Tips for moving to NYC

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Njm8845
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Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Njm8845 » Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:20 pm

I'm considering changing companies to one located in Manhattan. I will likely NOT have a vehicle. I have two toddlers and a wife.

Some questions for you NYC bogleheads:

1) The company builds large projects located all over the city. My work location would change every couple years, but my first one is in Queens. I'd like a central location but think I'm priced out of Manhattan. Any recommendations for neighborhoods? We tend to like vintage housing with a lot of character. I trust bogleheads more than some random "best neighborhoods" website.

2) Does it cost more than you expected when you moved there? What are the "hidden" costs of living in the city? I'm aware of the city income tax. From online COLA calculators, it looks like NYC is about 70% more expensive than my current situation.

3) What are the frugal tricks you do that are specific to NYC?

4) Basically, what do you wish you had known when you first moved there?

littlebird
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by littlebird » Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:54 pm

Find your Queens project on a subway map. Look for housing near the same subway line that your project is near. You may have a bus ride on one or both ends of your subway ride; Queens is a very big borough. On the plus side, there's plenty of "vintage" housing. :)

efinance
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by efinance » Fri Mar 23, 2018 5:36 pm

1. I tend to rave about Astoria, but I’m a little biased as a former resident. Incredible park on the East River, a tough-to-beat food scene for Queens, and much more affordable than Manhattan (though it is definitely getting pricer these days). There’s really incredible neighborhoods in Queens. What sort of income you make might also plays into what’s available for you.

2. I’m not sure I can think of what to share about that right now.

3. The incredible thing about New York is there is so much going on in terms of events and attractions, they practically give it away in some cases. There are plenty of worthwhile events that are entirely free. If you love exploring neighborhoods/architecture, you could spend weeks and weeks and weeks of that alone. While I can’t think of them off the top of my head right now, there’s multiple websites out there that detail all the free events happening in New York. Look them up.

Public transportation easily extends this whether you are taking the LIRR out to Fire Island or the PATH to Journal Square or MetroNorth to Beacon, there are plenty of close trips to take. Buses can take you to Boston, D.C., Philly, etc... If cities are less your thing, Harriman State Park is an easy bus/semi-easy train ride away. These are all affordable getaways. Museums a plenty, Queens Public Library (separate from the Library system in Manhattan/Bronx/SI) puts on some great programming, etc.. You will find not shortage of affordable ideas in New York.

4. Any time spent outside of you apartment will feel that experience of being in public space. It’s obvious in some ways, but in other ways, not until you live it.

hudsonriverjogger
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by hudsonriverjogger » Fri Mar 23, 2018 5:54 pm

I lived in Manhattan for three years and while some things are super expensive, other things are bizarrely affordable. For example, we found that buying groceries in drug stores was an odd hidden gem, cereal there was always $2.50 a box where at the grocery store proper it could be upwards of $7. There are fruit and vegetable stands on the street that practically give away produce, I often felt like I'd leave with two big bags for like $5. Salons, because there are so many, are very cheap... Manicures, hair cuts, etc. We saved a lot not owning, maintaining and insuring a car. In general, living in NYC cuts down on wasteful habits and overspending on junk because you'll surely have less space to fill. The cost of living in so many ways was high, but our salaries scaled to match it so it wasn't too horrible when we transferred here. Also, I second those who say the city is full of free entertainment. There's so much out there, you'll be overwhelmed by the idea that you aren't doing enough! Enjoy this adventure!

investorpeter
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by investorpeter » Fri Mar 23, 2018 6:49 pm

Queens is huge, and each neighborhood is very different. Here’s a quick rundown of the neighborhoods that people consider when moving away from manhattan, ranked from closest to farthest out from manhattan.

Long Island City: new condos and modern rentals, expensive, but very close to manhattan, ferry ride to east aide is option
Astoria: a little farther from manhattan than LIC, more residential and affordable than LIC, lots of restaurants
Jackson Heights: lots of large 2-3 bedroom rental apts in older large buildings, more affordable than Astoria but farther out
Forest Hills/Kew Gardens: even more residential, almost suburban in some areas, mansions in Forest Hills Gardens, easy access to Manhattan via LIRR, otherwise, 1 hour subway ride to manhattan
Flushing/Bayside: this is basically suburbs and not accessible via subway so would not consider unless you have a vehicle, otherwise it is very family friendly with mix of houses and rental apts

Isabelle77
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Isabelle77 » Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:01 pm

Your vintage housing comment made me chuckle. Everything affordable in NYC is vintage!

My husband and I spent our 20s living in Brooklyn and Queens, we left in 2004. It's been a while and I was a broke 20-something and not a parent yet, so there will be factors that will matter to you that didn't to me.

I found NYC to be pretty cheap once you got past taxes and housing. Eating out is cheap, no car or associated fees, utilities are often included in the rent (especially in those vintage buildings!), free entertainment everywhere! On the rare weekend that my husband and I didn't have anything to do we would take the subway to a different neighborhood in the city and just walk around. You could do that for years and not run out of places to see.

I lived in Astoria at one point as well and it's a lovely neighborhood in Queens near Manhattan, but there are lots of options in Queens, it's a huge borough. Things I wish I had known? You already know about the taxes. You'll want to live near the subway. It will be difficult for your wife or you to get around on mass transit with two young kids alone, I'd practice with her and see what works. You'll probably have to pay a broker to find you an apartment. You'll want to escape in the summer, the city gets gross, save some money for a trip out of town.

That's all I can think of. The things that I would be most concerned about, schools, daycare, etc. I can't really help you with.

Grt2bOutdoors
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Fri Mar 23, 2018 7:29 pm

Things about NYC - not all neighborhoods are the same. You may have projects all over the city, but you may not want to reside in certain neighborhoods for obvious reasons. Not all train lines are equal, some lines are notorious for poor service some of the time (like weekends) because of construction. If you have a car, you’ll find on street parking can be a nightmare, you might be driving around for a half hour looking for parking. If toddlers are close to school age you will want to reside in good school district, finding reliable and cost efficient childcare can be an issue too.
"One should invest based on their need, ability and willingness to take risk - Larry Swedroe" Asking Portfolio Questions

WS1
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by WS1 » Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:16 pm

I can go deep on this

I have two very young kids, have been in Greenpoint/Williamsburg for 6 years, married into a local family, and think about cities and transportation for work(and fun). To avoid writing a massive, unhelpful essay I need to know the following:

Where in Queens is the job, how long is that the location, any idea where the next location is
Preferred and max budget
How long a commute are you targetting
What activities do you want to be moderately close to so you actually do it in your spare time
What do you want to be 5-7 min walk from (walking places is why I live in NYC)
Is this a short term thing or are you intending to stay in NYC forever..ish

FYI - just to poke around with travel times
https://project.wnyc.org/transit-time/
https://citymapper.com/

PoppyA
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by PoppyA » Fri Mar 23, 2018 9:10 pm

One hidden cost I can think of is the additional cost moving companies charge if there is an elevator, more than “x” number of steps to the elevator/stairs, and number of flights that need to be climbed.

