Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

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Palatineman
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Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Palatineman »

Background:

1. Been with Mega Corp for 8 years as an IT Program/Project Manager

2. Love my job and Manager I work with and have full flexibility on my schedule (WFH anytime I want). But visit the office whenever I feel like it (especially with one-on-one's with my Manager every week).

3. Been asking for a promotion for past 3 years, but the Director above my manager kept changing until recently. Current Director has been in the role for past 1 1/2 years.

4. My manager has been actively trying to promote me since then with every Director, but there has always been some excuse from every one of them, due to their high turnover rate.. "I haven't worked with him long enough to be able to promote him"

5. Latest excuse from current Director is the same back in March " I don't feel comfortable asking for his promotion"

6. Last week spoke with my Manager and he indicated the Director is telling him all promotions are frozen within the IT Organization I work for.

7. My manager and I came up with a plan to write a letter to Director formally asking for the promotion anyways, since his conversation with the Director has seemed to have fallen on deaf ears.

8 The draft letter is below and is being reviewed by my Manager to provide his feedback. After this I plan to send the letter to the Director and cc my Manager.

9. My relationship with the Director from the few times I interact with him has always been positive and I keep him fully informed about the progress and issues of all Programs/Projects.

10. I have received an exceeded expectations review for the past 2 years and the standard corporate raise (3 percent) with a healthy bonus.

Any feedback would be appreciated from all!

"Dear Director,
It will be 8 years in Dec, 2017 since I have joined Fortune 10 Mega Corp and the IT PMO Organization. Throughout the years I have had the opportunity to lead several highly-visible and large Programs/Projects to successful conclusions.

Below is a list of the notable Programs that I have led over the years:
2009-2012 – Major Compliance Program
2011-2014 –Platform Consolidation Program
2014-2015 – Capacity Improvement Program
2016 – Current – Network Program
Major Platform Upgrade

During my tenure here, I have been committed to working above and beyond the responsibilities of my position to ensure that all IT Programs/Projects are met within all PMO standards and guidelines, which has earned me an exceeded expectations rating for the past 2 years.

In addition to commitment, applying strategic planning to create a viable roadmap to meet the business needs, taking scope/schedule/cost into perspective is one of the main strengths I possess.

The most recent example of this is the roadmap for the Discovery efforts created for the Major Platform Upgrade Program to help drive the June 2018 date the Business is requesting to generate ROI for 2018.
With that being said, I want to take this opportunity to request a promotion to Senior Advisor, Project Management and its accompanying raise.

I believe I have proven myself to have already been operating in this role over the years and consider now an appropriate time to officially promote me to this position. I know that you will understand that if you allow me this opportunity, I can continue to provide even greater service to this company.

I ask you to seriously consider my request. I suggest that we sit down together and discuss the matter further. That way we could examine how granting this request would not only benefit me personally, but the company's success and financial growth as well.

Sincerely,
Palatineman
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Sandtrap »

Outstanding!
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mortfree
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by mortfree »

Dear Paletineman

Thank you for your hard work. We appreciate you chasing this carrot but have no intentions of promoting you since you will work above and beyond regardless of how much we pay you.

Management.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by denovo »

mortfree wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2017 11:07 pm Dear Paletineman

Thank you for your hard work. We appreciate you chasing this carrot but have no intentions of promoting you since you will work above and beyond regardless of how much we pay you.

Management.

There's a grain of truth in this. If you feel like you are qualified for a better role, and the internal politics of this company are holding you back, you need to start looking around. Given what the director has stated, your letter won't matter.

They'll only maybe promote you if they are afraid of losing you and you have a competing offer.
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fmhealth
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by fmhealth »

Real bright red caution flag embedded in point #5. Comfort level is almost impossible to quantify via achievements & contributions. I would respectfully ask your supervisor to set-up a meeting for you with the decision maker.

When, a long,long time ago I found myself in this position I had a boss that was upfront & frank. He informed me that while I was the most qualified applicant for the VP position, it wouldn't be coming my way. Why, other VPs were "uncomfortable" with my style. Six months later I had a Senior VP position at another firm.

When the tables were turned & I had to promote. It was a nonstarter when I just couldn't generate a comfort level with with an applicant.What I found out was culture & comfort trump all else. Hope this helps a bit.

Be Well,
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baconavocado
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by baconavocado »

@fmhealth, "culture & comfort level" sounds a lot like "someone like me". Who shares your culture and makes you feel comfortable more than someone exactly like yourself? Same background, same religion, same gender, same skin color, . . . You've just described exactly what's wrong with American companies and organizations. In my mind, the most qualified person should always be promoted regardless of skin color, gender, "culture", religion, sexual orientation, or anything else. I've worked for plenty of bosses who didn't know what the heck they were doing but obviously fit the management culture and made their own boss comfortable. Toward the end of my career I decided I would never work for someone like that again.
wilked
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by wilked »

Couple things here.

Don’t send a letter - it’s a very weak move. Ask yourself why you feel like a letter is the right means of communication. Is it because you can’t get direct access to the person? If that is the case, work on that.

Wfh is nice but also has its limitations. Sounds like your ‘presence’ is not well known. Going into the office more often may help you to network, and networking is a key part of getting a promotion. Anytime I want to give one of my reports a promotion I do an active promotion campaign for them the 6-12 months leading up, being sure they get plenty of visibility to other senior leaders.

It also sound like your current director is somewhat powerless or not being fully truthful. Either one is not great

If there is truly a freeze than that is different. Is anyone getting promotions?

