Verbal abuser at work

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ThankYouJack
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Verbal abuser at work

Post by ThankYouJack » Mon Apr 03, 2017 10:49 am

My friend has a great job and fantastic manager at a megacorp, but her dotted line manager gets stressed, blames, intimidates and abuses verbally. It's not constant, but my friend and along with her colleagues have decided they've had enough. They're looking into other jobs and are going to inquire alternatives to deal with the dotted line manager less -- part-time, sabbatical, shift in role, or even quitting all together. Their manager has also made it clear that they can let him know whenever they feel the issue should be raised and he will do so for them. But my friend feels intimated doing so and that the wrath of the abuser will really come out when she finds out. The dotted line manager is at a very high level and it's a very tough position to fill so it's not like a couple complaints will get her fired. Any suggestions?

Jimmie
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Jimmie » Mon Apr 03, 2017 10:52 am

I would be in an HR office immediately. Megacorps have procedures for handling these types of things. There are even mechanisms to protect "whistle blowers".

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tyrion
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by tyrion » Mon Apr 03, 2017 10:55 am

Jimmie wrote:I would be in an HR office immediately. Megacorps have procedures for handling these types of things. There are even mechanisms to protect "whistle blowers".
Well, maybe. Remember that HR works for the company and not you.

retire57
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by retire57 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 10:56 am

A bully poisons a workplace. The only way to deal with a bully is by swift and strong action. Your friend and her colleagues need to visit HR. Today.

Cheyenne
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Cheyenne » Mon Apr 03, 2017 10:59 am

I used to work with someone like that. To deal with it I just imagined that I was working in an institution for the severely mentally ill, and he was a patient and nothing that came out of his mouth meant anything. Grin and bear it. It'll drive him crazy (or crazier).

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greg24
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by greg24 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:01 am

They should report him en masse to HR, but the best outcome is probably a new job. Corporations tend to protect insane managers.

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David Jay
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by David Jay » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:02 am

tyrion wrote:
Jimmie wrote:I would be in an HR office immediately. Megacorps have procedures for handling these types of things. There are even mechanisms to protect "whistle blowers".
Well, maybe. Remember that HR works for the company and not you.
True. But a hostile environment will mean a lot of turnover. Megacorp (and HR in particular) does not want a lot of turnover.
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Meg77
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Meg77 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:03 am

I agree with the above. This is what HR is for. Your friend's manager has acknowledged the problem and offered to escalate it when the team thinks it's gotten bad enough. If the whole team is considering quitting or scaling back, I'd say now is the time!

If you're considering quitting anyway, I don't understand why you wouldn't at least go to HR first or - even easier - tell your manager you all would like for him/her to escalate this widely acknowledged problem to HR. What's the worst that could happen? If this manager starts yelling just laugh and say you'll have to make another entry in your log of inappropriate work behavior for HR. [Each employee needs to start documenting all the instances of this "abuse" in detail, if they haven't already. And the manager who seems to be aware of this issue needs to document all the complaints he's received, even in casual conversation.]

There is no reason for an entire team of people to be considering quitting because no one wants to stand up to this dotted line manager. Your friend isn't the only one who knows about this or feels this way. Get the ball rolling. It takes at least 90 days for HR to document an ongoing problem before they can make a change like a transfer, demotion or firing.
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nedsaid
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by nedsaid » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:03 am

It depends on the type of organization you are working for. If it is a good organization, your friend isn't the only one who notices this behavior. Sooner or later, the problem should take care of itself. Unfortunately, some organizations are dysfunctional and people like this can hang around for a long time. Also these type of people are often politically astute and know who to show their good face to. We also don't know who the verbal abuser is friends with.

Giving advice on these situations is tough because each workplace is unique. Often these types of situations solve themselves over time. It depends upon how much your friend can tolerate. A risky strategy is to stand up to the abuser, sometimes it works and sometimes it just gets you fired.