Depending on the size of your building, you may have to get special permission for a “time” the movers can be there.

Most everyone I know sends their dry cleaning and regular laundry out to be cleaned. There is little room for washers and dryers.

If you have a doorman, you will want to tip him from time to time, and at Christmas if that is your tradition.

HTH. It’s a great city to live in!

investorpeter
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by investorpeter » Fri Mar 23, 2018 9:35 pm

Depending on the age of the toddlers, good public schools may be the primary deciding factor. Manhattan and Bayside have the best public schools in NYC. Forest Hills also had good schools, though not as good. Definitely look at the quality of schools wherever you decide to live. It can be a bit hit or miss.

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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by radiowave » Fri Mar 23, 2018 9:42 pm

efinance wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 5:36 pm

Public transportation easily extends this whether you are taking the LIRR out to Fire Island or the PATH to Journal Square or MetroNorth to Beacon, there are plenty of close trips to take. Buses can take you to Boston, D.C., Philly, etc... If cities are less your thing, Harriman State Park is an easy bus/semi-easy train ride away. These are all affordable getaways. Museums a plenty, Queens Public Library (separate from the Library system in Manhattan/Bronx/SI) puts on some great programming, etc.. You will find not shortage of affordable ideas in New York.

Re: LIRR and day trip to fire island. Either from Penn Station or Jamaica (or Hunters Point) you can do a day trip to FI for a reasonable fee:

http://web.mta.info/lirr/getaways/beac ... beach.htm .
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littlebird
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by littlebird » Fri Mar 23, 2018 10:53 pm

investorpeter wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 6:49 pm

Flushing/Bayside: this is basically suburbs and not accessible via subway so would not consider unless you have a vehicle, otherwise it is very family friendly with mix of houses and rental apts
Flushing has the No.7 train, which wends its way westward through Queens neighborhoods, before reaching Manhattan. That may be a great line for the OP to consider locating along. It also has a L.I.R.R. stop.

ManhattanTrnsfr
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by ManhattanTrnsfr » Sat Mar 24, 2018 7:56 am

Jackson Heights is one part of Queens that has not been mentioned yet. Lovely vintage housing (but 1930-1950 vintage, so the apartment buildings all have elevators). Transportation via 7 subway is good, and the Indian food shopping experience is super cool (there is a large “Little India” at 74th Street in Jackson Heights). Jackson Heights is also relatively affordable, at least compared to other NYC neighborhoods).

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tennisplyr
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by tennisplyr » Sat Mar 24, 2018 8:43 am

Born in Brooklyn, worked in Manhattan and spent most of my life in Bayside section of Queens. There are tons of mass transit options in Queens: Long Island railroad, subways, buses. This site might be useful for some research on the area:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/
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MichaelPalmer
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by MichaelPalmer » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:06 am

I’d also recommend checking out the Sunnyside section of Queens. It’s a really great family friendly area that is up-and-coming. Rents are much cheaper than Astoria.

Also there’s a Long Island Railroad Station at Woodside and 61st St.

bklyn96
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by bklyn96 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:12 am

Njm8845 wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:20 pm
....what do you wish you had known when you first moved there?
Both Kennedy and La Guardia airports are in Queens and you'll want to avoid being too close to any common flight paths.

ChrisC
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by ChrisC » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:18 am

investorpeter wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 9:35 pm
Depending on the age of the toddlers, good public schools may be the primary deciding factor. Manhattan and Bayside have the best public schools in NYC. Forest Hills also had good schools, though not as good. Definitely look at the quality of schools wherever you decide to live. It can be a bit hit or miss.
I guess you never lived in Brooklyn. I grew up in Red Hook and Cobble Hill Brooklyn, with roots and family still there. My old neighborhood school, PS 29, consistently ranks as one of the best public elementary schools in the City, and there are plenty of others in surrounding neighborhoods of Gowanus, Boerum Hill, Carroll Gardens, Park Slope, and Brooklyn Heights. http://www.ps29brooklyn.org/# These are basically all South Brooklyn neighborhoods where rental prices are very high and most are near subway stops (except Red Hook).

My youngest daughter lives in Williamsburg Brooklyn and commutes to work in Manhattan, She rents in a relatively new building, a studio apartment of around 450 Sf for $2700. She loves Williamsburg, but for me this is too hipster oriented.

Never heard the term "vintage housing" before. Vintage could mean carriage housing in my old neighborhood, which would date back to around the Civil War. Normally, one talks about pre-war II housing stock in NYC, which is normally apartment housing that could be subject to rent control or rent stabilization rules. Anything built after WWII would have been considered modern housing when I last lived there in the late 1970's. My sister, a real estate broker in Brooklyn, still makes the distinctions of apartment housing based on pre- or post- war construction.

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dm200
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by dm200 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:21 am

Njm8845 wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:20 pm
I'm considering changing companies to one located in Manhattan. I will likely NOT have a vehicle. I have two toddlers and a wife.
Some questions for you NYC bogleheads:
1) The company builds large projects located all over the city. My work location would change every couple years, but my first one is in Queens. I'd like a central location but think I'm priced out of Manhattan. Any recommendations for neighborhoods? We tend to like vintage housing with a lot of character. I trust bogleheads more than some random "best neighborhoods" website.
2) Does it cost more than you expected when you moved there? What are the "hidden" costs of living in the city? I'm aware of the city income tax. From online COLA calculators, it looks like NYC is about 70% more expensive than my current situation.
3) What are the frugal tricks you do that are specific to NYC?
4) Basically, what do you wish you had known when you first moved there?
What does your wife think about such a move?