Who covers for your director when he is on vacation? If it’s you, why don’t you know his boss better? If it’s not you and you’ve been in the position 8 years and been very successful, why is it not you?

If you feel stuck my advice is not a letter but to go job hunting. Get an offer and find your market value. You can always shop it to your director (and his boss) and see how much they really value you. And you might find you like the new company better anyway.

Good luck
Bacchus01
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Bacchus01 »

No, just don’t. I have never seen something like that be successful.

The right way to do it is to schedule time with the person and instead of saying “I need to be promoted” instead sat “what do I need to demonstrate to get to the next level?”

They might promote you on your letter just to hang on, but now you’ll be seen as the whiny needy kid and will never get another one.
aristotelian
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by aristotelian »

wilked wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:03 am Couple things here.

Don’t send a letter - it’s a very weak move. Ask yourself why you feel like a letter is the right means of communication. Is it because you can’t get direct access to the person? If that is the case, work on that.

Wfh is nice but also has its limitations. Sounds like your ‘presence’ is not well known. Going into the office more often may help you to network, and networking is a key part of getting a promotion. Anytime I want to give one of my reports a promotion I do an active promotion campaign for them the 6-12 months leading up, being sure they get plenty of visibility to other senior leaders.

It also sound like your current director is somewhat powerless or not being fully truthful. Either one is not great

If there is truly a freeze than that is different. Is anyone getting promotions?

Who covers for your director when he is on vacation? If it’s you, why don’t you know his boss better? If it’s not you and you’ve been in the position 8 years and been very successful, why is it not you?

If you feel stuck my advice is not a letter but to go job hunting. Get an offer and find your market value. You can always shop it to your director (and his boss) and see how much they really value you. And you might find you like the new company better anyway.

Good luck
+1. Letter would be much more effective if you can say "PS, I do not want to leave but I have an offer from another company and you have 48 hours to match it."
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by mass_biker »

I would not send that letter. That letter lays out a good rationale as to why [i]you[/i]believe you are qualified for a promotion, but a more concise and direct case has to be made to the key decision maker.

1) communicate your ambition - in the case of my current work organization, a key contributor came to me and made it clear that being promoted was important to him for personal and professional growth. Make the implicit, explicit.
2) get buy in from both parties - using the case above, we used the discussion about a desired promotion as a chance to set up expectations on both ends on what criteria were important to secure a promotion - demonstration of skills/responsibilities above the level at which the individual was hired, impact across the organization and not just our specific group, understanding of the specific role and how it impacts the company's P&L.
3) establish timelines and opportunities - and again, in the case above, we used the one:one discussion to lay out a timeline over which we could line the individual up for consideration for a promotion. Our promotion cycle is typically annual - so getting understanding from my direct report that if we worked on x,y,z over the course of the year, we would set him up in the best possible place to be considered the next time senior management went through their talent review.

This approach is somewhat specific to our organization, but what is universal is the fact that you need to self-advocate clearly, and in person. Don't rely on the written word to lay out your case.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by an_asker »

aristotelian wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:43 am
wilked wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:03 am Couple things here.

Don’t send a letter - it’s a very weak move. Ask yourself why you feel like a letter is the right means of communication. Is it because you can’t get direct access to the person? If that is the case, work on that.

Wfh is nice but also has its limitations. Sounds like your ‘presence’ is not well known. Going into the office more often may help you to network, and networking is a key part of getting a promotion. Anytime I want to give one of my reports a promotion I do an active promotion campaign for them the 6-12 months leading up, being sure they get plenty of visibility to other senior leaders.

It also sound like your current director is somewhat powerless or not being fully truthful. Either one is not great

If there is truly a freeze than that is different. Is anyone getting promotions?

Who covers for your director when he is on vacation? If it’s you, why don’t you know his boss better? If it’s not you and you’ve been in the position 8 years and been very successful, why is it not you?

If you feel stuck my advice is not a letter but to go job hunting. Get an offer and find your market value. You can always shop it to your director (and his boss) and see how much they really value you. And you might find you like the new company better anyway.

Good luck
+1. Letter would be much more effective if you can say "PS, I do not want to leave but I have an offer from another company and you have 48 hours to match it."
If I were in OP's position, I would turn in my notice - right after they matched the competing offer or after 48 hours, whichever comes first! In other words, given a choice, I wouldn't want to stick around where I (or my work) is not adequately appreciated (in monetary terms of course!).
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Jack FFR1846 »

What's going on in the company with respect to promotions, reviews and raises? The last company had none of those for 10 years, finally had company wide reviews and average raises of 1%. Several employees had their titles changed (downgraded) so that the company would have the excuse that they were at the top of their range for the job title.

Find another job where you can move up. It sounds like this company had decided that they don't care about employees.
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PlayingLife
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by PlayingLife »

I think in person is always best, but you would have to stay strong with the points you mention in your letter, and not "go soft" during the discussion. If you are comfortable with an in person discussion, I recommend this. This also gives the opportunity to directly discuss pay specifics, and immediately shut down any arguments brought on by management.

If you do not feel comfortable with an in-person discussion, your letter is well written and submitting would be a fine second option.

I am 34 and am starting to get tougher towards big businesses, but I also have been a bit too soft historically. These companies will not care about you, and they will try their best to fill their needed roles at the lowest price possible. I agree with others that you should start searching around. It's likely a good time to get a fresh perspective, which brings great learning and growth opportunities for yourself.