Your friend will make up her own mind. The best you can do is listen and be supportive.
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Jimmie » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:04 am

tyrion wrote:
Jimmie wrote:I would be in an HR office immediately. Megacorps have procedures for handling these types of things. There are even mechanisms to protect "whistle blowers".
Well, maybe. Remember that HR works for the company and not you.
Employees all have equal rights and protections, especially in larger corporations. HR is the "referee". It is not in the best interest of the company if one employee is dealt an injustice at the hands of another employee who is not following company behavioral policies, particularly if a lawsuit and bad PR is a consequence.

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bligh
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by bligh » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:06 am

With due respect to Jimmie, I strongly caution against following his advice.

HR departments are there to protect the interests of the Megacorp. If this dotted line manager is as senior and valuable as you say she is, they will not be talking about replacing her, but instead they will be talking about changing out the squeaky wheels. Unless, the squeaky wheels all collectively take a stand and replacing all of them would be harder. ie. If you and your co-workers all took a stand together and threatened to walk out, would that hurt the company more than if they let go this dotted line manager?

This isn't as clear cut like sexual harassment or racist comments, and such. It is "being mean", it could easily be recast as "your team is not meeting her expectations and is underperforming".

My advice is, get your ducks lined in a row and look for another job. Once you are reasonably confident you have another gig lined up, or otherwise "dont need to take this crap" anymore, then in your exit interview (if you have one) be honest as to why you are leaving.

If you are in a field that you cant get another job easily, or if you really need this job, then suck it up, keep your head down and try to grow a thicker skin.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by PandaBear » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:09 am

David Jay wrote:
tyrion wrote:
Jimmie wrote:I would be in an HR office immediately. Megacorps have procedures for handling these types of things. There are even mechanisms to protect "whistle blowers".
Well, maybe. Remember that HR works for the company and not you.
True. But a hostile environment will mean a lot of turnover. Megacorp (and HR in particular) does not want a lot of turnover.
That's not necessarily true. Some positions at megacorps are designed for high turnover.

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bligh
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by bligh » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:12 am

PandaBear wrote:
David Jay wrote:
tyrion wrote:
Jimmie wrote:I would be in an HR office immediately. Megacorps have procedures for handling these types of things. There are even mechanisms to protect "whistle blowers".
Well, maybe. Remember that HR works for the company and not you.
True. But a hostile environment will mean a lot of turnover. Megacorp (and HR in particular) does not want a lot of turnover.
That's not necessarily true. Some positions at megacorps are designed for high turnover.
Some also WANT the "turnover" so that they can reduce staff in certain departments without having to do layoffs.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Jimmie » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:14 am

Verbal abuse is intolerable and inexcusable.

Quitting a good job in lieu of addressing problems with management is not something I would personally tolerate. For the record, I work for a large company and have reported verbal abuse to HR quite successfully. That person's record was noted negatively, he was straightened out and we have not been staffed on common projects since.

Works for me.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Dottie57 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:15 am

retire57 wrote:A bully poisons a workplace. The only way to deal with a bully is by swift and strong action. Your friend and her colleagues need to visit HR. Today.

That may or may not help. Many people, including myself, have a web site for HR. There is also a faceless voice at the end of a phone call. A call center person who takes your problem and looks for your problem in a script. I miss the old HR.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by fiverus » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:17 am

This sounds like passive-aggressive behavior. or Narcissistic behavior. Seems like a flaw in his personality and needs help. I would think if several people went as a group to HR to complain I highly doubt it would get ignored. You have the right to tell HR representative when you are being abused.

No matter how valuable the abuser has been to your company, it is up to you to demand good behavior, with consequences for not complying.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by randomguy » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:29 am

bligh wrote:With due respect to Jimmie, I strongly caution against following his advice.

HR departments are there to protect the interests of the Megacorp. If this dotted line manager is as senior and valuable as you say she is, they will not be talking about replacing her, but instead they will be talking about changing out the squeaky wheels. Unless, the squeaky wheels all collectively take a stand and replacing all of them would be harder. ie. If you and your co-workers all took a stand together and threatened to walk out, would that hurt the company more than if they let go this dotted line manager?

