Annual house maintenance costs

Non-investing personal finance issues including insurance, credit, real estate, taxes, employment and legal issues such as trusts and wills
Post Reply
benevo
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2017 7:21 am

Annual house maintenance costs

Post by benevo » Thu May 18, 2017 10:45 am

Good day, Bogleheads!

I read somewhere that it's smart to save 1-2% of the value of your house each year to put aside for maintenance costs - new lawn mower, fixing siding, driveway patching, etc. General maintenance costs. So, a house valued at $350k = $3,500-7,000/year.

Curious what people here (1) think and (2) actually do!

Thanks!

-be

jebmke
Posts: 6486
Joined: Thu Apr 05, 2007 2:44 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by jebmke » Thu May 18, 2017 10:52 am

I just have the maintenance done when needed and pay the bills.

Hard to generalize about how much to allow. A lot depends on the property, not the value.
When you discover that you are riding a dead horse, the best strategy is to dismount.

Admiral
Posts: 744
Joined: Mon Oct 27, 2014 12:35 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by Admiral » Thu May 18, 2017 10:55 am

jebmke wrote:I just have the maintenance done when needed and pay the bills.

Hard to generalize about how much to allow. A lot depends on the property, not the value.


+1. Putting aside money based on the market value has no correlation to repair costs. A new roof is a new roof regardless of the gyrations of the real estate market. We don't put aside money, we just pay the bills. We have an EF for large (like many thousands of dollars) repairs.

Beach
Posts: 45
Joined: Tue Jan 10, 2017 5:48 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by Beach » Thu May 18, 2017 11:09 am

We save 1% of the house value each year. Our house is new so if it were older, I would likely save closer to 2%.

I do cheat a bit and use it as a home improvement fund too. Since we anticipate no major repairs, I dip into it when we need a small projects completed around the house.

Rupert
Posts: 2396
Joined: Fri Aug 17, 2012 12:01 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by Rupert » Thu May 18, 2017 11:12 am

I think those rules of thumb are pretty useless. I consider one tier of my emergency fund to be for both emergencies (medical, job loss, etc.) and unexpected, expensive home & auto repairs. I pay for everything else out of monthly cash flow. Once you become a seasoned homeowner or if you're just a reasonably handy person, there are very few unexpected home repairs, really. You learn to anticipate when things are going to need repairs/replacement.

rgs92
Posts: 1314
Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2009 8:00 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by rgs92 » Thu May 18, 2017 11:17 am

It's very hard to predict house repair costs. If you have a money pit, the sky's the limit for costs, regardless of the house value. A good-shape 7-figure house could have minimal expenses. You have to take a good subjective look at your house, take some educated guesses and projections and go from there. There's no good back-of-envelope method. It's the same with old cars.

I guess this just repeats what has been said here. But the larger issue is that owning a house carries an element of risk, and it's funny how conservative investors who avoid the stock market feel fine and secure with owning a house, often an old one.

I have heard from many people who avoid stocks how a house is less risky because you can see/touch/feel it, but stocks are just "paper" or "printouts" and it's like gambling. These same people often buy lots of lottery tickets too.

btenny
Posts: 4028
Joined: Sun Oct 07, 2007 6:47 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by btenny » Thu May 18, 2017 11:24 am

I have a 35 year old house that is worth about $400K. It is in good shape and not too dated. When I bought it I spent 2 months fixing stuff inside and repainting. That cost $6K plus a lot of my labor. I did not need to fix anything or spend anything for the next 6 years. But I have been updating and fixing stuff every year for the last 8 years. I spend about $5K to $7K or so per year to do stuff. One year I painted the whole outside. That was $3K. One year I replaced one AC unit that was $4K, the next year we replaced the back windows with dual pane, the next year we did the front windows, then the kitchen counters, etc.. You could get by spending a lot less by doing maintenance only but then you would need to do major $$$ renovation every 10 years or so. And by doing updates a little at a time you also do not get the latest styling big fancy new kitchens the ladies love. I have granite and OK appliances but older painted cabinets. So there are house maintenance trade offs.

