What was the main reason you retired?

Non-investing personal finance issues including insurance, credit, real estate, taxes, employment and legal issues such as trusts and wills
User avatar
Topic Author
TheTimeLord
Posts: 8269
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2013 2:05 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by TheTimeLord »

sport wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:59 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:49 am I did some quick math and best I can tell the days I work are 24 hours long as are my weekend days and my research shows the days during my retirement will be 24 hours long so unless I have something better to do with my time (#4, #5, #7, #8 or #9) I would think time that pays me money is greater than time not pursuing anything for free. Personally I don't buy into either Time for Time's sake or Money for Money's sake, neither is of much real use unless you have something of worth to apply them to.
There is another reason for retiring that you seem to ignore: Lack of stress.
Every job has some level of stress associated with it. You have to commute, you have to be there on time, you have to fight bad weather, you have deadlines to meet, you have to deal with disagreeable coworkers, you have an unreasonable boss, you have disagreeable customers, you are overworked, you have to work more hours than you wish, you have to do some undesirable tasks, your work is not fully appreciated, you have deadlines to meet, you have to correct other's mistakes, etc. etc. etc.
In retirement, I have found that not only does my time belong to me (not too surprising), but there is almost a total lack of stress. I don't set an alarm clock. Stress is bad for you and can shorten your life.
From my perspective stress would be part of #4 (work environment). I am sure it is possible but not sure my personality would allow me to be stress free without a paycheck. After dealing with my dying mom for years by managing her finances, arranging for her care, visiting her regularly and making life and death calls I am not sure I find most of those things as stressful as I would have when I was younger and less financially stable. It is very common for people I know to feel more stress thinking about work than actual being at work. At work they know what to do and move from thing to thing, thinking about work their imaginations go into overdrive. Everyone is different though and I try to understand and respect that.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
staythecourse
Posts: 6993
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2011 9:40 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by staythecourse »

TheNightsToCome wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:18 am
staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:13 am
HomerJ wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 10:35 pm My sister is an artist. She's doing what she loves, but she's broke. What sage advice do you have for her?
I would say it was a decision that should have been better decided when she was in her youth. I have a little one and this comes up ALL the time in discussions with our friends who have kids as well. My answer is I don't care what they do in life. BUT they have to live the life of that field they are interested in. What I would have done if that was my child interested in art is have her shadow an artist not just during the day, but spend some time with them at their home. Kids who decide on their occupation should not just focus on the field itself, but the life it lends to outside of work (unpaid hours off the clock, flexibility in schedule, salary, travel commitments, ease of raise of children, etc...). Picking an occupation is not deciding just on the work they are going to do, but the life they want to lead.

In your sister's case it is a case of missing the boat. Not much you can do now. BUT one can't complain they don't have much money when they pick an occupation that doesn't pay well. That is the reality of many jobs and one of the big issues of letting kids just pick what they are interested in. Being an artist and not having money is what should be expected. The phrase of "starving artist" is a common one, no? So if she loves what she does great. She has/ had to accept she will never have a lo of money. Nothing wrong with picking a job that makes no money, but something wrong with picking a job that folks KNOW in advance that don't make money and then being upset you don't have money.

Good luck.
I think the larger point is that it isn't possible for everyone to have a job they love that pays well. Practical experience (and blog posts around the Internet) suggests that very few find this particular version of heaven. So it's terrific that you love your job and your compensation, but it isn't helpful to recommend that everyone find the same. It just sounds smug.
Who is saying "love" or "pay well". It isn't smug to suggest finding a job that you like (don't think many find jobs they love) and that pays the bills. What I have a problem with is staying in a job/ career you don't like just to retire in 30-40 years. Doesn't make sense to go, "Hey it is worth not being happy at work from ages 20- 60 just so I can retire and enjoy from ages 60- 90. That doesn't make sense to me. If you are young and don't like your job/ career go get another one. Nothing is worse then not being happy in a job that takes up 8-10 hours of your day for 5 days per week for 30+ years just to make money. Heck, I would suggest taking LESS money to do something you like. So to be clear I am not saying find a job you "love" or "pays well". Find a job/ career that you enjoy and makes a living. I can't imagine being in a situation I was not happy for 30+ years. That would like being in a bad marriage!

Good luck.
"The stock market [fluctuation], therefore, is noise. A giant distraction from the business of investing.” | -Jack Bogle
User avatar
Sheepdog
Posts: 5655
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 3:05 pm
Location: Midwest, retired 1998 at age 65

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Sheepdog »

Because 65 was when it was expected at that time, at least in my company it was.
Time is the school in which we learn, time is the fire in which we burn.~ Delmore Schwartz
User avatar
Taylor Larimore
Advisory Board
Posts: 30040
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 8:09 pm
Location: Miami FL

"Enough" by John Bogle

Post by Taylor Larimore »

Bogleheads:

Mr. Bogle wrote a book about money and retiring. He titled it "Enough." This is the link to quotes reflecting many of Jack's experienced and insightful ideas:

"Enough" by Jack Bogle".

Best wishes.
Taylor
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle
User avatar
Monster99
Posts: 382
Joined: Tue Aug 29, 2017 10:28 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Monster99 »

#8, #4 and #6 with a early retirement package at 60.
2015
Posts: 2906
Joined: Mon Feb 10, 2014 2:32 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by 2015 »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:55 am
2015 wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:45 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:34 am
mlebuf wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 2:28 am
Depends on what you are financially able to do. I doubt very many retirees could afford to do anything they want so their finances have some control over their time or at least the choices they have. Also, being Financially Independent I feel like I already have control over my time and my decision to go to work is part of my exercising that control since I am not doing it out of financial necessity. For the most part the reality of life is man always has a choice but is never truly in control.
This isn't necessarily true. I have complete control over my two current favorite things to do: daily midday naps and reading books in the afternoon at my favorite cafe. The books are free from the library system and the specialty coffee is only $2.00. A life of frugality has freed me from dependence on spending for satisfaction (although I'm definitely lots more spending more in retirement than I have in the last 20 years, only because I can). I can't imagine losing my life to working again.
I didn't state it as an absolute but as my opinion for most retirees. Your being an exception doesn't make it untrue since the original statement allowed for exceptions. That said many people self edit their list of possibilities because they no they aren't attainable. I think it is fantastic you have found such a balance in your life, personally I struggle with the fact I can't imagine not working and most of the things that I think I want to do in retirement do have a price tag associated with them and are still achievable while continuing to work. Perhaps that will change as I grow wiser but for now my preference is to fall into bed exhausted at the end of the day over taking a nap during it. Viva le difference.
My stepfather was like that. I lost contact, but for all I know he may still have been still running his company when he passed in his early nineties. I'm coaching a gentleman in a high leadership position who very much identifies with his work. I would never recommend someone like him retire before he's ready because of the great satisfaction he gets from working. I agree with you in that it's important to identify what makes each of us different and to play on these strengths.