This isn't as clear cut like sexual harassment or racist comments, and such. It is "being mean", it could easily be recast as "your team is not meeting her expectations and is underperforming".

My advice is, get your ducks lined in a row and look for another job. Once you are reasonably confident you have another gig lined up, or otherwise "dont need to take this crap" anymore, then in your exit interview (if you have one) be honest as to why you are leaving.

If you are in a field that you cant get another job easily, or if you really need this job, then suck it up, keep your head down and try to grow a thicker skin.
The only thing for sure is that if you do nothing the abuse will continue. You want improvement, you have to tell your manager that this has gone on too long and hope for the best. It is complicated in the HR wants to protect the corporation from the abusive manager (they don't want to deal with lawsuits and the potential costs of replacing employees) while benefiting from thier talents. Where that balance line is for the corporation is hard to say. We have no clue if the friend (and her coworkers) is a skilled worker that is hard to replace or a job where you can get 10 people off the street up to speed in 30 mins.

There have been some studies linking long term health problems to issues like this. Not sure that trying to suck it up is a great idea. Might be the best choice for say 3-6 months but you need a plan to get yourself out of these type of situations.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by TIAX » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:31 am

OP, can you provide examples of the abuse?

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Teague » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:33 am

fiverus wrote:You have the right to tell HR representative when you are being abused.
True. Unfortunately, HR has the right to ignore you, or report you back to the problem manager, who in turn has the ability to make your life so miserable that you are forced to quit. Remember, your organization has already decided your supervisor is more important than you are; that's why they are your "superior." How things play out depends on your organization, and on some luck, too.
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bligh
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by bligh » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:40 am

randomguy wrote:
bligh wrote:With due respect to Jimmie, I strongly caution against following his advice.

HR departments are there to protect the interests of the Megacorp. If this dotted line manager is as senior and valuable as you say she is, they will not be talking about replacing her, but instead they will be talking about changing out the squeaky wheels. Unless, the squeaky wheels all collectively take a stand and replacing all of them would be harder. ie. If you and your co-workers all took a stand together and threatened to walk out, would that hurt the company more than if they let go this dotted line manager?

This isn't as clear cut like sexual harassment or racist comments, and such. It is "being mean", it could easily be recast as "your team is not meeting her expectations and is underperforming".

My advice is, get your ducks lined in a row and look for another job. Once you are reasonably confident you have another gig lined up, or otherwise "dont need to take this crap" anymore, then in your exit interview (if you have one) be honest as to why you are leaving.

If you are in a field that you cant get another job easily, or if you really need this job, then suck it up, keep your head down and try to grow a thicker skin.
The only thing for sure is that if you do nothing the abuse will continue. You want improvement, you have to tell your manager that this has gone on too long and hope for the best. It is complicated in the HR wants to protect the corporation from the abusive manager (they don't want to deal with lawsuits and the potential costs of replacing employees) while benefiting from thier talents. Where that balance line is for the corporation is hard to say. We have no clue if the friend (and her coworkers) is a skilled worker that is hard to replace or a job where you can get 10 people off the street up to speed in 30 mins.

There have been some studies linking long term health problems to issues like this. Not sure that trying to suck it up is a great idea. Might be the best choice for say 3-6 months but you need a plan to get yourself out of these type of situations.
I agree completely. Life is too short to put up with nonsense like this. However, through my own first hand experience, when the person you are complaining to HR about is
ThankYouJack wrote:...The dotted line manager is at a very high level and it's a very tough position to fill so it's not like a couple complaints will get her fired...
She will be the first person HR will meet with after the OPs friend is done complaining. This very senior person will now hold a grudge against him/her. She may stop the obvious verbal abuse, but most likely they will initiate what could become a downward spiral for the complainer. There are hundreds of ways to make a work environment suck. In other words, going to HR could very likely make the bad situation worse. Which is why I recommend getting another job if at all possible and being honest in the exit interview when dotted line manager cannot touch you.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by NotWhoYouThink » Mon Apr 03, 2017 11:48 am

Life is not fair.

Sometimes, you just have to walk away.