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dm200
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by dm200 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:38 am

Never lived in NYC - but been there many times - and have known many folks from there. There is a very different "culture" there and may (did for me) take some "adjustment" to get used to that "culture".

investorpeter
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by investorpeter » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:40 am

ChrisC wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:18 am
investorpeter wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 9:35 pm
Depending on the age of the toddlers, good public schools may be the primary deciding factor. Manhattan and Bayside have the best public schools in NYC. Forest Hills also had good schools, though not as good. Definitely look at the quality of schools wherever you decide to live. It can be a bit hit or miss.
I guess you never lived in Brooklyn. I grew up in Red Hook and Cobble Hill Brooklyn, with roots and family still there. My old neighborhood school, PS 29, consistently ranks as one of the best public elementary schools in the City, and there are plenty of others in surrounding neighborhoods of Gowanus, Boerum Hill, Carroll Gardens, Park Slope, and Brooklyn Heights. http://www.ps29brooklyn.org/# These are basically all South Brooklyn neighborhoods where rental prices are very high and most are near subway stops (except Red Hook).

My youngest daughter lives in Williamsburg Brooklyn and commutes to work in Manhattan, She rents in a relatively new building, a studio apartment of around 450 Sf for $2700. She loves Williamsburg, but for me this is too hipster oriented.

Never heard the term "vintage housing" before. Vintage could mean carriage housing in my old neighborhood, which would date back to around the Civil War. Normally, one talks about pre-war II housing stock in NYC, which is normally apartment housing that could be subject to rent control or rent stabilization rules. Anything built after WWII would have been considered modern housing when I last lived there in the late 1970's. My sister, a real estate broker in Brooklyn, still makes the distinctions of apartment housing based on pre- or post- war construction.
Definitely there are good schools in Brooklyn but I was limiting my discussion to Manhattan and Queens per OPs comments. I also did not mean any offense by discussing the best schools, which can obviously be a heated topic. I myself am a product of NYC public schools. I’ve also lived in Brookyln for many years. The commute from Brooklyn to Queens is a long haul, unless OP is living in Greenpoint and working in Long Island City, in which case living in Greenpoint is a great option.

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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by ChrisC » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:56 am

investorpeter wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:40 am
Definitely there are good schools in Brooklyn but I was limiting my discussion to Manhattan and Queens per OPs comments. I also did not mean any offense by discussing the best schools, which can obviously be a heated topic. I myself am a product of NYC public schools. I’ve also lived in Brookyln for many years. The commute from Brooklyn to Queens is a long haul, unless OP is living in Greenpoint and working in Long Island City, in which case living in Greenpoint is a great option.
No offense taken here; just pointing out that Brooklyn shouldn't be ruled out if one is thinking of good schools and a central location in NYC. The OP did say his first project would be in Queens, but that in future years that would change and projects would be all over the city. Manhattan is the best central location, geographically, but OP indicates this might be a priced-out location for his family. Staten Island (with limited public transporation) and the Bronx might not be central enough -- that leaves Queens and Brooklyn has the two alternatives.

ny_knicks
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by ny_knicks » Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:48 am

Cost of living was a huge shock. I live in Manhattan but my first trip to the local grocery store almost made me fall over. $12 / lb for chicken. What a joke. The outer boroughs may be different but the cheapest options we have found are ordering groceries online, Whole Foods or eating out. There are some options if you're willing to take a cab/subway but in my immediate area groceries are absurdly expensive. Talking with friends they mostly eat out as the cost / benefit of cooking just isn't there in NY. Don't take for granted access to good/cheaper grocery stores.

Grew up in the Northeast (Boston / New York areas). Those not from here might find it a bit of a culture shock. Not sure how to describe the culture but some throw around the terms rude, aggressive and unfriendly as part of it. I certainly don't agree with this but have heard it a number of times when people are visiting. There is something different here with the culture and it will take some getting used but give it a chance.

Access to green space is huge. Living near parks (I live near the large one) changes the feeling completely.

Good luck with the move!

Grt2bOutdoors
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:49 am

investorpeter wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 9:35 pm
Depending on the age of the toddlers, good public schools may be the primary deciding factor. Manhattan and Bayside have the best public schools in NYC. Forest Hills also had good schools, though not as good. Definitely look at the quality of schools wherever you decide to live. It can be a bit hit or miss.
LOL, how many noble peace prize winners came out of Bayside schools? How many have won Academy Awards, how many won Pulitzer Prizes? How many won Grammys? How many became Supreme Court justices? How many became CEO's of Fortune 500 companies? If you've never lived in Brooklyn, fuhgeddaboudit! Bayside's nice, but so far removed from the city proper, two ways of getting there - Throgs Neck Bridge which is always a hassle to get to seeing that the Cross Bronx is always choked with traffic - time of day does not matter and the LIRR which it and of itself can be another nightmare getting to and from the city. Manhattan has the best schools? - hit or miss, same pretty much with each borough of NYC.
"One should invest based on their need, ability and willingness to take risk - Larry Swedroe" Asking Portfolio Questions

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Njm8845
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Njm8845 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:50 am

WS1 wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:16 pm
I can go deep on this

I have two very young kids, have been in Greenpoint/Williamsburg for 6 years, married into a local family, and think about cities and transportation for work(and fun). To avoid writing a massive, unhelpful essay I need to know the following:

Where in Queens is the job, how long is that the location, any idea where the next location is
Preferred and max budget
How long a commute are you targetting
What activities do you want to be moderately close to so you actually do it in your spare time
What do you want to be 5-7 min walk from (walking places is why I live in NYC)
Is this a short term thing or are you intending to stay in NYC forever..ish

FYI - just to poke around with travel times
https://project.wnyc.org/transit-time/
https://citymapper.com/
Thanks for all the feedback. First, as a couple have mentioned, we are considering living in Brooklyn as well. The housing there seems much more our style from our cursory research. We still haven’t ruled out Manhattan either, but right now we’re looking at a budget of $3,000 per month and a minimum 800 SF, so as I said earlier that rules much of Manhattan out. Looks like east Harlem has housing that meets those requirements, but I have never been in that neighborhood.

The first project is la guardia airport, which will last 2-3 years. I have no idea where the next one will be. Children now are 3 years from school age, so we haven’t considered good school districts yet. We intend to be in nyc “foreverish”.