Maybe some people get lots of satisfaction out of work and others get satisfaction out of working on their own lives. I always worked on my own life while I was working and always wanted to be free just to work on my own life. Since retirement, what I have noticed is a dramatic difference in my satisfaction, fulfillment, and contentment levels as a result of the freedom to spend all of my time on my own projects and interests.
RadAudit
Posts: 3944
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Second star on the right and straight on 'til morning

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by RadAudit »

staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:31 am Nothing is worse then not being happy in a job that takes up 8-10 hours of your day for 5 days per week for 30+ years just to make money.
I concur. It's absolutely amazing to me the rationalizations one is capable of if he is raised in a environment where the highest goals are to put food on the table, clothes on your back and a roof over your head. And, then when a family comes along .... Nowhere in that mind set is anything about self actualization and personal happiness.
FI is the best revenge. LBYM. Invest the rest. Stay the course. - PS: The cavalry isn't coming, kids. You are on your own.
User avatar
Sandtrap
Posts: 11901
Joined: Sat Nov 26, 2016 6:32 pm
Location: Hawaii No Ka Oi , N. Arizona

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Sandtrap »

RadAudit wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 2:28 pm
staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:31 am Nothing is worse then not being happy in a job that takes up 8-10 hours of your day for 5 days per week for 30+ years just to make money.
I concur. It's absolutely amazing to me the rationalizations one is capable of if he is raised in a environment where the highest goals are to put food on the table, clothes on your back and a roof over your head. And, then when a family comes along .... Nowhere in that mind set is anything about self actualization and personal happiness.
Isn't that long the lines of, Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs where self-actualization can't happen unless lower more immediate needs like food, clothing, shelter, are fulfilled?

self actualization
esteem
love/belonging
safety
physiological needs
Wiki Bogleheads Wiki: Everything You Need to Know
Hockey10
Posts: 859
Joined: Wed Aug 24, 2016 12:20 pm
Location: Philadelphia suburbs

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Hockey10 »

I read the obituaries every day.

When I got to my mid-50s, I really started to notice the listings for those who pass that are my age or younger. While working, it felt like everything I did at work and at home was rushed. There was rarely enough free time to relax. I did a limited amount of exercise and I did not spend too much time taking care of my health. Lunch was typically a sandwich or slice (s) of pizza inhaled at my desk in 2 minutes. Blood pressure was high, cholesterol was high, weight was high.

Now that I am retired, exercise is the #1 priority. I am eating healthier and my weight is down to the level it was when I left active duty in the Army in the 1980s.

That combined with hitting my number and no longer enjoying work drove me to retire early.
Bigfish
Posts: 166
Joined: Wed May 07, 2014 5:41 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Bigfish »

#1 and #4
Woodshark
Posts: 501
Joined: Fri Jan 07, 2011 4:09 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Woodshark »

Snapper wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:29 pm 1 and 9 primarily. For everything there is a season. Earning is a means to an end. Do not make it the end.
Same here. Had a job that I liked (worked for myself) but we had saved for decades and it was time for something new. Or as I like to call it Life 2.0

It's been two years and I don't miss work at all.
User avatar
GerryL
Posts: 2918
Joined: Fri Sep 20, 2013 11:40 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by GerryL »

pennywise wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:29 am
So in answer to your question, he is absolutely going to tell the boss to take that job and shove it. We're just going to do it in our usual BH-ish fashion after we get all the walk away goodies he is entitled to and with very specific plans completed :wink:
In case you haven't considered it, if they are trying to trim the older (read: more expensive) workers, he might want to tough it out a bit longer and see if they will offer him a severance package to leave. In other words, annoy them with a zen attitude about shabby treatment and make them pay him to leave. A lot of companies go that route to avoid a potential age discrimination law suit.
jlawrence01
Posts: 1662
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2013 1:34 am
Location: Southern AZ

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by jlawrence01 »

#2 and #3.

I thought that continuing t work in the environment I was working was injurious to my health.

In 4.5 years, I do not regret it.
User avatar
Doom&Gloom
Posts: 3628
Joined: Thu May 08, 2014 3:36 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Doom&Gloom »

Because I was financially able to do what I wanted to do rather than continue working.
User avatar
Topic Author
TheTimeLord
Posts: 8269
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2013 2:05 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by TheTimeLord »

pennywise wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:29 am
staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:32 am
This is what I am curious about. If you guys are set financially why not just leave now? You talk about "doesn't have to stick around and being humiliated" yet they did just that. He was called in at 64 YO and given a reprimand for dress code?? If it was me I would have told that boss to "Xoff!" and quit right there. The amount of trash folks are willing to take even though they don't need to is amazing.

Good luck.
One common Boglehead trait we certainly share is caution and planning in all things, not to mention a constant focus on maximizing fiscal and other benefits. Given that the dress code issue literally happened 2 days ago, we immediately went into active let's-get-you-outta-there mode this weekend. We have been working on a general plan and he specifically has said for the past couple of years that he would work 'till something happens'. Something happened 48 hours ago.

He's going to speak to the manager at his volunteer commitment this week to flesh out details on the project they want to hire him to do so he can decide if he wants to be paid-or stay a volunteer.

I"m going to meet with our accountant ASAP to get clarity on how to handle taxes, retirement accounts etc for FY 2018. I am also calling our TIAA advisor to ask about specifics on retiring and what we need to do with his 403b balance.