Management knows this person is abusive, and allows it to continue. If she gets the job done she was hired and promoted to do, she will stay in place or move up. The person who complains to HR will get tagged as a troublemaker.

To be sure, there are rare occasions where reporting an abusive manager will result in "coaching" the manager and improving the workplace. But those situations are very much the exception, not the rule.

Your friend should prepare to walk away, start networking and interviewing for a new job. Once that process is well underway, she can consider reporting the abusive manager, just in case it does some good. But expect that it won't.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by DaftInvestor » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:01 pm

Lots of nuances in statements like "dotted line manager is at a very high level" And "intimidates and abuses verbally" making it hard to answer this question.
Do you have examples of the abuse and intimidation? I've been accused of verbal abuse just for being up-front with people and telling them they need to re-do something they did incorrectly. Unfortunately in today's world people tend to have very thin skin. On the other hand I've seen serious issues with true verbal abuse in the workplace that should be reported with corrective action necessary.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by adamthesmythe » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:05 pm

If you go to HR, expect that it is not going to help and that you will be looking for a new job anyway. There may be some personal satisfaction gained by confronting bad behavior.

HR will protect the corporation. Sometimes (maybe the right word is occasionally or rarely) behavior of a manager becomes so bad as to be perceived as a liability to the company. Don't count on it though.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Sandtrap » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:27 pm

retire57 wrote:A bully poisons a workplace. The only way to deal with a bully is by swift and strong action. Your friend and her colleagues need to visit HR. Today.
+1
This cure for a bully is to get put into place by a much larger authority. Serious visit to HR with follow-up and decisive action is in order.
However, the alternative is avoidance, and possibility that a report to HR will further incite the "bully's" rage to your detriment. If the "bully" is empowered because of a far greater value to the company, and the victim is low on the pecking order, then one is far more "disposable".
So. Alternatively. Research other job prospects as a backup rather than suffer abuse.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by financeidiot » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:45 pm

I had a former boss who threw temper tantrums all the time and constantly promised he was "working on it" and received coaching. The help didn't work and frustration continued to boil until literally everyone who worked directly for him had had enough and quit within the span of one month. He's still working at the company and was promoted to an executive position. Those of us who quit are all doing better things with our lives.

The best strategy is for your friend tos secure her exit before reporting the manager. The worst case scenario is to report to HR, they do nothing, and then she's stuck with the dotted line manager (who now knows she reported him) and she has no alternative but to leave. If I were in her shoes, I would:

1. Apply for other jobs. Finding a new job in a positive environment takes time. The sooner she starts, the sooner she is guaranteed a workable option to separate from the difficult manager. She also might get a better job, raise, better benefits, or a better company out of it.
2. Prepare to report the manager to HR by documenting his behavior. If it's he said/she said, the manager always wins. There needs to be documentation and witnesses for altercations or HR's hands are tied. Further, if she believes HR protects the company's interests (it does) they will not be compelled to act unless there is proof the company could be at risk from this manager's actions.

From the manager's perspective, there's no reason to change your personality and treat others well when you've built up years of bad habits and been rewarded for your behavior through raises, promotions, and awards. That doesn't excuse the behavior, but unless he's fired, she can expect more of the same. It's more probable that your friend finds a better job than the dotted line manager is removed or fixes his behavior.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Lexi » Mon Apr 03, 2017 12:53 pm

Unless you have evidence that the dotted line manager has engaged in illegal actions that could lead to a costly lawsuit against the company, do not expect HR to solve problems or help you.

There may be a reason that this senior manager is dotted line, e.g. the company knows he is lousy at dealing with people but values him for other contributions. Your best approach is through your solid line manager -- report everything to that manager, do nothing without that manager's approval, try to communicate through email with dotted line manager as much as possible and cc solid line manager. Generally, view it as the solid line manager's problem to deal with.

Updating your resume and considering other opportunities is a good idea, but this, too, may pass.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by ThankYouJack » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:03 pm

Thanks all. I'll pass the info along. I'm not sure about all of the specifics but here's what I believe:

1. The dotted line manager would take a very long time to replace. It's a very skilled, specific profession (probably only a handful of people in the country who would could fill it). My guess is that turn-over at a lower level would have a smaller affect on the company's bottom line.