I think a commute of less than 40 minutes is a good goal. I would like to be near subway stops.

We lived in Philadelphia a couple years ago. We lived on a quiet street in an old apartment, which was a few blocks from a large restaurant area. We loved it, and would love to be in that type of situation again. Being somewhat near a park would also be desirable.

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Pajamas
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Pajamas » Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:23 am

ny_knicks wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:48 am
Cost of living was a huge shock. I live in Manhattan but my first trip to the local grocery store almost made me fall over. $12 / lb for chicken. What a joke. The outer boroughs may be different but the cheapest options we have found are ordering groceries online, Whole Foods or eating out. There are some options if you're willing to take a cab/subway but in my immediate area groceries are absurdly expensive. Talking with friends they mostly eat out as the cost / benefit of cooking just isn't there in NY. Don't take for granted access to good/cheaper grocery stores.
A lot of people in Manhattan now shop at Trader Joe's if they don't use Fresh Direct or another delivery service. The prices at Trader Joe's in NYC are the same as at other locations. Same is true of Aldi, Target, Costco, etc. There are also plenty of other, less expensive grocery stores such as Western Beef, Hong Kong Mart, C-Town, Key Food, etc. Almost every neighborhood has something like one of those or a good "ethnic" grocery store with decent prices. You could be in a bad location for groceries if you are downtown or in Midtown. Even then there are a couple of decent grocery stores.

I totally disagree that the cost/benefit of cooking at home is absent in NYC. Might even be better than in other places as restaurants are comparatively more expensive.

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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by ny_knicks » Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:34 am

Pajamas wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:23 am
ny_knicks wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:48 am
Cost of living was a huge shock. I live in Manhattan but my first trip to the local grocery store almost made me fall over. $12 / lb for chicken. What a joke. The outer boroughs may be different but the cheapest options we have found are ordering groceries online, Whole Foods or eating out. There are some options if you're willing to take a cab/subway but in my immediate area groceries are absurdly expensive. Talking with friends they mostly eat out as the cost / benefit of cooking just isn't there in NY. Don't take for granted access to good/cheaper grocery stores.
A lot of people in Manhattan now shop at Trader Joe's if they don't use Fresh Direct or another delivery service. The prices at Trader Joe's in NYC are the same as at other locations. Same is true of Aldi, Target, Costco, etc. There are also plenty of other, less expensive grocery stores such as Western Beef, Hong Kong Mart, C-Town, Key Food, etc. Almost every neighborhood has something like one of those or a good "ethnic" grocery store with decent prices. You could be in a bad location for groceries if you are downtown or in Midtown. Even then there are a couple of decent grocery stores.

I totally disagree that the cost/benefit of cooking at home is absent in NYC. Might even be better than in other places as restaurants are comparatively more expensive.
Agree Trader Joe's is great just difficult to get to based on my location. That is why I advise anyone looking for housing to check grocery store options prior to signing a lease. We made the assumption there would be something cheap/good in walking distance. There is not. Done the C-Town / Key Food thing but just weren't happy with the quality. Maybe we should try Costco in Harlem.

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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by ny_knicks » Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:35 am

Njm8845 wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:50 am
Looks like east Harlem has housing that meets those requirements, but I have never been in that neighborhood.
I would not move to East Harlem with young kids but everyone has a different safety tolerance.

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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Pajamas » Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:40 am

ny_knicks wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 11:34 am

Agree Trader Joe's is great just difficult to get to based on my location. That is why I advise anyone looking for housing to check grocery store options prior to signing a lease. We made the assumption there would be something cheap/good in walking distance. There is not. Done the C-Town / Key Food thing but just weren't happy with the quality. Maybe we should try Costco in Harlem.
Well, you can always pay $7 a pound for tomatoes at the nearest Green Market. Or if you live anywhere close to a hospital there should be a good fruit & vegetable cart nearby.

Most everyone I know who lives outside of Manhattan has a car, so presumably O.P. will end up keeping his and driving to Walmart on Long Island on the weekends. :P

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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by babadi » Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:08 pm

Personally I would focus on Queens while you're based at LaGuardia. You're not going to enjoy a commute from Brooklyn or Manhattan to LaGuardia, which is both not particularly accessible by public transit or (during rush hour) by car.

I would focus on areas that others have already mentioned: Astoria, Forest Hills/Kew Gardens, and perhaps Jackson Heights. I'm a former Astoria resident and would recommend it -- great food scene, housing should be in your price range, Astoria Park is great, and direct bus access to LaGuardia via the M60 in about 15 min (if you live near the stop). Decent suburban-style supermarkets on the outskirts of the neighborhood (Best Market, Food Bazaar) if you have a car or don't mind taking Uber/Lyft/etc. I think Jackson Heights has direct bus access to LGA as well. I don't *think* FH/KG do, and although it's close by car, having a car in any of these neighborhoods without a parking spot will be quite painful. Out of these neighborhoods, schools are best in FH -- although if you're renting, you could always move when the kids are school age. All 3 have good subway access, although Astoria is the closest to the city by far. Personally, I would skip LIC -- you don't get much for your housing dollar there and shopping/restaurants/etc. are sparse compared to the others.

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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Pajamas » Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:21 pm

babadi wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:08 pm
You're not going to enjoy a commute from Brooklyn or Manhattan to LaGuardia, which is both not particularly accessible by public transit or (during rush hour) by car.

. . . and direct bus access to LaGuardia via the M60 in about 15 min (if you live near the stop).
The M60 travels across Manhattan on 125th street so it is actually pretty easy to get to LGA that way from almost anywhere in Manhattan, especially if you live near an express stop on an uptown/downtown train. Not a bad interborough commute at all for one that requires subway plus bus.

revert
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by revert » Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:45 pm

1. If your first job will be in Queens, I'd look for housing in Queens. I don't know your price range - Astoria is good but getting pricey; I know a number of people who have moved to Forest Hills as a place with some character, good access, and still inexpensive. Do stay very close to the subway if you're not planning on getting a car, transit access can get difficult deeper into Queens/Brooklyn.

Mentally prepare for moving after your first year. It's very common to move out here, find a halfway decent place to stay for up to one year, and then relocate once you have a better understanding of the neighborhoods, your commute, what kind of commute you can handle, etc. That's a lot of what makes it so hard to suggest neighborhoods, and how you end up with such a wide variety of opinions. 😊

2. Coming from Seattle, which was also relatively high COL, only two things surprised me: income tax and broker fees. Expect that many apartments will come with broker fees, and expect then to be on the order of a couple of thousand dollars. You can avoid them with some savvy, but it's extra hard to both find an initial place here when moving from another state _and_ avoid broker fees.