Good Luck.

hawkfan55
Posts: 177
Joined: Thu Apr 03, 2014 9:04 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by hawkfan55 » Thu May 18, 2017 11:34 am

The 1% concept is really just an estimate. Newer homes may not need much maintenance. Older more. The idea is just to realize that homes do require maintenance. Smaller expenses include fertilizer/lawn care, landscaping, leaky faucets, garage doors, etc. Larger projects that require use of Emergency Funds include replacement of appliances, roof, siding, hot water heater, heating/air conditioning, etc.

A good emergency fund will enable you to meet most expenses without worry.

Nate79
Posts: 1085
Joined: Thu Aug 11, 2016 6:24 pm
Location: Portland, OR

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by Nate79 » Thu May 18, 2017 11:42 am

I once made a big excel sheet of all the items in our house (appliances, roof, windows, etc etc etc), calculated a replacement cost and estimated life. I recall that the 1% per year cost, which of course doesn't actually occur every year but in lump sums, was actually pretty close to the value I calculated.

psteinx
Posts: 2563
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 2:24 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by psteinx » Thu May 18, 2017 11:52 am

hawkfan55 wrote:The 1% concept is really just an estimate. Newer homes may not need much maintenance. Older more.

Yes, it's a broad estimate.

That said, if you buy a $1M, 900 s.f. house in the Silicon Valley, you can probably maintain the status quo for far less than $10K/year.

And, if you buy a 2500 s.f. brick house in a declining Detroit neighborhood for $60K, if you want to maintain the status quo, it will likely cost far more than $600/year.

But in fact, folks who buy $1M 900 s.f. houses in S.V. probably DO spend a lot - not so much to maintain them, as to enhance them. Granite countertops, new hardwood floors, etc.

And folks who buy $60K decaying giants in Detroit probably don't really maintain the status quo. There's a reason neighborhoods in Detroit and elsewhere decline physically, as well as economically, over time. Maintenance is left undone or underdone.

User avatar
jharkin
Posts: 1239
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2016 7:14 am
Location: Boston suburbs

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by jharkin » Thu May 18, 2017 12:03 pm

I agree its very hard to generalize. Even the older house = more maintenance is not always strictly true. My house is 200 years old and I doubt that I have 10x, 5x or even 2x the maintenance cost of a 20 year old house. In fact when I bought my house the inspector told me it had a lot less problems than some houses 1/4 the age he inspects - which is just a reflection of the fact that prior owners maintained it more meticulously.

Give you some examples... My house is in the price range you threw out (300s). If I had to replace my roof tomorrow it would probably cost me 15k. Lets say its a "30 year" roof and realistically lasts 25 years. If I got lucky and bought my 200 year old house right after a prior owner replaced it, and the same day my neighbor buys a 20 year old "new" house with the original roof, who is going to be paying for a roof first?

hmmmm.......

psteinx
Posts: 2563
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 2:24 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by psteinx » Thu May 18, 2017 12:07 pm

jharkin wrote:Give you some examples... My house is in the price range you threw out (300s). If I had to replace my roof tomorrow it would probably cost me 15k. Lets say its a "30 year" roof and realistically lasts 25 years. If I got lucky and bought my 200 year old house right after a prior owner replaced it, and the same day my neighbor buys a 20 year old "new" house with the original roof, who is going to be paying for a roof first?

hmmmm.......

But the point is, you shouldn't generally view house maintenance as directly tied to how recently item X has been replaced. If you know item X, with replacement cost Y, will last Z years, then you should sort of mentally (or actually) budget maintenance on that item as Y/Z, per year.

i.e. $15K roof lasts 25 years, then in the very long term, roof maintenance is about $15000/25 = $600/year, even if the actual replacement was done only 3 years ago, and the next $15K (or more, with inflation) lump is about 22 years away...