2. My guess is the manager treats people different -- really lashing out on the "lower" level people in support roles, but not as bad with her direct reports. I'm guessing no one enjoys working for her, but few would probably go to HR to file complaints.

3. My friend is very highly regarded at the company and has a long of solid bridges and could return down the road. Lighting too big of a fire before leaving could burn some bridges.

4. My friend has worked her way up and is very good at her job and has developed a certain skill set specific to the job. So a lateral move would be tough, and any certain switch may result in a big pay cut. But she's willing to accept that and could probably move up even quicker at a new job. But I've told her and she agrees that part of the reason why she is so well compensated is because it's a very tough job due to the situation and she agrees that it's not worth the extra $.
TIAX wrote:OP, can you provide examples of the abuse?
I forget the exact examples, but it's getting right up in their faces and yelling at people in a harsh enough way to (I'm guessing purposely) make them cry. It's a high level, professional environment -- so it's not just people being overly sensitive or thin skinned.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Pajamas » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:44 pm

ThankYouJack wrote: I forget the exact examples, but it's getting right up in their faces and yelling at people in a harsh enough way to (I'm guessing purposely) make them cry. It's a high level, professional environment -- so it's not just people being overly sensitive or thin skinned.
The victim has the choice not to stand there and accept that sort of abuse but simply walk away, even if it results in being fired.

I once had to interact with someone who was a couple of levels above me but in another department who had similar behavior despite being pleasant most of the time. One day I was in his office with the door closed during a particularly nasty tantrum about something that I had done appropriately that he didn't agree with. At that point, I didn't really care about the consequences, so I stood up, excused myself, and walked out of his office and gently closed the door while he was angrily yelling at me to come back and sit down. I went back to my department and explained to my manager what had happened. I never heard about it again and in the future I made a point of not going into his office and sitting down but standing in the doorway to talk to him instead.

Another potential way to handle it if there are other victims in earshot is for them to plan in advance to all go and stand together with the current victim while the abusive behavior is occurring. From the company's standpoint, one employee victim is a nuisance, but a group standing together is a potential class action lawsuit.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by tim1999 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 1:55 pm

We have such a bully at work. He will call you "f-ing stupid" to your face and if you don't have the right answer for what he is looking for he will angrily tell your supervisor of your deficiency. Unfortunately he has risen up into senior management (how this guy continuously gets major promotions I have no clue), the CEO likes him, and everyone else is afraid of him so nobody complains. I think if someone made a complaint to HR, HR would just tell the person to forget about it and just ignore the guy. Most of this guy's direct reports are afraid of him and leave for another company after a couple of years under him.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Jimmie » Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:07 pm

Pajamas wrote: From the company's standpoint, one employee victim is a nuisance, but a group standing together is a potential class action lawsuit.
A small employer can fire you for two reasons: 1) Any reason and 2) No reason.

The fact that this is a megacorp tells me there is a greater likelihood of procedures and behavioral standards in place, particularly involving professionalism.

I have worked for both large and small employers throughout my career.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by munemaker » Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:15 pm

As a senior manager (before I recently retired), I advise you to tread lightly. Employees seldom win a fight with their boss.

Usually time takes care of these situations, but it can take quite a bit of time.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:19 pm

Having gone to megacorp HR myself for an issue with my immediate manager, then having a meeting immediately set up by my boss, I saw that indeed, anything and everything I said to HR was conveyed to my manager and then HR was done with their part of this issue. HR is the enemy.

I'd suggest your friend set up their smart phone ready to record. At any hint of a problem, start recording. At home, upload the recording onto a thumb drive to document each event. This can be later used with their lawyer or the labor department.
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by rralex1 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:37 pm

Jack FFR1846 wrote:I'd suggest your friend set up their smart phone ready to record. At any hint of a problem, start recording. At home, upload the recording onto a thumb drive to document each event. This can be later used with their lawyer or the labor department.
Danger Will Robinson.. Surreptitiously recording a person's conversation can in some states be in violation of the law, and in virtually any Mega corp would almost certainly be seen as a violation of an ethics policy or some other one...and could be used against the person who did the recording..