3. So the bad news is that taxes and housing are expensive. But I've found that food and entertainment are fairly plentiful on the cheap. With a subway card you'll have access to a wide variety of things. First year, I'd suggest getting an NYC ID card - that gets you a free one year membership to a lot of local institutions (MoMA, Film Forum, etc. etc.). Also, the library system is fantastic for requesting DVDs.

4. I wish someone had told me to have ~4 months rent saved away and a bank with quick access to cashier's checks for when I need to sign a rental agreement on the spot. Also, that if a subway car is empty there's probably a reason.

investorpeter
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by investorpeter » Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:46 pm

Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:49 am
investorpeter wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 9:35 pm
Depending on the age of the toddlers, good public schools may be the primary deciding factor. Manhattan and Bayside have the best public schools in NYC. Forest Hills also had good schools, though not as good. Definitely look at the quality of schools wherever you decide to live. It can be a bit hit or miss.
LOL, how many noble peace prize winners came out of Bayside schools? How many have won Academy Awards, how many won Pulitzer Prizes? How many won Grammys? How many became Supreme Court justices? How many became CEO's of Fortune 500 companies? If you've never lived in Brooklyn, fuhgeddaboudit! Bayside's nice, but so far removed from the city proper, two ways of getting there - Throgs Neck Bridge which is always a hassle to get to seeing that the Cross Bronx is always choked with traffic - time of day does not matter and the LIRR which it and of itself can be another nightmare getting to and from the city. Manhattan has the best schools? - hit or miss, same pretty much with each borough of NYC.
I have no idea which elementary schools they attended, but:

Benjamin Cardozo was from Queens and has a HS named after him in Bayside. Justice Scalia grew up in Elmhurst, Queens.
The US Supreme Court is packed with New Yorkers: Elena Kagan from Manhattan. Sotomayor from Bronx. And Ginsburg from Brooklyn.

Also: Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan, from Queens; Llyod Blankfein, CEO of Goldman Sachs, from Brooklyn. Hedge fund managers from Queens: Carl Icahn, John Paulson, bunch of others I can’t recall right now

And, of course, our current president is originally from Queens.

MichaelPalmer
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by MichaelPalmer » Sat Mar 24, 2018 2:12 pm

If you are working at LaGuardia for 2-3 years- look into housing in either Astoria, Jackson Heights, or Woodside where there is an express bus.

rjbraun
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by rjbraun » Sat Mar 24, 2018 2:16 pm

A great produce market in Hell's Kitchen (I think /guess -- West 52nd St, between 8th & 9th Aves): Stiles Farmers Market. Obviously, not suggesting OP move to the neighborhood just for the market, but I figured I would mention Stiles in case anyone lives nearby and wants to check it out (also, wherever OP ends up may well have something comparable in the neighborhood). Hours are somewhat limited, I suppose, by NYC standards: last I checked it was 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. every day except for Sunday, when it's 9 - 5 (I think). To give an idea of the prices, various apple varieties for a buck per lb, different types of coffee beans, that you can grind there, $6.99 per lb. Great prices and very good quality.

My understanding is that Stiles buys so much that they can be reasonably selective about what produce they will buy from vendors. If it's not acceptable, they can pass without risking that the vendor will not return the next day to show their goods. One disadvantage, I suppose, is that you can't always be sure that they will have a particular item in stock, but, frankly, I've had that same experience happen at Whole Foods and Trader Joe's.

https://www.yelp.com/biz/stiles-farmers ... new-york-2

The New York Public Library (NYPL), which another poster mentioned (maybe not? -- now I can't find the reference), is an absolutely amazing resource. I love that place (some locations more than others, too). Not sure if someone already mentioned this, but Queens and Brooklyn, by the way, are not part of the NYPL system; they have their own library systems. Just checked quickly now, but I guess Queens and Brooklyn residents can still use NYPL, though there are no NYPL branches in Brooklyn or Queens.

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Pajamas
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Pajamas » Sat Mar 24, 2018 2:43 pm

investorpeter wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:46 pm


I have no idea which elementary schools they attended, but:

Benjamin Cardozo was from Queens and has a HS named after him in Bayside. Justice Scalia grew up in Elmhurst, Queens.
The US Supreme Court is packed with New Yorkers: Elena Kagan from Manhattan. Sotomayor from Bronx. And Ginsburg from Brooklyn.

Also: Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan, from Queens; Llyod Blankfein, CEO of Goldman Sachs, from Brooklyn. Hedge fund managers from Queens: Carl Icahn, John Paulson, bunch of others I can’t recall right now

And, of course, our current president is originally from Queens.
Half of those people should be in prison and the other half are judges. :oops:

jodydavis
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by jodydavis » Sat Mar 24, 2018 2:48 pm

For a humorous look at living in NYC and the culture:

http://www.slate.com/blogs/business_ins ... laugh.html

J.D.

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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Sat Mar 24, 2018 8:42 pm

Pajamas wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 2:43 pm
investorpeter wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 12:46 pm


I have no idea which elementary schools they attended, but:

Benjamin Cardozo was from Queens and has a HS named after him in Bayside. Justice Scalia grew up in Elmhurst, Queens.
The US Supreme Court is packed with New Yorkers: Elena Kagan from Manhattan. Sotomayor from Bronx. And Ginsburg from Brooklyn.

Also: Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan, from Queens; Llyod Blankfein, CEO of Goldman Sachs, from Brooklyn. Hedge fund managers from Queens: Carl Icahn, John Paulson, bunch of others I can’t recall right now

And, of course, our current president is originally from Queens.
Half of those people should be in prison and the other half are judges. :oops:
Sandy Weill came from Brooklyn, while shareholders of Citigroup may not be so enamored with him, he did donate a lot of money to various hospitals in the city so not too bad.
"One should invest based on their need, ability and willingness to take risk - Larry Swedroe" Asking Portfolio Questions

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laughlinlvr
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by laughlinlvr » Sat Mar 24, 2018 8:52 pm

I am wondering what kind of projects you will be involved with. If it’s construction then your hours need to be taken into account.
I lived in Queens and worked construction for a couple of decades. Some additional points to consider that I haven’t seen already mentioned:
North-South commutes in Queens by public transportation are pretty much limited to the bus. Rail transit is geared to East-West travel especially into and out of Manhattan as are the MTA express buses.
“Two rivers” commutes are grueling. Living in Queens and working in NJ is almost unworkable by transit unless you live within walking distance of an LIRR station.
Investing - The hardest way to make an easy living.