This is not a perfect form of analysis, for a few reasons, including notably that houses don't last forever. But I think it's a broad-strokes accurate way to think about things...

onourway
Posts: 354
Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2016 3:39 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by onourway » Thu May 18, 2017 12:08 pm

Rule of thumb seems about spot-on to me after near 15 year ownership of an older house in good condition.

mak1277
Posts: 379
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2015 4:26 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by mak1277 » Thu May 18, 2017 12:17 pm

I think this is tough because different people will have different ideas about "necessary" maintenance costs. Is it necessary to replace appliances prior to them completely dying? Is it necessary to paint on any regular schedule? Neither of these examples are necessary in my opinion. We've lived in our house for almost 10 years now and I can say we've spent less than $10,000 on things that were truly necessary. Other money has been spent on vanity projects but nothing that I would ever consider necessary.

User avatar
Ketawa
Posts: 1839
Joined: Mon Aug 22, 2011 1:11 am
Location: Norfolk

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by Ketawa » Thu May 18, 2017 12:31 pm

I own a condo almost 110 years old and individual maintenance costs have been <$1000, or <0.4%, per year on average. Almost all the maintenance has been exclusively for my HVAC system. Condo fees (~1.4% of value per year) take care of the rest of the building maintenance, as well as insurance and some shared utilities. So in aggregate, 1.5-2.0% has been about right for me.

User avatar
jharkin
Posts: 1239
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2016 7:14 am
Location: Boston suburbs

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by jharkin » Thu May 18, 2017 12:36 pm

psteinx wrote:
jharkin wrote:Give you some examples... My house is in the price range you threw out (300s). If I had to replace my roof tomorrow it would probably cost me 15k. Lets say its a "30 year" roof and realistically lasts 25 years. If I got lucky and bought my 200 year old house right after a prior owner replaced it, and the same day my neighbor buys a 20 year old "new" house with the original roof, who is going to be paying for a roof first?

hmmmm.......

But the point is, you shouldn't generally view house maintenance as directly tied to how recently item X has been replaced. If you know item X, with replacement cost Y, will last Z years, then you should sort of mentally (or actually) budget maintenance on that item as Y/Z, per year.

i.e. $15K roof lasts 25 years, then in the very long term, roof maintenance is about $15000/25 = $600/year, even if the actual replacement was done only 3 years ago, and the next $15K (or more, with inflation) lump is about 22 years away...

This is not a perfect form of analysis, for a few reasons, including notably that houses don't last forever. But I think it's a broad-strokes accurate way to think about things...


Yes, but the point I was trying to make is that a big chunk of this long term average comes from big ticket items on long time horizons (15/20/30/50 years); while the industry average is that homeowners move every 7 years. Its luck of the draw if one or more of these items will come up in the time you own the house. If they do your expenses can be well above that 1% average... if they dont your expenses may be quite low.

new2bogle
Posts: 1063
Joined: Fri Sep 11, 2009 2:05 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by new2bogle » Thu May 18, 2017 12:45 pm

Very little necessary repairs:12 year old house, previous owner replaced roof after a hailstorm so the roof is only about 5 years old. Last year I spent ~$400 patching up entry points in the roof where animals were getting in (included patching all access points plus traps in the attic for 3 weeks, checking weekly). $40 for HVAC filters that last 12 months. Approx $600 for lawn maintenance (includes paying the mowing/trimming/hedging guy and the separate fertilizer company, but not watering the lawn). $500 for home warranty and I usually use $500 worth of it every year so it is a wash. $120 for carpet cleaning the 2nd floor. Several things I did by myself so free labor!

This year is shaping up to be more expensive. So far had to call a guy to remove a birds nest over our entry (~30 ft high so couldn't do that myself) and then apply some stuff so the birds don't come back ($150). Will need to get the trees trims (I do tree trimming myself, but this time I really need some large branches removed that are way too close to the house). The garbage disposal needs to be replaced. Some bath tub faucets are leaking. Lawn maintenance is about the same.