And we have a few other financial/benefit options that we will be exploring that have a high likelihood of extending his full salary without requiring him to sit at his desk and be treated shabbily.

Last but not least he certainly can walk into HR tomorrow and submit a retirement letter. That knowledge is perhaps even more satisfying than rising indignantly and storming out of the manager's office, at least to us.

So in answer to your question, he is absolutely going to tell the boss to take that job and shove it. We're just going to do it in our usual BH-ish fashion after we get all the walk away goodies he is entitled to and with very specific plans completed :wink:
This is just ill-advised to me. I mean really, someone asks you to meet dress code and people think this is how to respond. If they are really trying to run you off it seems asking you to conform to the dress code is a pretty weak attempt. What was the violation? Did he not know or understand the dress code or was it just no one enforced it. If he is being singled out then they have an HR problem and he might be able to pursue a remedy. If they were just reinforcing it because the staff had got lax then who cares. Personally I am not a fan of burning bridges in this manner. If this was the last straw fine, but leave the macho chest thumping at home. He either wants to keep working or doesn't, no need to make a mountain out of a molehill. Just step back for a second and think, would you want to be the guy remembered for leaving because someone cited you about the dress code? Even if no one else on the organization is, you can still be a professional. Don't become a cartoon character on your way out, you will just validate any negative feelings people have towards you.

Just as an aside I constantly hear people's co-workers complain about how they dress. I think a lot of people would be surprised to know how often co-workers complain about people or other groups which sometimes is the genesis of management action.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
EddyB
Posts: 1473
Joined: Fri May 24, 2013 3:43 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by EddyB »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:49 am
euroswiss wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:33 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:08 pm What was the main reason you retired? Here are some examples of reasons I assume one would retire:
1) Hit your number
2) The amount of your contributions no longer made a meaningful difference in the size of your portfolio
3) Lost the motivation to pursue money
4) Had enough of your work environment
5) Wanted to pursue a hobby
6) Forced into retirement
7) Needed a lifestyle change, ready to do something else
8) Job no longer fun or interesting
9) Felt there were things you wanted to do before you got too old

1. Time >>>> money

2. I could
I did some quick math and best I can tell the days I work are 24 hours long as are my weekend days and my research shows the days during my retirement will be 24 hours long so unless I have something better to do with my time (#4, #5, #7, #8 or #9) I would think time that pays me money is greater than time not pursuing anything for free. Personally I don't buy into either Time for Time's sake or Money for Money's sake, neither is of much real use unless you have something of worth to apply them to.
We get it. There’s nothing you’d like to do with your time that’s not compatible with your work. That’s not how everyone feels. Your response to euroswiss suggests you don’t care about responses to your question that don’t fit into your preconceived parameters. It’s as if I posed the question “If you could afford to retire but don’t, why don’t you?” and the only answers I would accept were things like “1) My life is devoid of any other meaning. 2) My identity is one-dimensional. 3) I was thoroughly brainwashed as a child.”
User avatar
Toons
Posts: 13829
Joined: Fri Nov 21, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Hills of Tennessee

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Toons »

Reason?
So that we could choose to do with our time(which we all have a limited amount of)to do as WE please,whatever that may be at the moment :happy
"One does not accumulate but eliminate. It is not daily increase but daily decrease. The height of cultivation always runs to simplicity" –Bruce Lee
euroswiss
Posts: 246
Joined: Sun Oct 25, 2015 4:40 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by euroswiss »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:49 am
euroswiss wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:33 am

1. Time >>>> money

2. I could
I did some quick math and best I can tell the days I work are 24 hours long as are my weekend days and my research shows the days during my retirement will be 24 hours long so unless I have something better to do with my time (#4, #5, #7, #8 or #9) I would think time that pays me money is greater than time not pursuing anything for free. Personally I don't buy into either Time for Time's sake or Money for Money's sake, neither is of much real use unless you have something of worth to apply them to.
[/quote]

Great post - especially given your name.... :wink:

I stand by my assessment that for me, time is much more valuable than money (given that I already said, I had enough money). And yes, I constantly come up with new things to apply it to :sharebeer
The Wizard
Posts: 13356
Joined: Tue Mar 23, 2010 1:45 pm
Location: Reading, MA

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by The Wizard »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:10 pm
pennywise wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:29 am
staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:32 am
This is what I am curious about. If you guys are set financially why not just leave now? You talk about "doesn't have to stick around and being humiliated" yet they did just that. He was called in at 64 YO and given a reprimand for dress code?? If it was me I would have told that boss to "Xoff!" and quit right there. The amount of trash folks are willing to take even though they don't need to is amazing.

Good luck.
One common Boglehead trait we certainly share is caution and planning in all things, not to mention a constant focus on maximizing fiscal and other benefits. Given that the dress code issue literally happened 2 days ago, we immediately went into active let's-get-you-outta-there mode this weekend. We have been working on a general plan and he specifically has said for the past couple of years that he would work 'till something happens'. Something happened 48 hours ago.

He's going to speak to the manager at his volunteer commitment this week to flesh out details on the project they want to hire him to do so he can decide if he wants to be paid-or stay a volunteer.

I"m going to meet with our accountant ASAP to get clarity on how to handle taxes, retirement accounts etc for FY 2018. I am also calling our TIAA advisor to ask about specifics on retiring and what we need to do with his 403b balance.

And we have a few other financial/benefit options that we will be exploring that have a high likelihood of extending his full salary without requiring him to sit at his desk and be treated shabbily.

Last but not least he certainly can walk into HR tomorrow and submit a retirement letter. That knowledge is perhaps even more satisfying than rising indignantly and storming out of the manager's office, at least to us.

