Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

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budha1111
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Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by budha1111 » Tue Mar 28, 2017 12:01 pm

I have had my 403B with fidelity for 30+ years. I started withdrawing in 2013 at which time I left the country and updated Fidelity with my foreign address. Everything was fine until 2016 - as a US citizen I would get 1099R for each withdrawl. I did 2 withdrawls in Oct and Nov of 2016 and they dedcuted 30% tax instead of the usual 20%. Since it was close to the end of the year I said I would file my taxes soon so it does not matter (I assumed the IRS rules changed and planned to check it early this year).

And now the nightmare begins:
Last months I downloaded the tax forms and noticed the 2016 amount in the 1099R was about half of the correct amount-I verified it by looking at the 2016 transaction history and then I noticed in the list page that for the last two transactions Form 1042-S was noted as the tax form. I went back to the tax forms page and there was a line I missed that had a link to display that form. That form was for the last 2 transactions of 2016 indeed. I tried to prepare the taxes but there was no option to add this for under "Retirement Income" -- of course, I am filing as a citizen living abroad.
I called Fidelty many times, talked to managers, and to no avail - their response: we are doing what the IRS mandates us to do, and because they had a foreign address I got the 1042-S. I examplained to them that as far as my residense I can live on the moon and they still have to issue a 1099R. It's been going on since mid February and it's like talking to a wall. In the mean time I had to withdraw money a month ago and they continue to take 30% tax and issue a 1042-S which is required for the case of FOREIGN PEOPLE not for US citizens who reside in FOREIGN COUNTRY.
In one of the conversations I was told that Fidelity was audited mid 2016 about compling with rules regarding forein people. I guess the IRS was not happy to find that Fidelity issued 1099R to forein people (e.g. forein students) and collected only 20%. As a response I guess Fidelity changed their computer system and the easiest was was to just issue 1024-S for every one with a forein address.

Ironically, from their tax information center site (https://institutional.fidelity.com/app/ ... enter.html ):
1099-R Distributions from pension plans, annuities, retirement and profit sharing plans, IRAs (including Traditional, Rollover, Roth, SIMPLE, SEP/SARSEP, BDAs, and Roth BDAs), Keoghs, and insurance contracts.
1042-S - Dividends and short-term capital gains subject to nonresident alien withholding for foreign individuals who earn income from a U.S. source.

Any advice on how to get them to correct it (that is to cancell the 1024-S and issue instead 1099Rs?
How do I file my taxes if they don't do that?

THANK YOU!

mhalley
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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by mhalley » Tue Mar 28, 2017 2:15 pm

Sounds like you need a tax attorney to help straighten it out if you have escalated at fidelity to no avail. You might try contacting some senior executives at fidelity.
http://www.bloomberg.com/research/stock ... pId=163894

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by Easy Rhino » Tue Mar 28, 2017 3:32 pm

Yeah, since 1042-s forms are for non resident aliens, and you are not an alien (because you're a US Citizen), then Fidelity is being dumb.

You could always close your account and open one elsewhere, where they will hopefully report correctly.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by Jackbnimble » Tue Mar 28, 2017 3:52 pm

You may have to file a paper return (not efile) and attach a statement about what you're doing and why you think it was reported on the wrong form to you. Properly report all of the income (including the 1042S), attach a copy to your return along with the statement and sign it. You may have to put the 1042S amounts on the same line that you do the 1099R.

Or you could get an extension and wait for Fidelity to change the forms, if they will. Which may or may not happen.

I would probably do the first one and then like someone said above, find another company to hold your retirement accounts. If you like them then just repeat what you did this year if you file your 1040 reporting the 1042S.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by TedSwippet » Tue Mar 28, 2017 5:52 pm

Is there any chance that you don't have a W-9 on file with Fidelity? Absent both this and a W-8BEN (for NRAs only), they would have to follow a bunch of complex 'presumption' rules, none of which I've been able to parse, to come to some default conclusion about whether or not you are a 'US person'. A foreign address is likely to be one thing that pushes in the direction of NRA rather than 'US person'.