Overall I'd say I'm spending $1500-$2000 per year.

psteinx
Posts: 2563
Joined: Tue Mar 13, 2007 2:24 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by psteinx » Thu May 18, 2017 12:51 pm

If we're excluding UPGRADES, then in a bit over 21 years, our bigger ticket maintenance items on a suburban house, bought new:

Roof (partially covered by insurance)
Wood fence (Most has been replaced/significantly repaired at some point in its 20 year lifespan - especially last summer, close to the 20 year mark)
Wood deck (Some replair/replacement)
HVAC (pre-emptively replaced in part because of tax incentives for efficient stuff)
Carpeting (one round of replacement on the original carpeting)
Interior painting (one or two rounds of repaint on most, but not all)
Appliances (generally on 2nd, in some cases 3rd, for major appliances)

Lesser items include the year-to-year outdoor yard/landscape stuff, some exterior trim, the occasional plumbing issue, possibly some electrical stuff (though most of this has been upgrades, not maintenance)...

hightower
Posts: 235
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2016 2:28 am

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by hightower » Thu May 18, 2017 1:02 pm

benevo wrote:Good day, Bogleheads!

I read somewhere that it's smart to save 1-2% of the value of your house each year to put aside for maintenance costs - new lawn mower, fixing siding, driveway patching, etc. General maintenance costs. So, a house valued at $350k = $3,500-7,000/year.

Curious what people here (1) think and (2) actually do!

Thanks!

-be


I think it is highly variable depending on the type of house you have. The size of the house is probably a more important gauge of the maintenance costs than the price. The bigger the house, the more it costs for upkeep. I don't know what the rule of thumb would be in that scenario. For me, I have a very old house that is also quite large (circa 1885 and approx. 4400 sq ft). I keep a 20k emergency fund and we save 600/month for "home improvement" costs, which currently is going towards a home equity loan for a few projects we're doing this year. Realistically we should be saving more (probably $1000/month). I could write a book on all the different things that can go wrong when you own a house that you would never expect. So, the more the better.
If I had to just make up a rule to follow, I would say save 2-4X the sq footage of your home for general maintenance and repairs. 2x if its a brand new home, 3-4x if its an old home.

hightower
Posts: 235
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2016 2:28 am

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by hightower » Thu May 18, 2017 1:21 pm

jharkin wrote:I agree its very hard to generalize. Even the older house = more maintenance is not always strictly true. My house is 200 years old and I doubt that I have 10x, 5x or even 2x the maintenance cost of a 20 year old house. In fact when I bought my house the inspector told me it had a lot less problems than some houses 1/4 the age he inspects - which is just a reflection of the fact that prior owners maintained it more meticulously.

Give you some examples... My house is in the price range you threw out (300s). If I had to replace my roof tomorrow it would probably cost me 15k. Lets say its a "30 year" roof and realistically lasts 25 years. If I got lucky and bought my 200 year old house right after a prior owner replaced it, and the same day my neighbor buys a 20 year old "new" house with the original roof, who is going to be paying for a roof first?

hmmmm.......


Good points. My house is still under restoration. We're almost done with all the big projects and I do expect our annual costs to go down after that. Older homes have some aspects that can save you money compared to newer homes. For instance, the type of roof we have is standing seam metal. If properly maintained it can last 50-100 years or more no problem. The original roof was 130 years old when we replaced it. A new house with typical shingles on the roof may need a new roof every 15 years. Also, we have all of our original wood windows. I'm currently restoring each one by hand. They will be kept behind storm windows after restoration which means they could easily last 30 years before needing new putty again. A new house with new vinyl windows will need all new windows every 15-25 years or as soon as the seals fail (which is far far more expensive than painting and replacing putty). Also, original plaster walls will outlast drywall by many decades (assuming the building is done settling). Drywall has seams that fail pretty quickly overtime (20 years in some cases). Plaster can last hundreds of years. Original masonry with proper mortar on an old brick home can last hundreds of years as well (may need tuck pointing at some point, but there are buildings in Europe that are 500 years old and still have the original mortar and its in good shape. has to do with the self healing properties of lime based mortars). Vinyl siding on a new house will fail pretty quickly as well.