R2D2
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by R2D2 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:08 pm

I would try to avoid paying a broker for an apartment rental. I paid one for my first two apts and then swore I'd never do it again. I found my third (and so far, my last) apt without a broker and my bank account thanked me. I don't want to get on a rant here, but I really don't like the broker system or the level of ethics that it promotes, even if it weren't for the expense.

Plenty of high rises will let you walk in and see an apartment with no broker. This web site lists some alternatives to using a broker:
https://www.brickunderground.com/blog/2 ... _york_city

Be aware that if you look on some site like craigslist and see a no-broker-fee apartment for rent and you call the number, you may very well be told, "No that apartment has already been rented, but give me your info and we'll find you a different apartment." In other words, it's a bait and switch. That original apt never existed and it was all a come-on to get you to work with them. I found this to be *very* common. Don't put up with it.

blueman457
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by blueman457 » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:24 pm

Good advice from previous posters:
Njm8845 wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 1:20 pm
I'm considering changing companies to one located in Manhattan. I will likely NOT have a vehicle. I have two toddlers and a wife.

Some questions for you NYC bogleheads:

1) The company builds large projects located all over the city. My work location would change every couple years, but my first one is in Queens. I'd like a central location but think I'm priced out of Manhattan. Any recommendations for neighborhoods? We tend to like vintage housing with a lot of character. I trust bogleheads more than some random "best neighborhoods" website.

2) Does it cost more than you expected when you moved there? What are the "hidden" costs of living in the city? I'm aware of the city income tax. From online COLA calculators, it looks like NYC is about 70% more expensive than my current situation.

3) What are the frugal tricks you do that are specific to NYC?

4) Basically, what do you wish you had known when you first moved there?
#1: Will defer to everyone else...

#2: It didn't cost more than I expected, I just expected it to cost a lot. As mentioned before, some things are cheaper, others are more expensive.

Changing apartments/moving is more expensive than I expected though. Many (not all) apartments are listed by brokers, so there's usually a fee to rent those (~15% of annual rent), combined with hiring movers, moving fees, etc.... it adds up. If you find a great apartment without a broker fee that's a win! Not having a car saves a ton of money, but if you need to own a car garage parking can add up very quickly.

#3: NYC specific: take the subway, don't own a car.

#4: NYC Is a fun place to live, just overall expensive. Take advantage of the free museums days, cheap happy hours, as much as possible. That being said, the free things are so packed that you might lose a little sanity.

Side note: If you see someone cross the street in front, don't assume there isn't a car coming... jaywalking or crossing the street without the light is a way of life and some folks cut it too close and tons of horrible drivers out there.

Congratulations on the job!

Blue Man

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Pajamas
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Pajamas » Sat Mar 24, 2018 9:51 pm

Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 8:42 pm
Sandy Weill came from Brooklyn, while shareholders of Citigroup may not be so enamored with him, he did donate a lot of money to various hospitals in the city so not too bad.
I have never accepted the validity of extremely wealthy people laundering money and reputations by means of large charitable donations, especially when their name ends up on the building. A lot of organizations now agree.

WS1
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by WS1 » Sun Mar 25, 2018 3:29 pm

Njm8845 wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:50 am
WS1 wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:16 pm
I can go deep on this

I have two very young kids, have been in Greenpoint/Williamsburg for 6 years, married into a local family, and think about cities and transportation for work(and fun). To avoid writing a massive, unhelpful essay I need to know the following:

Where in Queens is the job, how long is that the location, any idea where the next location is
Preferred and max budget
How long a commute are you targetting
What activities do you want to be moderately close to so you actually do it in your spare time
What do you want to be 5-7 min walk from (walking places is why I live in NYC)
Is this a short term thing or are you intending to stay in NYC forever..ish

FYI - just to poke around with travel times
https://project.wnyc.org/transit-time/
https://citymapper.com/
Thanks for all the feedback. First, as a couple have mentioned, we are considering living in Brooklyn as well. The housing there seems much more our style from our cursory research. We still haven’t ruled out Manhattan either, but right now we’re looking at a budget of $3,000 per month and a minimum 800 SF, so as I said earlier that rules much of Manhattan out. Looks like east Harlem has housing that meets those requirements, but I have never been in that neighborhood.

The first project is la guardia airport, which will last 2-3 years. I have no idea where the next one will be. Children now are 3 years from school age, so we haven’t considered good school districts yet. We intend to be in nyc “foreverish”.

I think a commute of less than 40 minutes is a good goal. I would like to be near subway stops.

We lived in Philadelphia a couple years ago. We lived on a quiet street in an old apartment, which was a few blocks from a large restaurant area. We loved it, and would love to be in that type of situation again. Being somewhat near a park would also be desirable.
The good news is many of the neighborhoods in Western Queens will have good bus connections to LGA and are great neighborhoods for people that love urban neighborhoods. I get the impression your preferences are kind of like mine. A Saturday well spent involves aimless wandering chasing #1 on her scooter, the ability to walk to get pizza, breakfast, decent coffee, ice cream, and a farmers market. Want easy access to a baffling array of ethnic foods and various price points? You will find all this in Astoria, Sunnyside, Forest Hills and Jackson Heights. Long Island City and Queensboro Plaza are just next door with gobs of new construction. Try StreetEasy and PadMapper for your apartment hunting.

Now for the wrinkle-
Working in the passenger terminal is not the same as reporting to work at a construction staging area at the far side of the airport property. I recommend using City Mapper to see if your job site is even accessible by bus. You'll need to find out if the bus doesn't go to near your work site and then you have to take an on airport employee shuttle. If the bus seems like a pain but for some reason you'll have easy parking, driving to the airport can be less painful then you'd guess. Driving to LGA from Williamsburg/Greenpoint at 7:45am is maybe 20 minutes. The pain of street parking depends on a lot of variables, but you can probably find a space to rent for $325 and having a car opens up a ton of regional activities considering you have two kids. Want to spend every summer weekend on the beach or go hiking in the hudson valley - a car will set you free.