To be honest, this missing documentation problem -- the term used in the rulings is 'recalcitrant' -- seems a bit unlikely, since I'd have thought that if this were the case, Fidelity would by now have told you, since you queried it with them. Repeatedly. And they did the right thing up to a few months ago. But you never know. Once anything foreign enters their processes, quite a few US financial institutions appear to have no real idea of what the right action to take really is.

Beyond this, like others, I'd suggest that the only real remedy may be to transfer to a provider who can do the right thing regarding IRS reporting and paperwork. It sounds like this may be more FATCA fallout. (Ah... FATCA, the gift that keeps on giving.)

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celia
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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by celia » Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:04 pm

I'm not an expert in this area, but think there is a good chance they are doing it correctly. I am assuming you still live outside the U.S. If so, you already benefit from a pretty good chunk of income not being taxed in the U.S., as I understand it. To make up for it, other items are probably treated differently than if you were living in the U.S. Your distributions from the 403b may be one example.

Are there any Americans living near you who may be in a similar situation? See which forms they get for distributions from tax-deferred accounts. It doesn't sound right that you can defer income, and then when it's time to distribute it, you can get another tax break. And just because increased taxes are withheld, that has nothing to do with your tax liability.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by StretchArmstrong » Tue Mar 28, 2017 6:59 pm

You should probably invest in a US-based mail service or use a family member's address just to avoid this (hopefully in a no tax state). The foreign address really messes things up.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by triceratop » Tue Mar 28, 2017 7:12 pm

celia wrote:I'm not an expert in this area, but think there is a good chance they are doing it correctly. I am assuming you still live outside the U.S. If so, you already benefit from a pretty good chunk of income not being taxed in the U.S., as I understand it. To make up for it, other items are probably treated differently than if you were living in the U.S. Your distributions from the 403b may be one example.

Are there any Americans living near you who may be in a similar situation? See which forms they get for distributions from tax-deferred accounts. It doesn't sound right that you can defer income, and then when it's time to distribute it, you can get another tax break. And just because increased taxes are withheld, that has nothing to do with your tax liability.
No. This is false.
"To play the stock market is to play musical chairs under the chord progression of a bid-ask spread."

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in_reality
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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by in_reality » Tue Mar 28, 2017 8:05 pm

budha1111 wrote: Any advice on how to get them to correct it (that is to cancell the 1024-S and issue instead 1099Rs?
How do I file my taxes if they don't do that?

THANK YOU!
If you are in fact not an NRA, but rather an American Citizen who received the money directly and not through some kind of flow-through entity, I would manually enter the 1099Rs.

I am not a tax professional but my thinking is this:

1) the amount you report will be accurate so I can't see a penalty in any case
2) if the IRS gets mad, I'd expect them to bring the issue up with Fidelity
3) Fidelity may get the issue corrected in the future
4) badgering Fidelity may get your account frozen (so you have to transfer out).
5) it's difficult as an expat to find a good broker. Don't leave unless you have to. Voting with your feet don't apply here I think.

Just for the record, here are the IRS instructions saying it's a mistake (it's in the i1042s instructions):

Amounts paid to an individual that is a bona fide resident of a U.S. possession or territory are not subject to reporting on Form 1042-S if the beneficial owner of the income is a U.S. citizen, national, or resident alien (such amounts may be subject to Form 1099 reporting).
https://www.irs.gov/instructions/i1042s ... tml#d0e251 [it's under 'who must file']

As for any questions of Fidelity being dense or lazy or whatever, let's chalk this up to complex regulations. Read the docs and your head will spin on the variations of cases where a US person is receiving the money.