If you are willing to seek a new position, then you are in a "win win" situation. You talk to management and they give you want you want, you win.
You look for a new job and you will likely get the raise you are seeking, you win. Just don't ever accept a counter offer. Good luck.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Dottie57 »

Bacchus01 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:28 am No, just don’t. I have never seen something like that be successful.

The right way to do it is to schedule time with the person and instead of saying “I need to be promoted” instead sat “what do I need to demonstrate to get to the next level?”

They might promote you on your letter just to hang on, but now you’ll be seen as the whiny needy kid and will never get another one.
+1

No letter. Direct contact. Engage the decision maker. Achievements are important. Make the want to promote you because it will make them look good.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by msk »

Worked at a very high level in a Fortune 10 and my expectation is that the letter would do zilch. Reality is that in any organization there is always a tremendous suction upwards. Your supervisor not having been promoted recently indicates to me that he himself is not deemed suited for management levels. Your continuing to work off-site indicates to me that while you are probably considered an excellent "worker", you are not under any consideration for a management role. If you continue to stay in that company you can reasonably look forward to getting raises and bonuses commensurate with your current, excellent "worker" role. Until there is a major downsizing exercise and you are deemed too old and too expensive to retain. Nasty to be forced into retirement when you are not ready for it.

My advice: look for a job elsewhere. You will probably get a raise, but if you continue to work from home in your new job my expectations for you will remain as above. Management levels require different competencies and personality. It's always a major headache for any organization that they all require their managements to have skills competency cred with their subordinates, but most subordinates lack the management competencies. Hence that eternal suction upwards. Good luck with your job search but unfortunately no more working from home :shock: There is a very good reason why up and coming bright youngsters are called to make presentations to senior management. There is always a dearth of people with both skills cred and management competencies.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by aristotelian »

Bacchus01 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:28 am No, just don’t. I have never seen something like that be successful.

The right way to do it is to schedule time with the person and instead of saying “I need to be promoted” instead sat “what do I need to demonstrate to get to the next level?”
And if they can't answer that question, that tells you that you will be stuck where you are and they have no intention of promoting you, ever.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Bacchus01 »

Jack FFR1846 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 6:40 am What's going on in the company with respect to promotions, reviews and raises? The last company had none of those for 10 years, finally had company wide reviews and average raises of 1%. Several employees had their titles changed (downgraded) so that the company would have the excuse that they were at the top of their range for the job title.

Find another job where you can move up. It sounds like this company had decided that they don't care about employees.
Or maybe the employee is not as good as he thinks he is

Or maybe the employee has articulated a bunch of stuff he thinks are important that aren’t

Ask how, not demand
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Bacchus01 »

aristotelian wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:20 am
Bacchus01 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:28 am No, just don’t. I have never seen something like that be successful.

The right way to do it is to schedule time with the person and instead of saying “I need to be promoted” instead sat “what do I need to demonstrate to get to the next level?”
And if they can't answer that question, that tells you that you will be stuck where you are and they have no intention of promoting you, ever.
Then you have a mutual understanding of the future at that point
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by 8foot7 »

The letter is a terrible idea, but then again it may not even matter whether you send it or not. Sometimes you can see your future in organizations and it sounds like you can see yours; you just don't like what it says. From what I can tell, you've been banging on about a promotion for some time now and the answer has been repeatedly no. You have pretty much used up your credibility at this point; they know they can tell you no and you won't do anything about it. If vertical motion is important to you, you need to go to a different employer.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by TheHouse7 »

8foot7 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:23 am The letter is a terrible idea, but then again it may not even matter whether you send it or not. Sometimes you can see your future in organizations and it sounds like you can see yours; you just don't like what it says. From what I can tell, you've been banging on about a promotion for some time now and the answer has been repeatedly no. You have pretty much used up your credibility at this point; they know they can tell you no and you won't do anything about it. If vertical motion is important to you, you need to go to a different employer.
+1 (my current company culture is threaten to quit if you want a promotion and you will find out what your really worth)
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Steve723
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Steve723 »

8foot7 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:23 am The letter is a terrible idea, but then again it may not even matter whether you send it or not. Sometimes you can see your future in organizations and it sounds like you can see yours; you just don't like what it says. From what I can tell, you've been banging on about a promotion for some time now and the answer has been repeatedly no. You have pretty much used up your credibility at this point; they know they can tell you no and you won't do anything about it. If vertical motion is important to you, you need to go to a different employer.
Well, that's a little caustic, and may in the end be true. But I don't see anything wrong with sending a respectful letter like this. If they still say no, then the OP needs to make a decision. Sometimes folks accept the other benefits of a great boss, great culture, etc. and stay in place and others decide to go for more $ and hopefully get the same intangibles. That will be his next decision point if the promotion request gets denied.

I say go for it!
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8foot7
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by 8foot7 »

Steve723 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:18 am
8foot7 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:23 am The letter is a terrible idea, but then again it may not even matter whether you send it or not. Sometimes you can see your future in organizations and it sounds like you can see yours; you just don't like what it says. From what I can tell, you've been banging on about a promotion for some time now and the answer has been repeatedly no. You have pretty much used up your credibility at this point; they know they can tell you no and you won't do anything about it. If vertical motion is important to you, you need to go to a different employer.
Well, that's a little caustic, and may in the end be true. But I don't see anything wrong with sending a respectful letter like this. If they still say no, then the OP needs to make a decision. Sometimes folks accept the other benefits of a great boss, great culture, etc. and stay in place and others decide to go for more $ and hopefully get the same intangibles. That will be his next decision point if the promotion request gets denied.