If the situation was stressful enough, I would consult with a labor attorney. Sometimes getting professional counsel, even if it isn't what one wants to hear, and even it is summarized by a recommendation to move on can help.
Last edited by rralex1 on Mon Apr 03, 2017 3:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by Capsu78 » Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:49 pm

I at least would look for the opportunity to see what it would take to make the dotted line manager happier and see if you can be the hero that diffuses her...that brings real "value" to the organization. I was once assigned "dotted line" to a high maintenance external guy who megacorp had a license agreement with. He had already burned through several such liasons and it was known as an assignment to avoid. I got unvoluntarily "assigned", worked successfully internally and externally to keep the guy satisfied for about 60 days. I then approached him and said "So what do you think of this relationship?" He was puzzled and asked why I said that...I said " Jury is still out for me. I have watch 2 peers get shredded working with you and I don't intend to be the 3rd. I could go back in today and tell them you are the biggest jerk I have ever worked with and you know what, they would believe me." He said, "No, no no I don't want to lose you!" I said "OK, then here are some ground rules... Don't jerk my chain by doing either A, B or C". It actually lead to a 10 year off again/ on again business relationship across several opportunities and had my bosses boss call me in to ask "what did you do to fix this relationship".

Obviously not going work in many situations, but I was given a lot of freedom as long as I kept the guy in check. I made myself as "indispensable" as I could to megacorp.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:56 pm

There are two general groups of employees:
1. Those who feel strong in their positions.
2. Those who feel weak in their positions.

Bogleheads recommending assertive actions are likely to be in strong positions, but the OP's friend appears to be in a weak position. Bullies sense who's strong and who's weak, and attack weak ones. Thus, an advice "I would never allow this" or "This is unacceptable" is sincerely offered but may be impractical or even damaging.

Just because multiple people feel strongly about the manager does not mean that they will organize to complain about him. Usually, it's one person who takes all the heat, and if she (or he) succeeds others step in.

Probably, the best thing for the OP's friend is to do is to move to another job. If the job is with another company she can use the exit interview to explain her reasons.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by arizonaslim » Mon Apr 03, 2017 2:57 pm

When I lived in Pittsburgh, I had a boss who went to the Attila the Hun School of Management. I mean, this gal was a peach. Her favorite motivational technique was the blistering tirade.

Well, after a year of enduring this, I was at my wit's end. Then came the Ultimate Tirade. This one was a real doozy.

At one point she said "Start looking for another JOB!"

My calm reply: "I think I'll start looking for another city."

You could have knocked Ms. Attila over with a feather. She was that stunned.

"You don't have to do anything that drastic," she said. And she almost sounded like she was pleading with me to stay in Pittsburgh.

Nope. Uh-uh. No way.

A few weeks later, I left that job. And Pittsburgh.

After spending three months on a bicycle trip, I settled here in Tucson. That was in 1987. And I'm still here.

If I were to see Ms. Attila today, I would thank her for motivating me to take the great leap into the wonderful life I have now.

jalbert
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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by jalbert » Mon Apr 03, 2017 4:01 pm

As a start, your friend should politely direct the "dotted line" manager to your friend's actual manager when the dotted line manager requests something from your friend, who should say that his or her actual manager is in charge of managing his or her work priorities. Your friend should be polite, consistent, and firm about this. Interactions with the dotted line mgr should be documented in a log. HR should only be involved if the dotted line manager insists on violating employer policy or employment law in a documented manner.
Index fund investor since 1987.

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Re: Verbal abuser at work

Post by LadyGeek » Mon Apr 03, 2017 4:09 pm

This thread has run its course and is locked (relationship issue, not personal finance). See: Acceptable Topics and Subforum Guidelines
This is an investing and personal finance forum. We also maintain a subforum that allow our members to discuss consumer goods and services and recreational activities. Anything else is considered "Off Topic" and is not acceptable on this forum.
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