For example, if they don't have a US person's W-9 on file, in the following case of there being a flow-through entity, income would go on Form 1042-S.
Payments allocated, or presumed made, to U.S. non-exempt recipients.
You may be given Forms W-9 or other information regarding U.S. non-exempt recipients from an NQI or flow-through entity together with information allocating all or a part of the payment to U.S. non-exempt recipients. You must report income allocable to a U.S. non-exempt recipient on the appropriate Form 1099 and not on Form 1042-S, even though you are paying that income to an NQI or a flow-through entity. If, however, a participating FFI or registered deemed-compliant FFI provides a withholding statement allocating all or part of the payment to a chapter 4 withholding rate pool of U.S. payees along with the certification provided on Form W-8IMY required for reporting such pool (as described in Regulations section 1.1471-3(c)(3)(iii)(B)), you must report the income allocable to such pool on Form 1042-S.
Sorry to be sympathetic to Fidelity here, but as an expat I am at their mercy - bless their hearts for having me who is surely such an unworthy guest (or that's my attitude anyway).

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by Saving$ » Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:18 pm

mhalley wrote:Sounds like you need a tax attorney to help straighten it out if you have escalated at fidelity to no avail. You might try contacting some senior executives at fidelity.
http://www.bloomberg.com/research/stock ... pId=163894
This.
But keep your letter VERY simple. State only
- You have a 403b from which you made withdrawals
- Fidelity issued a 1043-S, the form for non-resident aliens
- You are a non-resident US Citizen, so per the IRS you need a 1099-R
- Multiple calls to Fidelity have not resolved the issue, and you need help in resolving for this year and moving forward.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by HueyLD » Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:48 pm

A few suggestions for you.

(1). Send Fidelity a completed form W-9 indicating that you are a U.S. Citizen and not subject to the 30% withholding.

(2). If necessary, contact one of the executives Below:

EXECUTIVE CONTACTS
Primary Contact
Hank Kucinski
Director of Operations Excellence
245 Summer Street
Boston, MA 02201
Hank.Kucinski@fmr.com

Secondary Contact
Renee Jackson
Director, Customer Experience
245 Summer Street
Boston, MA 02201
Renee.Jackson@fmr.com

Timothy Neal
Customer Resolution Manager
245 Summer Street
Boston, MA 02201
Timothy.Neal@fmr.com

Chief Executive
Abby Johnson
CEO
245 Summer Street
Boston, MA 02201
abby.johnson@fmr.com

Timothy Neal may be your best bet.

Good luck. Hope your issue is resolved before year end. In the meantime, just file your tax return using the 1042-S and attach an explanation to your return indicating your unsuccessful efforts in trying to get Fidelity to issue a correct tax form.

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in_reality
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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by in_reality » Tue Mar 28, 2017 9:57 pm

HueyLD wrote: Good luck. Hope your issue is resolved before year end. In the meantime, just file your tax return using the 1042-S and attach an explanation to your return indicating your unsuccessful efforts in trying to get Fidelity to issue a correct tax form.
Does your tax liability change if it's on the 1042-S, compared to if you entered a (hypothetically correct) 1099-R manually? You would declare the 30% withheld and so be credited with having paid that. Other than losing the 30% until it's refunded, there isn't any difference is there?

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by jane1 » Tue Mar 28, 2017 10:57 pm

Send a Direct Message to them on Twitter. Twitter messages get very good customer service (from any company). Do not post confidential info, just the initial contact to get their attention.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by Katietsu » Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:10 pm

I believe you need to contact Fidelity in writing. You are most likely to get the desired outcome if you write out all the facts and provide the IRS documentation to them. Include a W-9 so that there can be no question about this.

You should not have to do their work for them. However, my experience is that it greatly increases your odds of success.

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in_reality
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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by in_reality » Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:16 pm

budha1111 wrote: How do I file my taxes if they don't do that?
Use Form 4852!!!

Turbotax states the following if you choose to enter a substitute 1099R.
Form 4852, Substitute for Form 1099-R, Distributions from Pensions, Annuities, Retirement or Profit-Sharing Plans, IRAs, Insurance Contracts, Etc.
Substitute Form 1099-R


If your plan administrator doesn't give you Form 1099-R for 2016 (or the one you receive is wrong and your plan administrator refuses to correct it), do your best to obtain the form or correction before completing a substitute on Form 4852.
You'll be required to:
- describe your communications with the plan administrator in your attempt
to get the form, and
- attest to the IRS that you were unable to obtain it.