I say go for it!
OP has been in same position 8 years, clamoring for a promotion for 3 of them, and has been denied twice in the last six months. One must read the room.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Broken Man 1999 »

In my career at Megacorp I leaned many things:

1. If management wants to give you a raise, but raises are "frozen", management will give you a raise. I bumped up against the top pay for my level once. So, I was promoted to a higher level doing the exact same job. Opened up the salary band again for me.

2. If management wants to give you a promotion, but promotions are "frozen", management will give you a promotion. But staffing a newly created position at a higher level works as well.

3. If rules state you must be gone from the company for a year until you can become a contractor, but management wants you, you will be rehired, sometimes the next day after you leave. It totally depends on your value in the eyes of management.

4. If hiring is "frozen", but management wants someone, they will be hired.

There are many excuses that are mouthed by management who typically blame HR or something else, but there is usually a way IF management wants something badly enough.

Best of luck. Personally, I wouldn't do the letter. I would be searching for another job. I don't think they will offer you a promotion. Sometimes it is something you just can't figure out, but it happens.

Broken Man 1999
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Lynette »

Bacchus01 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:22 am
aristotelian wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:20 am
Bacchus01 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:28 am No, just don’t. I have never seen something like that be successful.

The right way to do it is to schedule time with the person and instead of saying “I need to be promoted” instead sat “what do I need to demonstrate to get to the next level?”
And if they can't answer that question, that tells you that you will be stuck where you are and they have no intention of promoting you, ever.
Then you have a mutual understanding of the future at that point
+1

Many years ago a manager in a Megacorp told us that one had to work as hard at getting a promotion as actually doing your work. If you want to stay with your organization, are there opportunities for skip-level meetings? Do you have opportunities in your work to interact with senior management. We had at least quarterly company meetings for reviews of company performance/direction. We had the opportunity to ask questions. At break and afterwards people malled around and chatted. Ask questions in the meeting and go and introduce yourself to senior management and engage in conversation so that they will remember you. I would not use these opportunities to ask for promotion but to get to know key players.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by SmileyFace »

Don't do it.
A conversation is far better than a letter like this.
If I got a letter like this the first thing I would think is "This person lacks the interpersonal skills to be a 'Senior Advisor, Project Management' ".
If they tell you the additional steps you need to take to become promoted - you can follow up with a note after the conversation re-iterating your understanding of what you were told and how you will take action.
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by TravelGeek »

Palatineman wrote: Wed Oct 25, 2017 10:52 pm
6. Last week spoke with my Manager and he indicated the Director is telling him all promotions are frozen within the IT Organization I work for.
Do you see other people in your organization getting promoted despite the “freeze”? Have you seen other people at similar job levels as yourself get promoted over the course of the last eight years?
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by 2015 »

Broken Man 1999 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:30 am In my career at Megacorp I leaned many things:

1. If management wants to give you a raise, but raises are "frozen", management will give you a raise. I bumped up against the top pay for my level once. So, I was promoted to a higher level doing the exact same job. Opened up the salary band again for me.

2. If management wants to give you a promotion, but promotions are "frozen", management will give you a promotion. But staffing a newly created position at a higher level works as well.

3. If rules state you must be gone from the company for a year until you can become a contractor, but management wants you, you will be rehired, sometimes the next day after you leave. It totally depends on your value in the eyes of management.

4. If hiring is "frozen", but management wants someone, they will be hired.

There are many excuses that are mouthed by management who typically blame HR or something else, but there is usually a way IF management wants something badly enough.

Best of luck. Personally, I wouldn't do the letter. I would be searching for another job. I don't think they will offer you a promotion. Sometimes it is something you just can't figure out, but it happens.

Broken Man 1999
Yup. Best advice you could get. So-called leadership in organizations can do anything they want when they want however they want to do it. And they do. All the time.

If you haven't figured out in the end it's all about politics in organizations, you probably aren't fit for a promotion in that organization anyway (OTOH, it appears you know how to add value, why not offer that value to another organization who will reward you with greater opportunity and compensation?). Before asking for a promotion, it's extremely important to evaluate the extent of your political capital. Higher up you go in an organization less it becomes about technical skills, abilities, competencies, accomplishments, "value", performance reviews, and the more it's about who "likes you" and "knows you" (and your boss and your boss's boss, boss's boss's boss's boss, etc. as well). It's all about your ability to vie against others in the organization for scarce organizational resources (time, money, prestige, power, support, opportunity for you and your staff, etc.) It's also about your ability to keep the troops below you effectively motivated, cohesive, and productive. Only at the individual contributor level is there any power in technical skills, contributions, and accomplishment, and even that's only when your skill set is in short supply.
Bacchus01
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Bacchus01 »

2015 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 9:39 am
Broken Man 1999 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:30 am In my career at Megacorp I leaned many things:

1. If management wants to give you a raise, but raises are "frozen", management will give you a raise. I bumped up against the top pay for my level once. So, I was promoted to a higher level doing the exact same job. Opened up the salary band again for me.

2. If management wants to give you a promotion, but promotions are "frozen", management will give you a promotion. But staffing a newly created position at a higher level works as well.

3. If rules state you must be gone from the company for a year until you can become a contractor, but management wants you, you will be rehired, sometimes the next day after you leave. It totally depends on your value in the eyes of management.

4. If hiring is "frozen", but management wants someone, they will be hired.

There are many excuses that are mouthed by management who typically blame HR or something else, but there is usually a way IF management wants something badly enough.

