Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

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livesoft
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby livesoft » Thu May 18, 2017 7:14 pm

You will need to be employed on June 1st won't you for health insurance reasons?
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Helo80
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Helo80 » Thu May 18, 2017 7:56 pm

Jags4186 wrote:Hi everyone I figured I'd revive this thread instead of posting a new one.

I have accepted a job and my start date will be June 19. I am scheduled for vacation the week of Memorial Day and figured I would come back on Monday June 5 and give my two weeks notice. After talking to a few people, it seems like the consensus is split--some say it's a crappy thing to do and would burn bridges, other's say don't risk losing your vacation (company's policy is to not pay out any accrued time upon departure whether voluntary or involuntary).


1. Do you have any plans to ever return to this company?
2. About half of the country require PTO to be paid out. The other half leaves it up to company policy. If your state leaves it to company policy, your state's DOL likely will only do something if the company acts against their written policy. If the written policy is as you say.... either take your PTO or lose it.
3. 9 times out of 10, if your mgmt is half-way decent, they'll be excited for you and happy to hear of a new opportunity. You're not required to let them know where you're going or for how much. Also, if your mgmt gets upset, their short-term loss is not worth it for your long-term (hopeful) gain.

Jags4186 wrote:I also have a few doctor bills coming in soon and I would like to use my Health Reimbursement Account to pay for them. I figure 4 weeks is enough time for them to come through.


I'm not sure how HRA's work. I have an HSA and medical insurance is already complicated enough such that I don't want to give you bad advice.

Jags4186 wrote:So the question is....is it a burning bridge scenario to go on vacation and then give two weeks notice on first day back? The company has been good to me (and in fact I fished for a counter offer about 16 months ago and received it) and I like my coworkers and boss. I just got a very good offer elsewhere.


Been there, done that. Would do it again. But, my direct manager knew my days were limited though I did not know my day or hour.

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FIREchief
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby FIREchief » Thu May 18, 2017 11:09 pm

I can't believe how complicated some of you are suggesting it is to quit a job. Just quit! Be professional? Yes. Give reasonable notice? Yes. Everything else? Forget about it. Nobody cares.

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FIREchief
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby FIREchief » Thu May 18, 2017 11:16 pm

btenny wrote:I am also not sure of the gov't/HR rules if they just walk you out the door the day you give notice and not pay you the extra two weeks from that date. I suspect they could say you already had your two weeks by taking vacation. But others may correct me on this detail.

Good Luck.


If your state has typical "at will" employment laws, it means that an employment relationship can be terminated at any time, by either party, for any reason (subject to legally protected discrimination laws). My old megacorp used to have a policy "requiring" advance notice to quit (yeah, I could never quit laughing about that one either). Finally, the lawyers intervened (I assume) and the policy changed to a "requested" notification.

Dyloot
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Dyloot » Thu May 18, 2017 11:42 pm

Jags4186 wrote:Hi everyone I figured I'd revive this thread instead of posting a new one.

I have accepted a job and my start date will be June 19. I am scheduled for vacation the week of Memorial Day and figured I would come back on Monday June 5 and give my two weeks notice. After talking to a few people, it seems like the consensus is split--some say it's a crappy thing to do and would burn bridges, other's say don't risk losing your vacation (company's policy is to not pay out any accrued time upon departure whether voluntary or involuntary). I also have a few doctor bills coming in soon and I would like to use my Health Reimbursement Account to pay for them. I figure 4 weeks is enough time for them to come through.

So the question is....is it a burning bridge scenario to go on vacation and then give two weeks notice on first day back? The company has been good to me (and in fact I fished for a counter offer about 16 months ago and received it) and I like my coworkers and boss. I just got a very good offer elsewhere.


You're feeling guilty, and you've conjured up a situation that likely will not play out. When you give notice, the conversation will likely not go "how long have you known? Did you take vacation knowing you were just coming back to quit? How could you do that to us?!?!?"

I've never once had a boss who questioned the details of how I got a job when I gave notice. If for some strange reason yours does, just say you got the offer right before you left on vacation.

I agree with FireChief. Most of the time, no one cares. People quit all the time. It's part of doing business.

While others may disagree, I find that sugarcoating the reason for leaving to be a good way of keeping a relationship strong as you head for the door. It's very simple to say: this is hard for me to say, but I'm taking another job. My experience here with this company has been amazing and I've loved working for you and with this team, but I've had an opportunity come up that I need to take for my family."

MrJones
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby MrJones » Fri May 19, 2017 12:40 am

Dyloot wrote:You're feeling guilty, and you've conjured up a situation that likely will not play out. When you give notice, the conversation will likely not go "how long have you known? Did you take vacation knowing you were just coming back to quit? How could you do that to us?!?!?"

I've never once had a boss who questioned the details of how I got a job when I gave notice. If for some strange reason yours does, just say you got the offer right before you left on vacation.


+1

sunny_socal
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby sunny_socal » Fri May 19, 2017 4:59 am

Dyloot wrote:You're feeling guilty, and you've conjured up a situation that likely will not play out. When you give notice, the conversation will likely not go "how long have you known? Did you take vacation knowing you were just coming back to quit? How could you do that to us?!?!?"

I've never once had a boss who questioned the details of how I got a job when I gave notice. If for some strange reason yours does, just say you got the offer right before you left on vacation.

I agree with FireChief. Most of the time, no one cares. People quit all the time. It's part of doing business.


Oh this exact scenario has happened to me. Boss was not thrilled and tried to grill me from every angle. It was not pleasant.