Complete a Form 1099-R as if you actually received the correct form. Enter as much information about the payer as you can, including name, address, and the amounts for 2016. Then complete the information for the substitute form.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by HueyLD » Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:33 pm

in_reality wrote:
HueyLD wrote: Good luck. Hope your issue is resolved before year end. In the meantime, just file your tax return using the 1042-S and attach an explanation to your return indicating your unsuccessful efforts in trying to get Fidelity to issue a correct tax form.
Does your tax liability change if it's on the 1042-S, compared to if you entered a (hypothetically correct) 1099-R manually? You would declare the 30% withheld and so be credited with having paid that. Other than losing the 30% until it's refunded, there isn't any difference is there?
Correct.

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celia
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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by celia » Tue Mar 28, 2017 11:56 pm

triceratop wrote:
celia wrote:I'm not an expert in this area, but think there is a good chance they are doing it correctly. I am assuming you still live outside the U.S. If so, you already benefit from a pretty good chunk of income not being taxed in the U.S., as I understand it. To make up for it, other items are probably treated differently than if you were living in the U.S. Your distributions from the 403b may be one example.

Are there any Americans living near you who may be in a similar situation? See which forms they get for distributions from tax-deferred accounts. It doesn't sound right that you can defer income, and then when it's time to distribute it, you can get another tax break. And just because increased taxes are withheld, that has nothing to do with your tax liability.
No. This is false.
I was thinking about the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion when I said a lot of income is not taxed in the U.S. when you live outside the country:
https://www.irs.gov/individuals/interna ... -exclusion
I consider $100,000 a pretty good chunk of income.

in_reality wrote:Just for the record, here are the IRS instructions saying it's a mistake (it's in the i1042s instructions):
Amounts paid to an individual that is a bona fide resident of a U.S. possession or territory are not subject to reporting on Form 1042-S if the beneficial owner of the income is a U.S. citizen, national, or resident alien (such amounts may be subject to Form 1099 reporting).
https://www.irs.gov/instructions/i1042s ... tml#d0e251 [it's under 'who must file']
This sounds to me like it confirms that the 1042-S is correct. If the OP is NOT currently residing within U.S. boundaries, then (s)he IS subject to reporting on Form 1042-S. That is likely why the IRS told Fidelilty to change their procedures.

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in_reality
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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by in_reality » Wed Mar 29, 2017 12:17 am

celia wrote:
triceratop wrote:
celia wrote:I'm not an expert in this area, but think there is a good chance they are doing it correctly. I am assuming you still live outside the U.S. If so, you already benefit from a pretty good chunk of income not being taxed in the U.S., as I understand it. To make up for it, other items are probably treated differently than if you were living in the U.S. Your distributions from the 403b may be one example.