Valuethinker
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Mar 26, 2018 11:59 am

Njm8845 wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:50 am
WS1 wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:16 pm
I can go deep on this

I have two very young kids, have been in Greenpoint/Williamsburg for 6 years, married into a local family, and think about cities and transportation for work(and fun). To avoid writing a massive, unhelpful essay I need to know the following:

Where in Queens is the job, how long is that the location, any idea where the next location is
Preferred and max budget
How long a commute are you targetting
What activities do you want to be moderately close to so you actually do it in your spare time
What do you want to be 5-7 min walk from (walking places is why I live in NYC)
Is this a short term thing or are you intending to stay in NYC forever..ish

FYI - just to poke around with travel times
https://project.wnyc.org/transit-time/
https://citymapper.com/
Thanks for all the feedback. First, as a couple have mentioned, we are considering living in Brooklyn as well. The housing there seems much more our style from our cursory research. We still haven’t ruled out Manhattan either, but right now we’re looking at a budget of $3,000 per month and a minimum 800 SF, so as I said earlier that rules much of Manhattan out. Looks like east Harlem has housing that meets those requirements, but I have never been in that neighborhood.
Unless East Harlem has changed a lot in 10 years, I would not live there. Traditionally a Hispanic/ Puerto Rican area, with some very significant crime issues, big Projects. etc. Demographic change is a constant -- last time I was in Harlem I noticed that it was the older people who were all black and the younger people from newer waves of immigration (Hispanic but not necessarily from PR) -- (we had a wonderful time on the bus from lower Manhattan to Morris Jumel Mansion, about 176th St on the E side-- the only white couple on a bus full of elderly African Americans; there was a young woman talking very loudly on the phone about her various lovers in different cities, etc., and the comments when she got off had us doubled over with laughter). So maybe UEH has changed-- but it's one area in Manhattan (maybe the only one) that I did feel there could be significant crime issues.

NYC has crime maps. Worth checking out. Oddly it's not necessarily the murders (which are often between related parties)-- it's the muggings, because those are the crimes where you are preyed upon by people who you have no connection with - totally random.

800 sf is a very small space for a family w 2 kids (I know in the rest of the world that's not abnormal. We can't all live like North Americans. But still).
The first project is la guardia airport, which will last 2-3 years. I have no idea where the next one will be. Children now are 3 years from school age, so we haven’t considered good school districts yet. We intend to be in nyc “foreverish”.

I think a commute of less than 40 minutes is a good goal. I would like to be near subway stops.
People in outer suburbs of NYC own cars. The public transport works well outskirts to centre, but not radially. The old Brooklyn street cars (which also linked to Queens along the rim of the wheel) are long gone. And I understand that many lines have poor service out of peak hours.

What I don't know is whether Zipcar or weekend car rental would fulfill that goal. My guess is that unfortunately the weekends when you want cars are the same ones as everyone else, and that's going to be a hassle. But I don't now.

The NOT FOR TOURISTS guides are helpful in going neighbourhood by 'hood, giving you a feel for the different areas. There is one for Brooklyn and one for Queens.
We lived in Philadelphia a couple years ago. We lived on a quiet street in an old apartment, which was a few blocks from a large restaurant area. We loved it, and would love to be in that type of situation again. Being somewhat near a park would also be desirable.
Small kids. Park. Essential.

Tmack101
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Tmack101 » Mon Mar 26, 2018 4:39 pm

Njm8845 wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 10:50 am
WS1 wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 8:16 pm
I can go deep on this

I have two very young kids, have been in Greenpoint/Williamsburg for 6 years, married into a local family, and think about cities and transportation for work(and fun). To avoid writing a massive, unhelpful essay I need to know the following:

Where in Queens is the job, how long is that the location, any idea where the next location is
Preferred and max budget
How long a commute are you targetting
What activities do you want to be moderately close to so you actually do it in your spare time
What do you want to be 5-7 min walk from (walking places is why I live in NYC)
Is this a short term thing or are you intending to stay in NYC forever..ish

FYI - just to poke around with travel times
https://project.wnyc.org/transit-time/
https://citymapper.com/
Thanks for all the feedback. First, as a couple have mentioned, we are considering living in Brooklyn as well. The housing there seems much more our style from our cursory research. We still haven’t ruled out Manhattan either, but right now we’re looking at a budget of $3,000 per month and a minimum 800 SF, so as I said earlier that rules much of Manhattan out. Looks like east Harlem has housing that meets those requirements, but I have never been in that neighborhood.

The first project is la guardia airport, which will last 2-3 years. I have no idea where the next one will be. Children now are 3 years from school age, so we haven’t considered good school districts yet. We intend to be in nyc “foreverish”.

I think a commute of less than 40 minutes is a good goal. I would like to be near subway stops.

We lived in Philadelphia a couple years ago. We lived on a quiet street in an old apartment, which was a few blocks from a large restaurant area. We loved it, and would love to be in that type of situation again. Being somewhat near a park would also be desirable.
Harlem, East or West, is a great option if you are working at laGuardia. The M60 bus goes straight there along 125th Street from Manhattan to the airport, for the same price as a subway swipe. Also, a 30-day metrocard is the best value in town!

knowledge
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by knowledge » Mon Mar 26, 2018 5:50 pm

Some other tidbits:

- The one thing that doesn't get discussed often is the noise. You have people, trains, cars, sirens, helicopters, planes, constructions, dogs, etc. There are areas where it is non-stop. It can beat on you if you're not used to it. For others, it becomes white noise and they can't sleep in silence.

- If you plan on having a car, expect to get 3 parking tickets a year (or more) or pay for a garage. Not sure what those cost in Queens anymore, but in Manhattan, that's $500+/mo. Uber/Lyft may have changed some of this - and maybe you won't need a car.

- There's been a lot of talk about how the subway system is degrading and not as reliable. From what I can tell, it's true. So yes, while it runs 24/7, there's night maintenance work, weekend maintenance work, etc. - that can ruin your plans. However, it may not be an issue if you're not commuting to Manhattan.