Best of luck. Personally, I wouldn't do the letter. I would be searching for another job. I don't think they will offer you a promotion. Sometimes it is something you just can't figure out, but it happens.

Broken Man 1999
Yup. Best advice you could get. So-called leadership in organizations can do anything they want when they want however they want to do it. And they do. All the time.

If you haven't figured out in the end it's all about politics in organizations, you probably aren't fit for a promotion in that organization anyway (OTOH, it appears you know how to add value, why not offer that value to another organization who will reward you with greater opportunity and compensation?). Before asking for a promotion, it's extremely important to evaluate the extent of your political capital. Higher up you go in an organization less it becomes about technical skills, abilities, competencies, accomplishments, "value", performance reviews, and the more it's about who "likes you" and "knows you" (and your boss and your boss's boss, boss's boss's boss's boss, etc. as well). It's all about your ability to vie against others in the organization for scarce organizational resources (time, money, prestige, power, support, opportunity for you and your staff, etc.) It's also about your ability to keep the troops below you effectively motivated, cohesive, and productive. Only at the individual contributor level is there any power in technical skills, contributions, and accomplishment, and even that's only when your skill set is in short supply.
Bitter much?

This is true is some organizations but is a far reaching generalization that is not true for most
stoptothink
Posts: 8998
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by stoptothink »

8foot7 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 7:23 am The letter is a terrible idea, but then again it may not even matter whether you send it or not. Sometimes you can see your future in organizations and it sounds like you can see yours; you just don't like what it says. From what I can tell, you've been banging on about a promotion for some time now and the answer has been repeatedly no. You have pretty much used up your credibility at this point; they know they can tell you no and you won't do anything about it. If vertical motion is important to you, you need to go to a different employer.
This. I did something similar at a prior position and actually received tons of promises from the VP, on multiple occasions...zero that came to fruition, in two years. I was a very high achiever, never received less than an exceeds on a review in 4yrs and was asked to handle several times the responsibilities of my colleagues (and much of my director's responsibilities), all who were less experienced, less qualified, and far less productive (but were hired as friends of the director). All I was initially asking for was that I received equal compensation to my colleagues and got nothing but empty promises. So, I walked into the VP's office one day and told her I was cleaning out my desk, and I did. I didn't even have another offer. Within a week, the VP contacted me, saying she would not only guarantee my prior requests, but offered me the director's position. She had just fired the director and most of her unqualified friends. I politely told her she had had 2yrs to make this happen and I had accepted another opportunity.

My wife also just recently went through a similar experience (high achiever whose director kept calling her bluff about leaving for better offers, of which she had over a dozen within the past year, several internally), and she made an internal transfer because the director in another department was willing to put in writing what he was telling her.

The only thing that works in these instances is to have another offer, in writing, and approach them face-to-face about it. And then, be prepared to leave, because chances are slim that playing this game doesn't work with a current employer or that it won't sour the work environment moving forward.
2015
Posts: 2906
Joined: Mon Feb 10, 2014 2:32 pm

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by 2015 »

Bacchus01 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 9:53 am
2015 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 9:39 am
Broken Man 1999 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:30 am In my career at Megacorp I leaned many things:

1. If management wants to give you a raise, but raises are "frozen", management will give you a raise. I bumped up against the top pay for my level once. So, I was promoted to a higher level doing the exact same job. Opened up the salary band again for me.

2. If management wants to give you a promotion, but promotions are "frozen", management will give you a promotion. But staffing a newly created position at a higher level works as well.

3. If rules state you must be gone from the company for a year until you can become a contractor, but management wants you, you will be rehired, sometimes the next day after you leave. It totally depends on your value in the eyes of management.

4. If hiring is "frozen", but management wants someone, they will be hired.

There are many excuses that are mouthed by management who typically blame HR or something else, but there is usually a way IF management wants something badly enough.

Best of luck. Personally, I wouldn't do the letter. I would be searching for another job. I don't think they will offer you a promotion. Sometimes it is something you just can't figure out, but it happens.

Broken Man 1999
Yup. Best advice you could get. So-called leadership in organizations can do anything they want when they want however they want to do it. And they do. All the time.

If you haven't figured out in the end it's all about politics in organizations, you probably aren't fit for a promotion in that organization anyway (OTOH, it appears you know how to add value, why not offer that value to another organization who will reward you with greater opportunity and compensation?). Before asking for a promotion, it's extremely important to evaluate the extent of your political capital. Higher up you go in an organization less it becomes about technical skills, abilities, competencies, accomplishments, "value", performance reviews, and the more it's about who "likes you" and "knows you" (and your boss and your boss's boss, boss's boss's boss's boss, etc. as well). It's all about your ability to vie against others in the organization for scarce organizational resources (time, money, prestige, power, support, opportunity for you and your staff, etc.) It's also about your ability to keep the troops below you effectively motivated, cohesive, and productive. Only at the individual contributor level is there any power in technical skills, contributions, and accomplishment, and even that's only when your skill set is in short supply.
Bitter much?

This is true is some organizations but is a far reaching generalization that is not true for most
Not bitter at all. It's just a fact of organizational life. The exceptions to this generalization, if there are any, are only temporary. No organization can survive without power struggles, as they themselves operate within a context of power struggles (with the ever changing external environment). You have to have reached high levels of organizational leadership before you can see this truth, and most importantly, see it for what it is. Only then can you take advantage of it, and only if you desire.
Topic Author
Palatineman
Posts: 139
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2016 10:40 pm

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Palatineman »

Thanks everyone for your insightful and varied responses!