Are there any Americans living near you who may be in a similar situation? See which forms they get for distributions from tax-deferred accounts. It doesn't sound right that you can defer income, and then when it's time to distribute it, you can get another tax break. And just because increased taxes are withheld, that has nothing to do with your tax liability.
No. This is false.
I was thinking about the Foreign Earned Income Exclusion when I said a lot of income is not taxed in the U.S. when you live outside the country:
https://www.irs.gov/individuals/interna ... -exclusion
I consider $100,000 a pretty good chunk of income.
Foreign Earned Income is taxes by the country of residence.
Retirement distributions for US accounts are taxed by the US. You may not exclude it from taxable income.
Foreign Earned Income amounts are used to calculate your US tax bracket. It is not ignored.
celia wrote:
in_reality wrote:Just for the record, here are the IRS instructions saying it's a mistake (it's in the i1042s instructions):
...
This sounds to me like it confirms that the 1042-S is correct. If the OP is NOT currently residing within U.S. boundaries, then (s)he IS subject to reporting on Form 1042-S. That is likely why the IRS told Fidelilty to change their procedures.
OK, let me try that again. https://www.irs.gov/instructions/i1042s ... tml#d0e204
Amounts Subject to Reporting on Form 1042-S
Amounts subject to reporting on Form 1042-S are amounts from U.S. sources paid to foreign persons (including persons presumed to be foreign) or included in a U.S. payee pool that are reportable under chapters 3 and 4, even if no amount is deducted and withheld from the payment because of a treaty or Code exception to taxation or if any amount withheld was repaid to the payee.
So assuming the OP received the money directly, they must be a foreign person for it to be on Form 1042-S
Foreign person. A foreign person includes a nonresident alien individual, a foreign corporation, a foreign partnership, a foreign trust, a foreign estate, and any other person that is not a U.S. person. The term also includes a foreign branch or office of a U.S. financial institution or U.S. clearing organization if the foreign branch is a QI. A payment to a U.S. branch of a foreign person is treated as a payment to a foreign person for purposes of Form 1042-S.
By US law, a citizen is a US person and not a foreign person. Thus, a US citizen would not normally have it reported on a Form 1042-S. If they don't receive the money directly though and go through a non-qualified intermediary or pass-through entity, then it's possible for a Form 1042-S to be involved.

https://www.irs.gov/individuals/interna ... x-purposes

Anyway, use form 4852 per my previous post.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by TBillT » Wed Mar 29, 2017 12:42 pm

... Turbo Tax may have options to self-generate 1099's and other forms with appropriate explanation statements.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by budha1111 » Wed Mar 29, 2017 10:11 pm

Thank you guys for your replies. I managed to get more informative answer from Fidelity. After the IRS audit Fidelity changed their internal procedures so that for any account with a Foreign address, UNLESS there is a proof on file that the account holder is a US Citizen the account is flagged as a foreign person's account and the 30% tax withholding takes place and 1024-S is issued. And As proof:
"TedSwippet » Wed Mar 29, 2017 1:52 am
Is there any chance that you don't have a W-9 on file with Fidelity? Absent both this and a W-8BEN (for NRAs only),
they would have to follow a bunch of complex 'presumption' rules "

Indeed they require W9 (W-8BEn is for non-citizens). The point is that they never asked for it before.

"by in_reality » Wed Mar 29, 2017 4:05 am
Sorry to be sympathetic to Fidelity here, but as an expat I am at their
mercy - bless their hearts for having me who is surely
such an unworthy guest (or that's my attitude anyway)."

In reality there Is also something called "customer" . The most terrible thing for me is that Fidelity demonstrated total lack of care about the customer. For 3 years since my change of address they did not require W9 on file and changed it only the second half of 2016. You do such a major change, then notify your customers with foreign address that "as of <date> any account without a W9 on file will be flagged as foreign subject to 30% tax withholding and form 1024-S will be issued" . There was never any form of communications from Fidelity on this matter.

"HueyLD » Wed Mar 29, 2017 5:48 am
A few suggestions for you.
(1). Send Fidelity a completed form W-9 indicating that you are a U.S. Citizen
and not subject to the 30% withholding.
(2). If necessary, contact one of the executives Below:
Thank you Huey, I will do both. (2) is to convey my comments about customer service. I don't believe they will retroactively replace the forms. I got 2 towards the end of 2106 and unfortunately one for January 2017 withdrawal.

To all those who referred to tax breaks or foreign income exclusion etc. : There is no foreign earned money in this case (just my address is foreign); Since the source of the income is USA Retirement, there is no impact here on the tax liability itself. The 30% vs 20% refers just to how much Fidelity withhold. The actual tax liability is determined as usual when tax forms are filed and I will get a refund of the excess amount back. It still significant for me if they take extra 10% in January on a significant amount and I have to wait more than a year to get it back. But the main issue is the complexity of the filing and the need to do it manually with letters of explanation to the IRS.