I'm an old house lover can you tell:)? But, I'm not going to lie. We've had to put a lot of money into our house and even more blood, sweat, and tears. Haha

benevo
Posts: 65
Joined: Wed Apr 05, 2017 7:21 am

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by benevo » Thu May 18, 2017 1:33 pm

hightower wrote:If properly maintained it can last 50-100 years or more no problem. The original roof was 130 years old when we replaced it. A new house with typical shingles on the roof may need a new roof every 15 years.


Kinda off-topic yet related to value of roof - anyone have any thoughts as to value and maintenance of roof with solar? Does it actually end up protecting it a bit? I know it can raise overall value/equity in house, but interested in actual value and maintenance "delays"

User avatar
jharkin
Posts: 1239
Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2016 7:14 am
Location: Boston suburbs

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by jharkin » Thu May 18, 2017 1:34 pm

hightower wrote:
Good points. My house is still under restoration. We're almost done with all the big projects and I do expect our annual costs to go down after that. Older homes have some aspects that can save you money compared to newer homes. For instance, the type of roof we have is standing seam metal. If properly maintained it can last 50-100 years or more no problem. The original roof was 130 years old when we replaced it. A new house with typical shingles on the roof may need a new roof every 15 years. Also, we have all of our original wood windows. I'm currently restoring each one by hand. They will be kept behind storm windows after restoration which means they could easily last 30 years before needing new putty again. A new house with new vinyl windows will need all new windows every 15-25 years or as soon as the seals fail (which is far far more expensive than painting and replacing putty). Also, original plaster walls will outlast drywall by many decades (assuming the building is done settling). Drywall has seams that fail pretty quickly overtime (20 years in some cases). Plaster can last hundreds of years. Original masonry with proper mortar on an old brick home can last hundreds of years as well (may need tuck pointing at some point, but there are buildings in Europe that are 500 years old and still have the original mortar and its in good shape. has to do with the self healing properties of lime based mortars). Vinyl siding on a new house will fail pretty quickly as well.

I'm an old house lover can you tell:)? But, I'm not going to lie. We've had to put a lot of money into our house and even more blood, sweat, and tears. Haha



Oh thats so funny.... Ive been going thought all my old windows as well. Sarco Type M is the bomb :) I'm sure you get what I mean... :twisted:

I got lucky that the previous owner put on a new roof and had both chimneys repointed so the biggest problem I had to deal with was one section of sill beam that needed replacements and things like reglazing windows and restoring some doors...

Are you on Historic District or OHW by chance?

beth65
Posts: 26
Joined: Mon May 08, 2017 1:51 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by beth65 » Thu May 18, 2017 10:25 pm

Another thing to consider is the climate/part of the country. I'm from the NE and moved to the SE 4 years ago, and we have to put much more maintenance into our home that is only 6 years old than the homes up north that were 50+ years old. The older homes did have higher costs for things like roofing, HVAC, water heater/boilers, etc., but we have to constantly repaint, re-stain, power wash, reseal the crawl space every few years, buy new patio furniture, etc., due to all of the humidity and mold in the region. Overall, I would say I put aside about .5% of my property value every year, give or take, for maintenance. The costs are kept lower because the house is less than 10 years old.

CyclingDuo
Posts: 673
Joined: Fri Jan 06, 2017 9:07 am

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by CyclingDuo » Fri May 19, 2017 5:53 am

benevo wrote:Good day, Bogleheads!

I read somewhere that it's smart to save 1-2% of the value of your house each year to put aside for maintenance costs - new lawn mower, fixing siding, driveway patching, etc. General maintenance costs. So, a house valued at $350k = $3,500-7,000/year.

Curious what people here (1) think and (2) actually do!

Thanks!