A few things I need to clarify:

1. This promotion would be a "title" promotion with the accompanying salary bump, based on the Corporate grade of the position. I will have no direct reports now or after the promotion. I will be an official employee at the Company in Dec for 4 years, I was a contractor the prior 4 years.

2. There have been no "visible" promotions that I have seen in the Organization for the past few years. My peers have expressed their concern about this via employee engagement surveys and management attempted to create a grid with HR aligning specific skill sets and experience which we all filled out and submitted in March, but seems to have gone down some black hole.

3. My intent is to send the letter with a follow up meeting with the Director. Even though the Director has about 70 people under him, I have worked with him directly and have access to him any time it is needed. I am sure he has other things on his mind, besides my promotion request in March as he is leading 5 different Portfolios in the Organization. So the letter is to refresh his mind, put my accomplishments into perspective via documentation over the years, as I have been at the Organization longer than he has and he may not be aware of these past accomplishments.

4. I am currently leading a Program that is going to save the company $100 mil in three years, highly visible and the VP's in the IT Organizations know who I am, as I have led meetings to bring them up to speed on this Program. I have about 100 business and IT resources leading this effort and I am pretty sure they would not put me in charge of this, if there was even a hint of incompetence detected, nor would they allow an exceed expectations review for the past 2 years, if that was the case.

5. I get new multiple job leads on a daily basis as there is a significant demand for the skills sets and experience I have to offer. But the personal, intangible factors have kept me here:

-86 yo mother living with me, who I support and can provide care for, whenever needed

-20 min commute, flexibility -WFH whenever (I go into the office 3 days a week, so there is enough exposure to me in person). The company has multiple locations all over the country and the workforce is highly distributed in all different time zones, so relationships get established via conference calls for specific Projects you are working on with those individuals

- No travel - company is saving millions on this - you actually need good justification to travel to any location

- Excellent relationships with Management and my business counterparts

6. I get paid well for what I do with great benefits (health insurance, matching 5 percent 401K, vesting stock).

7. My plan is to wait for my immediate manager to provide me feedback, get a pulse, and we will both make an informed decision on the next steps.

Best wishes!
soupcxan
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by soupcxan »

Sorry but a letter is a waste of everyone's time.

The only way you will get a promotion is by changing employers.
wilked
Posts: 1896
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 1:50 pm

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by wilked »

Palatineman wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 10:58 am

6. I get paid well for what I do with great benefits (health insurance, matching 5 percent 401K, vesting stock).
So you’ve got a ton of freedom (wfh etc), promotion wouldn’t change your job duties, and money is not a motivating factor / you don’t feel underpaid.

What’s the issue exactly?
Nearly A Moose
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Nearly A Moose »

Bacchus01 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:28 am No, just don’t. I have never seen something like that be successful.

The right way to do it is to schedule time with the person and instead of saying “I need to be promoted” instead sat “what do I need to demonstrate to get to the next level?”

They might promote you on your letter just to hang on, but now you’ll be seen as the whiny needy kid and will never get another one.
This, plus what the poster above Bacchus said. You need to do this face to face, and yes, you really would benefit from your direct manager campaigning for you strategically. Suggest laying out a 6 month gameplan that leads up to the big ask. Step one is to have coffee with your director, explain your role and value to the company, and tell him you want to continue growing in how you help company. What can you do, and does he have any guidance? Get on his radar. Same with your direct supervisor, but it sounds like you need to bring the gameplan to him a bit. Then it sort of has to grow organically from there. And, yes, a competing job offer would help, provided you're willing to jump if you don't get the promotion. You can use your letter as your own talking points.
Pardon typos, I'm probably using my fat thumbs on a tiny phone.
Topic Author
Palatineman
Posts: 139
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2016 10:40 pm

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Palatineman »

"So you’ve got a ton of freedom (wfh etc), promotion wouldn’t change your job duties, and money is not a motivating factor / you don’t feel underpaid.

What’s the issue exactly?"

As another poster stated, being promoted is important to me for personal and professional growth. There should always be a fairness in life to reward someone for their accomplishments and potential to ensure one's efforts get compensated accordingly for the value that is being provided.

I believe I have and continue to provide more than enough value to the company to be able to ask for the promotion.

More money, along with a better job title and career progression is "always" a factor, which can in the future translate to better opportunities, at the company I work for or elsewhere.

Otherwise, why have various roles and compensation structures?
an_asker
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by an_asker »

Broken Man 1999 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:30 am In my career at Megacorp I leaned many things:

1. If management wants to give you a raise, but raises are "frozen", management will give you a raise. I bumped up against the top pay for my level once. So, I was promoted to a higher level doing the exact same job. Opened up the salary band again for me.

2. If management wants to give you a promotion, but promotions are "frozen", management will give you a promotion. But staffing a newly created position at a higher level works as well.

3. If rules state you must be gone from the company for a year until you can become a contractor, but management wants you, you will be rehired, sometimes the next day after you leave. It totally depends on your value in the eyes of management.

4. If hiring is "frozen", but management wants someone, they will be hired.

There are many excuses that are mouthed by management who typically blame HR or something else, but there is usually a way IF management wants something badly enough.

Best of luck. Personally, I wouldn't do the letter. I would be searching for another job. I don't think they will offer you a promotion. Sometimes it is something you just can't figure out, but it happens.