So in answer to your question, he is absolutely going to tell the boss to take that job and shove it. We're just going to do it in our usual BH-ish fashion after we get all the walk away goodies he is entitled to and with very specific plans completed :wink:
This is just ill-advised to me. I mean really, someone asks you to meet dress code and people think this is how to respond. If they are really trying to run you off it seems asking you to conform to the dress code is a pretty weak attempt. What was the violation? Did he not know or understand the dress code or was it just no one enforced it. If he is being singled out then they have an HR problem and he might be able to pursue a remedy. If they were just reinforcing it because the staff had got lax then who cares. Personally I am not a fan of burning bridges in this manner. If this was the last straw fine, but leave the macho chest thumping at home. He either wants to keep working or doesn't, no need to make a mountain out of a molehill. Just step back for a second and think, would you want to be the guy remembered for leaving because someone cited you about the dress code? Even if no one else on the organization is, you can still be a professional. Don't become a cartoon character on your way out, you will just validate any negative feelings people have towards you.

Just as an aside I constantly hear people's co-workers complain about how they dress. I think a lot of people would be surprised to know how often co-workers complain about people or other groups which sometimes is the genesis of management action.
It's possible the husband was wearing sandals with socks to work.
That's a rather egregious violation of all possible dress codes...
Attempted new signature...
User avatar
Topic Author
TheTimeLord
Posts: 8269
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2013 2:05 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by TheTimeLord »

EddyB wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:31 pm
TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:49 am
euroswiss wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:33 am
TheTimeLord wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 6:08 pm What was the main reason you retired? Here are some examples of reasons I assume one would retire:
1) Hit your number
2) The amount of your contributions no longer made a meaningful difference in the size of your portfolio
3) Lost the motivation to pursue money
4) Had enough of your work environment
5) Wanted to pursue a hobby
6) Forced into retirement
7) Needed a lifestyle change, ready to do something else
8) Job no longer fun or interesting
9) Felt there were things you wanted to do before you got too old

1. Time >>>> money

2. I could
I did some quick math and best I can tell the days I work are 24 hours long as are my weekend days and my research shows the days during my retirement will be 24 hours long so unless I have something better to do with my time (#4, #5, #7, #8 or #9) I would think time that pays me money is greater than time not pursuing anything for free. Personally I don't buy into either Time for Time's sake or Money for Money's sake, neither is of much real use unless you have something of worth to apply them to.
We get it. There’s nothing you’d like to do with your time that’s not compatible with your work. That’s not how everyone feels. Your response to euroswiss suggests you don’t care about responses to your question that don’t fit into your preconceived parameters. It’s as if I posed the question “If you could afford to retire but don’t, why don’t you?” and the only answers I would accept were things like “1) My life is devoid of any other meaning. 2) My identity is one-dimensional. 3) I was thoroughly brainwashed as a child.”
No, that is not what I am saying. The vast majority of my life has been pretty much disconnected from my work, maybe that's why I don't resent it because I see work as having enabled my adventures not restricted them. But what I am saying this "Personally I don't buy into either Time for Time's sake or Money for Money's sake, neither is of much real use unless you have something of worth to apply them to.". Working or retired you have the same amount of time, what varies is what you apply it to.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
User avatar
Topic Author
TheTimeLord
Posts: 8269
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2013 2:05 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by TheTimeLord »

euroswiss wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:36 pm
TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:49 am
euroswiss wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:33 am

1. Time >>>> money

2. I could
I did some quick math and best I can tell the days I work are 24 hours long as are my weekend days and my research shows the days during my retirement will be 24 hours long so unless I have something better to do with my time (#4, #5, #7, #8 or #9) I would think time that pays me money is greater than time not pursuing anything for free. Personally I don't buy into either Time for Time's sake or Money for Money's sake, neither is of much real use unless you have something of worth to apply them to.
Great post - especially given your name.... :wink:

I stand by my assessment that for me, time is much more valuable than money (given that I already said, I had enough money). And yes, I constantly come up with new things to apply it to :sharebeer
[/quote]

Which is awesome. Not everybody has the ability to do that.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
User avatar
Topic Author
TheTimeLord
Posts: 8269
Joined: Fri Jul 26, 2013 2:05 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by TheTimeLord »

The Wizard wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:57 pm
TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:10 pm
pennywise wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:29 am
staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:32 am
This is what I am curious about. If you guys are set financially why not just leave now? You talk about "doesn't have to stick around and being humiliated" yet they did just that. He was called in at 64 YO and given a reprimand for dress code?? If it was me I would have told that boss to "Xoff!" and quit right there. The amount of trash folks are willing to take even though they don't need to is amazing.

Good luck.
One common Boglehead trait we certainly share is caution and planning in all things, not to mention a constant focus on maximizing fiscal and other benefits. Given that the dress code issue literally happened 2 days ago, we immediately went into active let's-get-you-outta-there mode this weekend. We have been working on a general plan and he specifically has said for the past couple of years that he would work 'till something happens'. Something happened 48 hours ago.

He's going to speak to the manager at his volunteer commitment this week to flesh out details on the project they want to hire him to do so he can decide if he wants to be paid-or stay a volunteer.

I"m going to meet with our accountant ASAP to get clarity on how to handle taxes, retirement accounts etc for FY 2018. I am also calling our TIAA advisor to ask about specifics on retiring and what we need to do with his 403b balance.

And we have a few other financial/benefit options that we will be exploring that have a high likelihood of extending his full salary without requiring him to sit at his desk and be treated shabbily.

Last but not least he certainly can walk into HR tomorrow and submit a retirement letter. That knowledge is perhaps even more satisfying than rising indignantly and storming out of the manager's office, at least to us.

So in answer to your question, he is absolutely going to tell the boss to take that job and shove it. We're just going to do it in our usual BH-ish fashion after we get all the walk away goodies he is entitled to and with very specific plans completed :wink:
This is just ill-advised to me. I mean really, someone asks you to meet dress code and people think this is how to respond. If they are really trying to run you off it seems asking you to conform to the dress code is a pretty weak attempt. What was the violation? Did he not know or understand the dress code or was it just no one enforced it. If he is being singled out then they have an HR problem and he might be able to pursue a remedy. If they were just reinforcing it because the staff had got lax then who cares. Personally I am not a fan of burning bridges in this manner. If this was the last straw fine, but leave the macho chest thumping at home. He either wants to keep working or doesn't, no need to make a mountain out of a molehill. Just step back for a second and think, would you want to be the guy remembered for leaving because someone cited you about the dress code? Even if no one else on the organization is, you can still be a professional. Don't become a cartoon character on your way out, you will just validate any negative feelings people have towards you.