Topic Author
Njm8845
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Njm8845 » Mon Mar 26, 2018 7:41 pm

WS1 wrote:
Sun Mar 25, 2018 3:29 pm
The good news is many of the neighborhoods in Western Queens will have good bus connections to LGA and are great neighborhoods for people that love urban neighborhoods. I get the impression your preferences are kind of like mine. A Saturday well spent involves aimless wandering chasing #1 on her scooter, the ability to walk to get pizza, breakfast, decent coffee, ice cream, and a farmers market. Want easy access to a baffling array of ethnic foods and various price points? You will find all this in Astoria, Sunnyside, Forest Hills and Jackson Heights. Long Island City and Queensboro Plaza are just next door with gobs of new construction. Try StreetEasy and PadMapper for your apartment hunting.

Now for the wrinkle-
Working in the passenger terminal is not the same as reporting to work at a construction staging area at the far side of the airport property. I recommend using City Mapper to see if your job site is even accessible by bus. You'll need to find out if the bus doesn't go to near your work site and then you have to take an on airport employee shuttle. If the bus seems like a pain but for some reason you'll have easy parking, driving to the airport can be less painful then you'd guess. Driving to LGA from Williamsburg/Greenpoint at 7:45am is maybe 20 minutes. The pain of street parking depends on a lot of variables, but you can probably find a space to rent for $325 and having a car opens up a ton of regional activities considering you have two kids. Want to spend every summer weekend on the beach or go hiking in the hudson valley - a car will set you free.
All good advice once again. I've almost certainly ruled out having a car... I just don't want that hassle. I'll take my chances with zipcar when we really need out of the city.

The hardest part of this decision is determining the increase in cost of living. I've looked at calculators online, but they assume an "apples to apples" comparison, which in this case isn't accurate because I would be living in a much smaller apartment. So then I applied factors to my current spending categories, and I think I'm getting close. The biggest question mark for me is groceries, because it's a big category for my family and I can't imagine buying all groceries at a small urban market.

Has anybody tried a grocery delivery service? Wondering about the pros/cons/cost.

blueman457
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by blueman457 » Mon Mar 26, 2018 9:03 pm

If groceries are your biggest concern at this point, I think you'll be fine.

We ate pretty well (grocery wise): and spent ~$600-900/month for 3 adults and a kiddo. Caveat: we didn't shop sales, coupon clip because it wasn't worth the time for my wife to meal plan around what was on sale. You can definitely do better than we did.

Things we did:

Local grocery store (for weekly shopping); not the best but nearby. Produce and basics.
Chinatown grocers: probably once every 3-4 weeks for Asian goods, produce, and a fair amount of proteins (fish/pork/beef). Cheap and good quality. (The vegetable stand we went to somehow always charged us $13 regardless if we left with 1 bag or 3 bags. A steal overall).
Amazon Pantry: for dry goods

Grocery delivery is definitely a possibility. I tried Amazon Grocery for a bit: produce was plus/minus. Instacart is popular in the area as well, they up charge about 10-20% from the store prices. You can set up an account and pretend shop to see how much a weekly grocery bill would be.


Blue Man

revert
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by revert » Mon Mar 26, 2018 9:16 pm

rjbraun wrote:
Sat Mar 24, 2018 2:16 pm
A great produce market in Hell's Kitchen (I think /guess -- West 52nd St, between 8th & 9th Aves): Stiles Farmers Market. Obviously, not suggesting OP move to the neighborhood just for the market, but I figured I would mention Stiles in case anyone lives nearby and wants to check it out (also, wherever OP ends up may well have something comparable in the neighborhood). Hours are somewhat limited, I suppose, by NYC standards: last I checked it was 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. every day except for Sunday, when it's 9 - 5 (I think). To give an idea of the prices, various apple varieties for a buck per lb, different types of coffee beans, that you can grind there, $6.99 per lb. Great prices and very good quality.
Amazing - thanks so much for the recommendation! I live nearby and have been schlepping down to Chinatown for produce. :oops:

rjbraun
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by rjbraun » Mon Mar 26, 2018 9:40 pm

Njm8845 wrote:
Mon Mar 26, 2018 7:41 pm
<snip>
Has anybody tried a grocery delivery service? Wondering about the pros/cons/cost.
You can check out Fresh Direct to get an idea of NYC prices. They seem to deliver to popular Queens and Brooklyn locales, based on my random check just now. Some of the pros / cons are probably similar to any grocery delivery service:

Pros:
- Can schedule deliveries within 2-hour time slot
- Can reschedule intended delivery pretty easily (if your schedule changes and with reasonable advance notice)
- Delivery can be to your door (assuming your building allows this) -- great if you order heavy or bulky stuff
- Online service, so can automate or reorder from prior orders
- Can shop from anywhere and anytime of the day

Cons:
- Sometimes the service may mess up the order *
- Or, you mess up the order or you forget to include some key ingredient that necessitates making a trip to the market anyway
- Or, the vendor is out of some key ingredient and by the time you find out you still have to make a special trip to the store
- Can't select / inspect the produce, meat, etc to pick what you want
- Probably not so environmentally-sound (lots of packaging materials, etc. though it can be reused)
- Price is probably higher, especially if you are willing to shop around or just know where to go for certain items
- Sometimes you may have to buy predetermined quantities (e.g., apples only sold in quantities of 4).
- Not sure, but I think certain produce was also sold by the piece, so if you order 1 potato the actual size and weight could be highly variable. Makes meal planning and recipes tough
- Probably more limited selection than at a normal large grocery store

* I haven't used Fresh Direct in years, but I've heard they have improved. Even before, I thought they were pretty good, certainly for the convenience and if one is pressed for time. Also, they did seem to have reasonably good customer service, though at this point my information is stale.

https://www.freshdirect.com/index.jsp

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Rob5TCP
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Re: Tips for moving to NYC

Post by Rob5TCP » Mon Mar 26, 2018 9:48 pm

I've been using Fresh Direct for many many years. In winter, I get the delivery pass which reduces the delivery costs by 50%+.
Yes, they don't have the selection of a good supermarket and prices are somewhat higher. However, the convenience,to me,
outweighs the additional costs.

The orders messed up are very FEW (not like in the past). When they screw up, the credit is immediate. They are MUCH MUCH improved.

If weather is nice and I am in the mood, I will drive to Fairway. Instacart delivery for Fairway and it is cheaper.
BUT, they have a 10% voluntary surcharge, then there is a $8.00 delivery charge and then a third recommended tip
to the delivery man.

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