Broken Man 1999
+1! I've worked at three places, never been promoted anywhere, am not good at observation. But I've still observed all of the items listed above! The USA can legislate all they want, but if the boss(es) want (or don't want) something, they can make it happen (or not)!
User avatar
LiveSimple
Posts: 1896
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by LiveSimple »

Writing a letter, tells that you are not ready for the next level. This is a passive move. What of the director do not respond, what are your options.

Better schedule a meeting and have a discussion.

Even that do need to be informal, if you are not able to start a conversation informal, then you are not ready yet.

Better options are

1, Enjoy where you are. I have heard at corporate, you get a promotion, only when someone above you dies. ( opening up a position)

2. Send out your resumes and see what catches.
Last edited by LiveSimple on Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
mchriton
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by mchriton »

I agree on not sending the letter. I'm in a director level position and I get these types of letters periodically with employees asserting they should be promoted without fully appreciating what's holding them back.

It would be much better to say you have aspirations for promotions and willing to work hard to get it just you want to better understand what is required. Ask for a meeting with the decision makers that matter. The goal is to understand why you haven't been promoted, what you need to do/change, and ideally capture the key points in writing. if you're a remote employee you might be maxed out at your current employer - consider relocating to HQ if promotion truly matters to you.

For competing job offers it's not enough to have interest for other companies, you need an offer in hand, significant increase in salary and demonstrate desire to quit over the offer for it to have any impact.
stoptothink
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by stoptothink »

Palatineman wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:05 pm There should always be a fairness in life to reward someone for their accomplishments and potential to ensure one's efforts get compensated accordingly for the value that is being provided.
I think you have already seen that your superiors don't necessarily agree with this statement.
themesrob
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by themesrob »

Agree that an in-person meeting would be more beneficial. If you like, and think it would work with your director's style, you can use some the points made in your draft letter as the framework for a Powerpoint on your projects/successes. (Personally, I would print the slides out for the director here rather than use A/V, because it forces him/her to focus/follow a bit more, and it's not like you have a big audience to speak to.)
Topic Author
Palatineman
Posts: 139
Joined: Mon Jun 20, 2016 10:40 pm

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by Palatineman »

Nearly A Moose wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:03 pm
Bacchus01 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 5:28 am No, just don’t. I have never seen something like that be successful.

The right way to do it is to schedule time with the person and instead of saying “I need to be promoted” instead sat “what do I need to demonstrate to get to the next level?”

They might promote you on your letter just to hang on, but now you’ll be seen as the whiny needy kid and will never get another one.
This, plus what the poster above Bacchus said. You need to do this face to face, and yes, you really would benefit from your direct manager campaigning for you strategically. Suggest laying out a 6 month gameplan that leads up to the big ask. Step one is to have coffee with your director, explain your role and value to the company, and tell him you want to continue growing in how you help company. What can you do, and does he have any guidance? Get on his radar. Same with your direct supervisor, but it sounds like you need to bring the gameplan to him a bit. Then it sort of has to grow organically from there. And, yes, a competing job offer would help, provided you're willing to jump if you don't get the promotion. You can use your letter as your own talking points.
I agree with this approach! As I mentioned earlier my direct supervisor has been campaigning for me with the Director for the past 2 years, without my direct involvement with him. The intent of the letter is to get the information on his radar earlier, so he can digest the information and follow up with a Conference call between the 3 of us to discuss it.

Unfortunately, a face-to-face coffee meeting is not feasible, as he is on the east coast and I am in the mid-west and travel is restricted by company policy.

Obviously the main question will be asked as to "what steps need to be taken to give me a chance to get the documented promotion?" and respectfully ask for his guidance.

I disagree with the approach that I shouldn't state that I have demonstrated that I been operating at the promoted level for years at the company. This is fact that I need to make sure he understands - I believe he does and so does my direct manager - but needs a gentle reminder, as he has 70 reports under him that he has to look out for.

Worst case scenario is that he won't be able to give me a promotion due to several possible reasons he may not reveal - personal or professional- I get and possibly expect that. I will then have to figure out whether to stay or look for other opportunities.
maroon
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by maroon »

I have to think that if you are as valuable as you say you are, you would have gotten some traction earlier. Or perhaps your supervisor is ineffective at advocating for you. Why don't you check out some of the multiple job leads you say you're getting? Perhaps a new employer will also allow a flexible schedule, pay well, etc.

Recently I found a new opportunity, got a job offer, and informed my boss that I was leaving. My boss asked to counter, and within two days I was offered both a promotion and a raise. That's how you find out how much you're valued, though clearly it only works if you're actually willing to leave.

Someone earlier said that organizational leadership can do what they want, when they want. I tend to agree with this.
music_man
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by music_man »

Broken Man 1999 wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 8:30 am In my career at Megacorp I leaned many things:

1. If management wants to give you a raise, but raises are "frozen", management will give you a raise. I bumped up against the top pay for my level once. So, I was promoted to a higher level doing the exact same job. Opened up the salary band again for me.

2. If management wants to give you a promotion, but promotions are "frozen", management will give you a promotion. But staffing a newly created position at a higher level works as well.

3. If rules state you must be gone from the company for a year until you can become a contractor, but management wants you, you will be rehired, sometimes the next day after you leave. It totally depends on your value in the eyes of management.

4. If hiring is "frozen", but management wants someone, they will be hired.

There are many excuses that are mouthed by management who typically blame HR or something else, but there is usually a way IF management wants something badly enough.

Best of luck. Personally, I wouldn't do the letter. I would be searching for another job. I don't think they will offer you a promotion. Sometimes it is something you just can't figure out, but it happens.