"... StretchArmstrong » Wed Mar 29, 2017 2:59 am
You should probably invest in a US-based mail service or use a family
member's address just to avoid this (hopefully in a no tax state).
The foreign address really messes things up."
Well, that's what I did the first year (used my son's address in CA)... created more complications because Fidelity also withheld California state tax and I needed state filing as well, so I changed to the foreign address with Fidelity as a result.

For all those suggesting to use turbo tax for 1099R substitute, it won't help, because there is still a 1024-S reported to the IRS and the computer will view it as missing from my return. So it has to be manual with a letter of explanation. I am still not sure how to actually report the 1042-S on my return. I saw a similar case discussed 6 years ago and the suggestion was to report the amount of 1042-S as misc. income, and in the letter explain that the amount of the misc income is actually the one reported on the 1042-S.

Does this seems my best option?

Thank you

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by in_reality » Wed Mar 29, 2017 10:29 pm

budha1111 wrote: For all those suggesting to use turbo tax for 1099R substitute, it won't help, because there is still a 1024-S reported to the IRS and the computer will view it as missing from my return. So it has to be manual with a letter of explanation. I am still not sure how to actually report the 1042-S on my return. I saw a similar case discussed 6 years ago and the suggestion was to report the amount of 1042-S as misc. income, and in the letter explain that the amount of the misc income is actually the one reported on the 1042-S.
Again, create a 1099R substitute via form 4852. It was created for this purpose. There is space in the form for explanation, and is what TurboTax will have you do.
8 Form 1099-R. Enter distributions from pensions, annuities, retirement/profit-sharing plans, IRAs, insurance contracts, etc.
9 How did you determine the amounts on lines 7 and 8 above?
10 Explain your efforts to obtain Form W-2, Form 1099-R, or Form W-2c, Corrected Wage and Tax Statement.
https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f4852.pdf

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by budha1111 » Thu Mar 30, 2017 10:48 am

" by in_reality » Thu Mar 30, 2017 6:29 am
Again, create a 1099R substitute via form 4852. It was created for this purpose.
There is space in the form for explanation, and is what TurboTax will have you do."

o.k. Got it. Did not understand the first time that there is space for explanation where I can state that it is for the amount reported on 1024-S.
THANK YOU VERY MUCH.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by arniebar » Wed Apr 05, 2017 5:38 am

I had almost the same experience with Fidelity. They issued me both a 1099-R and a 1042-S, explaining that the 1042-S is for payments to me before they received my W-9, while the 1099-R is for payments after they had the W-9. Given my foreign address, it would appear on first sight that they applied the IRS presumption rules correctly to assume that I am a foreign person. However, I pointed out to them that when I applied to receive pension benefits I sent them a copy of my US passport (as proof of date of birth). I claimed that my US passport should have been sufficient proof that I am a "US person" even before they received the W-9, but they refused to send me a corrected 1099-R. I am no tax expert, but I find it difficult to accept that I should be treated as a nonresident alien at the same time that they have my US passport on file.

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by cyjliu » Mon Feb 26, 2018 10:13 pm

Hello,
I'm a US citizen living abroad since 2016. As a result of my foreign address I also received 1042S instead of 1099R.
I'm wondering what's your resolution as to how you finally filed your 2016 tax return and if you can give me some advice or insights on how to go about it. thank you.
Do I file form 4852 thru TurboTax (have to mail in)?
Is this the way you did it and did you get your tax refund?

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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by LadyGeek » Mon Feb 26, 2018 10:43 pm

FYI - cyjliu is asking the same question here: US citizen received 1042S instead of 1099R
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stlutz
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Re: Fidelity issued 1042-S Instead of 1099R. They Refuse to Change it

Post by stlutz » Mon Feb 26, 2018 11:44 pm

In the instructions to Form 4852, the IRS says that you should call them if the payor will not issue you a 1099. They will then contact the payor to request that they sent you the form.

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