Just as an aside I constantly hear people's co-workers complain about how they dress. I think a lot of people would be surprised to know how often co-workers complain about people or other groups which sometimes is the genesis of management action.
It's possible the husband was wearing sandals with socks to work.
That's a rather egregious violation of all possible dress codes...
Sadly, we have a group that comes in with sandels sans socks. Personally, I think they look silly on cold days (okay, I think they look silly every day.) but not my call.
IMHO, Investing should be about living the life you want, not avoiding the life you fear. | Run, You Clever Boy! [9085]
pennywise
Posts: 819
Joined: Sat May 31, 2014 6:22 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by pennywise »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:10 pm
pennywise wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 10:29 am

So in answer to your question, he is absolutely going to tell the boss to take that job and shove it. We're just going to do it in our usual BH-ish fashion after we get all the walk away goodies he is entitled to and with very specific plans completed :wink:
This is just ill-advised to me. I mean really, someone asks you to meet dress code and people think this is how to respond. If they are really trying to run you off it seems asking you to conform to the dress code is a pretty weak attempt. What was the violation? Did he not know or understand the dress code or was it just no one enforced it. If he is being singled out then they have an HR problem and he might be able to pursue a remedy. If they were just reinforcing it because the staff had got lax then who cares. Personally I am not a fan of burning bridges in this manner. If this was the last straw fine, but leave the macho chest thumping at home. He either wants to keep working or doesn't, no need to make a mountain out of a molehill.
Thanks for your feedback. Seems my attempt at levity through quoting an old country song wasn't quite obvious in my response. As far as macho chest thumping, there will be none of that, rather as soon as he is ready there will be a simple statement that he is retiring which will be transmitted through the appropriate channels. As with many (most?) couples, we'll save the dramatic shaking of fists, cursing of the boss and statements of valor for dinner table conversation at home :wink: .

While specifics may not be all that interesting-my husband is pretty much the last of the old guard from his IT unit and as the culture has changed he hasn't. Simple as that--he's been told a few times over the past couple of years that he has to wear docker-style pants and a tucked in button down dress shirt to work. He's been wearing a pair of dark green pants with side pockets that his manager designated as cargo pants, and he had on a tucked in flannel shirt because the temperature of his building is kept very low and he gets cold. Also since he rides his bike to work in the Miami heat/humidity, he was told he can't come to his cubicle in a t shirt and put on his dress shirt over it there. Meanwhile the guy in the cube next to him was wearing jeans and a polo shirt and the woman on his other side worked all day wearing a parka. So yeah, it's clearly targeting and it's also clearly time to move on. Frankly if he needed the job and the money for years to come we'd be more inclined to deal with that targeting and unequal treatment.

He doesn't so we won't.
User avatar
tomander
Posts: 75
Joined: Wed Feb 28, 2007 12:01 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by tomander »

Old Age
TheNightsToCome
Posts: 628
Joined: Fri Jun 30, 2017 11:48 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by TheNightsToCome »

RadAudit wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 2:28 pm
staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:31 am Nothing is worse then not being happy in a job that takes up 8-10 hours of your day for 5 days per week for 30+ years just to make money.
I concur. It's absolutely amazing to me the rationalizations one is capable of if he is raised in a environment where the highest goals are to put food on the table, clothes on your back and a roof over your head. And, then when a family comes along .... Nowhere in that mind set is anything about self actualization and personal happiness.
"Nothing is worse then (sic) not being happy in a job that takes up 8-10 hours of your day for 5 days per week for 30+ years just to make money."

It is bad. Yet this appears to describe the lives of most people.

You maintain this is easily fixed. Then why doesn't everyone just find a job they like that provides adequate compensation? Is everyone too dumb or too lazy?
cherijoh
Posts: 6591
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 4:49 pm
Location: Charlotte NC

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by cherijoh »

staythecourse wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:53 pm Not to hijack the thread, but those who answered that they disliked the job makes it a bit sad. Great you have enough to do what you want AFTER spending 30+ years doing something you disliked. Seems that one wasted a LARGE portion of their youth just to make money that they may or may not take advantage of later in life (health permitting).
You are making a BIG assumption that people answering #4 or #8 have felt that way their entire career. I would disagree.

I have continued to work past the point where I knew I could retire because I do like my job - or at least did until recently. (The lack of retiree health benefits also had something to do with my continued employment).

But a new manager who is trying to micromanage the technical aspects of my job (when he doesn't have the skills to do so) as well as increasing demands to meet unrealistic timelines (as the company shrinks the workforce but not the workload) has convinced me that I really should retire. I'm planning to hang around long enough to get my 2017 bonus and voluntary employer contribution to the 401k, but I'm ready to join the retirement class of 2018.
cherijoh
Posts: 6591
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 4:49 pm
Location: Charlotte NC

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by cherijoh »

sport wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 9:59 am There is another reason for retiring that you seem to ignore: Lack of stress.
Every job has some level of stress associated with it. You have to commute, you have to be there on time, you have to fight bad weather, you have deadlines to meet, you have to deal with disagreeable coworkers, you have an unreasonable boss, you have disagreeable customers, you are overworked, you have to work more hours than you wish, you have to do some undesirable tasks, your work is not fully appreciated, you have deadlines to meet, you have to correct other's mistakes, etc. etc. etc.
In retirement, I have found that not only does my time belong to me (not too surprising), but there is almost a total lack of stress. I don't set an alarm clock. Stress is bad for you and can shorten your life.
I would agree - provided you are not stressed about running out of money. I have non-Boglehead friends and acquaintances who were not prepared when the axe fell during the last recession and since then. Losing a job when you do not yet have sufficient money to retire comfortably but being old enough that finding a well-paying is near impossible is VERY stressful.
cherijoh
Posts: 6591
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 4:49 pm
Location: Charlotte NC

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by cherijoh »

TheTimeLord wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:09 pm
The Wizard wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 4:57 pm It's possible the husband was wearing sandals with socks to work.
That's a rather egregious violation of all possible dress codes...
Sadly, we have a group that comes in with sandels sans socks. Personally, I think they look silly on cold days (okay, I think they look silly every day.) but not my call.
My brother worked in IT and the informal "dress code" was buttoned shirts and khaki-type slacks. One of his coworkers wore shorts and sandals or tennis shoes every day. Apparently during the coldest days in the winter he wore thermal long johns under his shorts. :oops:
RadAudit
Posts: 3944
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Second star on the right and straight on 'til morning

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by RadAudit »

TheNightsToCome wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 5:45 pm You maintain this is easily fixed. Then why doesn't everyone just find a job they like that provides adequate compensation? Is everyone too dumb or too lazy?
Neither.