Broken Man 1999
Completely agree with this. I think there's very seldom a case where a Senior enough manager can't "make" something happen if s/he really wants to make it happen. Of course, good managers' job is to "manage", including managing expectations when people ask for things like raises, promotions, etc. They can come up with whatever lines they need to to accomplish that.
mchriton
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Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:26 pm

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by mchriton »

Palatineman wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:27 pm Unfortunately, a face-to-face coffee meeting is not feasible, as he is on the east coast and I am in the mid-west and travel is restricted by company policy.
Face-to-face might not be possible but you can still have a live chat over the phone which is preferable.
Palatineman wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:27 pm I disagree with the approach that I shouldn't state that I have demonstrated that I been operating at the promoted level for years at the company. This is fact that I need to make sure he understands - I believe he does and so does my direct manager - but needs a gentle reminder, as he has 70 reports under him that he has to look out for.
Clearly your management disagrees because they haven't promoted you.

It's hard to say conclusively you're ready for promotion as you don't have full visibility in the process.

If you assert you should be promoted when you're viewed as not ready you come off as wrong/immature. If you're wrong about this, what else do you get wrong in your job?

I've tried to managed my brand such that I'm viewed as never or almost never wrong. If one of your few interactions with your director is something you're arguing incorrectly about I don't think he will have as good of impression as he could have. Aspiration/hard work == good quality. Wrong/poorly informed == not good.
abner kravitz
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Location: Beaufort County, SC

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by abner kravitz »

I vote no on the letter - your desire for promotion is already known, and a letter moves you a little bit closer to "PITA" in some eyes. What about asking your management if you are releasable to pursue other opportunities internally? This would let them know you are not happy while still loyal to the firm. If they won't release you, it gives you more leverage; if they do, that tells you something else.

I am a Fortune 10 megacorp veteran also, and I did a lot of hiring. I got giddy when I saw "exceeds expectations" in my stack of resumes.
TM90
Posts: 132
Joined: Mon Mar 06, 2017 2:13 am

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by TM90 »

The letter you made is not a good idea i think.

Why don't you send him a letter in which you state you would like a conference call or meeting with him to discuss his views on what is needed to be promoted. That way you can give him a heads up about your demand as you wanted but also show your mature enough to deal with it in person.

In the meeting you can clearly state your role in the company and projects you've worked on and your future goals for the company and yourself. Remember these people don't give a ... about you they only care about how you can help them or the company. So highlight what you want for the company and what you can do to achieve this.

Ask them what needs to be done, explain how you can do it or already do it and tell them you get many leads.

My 2 cents.
eg1
Posts: 30
Joined: Thu Jul 27, 2017 1:23 pm

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by eg1 »

What do you think will be best case scenario when you send this letter to your director? Do you think he will read it, realize that he has been misinformed about your accomplishments and give you a promo on the spot? I honestly think there is something else going on politically that is limiting your promotion. If the last couple of directors weren't OK with giving you a promotion, this new guy wont be either. You don't want to be seen as the guy that constantly whines about promotions. What I have found in Megacorps, some people get promoted, some don't and most of the time it has nothing to do with skills, intelligence or how hard they work. Proceed with caution.
tjf9
Posts: 15
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by tjf9 »

Another detail that's important: you've been an employee for 4 years and asking for a promotion for 3. If you thought you were deserving of a promotion, why didn't you ask for it in the hiring process? If you weren't deserving then, why would you be deserving after only one year in your new role?

I agree that looking for work elsewhere is probably a faster way to that promotion, but given that you would prefer to stay with your current employer, I think a promotion can still happen. I would also say the letter does not help your case. Your director has stated that he doesn't feel comfortable asking for your promotion. That means he doesn't feel you're strong enough to use his political capital to make it happen. What you have to figure out is what *will* make him comfortable to ask for your promotion. You need to have a direct conversation with him to come up with a set of goals that will make him comfortable advocating for you. Once you meet those goals, then that's the path to promotion.

Good luck!
TravelGeek
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Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by TravelGeek »

Palatineman wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:27 pm I disagree with the approach that I shouldn't state that I have demonstrated that I been operating at the promoted level for years at the company
And what if they agree and say that you already "get paid well for what (you) do with great benefits (health insurance, matching 5 percent 401K, vesting stock)" ? (so a promotion to a higher salary level isn't actually justified) :shock:

Not saying that you don't deserve a promotion. We don't know you or what you do or how your company handles promotions. If I was interested in a promotion, I would ask for concrete goals to meet. Perhaps, once they are clearly stated, you can argue that in fact you already meet those goals.
wilked
Posts: 1896
Joined: Thu Mar 24, 2011 1:50 pm

Re: Request for Promotion letter to Senior Management

Post by wilked »

Palatineman wrote: Thu Oct 26, 2017 12:05 pm "So you’ve got a ton of freedom (wfh etc), promotion wouldn’t change your job duties, and money is not a motivating factor / you don’t feel underpaid.

What’s the issue exactly?"

As another poster stated, being promoted is important to me for personal and professional growth. There should always be a fairness in life to reward someone for their accomplishments and potential to ensure one's efforts get compensated accordingly for the value that is being provided.

I believe I have and continue to provide more than enough value to the company to be able to ask for the promotion.

More money, along with a better job title and career progression is "always" a factor, which can in the future translate to better opportunities, at the company I work for or elsewhere.

Otherwise, why have various roles and compensation structures?
Ok then if money and promotion and recognition are important than you need to go shop for a new job. Get an offer in hand and then you are in a position to negotiate
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