While others may disagree, I find that sugarcoating the reason for leaving to be a good way of keeping a relationship strong as you head for the door. It's very simple to say: this is hard for me to say, but I'm taking another job. My experience here with this company has been amazing and I've loved working for you and with this team, but I've had an opportunity come up that I need to take for my family."


This is good. No need to share all the details, just remain cordial and things will be ok. Tell _everyone_ how great it's been to work with them and that you'd do so again in the future. (even people you don't like)

Bacchus01
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Bacchus01 » Fri May 19, 2017 5:49 am

tinscale wrote:1. Give at least 2 weeks notice, 3 if you are amidst a key project (if new employer is ok with waiting).
2. What you already said - I'm leaving for career growth and pay.
3. Just go in and tell the boss. It's always awkward/uncomfortable. Hand him/her a letter.
4. Why not? Who cares?
5. Co-workers will know before you get back to your desk.

Take a bucket and fill it with water,put your hand in it up to the wrist, and pull out your hand. The hole that's remaining Is a measure of how much you'll be missed.



This is pretty spot on. 2 weeks is fine. I've had much higher level jobs and 2 weeks is fine. Although I currently have a 12 month notice in my contract that goes both ways. Kinda nice that way.

As for why you left, always position it as you are going to something and not moving away from something. Opportunity, pay, advancement, exciting new challenge, etc. never leave with a "I don't like it here" theme of response. Never torpedo your boss unless he/she is really really bad.

I've never not told someone where I was going. When people refuse to share that information with me, I immediately begin to distrust that person and rationalize good reasons they are now gone. I really don't understand this. If it's a competitor, we're going to catch you on your non compete anyway.

Take some time off between jobs. Really. Take at least a week and 2 is preferred. Your new employer doesn't need you that bad. Decompress from the old job and clear your mind. Get ready for the new one. Get a few personal things done so they don't hang out there when you start the new one. Hopefully you will only have a few company changes in your life. Use the time in between to reset. Read the book "the first 90 days." While it's slanted towards senior executives and c-suite roles, I think the learnings in there around prep and assessment are very important for most people changing jobs.

Good luck.

Boglegrappler
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Boglegrappler » Fri May 19, 2017 7:28 am

I've only got a couple of pieces of advice.

1. Be prepared for anything. They could tell you to get out now. Be sure you're calm about this, and courteous. Stay on the high road always always always, because:

2. The world is much smaller than people imagine, and remarkable twists and things happen. One of the biggest, which I've seen more than once, and heard of many times, is crossing paths in the future with someone you've disrespected or burned bridges with in the past. It's not unheard of to wind up working for someone again at another place that you assumed you'd never see again (e.g. the guy gets hired in above you). It's also happened that people return to where they once were, as long as they were on great terms when they left. Never discount any of these possibilities.

Dyloot
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Dyloot » Fri May 19, 2017 9:21 am

sunny_socal wrote:
Dyloot wrote:You're feeling guilty, and you've conjured up a situation that likely will not play out. When you give notice, the conversation will likely not go "how long have you known? Did you take vacation knowing you were just coming back to quit? How could you do that to us?!?!?"

I've never once had a boss who questioned the details of how I got a job when I gave notice. If for some strange reason yours does, just say you got the offer right before you left on vacation.

I agree with FireChief. Most of the time, no one cares. People quit all the time. It's part of doing business.


Oh this exact scenario has happened to me. Boss was not thrilled and tried to grill me from every angle. It was not pleasant.


I've, thankfully, never had that happen. For the OP, it's really an easy fix. He can just say he didn't get an official offer until he was on vacation. If that doesn't satisfy the manager, what else can you do other than hold your ground?

I have heard from managers who were suspicious of employees who were taking half day doctor's appointments (for a suspected job interview), but I've yet to work with a manager who grilled the employee for details as he or she was giving notice.

I'd also say it's really in the employers best interest to celebrate your opportunity instead of playing the victim. If you want to keep morale high when a valued person leaves, you throw him or her a party. You tell everyone that they are leaving for a really, really good reason. You allow that employee to tell everyone how much they loved working there and how they'll miss everyone. You tell he or she that you are proud of them. The departure may still be bad for business, but a good manager will still craft as much of a positive perception as possible as they search for a replacement.

ny_knicks
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby ny_knicks » Fri May 19, 2017 9:47 am

Make a meeting with your manager and tell them you are leaving for better opportunity/more pay/better commute/whatever other reason you want to share. Clearly tell them your last day will be x.

If they ask where you are going to work I personally think it is fine to share. I think it can come off as a bit standoffish if you don't but everyone feels differently. Your professional network is very important. You never know when you will interact with/need help from those in it again so leave on the best note possible. Most people are very understanding.

Do your best to make the transition as smooth as possible. Some places will have you leave immediately others will want you to work as long as possible. Everyone feels that thy are irreplaceable but the reality is within a few weeks everyone will get their new routine down and they probably won't even remember you left.

Bacchus01
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Bacchus01 » Fri May 19, 2017 12:34 pm

KlangFool wrote:
DoubleClick wrote:I think it's been established that giving written notice is the way to go.

As LadyGeek said, it would be nice to now focus on other best practices. I'd rather the written notice issue not derail what has been an excellent thread :).


DoubleClick,

1) Send an email out to thank everyone and provide your personal email address to your co-workers before your leave the company.

2) After you leave and started work with the new employer, wait at least one month before contacting any of your former co-workers.

3) After one month, send an email to your former boss and co-workers to inform them where you landed if you are in good relationship with them.

KlangFool


Whatever you do, don't do any of this.


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