It probably has something to do with the values one internalizes which impact the life decisions one makes and the actions one takes. Additionally, may have something to do with the reinforcement one receives from family, friends and community for those actions / decisions. Not to mention the availability of these lower paying jobs that you like and provide you enough money to meet your goals.

Nothing easy about it.
FI is the best revenge. LBYM. Invest the rest. Stay the course. - PS: The cavalry isn't coming, kids. You are on your own.
RadAudit
Posts: 3944
Joined: Mon May 26, 2008 10:20 am
Location: Second star on the right and straight on 'til morning

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by RadAudit »

Sandtrap wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 3:02 pm Isn't that long the lines of, Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs where self-actualization can't happen unless lower more immediate needs like food, clothing, shelter, are fulfilled?
I wondered where that came from. I was raised by a son of a share cropper. I don't think in the Depression they got much past step 3 on a routine basis.
FI is the best revenge. LBYM. Invest the rest. Stay the course. - PS: The cavalry isn't coming, kids. You are on your own.
remomnyc
Posts: 845
Joined: Mon Jan 04, 2016 4:27 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by remomnyc »

I plan to retire next year. Until the great recession of 2008, I intended to work until 67, but my work environment changed dramatically and now I dread each day (#4 & #8). When I hit my number (#1), I realized that my portfolio earns more than I do (#2). I may work again when I quit this job that I no longer like, but I no longer need the money (#3). I want to do something more meaningful with my life (#9) while I still have energy and health.
scrabbler1
Posts: 2525
Joined: Fri Nov 20, 2009 2:39 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by scrabbler1 »

For me, #1, #3, #4, and #8. But the main reason was that I just hated, hated, hated the commute. Twice I reduced it in the 7 years I worked part-time, but the only solution to that was to reduce it zero.
StealthRabbit
Posts: 528
Joined: Sat Jun 13, 2009 1:25 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by StealthRabbit »

99). Didn’t want to sit through another annual ‘performance de-valuation’... enough is enough.

I miss paid vacations and profit sharing, (and free lunch and night shift premium)

But.... no shortage of Fun and Adventure in retirement. Left @ age 49... (I never really had time for a J-O-B anyway.) :D
User avatar
HomerJ
Posts: 15349
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2008 12:50 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by HomerJ »

TheNightsToCome wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:18 am
staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:13 am
HomerJ wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 10:35 pm My sister is an artist. She's doing what she loves, but she's broke. What sage advice do you have for her?
I would say it was a decision that should have been better decided when she was in her youth. I have a little one and this comes up ALL the time in discussions with our friends who have kids as well. My answer is I don't care what they do in life. BUT they have to live the life of that field they are interested in. What I would have done if that was my child interested in art is have her shadow an artist not just during the day, but spend some time with them at their home. Kids who decide on their occupation should not just focus on the field itself, but the life it lends to outside of work (unpaid hours off the clock, flexibility in schedule, salary, travel commitments, ease of raise of children, etc...). Picking an occupation is not deciding just on the work they are going to do, but the life they want to lead.

In your sister's case it is a case of missing the boat. Not much you can do now. BUT one can't complain they don't have much money when they pick an occupation that doesn't pay well. That is the reality of many jobs and one of the big issues of letting kids just pick what they are interested in. Being an artist and not having money is what should be expected. The phrase of "starving artist" is a common one, no? So if she loves what she does great. She has/ had to accept she will never have a lo of money. Nothing wrong with picking a job that makes no money, but something wrong with picking a job that folks KNOW in advance that don't make money and then being upset you don't have money.

Good luck.
I think the larger point is that it isn't possible for everyone to have a job they love that pays well. Practical experience (and blog posts around the Internet) suggests that very few find this particular version of heaven. So it's terrific that you love your job and your compensation, but it isn't helpful to recommend that everyone find the same. It just sounds smug.
This. Sorry, but staythecourse, your response did seem a little smug. "Hi, I don't understand how anyone can work at a job they hate... I love my job and make a ton of money. So much money, I can retire at 45, but I probably won't because my job is so great! I would never work at a job I hated; I don't understand why anyone does that!"

I saw a documentary once where a guy was reminiscing about his dad working at a hat factory. Not management, on the line. Ton of people with jobs like that you know. When he was 14, he asked his dad why he worked a boring factory job, and his father smacked him upside the head, and said, "To feed you, you schmuck!"
User avatar
HomerJ
Posts: 15349
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2008 12:50 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by HomerJ »

staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:31 amSo to be clear I am not saying find a job you "love" or "pays well". Find a job/ career that you enjoy and makes a living. I can't imagine being in a situation I was not happy for 30+ years. That would like being in a bad marriage!
That makes more sense, I'm sure it was just a miscommunication. But note that people who say #4, aren't necessarily saying they hated their job for 30+ years. Maybe it just recently got bad.
Cruise
Posts: 1085
Joined: Mon Nov 21, 2016 7:17 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Cruise »

TheNightsToCome wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 11:18 am
staythecourse wrote: Sun Oct 29, 2017 8:13 am
HomerJ wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 10:35 pm My sister is an artist. She's doing what she loves, but she's broke. What sage advice do you have for her?
I would say it was a decision that should have been better decided when she was in her youth. I have a little one and this comes up ALL the time in discussions with our friends who have kids as well. My answer is I don't care what they do in life. BUT they have to live the life of that field they are interested in. What I would have done if that was my child interested in art is have her shadow an artist not just during the day, but spend some time with them at their home. Kids who decide on their occupation should not just focus on the field itself, but the life it lends to outside of work (unpaid hours off the clock, flexibility in schedule, salary, travel commitments, ease of raise of children, etc...). Picking an occupation is not deciding just on the work they are going to do, but the life they want to lead.