-be


However you want to do the accounting - yes, stash away some cash to use for repairs/maintenance. As many have mentioned, it's not tied to the value of the home. Obviously, depending on where you live, contractors may cost more than in other areas of the country. So if one's home value is way up there, chances are they live in a higher cost of living area where a contractor charges more than in a lower cost of living section of the country. Example: San Francisco Bay Area compared to Bloomington, Indiana.

Stash away a chunk of change for automotive repairs/maintenance/expenses while you are at it.

True cost of home ownership, and true cost of automobile ownership are rather eye opening compared to the actual purchase price. The more you can DIY repairs/maintenance on both your home and your car(s) - the more you will save.

Miguelito
Posts: 144
Joined: Thu Feb 27, 2014 1:21 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by Miguelito » Fri May 19, 2017 7:38 am

There is a lot of gray area in my opinion.

There are things that are clearly maintenance: Landscaping, snow removal, fixing a leaky fixture, refinishing your front door, repainting of exterior trim, sealing driveway, repairing broken AC, heater, or fridge.

Other things some may consider maintenance and prorate the expense, but really, they are big expenses that happen once every many years, like a new roof, a new AC, new siding, new driveway, new windows, etc.

Personally, you tend to know when you buy a house what your horizon is before one of these big ticket items are due. If you buy a new house, for the first 5 or even 10 years, there will be little to maintain.

Example: My house was built close to a decade ago. I've only had to refinish the front door, seal driveway, replace deck railings (done poorly when new). A couple of bathroom fixtures had to be replaced as well. That's it. The cost of all this over several years (especially if you exclude the deck which should not have happened had it been built properly) would have been well under 1% (more on this later). In the next 5 years more stuff will start to come up. I'll probably have exterior trim repainted and it's possible something HVAC related may need repair or replacement.

When I bought my previous home, which was much older, I knew over then next 5-10 years I was staring at all sorts of things to have done beyond remodeling. The AC, heater, roof, and deck all would need to be replaced. I knew the landscaping and retaining walls would need attention. I knew the pool was old. We did do all that. Do I call that maintenance? I don't know. I wouldn't. I had to spend money on landscaping on the new house. I knew that going in. That was an improvement, not maintenance.

Finally, the "1-2%" thing is very relative and variable. A fancy house in the suburbs with a long driveway and big lawn/land may cost a fortune to maintain. One in the city of equal living space but a small lot won't. How fancy is the house? How complicated is the roof? How many zones? How up-to date is the electrical wiring?

A service visit for a clogged toilet is the same regardless of a $300K house or a $3M house. Will you cut your own lawn? Will you hire a plow? How handy are you? Can you replace a faucet or light fixture or door knob?

What about acts of God? Big tree comes down on your yard. Ice/water damage. You break a window. Are those maintenance?

Way too variable to throw a round number out there to catch it all.

User avatar
just frank
Posts: 1228
Joined: Sun Nov 02, 2014 4:13 pm
Location: Philly Metro

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by just frank » Fri May 19, 2017 7:46 am

The 1% number is rather accurate in my case. My house has 20+ years of deferred maintenance, so it ran closer to 2% during the first 10 years we owned it (getting caught up). Not a big deal since we got it marked down about 10% at time of sale due to poor condition.

The point is that deferring maintenance doesn't save anything....it catches up later or at sale time.

Of course, 1% is a time average.....you can go a year or two well below, and then get whacked. Just have to roll with it.

hightower
Posts: 235
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2016 2:28 am

