GrowthSeeker
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by GrowthSeeker »

I intentionally did not read the responses above here - yet. I'll go back and read after I post.
I would think of this as two phases:
Phase One: take the raise, report to your former peer, suck it up, don't quit.
Phase Two: immediately start polishing your CV and looking around for another job elsewhere; don't tell a soul at work that you're planning this. Read and reread your employment contract, benefits information, pension information, anything relevant. As they say in SCUBA, plan your dive then dive your plan.

If you end up not finding anything right away, not a big problem, you're still banking that extra 5%.
If you get a new job soon, or not soon, whenever it is: off you go, don't burn any bridges, do not give any "take this job and shove it" speeches, do make "it's been great working here with everyone - yada yada yada ..." type speeches, if you wish. And as you walk out the door the last time, ever so slightly extend your middle finger just a few degrees more than the adjacent fingers. No one else will see it. But you'll know.

Sometimes the kick to the soft parts ends up being a blessing in disguise; sometimes you look back 5-10 years later from a much better life and feel like thanking the ones that did wrong by you.
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pdavi21
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by pdavi21 »

Have you considered exploiting your close relationship to gain special treatment?
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munemaker
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by munemaker »

Doing something rash would be the worst action you could take.

Give the new reporting relationship a try and work to make your new boss successful.

If after 6 months minimum, it isn't working out, then look for a new job. Don't leave or slack off on your work until you find a new job.

You might be surprised. It may all work out very nicely.
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cheese_breath
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by cheese_breath »

I agree with others who said they don't know what your problem is. Unless your's is a job where promotions are based on seniority you better get used to it. Some day you might end up reporting to someone you trained. If I was you I'd give her your total support. Anything else might cause management to wonder about your potential for any future promotions.
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scifilover
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by scifilover »

Given the well publicized difference in the numbers of women in management positions compared to men in most industries, a little strategic thinking on your part might have helped you anticipate this series of events. I would think that companies, especially in tech, are looking for women to promote.

Where I started working after military service, there were no women employed except in clerical positions. After the lawsuit in the early 70's, things began to change.

In any event, look at the numbers in your company, if most senior folks are male, they have a problem and should be trying to fix it. They may even be looking at how you react, judging you.....
bloom2708
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Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by bloom2708 »

panine wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 8:11 pm
bloom2708 wrote: Sat Feb 16, 2019 12:50 pm If you are that confident you can get a new job with similar pay and responsibilities, then quit.

In this environment adding additional female/minority managers is very common. If you are equals, then I would be nothing but happy for her and just keep doing your best. Do the right thing. Every day.

I think you are "doing it" wrong. Your strategy/feelings do not sound like a fun way to go about work/career/life balance. :|
What does "in this environment" mean?
There are a few things happening out there. Glass ceilings being removed, companies working to have more female managers and employees. Companies working to increase the number of workers of different nationalities/ethnicity/orientations/disabilities. Inclusion.
"We are here to provoke thoughtfulness, not agree with you." Unknown Boglehead
TheHouse7
Posts: 514
Joined: Fri Jan 13, 2017 2:40 am
Location: Washington State

Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by TheHouse7 »

Definitely keep the 5% raise. Stick with a reassessment plan in 6 months and one year. Two of my colleagues just went through this in the last year, and ended up with better jobs with our customer.

It has taken me seven years to realize there is no company loyalty to an employee. Regular 3 to 5% raises are easily outpaced by switching companies and taking larger positions.
"PSX will always go up 20%, why invest in anything else?!" -Father-in-law early retired.
mariezzz
Posts: 848
Joined: Mon Oct 02, 2017 11:02 pm

Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by mariezzz »

TheHouse7 wrote: Sun Feb 17, 2019 11:07 am It has taken me seven years to realize there is no company loyalty to an employee. Regular 3 to 5% raises are easily outpaced by switching companies and taking larger positions.
This is absolutely true. Even if you have a good manager at Time A, that can quickly change. Even if your employer overall has good practices, a bad manager can really do a lot of damage, and it can be difficult to complain about that person or make change.

But when you switch jobs, it's a coin toss as to whether you'll have a good manager. I know someone who had a fairly decent working situation for 20 years, happily switching managers as needed, and then got a micro-manager. It took a job that had been marvelous & made it awful. Luckily, however, the micro-manager was known for short tenures and the hope was that person would move on within a year. Luckily, the move occurred after 6 months. And everyone affected by that person became much much happier.
slyfox1357
Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Dec 26, 2017 6:13 pm

Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by slyfox1357 »

This change is part and parcel of many things you'll see amongst a typical working career. I don't understand the rush to a finite set of rash choices. Just suck it up, see how things look in 6 months and reevaluate. Inaction, and status quo, is the right choice now.
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davehica
Posts: 44
Joined: Sun May 18, 2014 3:07 pm

Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by davehica »

Wow. Posted this before the long weekend thinking it would take some time to collect responses. Definitely did not expect the number of replies, or the consistency of the responses, but I absolutely appreciate them. They really helped me look at this in a different light.

Anyway, I met with my new boss yesterday and gave her my full support. Not planning anything rash over the next 6-12 months, but did set up a few job alerts in case something really appealing pops up. Thanks again to everyone for talking me off the ledge, I can always count on BH to provide excellent advice.
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Doom&Gloom
Posts: 3628
Joined: Thu May 08, 2014 3:36 pm

Re: Help with difficult work situation

Post by Doom&Gloom »

davehica wrote: Tue Feb 19, 2019 5:38 pm Wow. Posted this before the long weekend thinking it would take some time to collect responses. Definitely did not expect the number of replies, or the consistency of the responses, but I absolutely appreciate them. They really helped me look at this in a different light.

Anyway, I met with my new boss yesterday and gave her my full support. Not planning anything rash over the next 6-12 months, but did set up a few job alerts in case something really appealing pops up. Thanks again to everyone for talking me off the ledge, I can always count on BH to provide excellent advice.
It is heartening to see a poster ask for advice, evaluate it, and act upon it. Thanks for the update and good luck!
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