In your sister's case it is a case of missing the boat. Not much you can do now. BUT one can't complain they don't have much money when they pick an occupation that doesn't pay well. That is the reality of many jobs and one of the big issues of letting kids just pick what they are interested in. Being an artist and not having money is what should be expected. The phrase of "starving artist" is a common one, no? So if she loves what she does great. She has/ had to accept she will never have a lo of money. Nothing wrong with picking a job that makes no money, but something wrong with picking a job that folks KNOW in advance that don't make money and then being upset you don't have money.

Good luck.
I think the larger point is that it isn't possible for everyone to have a job they love that pays well. Practical experience (and blog posts around the Internet) suggests that very few find this particular version of heaven. So it's terrific that you love your job and your compensation, but it isn't helpful to recommend that everyone find the same. It just sounds smug.
It did not sound smug to me.

Take the example of two siblings, one works their tail off for 35 years, picks a career which earns a pension and also allows accumulation of a lot of wealth. The other sibling is a party animal who puts a lower priority on career and therefore, has little in the bank to show for it. Should we feel sorry for Party Charlie when he (or she) has a hard time making ends meet at age 65? Seems like it is all very predictable and therefore avoidable.
User avatar
Rocco Sampler
Posts: 54
Joined: Wed Aug 23, 2017 6:59 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Rocco Sampler »

The first half of my career was a dream job. I can literally say that almost all my dreams came true. I traveled all over the world and got to do things and meet people that were incredible, including my DW. I stayed in modest hotels and only took a Sony Walkman with a few cassettes of music, along with some clothes and never knew when I was coming back. Sometimes there was no electricity, no hospital and no phone. I was the happiest I could be. As an older merchant marine told me then, “You have the unknown, what else do you want?” I also met a lot of poor people around the world who were happy, although they had short life expectancies; they taught me so much. I learned that having things doesn’t equate to happiness, although it’s nice to have options. For me, it was these experiences that mattered and they also gave me memories. Also, I’m not sure the digital age has been good for us. A lot of what we produce now is a distraction from life. Manual work and crafts are important for physical and mental health, so is letting life happen in some ways rather than having everything planned.

The second half of my career was a bureaucratic slog that I am glad is coming to an end. I have enough now to live at least as well as I have been, but could survive if things didn’t turn out, or be able to accept an early curtain call if that comes. I’ve also seen enough folks who got to their 40’s, 50’s and 60’s whose live took a turn for the worse before they got to their plans.
User avatar
HomerJ
Posts: 15349
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2008 12:50 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by HomerJ »

Cruise wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:11 amTake the example of two siblings, one works their tail off for 35 years, picks a career which earns a pension and also allows accumulation of a lot of wealth. The other sibling is a party animal who puts a lower priority on career and therefore, has little in the bank to show for it. Should we feel sorry for Party Charlie when he (or she) has a hard time making ends meet at age 65? Seems like it is all very predictable and therefore avoidable.
Except of course, that's not at all what he said. He said almost the exact opposite.

He basically couldn't understand the person who would pick a career just for money, and work their tail off for 35 years just for money. Even though at least 90% of the working adult human population on earth does exactly that. To feed themselves and their kids.

He said, one should only work a job that makes you happy.

Now he ALSO said, one should work a job that makes you happy AND makes you rich, like he did. It's great advice, if you can get it.

Edit: Maybe a fairer assessment would be that he said "Don't stay in a job that makes you miserable", and I think most of us can agree with that. But many many people do have to work hard unfun jobs to put food on the table, and we should recognize that.
Last edited by HomerJ on Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
azanon
Posts: 2967
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 10:34 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by azanon »

HomerJ wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:09 am
Cruise wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:11 amTake the example of two siblings, one works their tail off for 35 years, picks a career which earns a pension and also allows accumulation of a lot of wealth. The other sibling is a party animal who puts a lower priority on career and therefore, has little in the bank to show for it. Should we feel sorry for Party Charlie when he (or she) has a hard time making ends meet at age 65? Seems like it is all very predictable and therefore avoidable.
Except of course, that's not at all what he said. He said almost the exact opposite.

He basically couldn't understand the person who would pick a career just for money, and work their tail off for 35 years just for money. Even though at least 90% of the working adult human population on earth does exactly that. To feed themselves and their kids.

He said, one should only work a job that makes you happy.

Now he ALSO said, one should work a job that makes you happy AND makes you rich, like he did. It's great advice, if you can get it.
I'm with HomerJ on this one. I think of all the things that I want to do with my free time (and there are several), and there's no way someone would pay me, especially a significant sum, to do any of those things.

I'm paid quite a bit to do what I do for my occupation, and one of those reasons has to be because no one in their right mind would do it for free. I promise you, if "they" could get someone competent to do what you do for free, then "they" sure as heck wouldn't pay someone else to do the same thing. Basically, I mostly don't believe the "i love my job" crowd; no offense, or in those cases where it really is true, I'd say it's a very rare occurrence.
mak1277
Posts: 1638
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by mak1277 »

azanon wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:24 am
HomerJ wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:09 am
Cruise wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2017 3:11 amTake the example of two siblings, one works their tail off for 35 years, picks a career which earns a pension and also allows accumulation of a lot of wealth. The other sibling is a party animal who puts a lower priority on career and therefore, has little in the bank to show for it. Should we feel sorry for Party Charlie when he (or she) has a hard time making ends meet at age 65? Seems like it is all very predictable and therefore avoidable.
Except of course, that's not at all what he said. He said almost the exact opposite.

He basically couldn't understand the person who would pick a career just for money, and work their tail off for 35 years just for money. Even though at least 90% of the working adult human population on earth does exactly that. To feed themselves and their kids.

He said, one should only work a job that makes you happy.

Now he ALSO said, one should work a job that makes you happy AND makes you rich, like he did. It's great advice, if you can get it.
I'm with HomerJ on this one. I think of all the things that I want to do with my free time (and there are several), and there's no way someone would pay me, especially a significant sum, to do any of those things.