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by hightower » Mon May 29, 2017 7:45 pm

jharkin wrote:
hightower wrote:
Good points. My house is still under restoration. We're almost done with all the big projects and I do expect our annual costs to go down after that. Older homes have some aspects that can save you money compared to newer homes. For instance, the type of roof we have is standing seam metal. If properly maintained it can last 50-100 years or more no problem. The original roof was 130 years old when we replaced it. A new house with typical shingles on the roof may need a new roof every 15 years. Also, we have all of our original wood windows. I'm currently restoring each one by hand. They will be kept behind storm windows after restoration which means they could easily last 30 years before needing new putty again. A new house with new vinyl windows will need all new windows every 15-25 years or as soon as the seals fail (which is far far more expensive than painting and replacing putty). Also, original plaster walls will outlast drywall by many decades (assuming the building is done settling). Drywall has seams that fail pretty quickly overtime (20 years in some cases). Plaster can last hundreds of years. Original masonry with proper mortar on an old brick home can last hundreds of years as well (may need tuck pointing at some point, but there are buildings in Europe that are 500 years old and still have the original mortar and its in good shape. has to do with the self healing properties of lime based mortars). Vinyl siding on a new house will fail pretty quickly as well.

I'm an old house lover can you tell:)? But, I'm not going to lie. We've had to put a lot of money into our house and even more blood, sweat, and tears. Haha



Oh thats so funny.... Ive been going thought all my old windows as well. Sarco Type M is the bomb :) I'm sure you get what I mean... :twisted:

I got lucky that the previous owner put on a new roof and had both chimneys repointed so the biggest problem I had to deal with was one section of sill beam that needed replacements and things like reglazing windows and restoring some doors...

Are you on Historic District or OHW by chance?


I just discovered Historic District actually. I haven't made any posts yet. I plan on doing a post with pics of the house soon though.

hightower
Posts: 235
Joined: Mon Dec 12, 2016 2:28 am

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by hightower » Mon May 29, 2017 7:48 pm

benevo wrote:
hightower wrote:If properly maintained it can last 50-100 years or more no problem. The original roof was 130 years old when we replaced it. A new house with typical shingles on the roof may need a new roof every 15 years.


Kinda off-topic yet related to value of roof - anyone have any thoughts as to value and maintenance of roof with solar? Does it actually end up protecting it a bit? I know it can raise overall value/equity in house, but interested in actual value and maintenance "delays"


I don't know if anyone has done any studies on it, but I would doubt that solar could extend the life of the roof at all because the panels aren't going to cover every single inch of roof space. You'll still have plenty of roof fully exposed to the elements. Plus, depending on the type of installation, solar may actually increase the number of penetrations on your roof making it more likely to leak. That's actually not an issue with standing seam installations though where they use a special clamp to secure the panels and require no actual penetrations.
If Tesla's claims hold up, their new solar roof tiles will out last traditional roofing materials and may be worth the investment as costs come down.

User avatar
JonnyDVM
Posts: 1578
Joined: Wed Feb 12, 2014 6:51 pm
Location: Atlanta, GA

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by JonnyDVM » Mon May 29, 2017 8:30 pm

Really it depends on the age of the house. Our house is eight years old. This past year we've had to replace several pieces of the deck, we had some crumbling flagstone mortar redone, a few shingles on part of the roof were slipping off,and the main fridge crapped out. Total cost ~$4000.
Sometimes the questions are complicated and the answers are simple. -Dr. Seuss

VaR
Posts: 332
Joined: Sat Dec 05, 2015 11:27 pm

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by VaR » Mon May 29, 2017 9:47 pm

I think that the 1%-2% rule of thumb sounds good for a rule of thumb. We've spent about 20% of the purchase price of our home in repairs over the past 10 years. I think we're on the high end because it was an older home (40 years old) plus certain repairs inevitably lead to a certain amount of upgrading - like a kitchen flood that led to a kitchen renovation and having to replace the bathroom shower leading to a bathroom renovation. Things like the HVAC were more straight replacements.

MarvinK
Posts: 62
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2017 8:04 pm
Location: DC

Re: Annual house maintenance costs

Post by MarvinK » Mon May 29, 2017 11:35 pm

I am with hightower and jharkin, an old house lover.
Currently living in a 130 year old that I had renovated.
I keep a running list of projects that will cost me more than $200 and am able to save up the money to get to them one at a time.
I keep a 10 year list of what to expect or maintain.
I made a "winterizing' list of tasks.

Can't wait for my next old house!

Post Reply