I'm paid quite a bit to do what I do for my occupation, and one of those reasons has to be because no one in their right mind would do it for free. I promise you, if "they" could get someone competent to do what you do for free, then "they" sure as heck wouldn't pay someone else to do the same thing. Basically, I mostly don't believe the "i love my job" crowd; no offense, or in those cases where it really is true, I'd say it's a very rare occurrence.
People are just wired differently I think. Even if I *was* able to be paid for doing things I want to do in my free time, I have no doubts at all that eventually I would want to retire from those things. I love to fish, but if I **had** to go fishing every day in order to pay the bills, I would soon tire of it. I can't imagine anything that I enjoy enough to put up with the mere obligation of going to work such that I would never want to quit.
User avatar
HomerJ
Posts: 15349
Joined: Fri Jun 06, 2008 12:50 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by HomerJ »

mak1277 wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:54 amI can't imagine anything that I enjoy enough to put up with the mere obligation of going to work such that I would never want to quit.
That's a good point.

I mean, I like my job... But there are times when it's raining outside, or snowing outside, and that warm bed is just so comfortable, that having to get up to go to work just makes you sad.

And then there are days when the weather is perfect, and you just want to go for a walk, or take the boat out, or sit on your deck with friends and a cold beer, and instead you have a 4:30 meeting (that runs late!) that you have to sit through.

If, at those times, you have enough money to retire... you're going to start thinking about it.
ychuck46
Posts: 132
Joined: Fri Jan 04, 2008 1:54 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by ychuck46 »

#4 and #8 - I guess it had something to do with being employed.
User avatar
flamesabers
Posts: 1822
Joined: Fri Mar 03, 2017 12:05 pm
Location: Rochester, MN

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by flamesabers »

theplayer11 wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 7:38 pm should add health to that list
I agree. This was a major reason why my mom decided to retire at age 64 after working overnights for 15 years.
Watty wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 9:48 pm10) Went to too many funerals of people that were about my age.
After my father passed away unexpectedly, one of my uncles said this was a factor for why he decided to retire sooner then later.
Ron Scott
Posts: 1090
Joined: Tue Apr 05, 2016 5:38 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Ron Scott »

When I concluded that time with my wife and owning my own schedule were more valuable than my ability to earn.
Retirement is a game best played by those prepared for more volatility in the future than has been seen in the past. The solution is not to predict investment losses but to prepare for them.
azanon
Posts: 2967
Joined: Mon Nov 07, 2011 10:34 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by azanon »

HomerJ wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2017 10:05 am
mak1277 wrote: Mon Oct 30, 2017 9:54 amI can't imagine anything that I enjoy enough to put up with the mere obligation of going to work such that I would never want to quit.
That's a good point.

I mean, I like my job... But there are times when it's raining outside, or snowing outside, and that warm bed is just so comfortable, that having to get up to go to work just makes you sad.

And then there are days when the weather is perfect, and you just want to go for a walk, or take the boat out, or sit on your deck with friends and a cold beer, and instead you have a 4:30 meeting (that runs late!) that you have to sit through.

If, at those times, you have enough money to retire... you're going to start thinking about it.
I guess people are meaning different things by "like"; or liking your job, or even loving/not loving your job. I certainly don't hate my job, but if I could afford to do it for free, there's no way that I would. For me, there's no getting around the fact that if I wasn't paid, and if I didn't need the money, there's no way I would do it.

And if your job would win out over all possible "hobbies", then you either have one outstanding job, or some crappy hobby choices; my opinion of course.

My dad who's retired, says he still runs out of time, and too many things to do, all just for fun. I have no doubt I'll have that same problem someday.
invst65
Posts: 644
Joined: Thu Nov 27, 2014 11:04 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by invst65 »

#6 (forced)but hit #1 (hit number) before severance pay ran out. So no regrets
jimbok_mb
Posts: 12
Joined: Fri Jun 17, 2016 11:16 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by jimbok_mb »

Not in your list, but recurrent cancer. I figured the job stress would not help my situation. Retirement date was just 2 years ahead of what I planned, so still good in terms of ability to financially handle retirement. That was 4 years ago and absolutely no regrets.
bloom2708
Posts: 8267
Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2014 2:08 pm
Location: Fargo, ND

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by bloom2708 »

sambb wrote: Sat Oct 28, 2017 8:54 pm amazing how many people dont like their job, i like mine. was in a situation i didnt like - changed it
good poll to see why people retire though
I wish it was easy as I make $100k+ in a job I find stressful and do not like. So I will change. Next I will go make $90k in a job that I love and is not stressful.

For me it is $100k (just an example) or $30k to find a super enjoyable/low stress job. I haven't found a low stress, fun, enjoyable job that pays well in the tech industry. I may be the exception.
"We are here to provoke thoughtfulness, not agree with you." Unknown Boglehead
User avatar
Escape Velocity
Posts: 109
Joined: Sun Jul 05, 2015 9:05 am

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Escape Velocity »

I may have missed my primary reason as I scanned the replies to date, but ...

I actually liked my job, as it was quite technically and mentally challenging, and served what seemed to me to be a worthwhile purpose.

But we only go around once in this game of life, and I wanted to feel the *freedom* of not having to work -- of not being needed for that specialty.

My work focused heavily on my analytic side, and I wanted to give my creative side some opportunity to see if it wants to blossom.

Still waiting for my creative muse to fully appear, as there was a backlog of honey-do requirements immediately post retirement. But I'm beginning to see her reflection, as things slow down, and more time is spent with nature ;-)

So ultimately, retirement for me was simply to allow space and time for new, creative endeavors.

EV
Tomhost
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Oct 23, 2017 10:09 pm

Re: What was the main reason you retired?

Post by Tomhost »

Yes, Yes and Yes to the above. I had a great job, 6 figures, lots of freedom, great bene's, lots of outdoor and traveling but the company still owned me even when I was not at work. When we went on vacation I would always be thinking about that Monday morning when I had to go back. I had to hit 30 years to get benefits. lived well below our means-kept cars for 15 years, never used credit, paid cash for our house. My new occupation will be building our dream house.
Post Reply