Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

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DoubleClick
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Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby DoubleClick » Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:34 pm

So I've lined up a new job and want to resign from my current job.

I'm in tech, and in perhaps between a lower and a mid-level position. I'm leaving for career growth and pay. I really don't want to burn bridges, since in tech, it's not unusual to come back to a company one left, or to bump into people elsewhere. In fact, I want to leave on the smoothest, friendliest, and most professional note possible. With that in mind:

1) Should I stick with the two-week notice or give 3-4 weeks? They'd have to scramble to find a replacement for me, and I'd like to minimize their trouble since the company has been good to me. What are the risks to giving a longer notice?

2) What should I say is the reason, to keep it as smooth as possible?

3) How do I broach this topic with my manager? Literally, what words can I use? It is an "announcement"? Decision? News?

4) Should I avoid mentioning where I'm going? (Edit: I'm not going to a competitor or anything like that)

5) Any other tips for how to handle it, before, after, etc.? Eg: When is the best time to inform my co-workers?

Thank you!
Last edited by DoubleClick on Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:20 pm, edited 3 times in total.

alfaspider
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby alfaspider » Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:42 pm

DoubleClick wrote:So I've lined up a new job and want to resign from my current job.

I'm in tech, and in perhaps between a lower and a mid-level position. I'm leaving for career growth and pay. I really don't want to burn bridges, since in tech, it's not unusual to come back to a company one left, or to bump into people elsewhere. In fact, I want to leave on the smoothest, friendliest, and most professional note possible. With that in mind:

1) Should I stick with the two-week notice or give 3-4 weeks? They'd have to scramble to find a replacement for me, and I'd like to minimize their trouble since the company has been good to me. What are the risks to giving a longer notice?

2) What should I say is the reason, to keep it as smooth as possible?

3) How do I broach this topic? Literally, what words can I use? It is an "announcement"? Decision? News?

4) Should avoid mentioning where I'm going?

5) Any other tips for how to handle it, before, after, etc.? Eg: When is the best time to inform my co-workers?

Thank you!


1) May depend on employer. You should be prepared for the possibility that they will dismiss you immediately. Two weeks shouldn't burn bridges.

2) You don't need to give a reason. If asked, you can let them know you were presented with an exciting opportunity.

3) Any of those works. Gets the point across.

4) I don't see why you would do this. Better for your professional network for people to know where you are going.

5) Will depend on your relationships. When I left my last job, I let a few trusted friends know as soon as I received the offer. I gave my bosses the customary 2 weeks. Worked out fine.

People leave companies all the time. Unless you are a senior executive where there are market disclosure implications, most departures are just met with a shrug.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby simplesimon » Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:44 pm

Two weeks. I have a friend who tried to give the company longer and they actually cut him that day.

Nobody will say "oh DoubleClick is a jerk for making us scramble his last two weeks". There will be at least one or two people on your team that wished they found something before you did or are happy that you have an opportunity to advance (depends on what kind of people they are).

Pull your boss into a meeting and just say "you found a better opportunity for growth" and that you'll do the best you can to make it a smooth transition. You don't need to disclose where you're going.

Someone on my team left and came back to the company within three months. His departure was managed in this way and nobody had any hard feelings.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Swansea » Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:45 pm

At the level you state you are, two weeks is fine. Also, your loyalty will now be to the new company, so don't keep them waiting. Make very sure to tell your boss before anyone else at work.
Just state you have accepted a very good offer. There is no need to go into detail. If the boss asks, sure, tell him the name of the firm. Once you've done all that, you should let your co-workers know.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby imsomeguy » Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:46 pm

1 - depends on a few things, but 3-4 weeks would be courteous. But be firm too and ensure your new employer is ok with your start date too

2 - be honest, if you are leaving for more $ and better opportunities stay so, you aren't the first who left for those reasons But be careful because you might get counter-offered so be prepared on how to handle that if necessary. Some will say its never good to accept a counter for a variety of reasons but that may be a different discussion

3 - Depends on your relationship with your boss and employer. My employers have always required a formal resignation email, but I always went up to my boss and had the discussion in person then followed up with the formal email for HR purposes.

4 - Yea I usually avoid mentioning it because I'm always going to a competitor and it could make the final few weeks awkward. But again people try to beat that info out of you so be prepared to handle it.

Congrats on the offer and new gig, just stick to your guns

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby jf89 » Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:49 pm

Make it clear that you are leaving... not that you received an offer. Don't give your boss the opportunity to get their hopes up and provide a counter... unless that's what you're fishing for.

The cleanest thing to say is "I'd like to put in my two weeks' notice" then hand over your signed letter. After that it's all about your boss's curiosity. If they don't have any questions, then just thank them and walk out of their office and back to work. In my experience, their questions are going to be about 1) Whether there's some way to keep you and 2) The reasons you're leaving. Keep your answers short and try not to offend them.
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Jack FFR1846 » Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:54 pm

Boy....it's all "it depends" with regard to notice. I once left a job as a lead technologist at a large company to work a field job where my old company would be one of my customers. I gave them 7 weeks notice. They didn't even start looking for a replacement until 2 weeks before I left.
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby KlangFool » Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:55 pm

Swansea wrote:At the level you state you are, two weeks is fine. Also, your loyalty will now be to the new company, so don't keep them waiting. Make very sure to tell your boss before anyone else at work.
Just state you have accepted a very good offer. There is no need to go into detail. If the boss asks, sure, tell him the name of the firm. Once you've done all that, you should let your co-workers know.


Swansea,

Do not do that. In fact, do not tell anyone where you are going until you started the new job for a few months.

There have been instances where

A) The new employer had been sued and forced to withdraw the offer. The current employer claimed some kind of pre-existing non-competitive or confidential requirement.

B) The current boss / co-worker knows somebody in the new employer and spread bad stuff before the person starts.

Do not create any problem for yourself.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby KlangFool » Wed Aug 31, 2016 2:59 pm

OP,

Just tell your boss that you resign and will be gone in 2 weeks. Do not explain and give a reason. Just say it is time to go. Do not tell where you are going and whether you have an offer. Just say that you will inform your boss in future when you had settled down if he / she is interested.

It is a very small world. I had seen too many bad stuff happened when someone tells / discloses too much. Nothing good ever come out of this.

Remember to send an e-mail to your boss and CCed the HR. BCC a copy to yourself too. I had seen situations where the boss withheld the resignation letter and claimed that it never happened. Learn to protect yourself.

KlangFool

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby itstoomuch » Wed Aug 31, 2016 3:29 pm

Companies don't have to tell you anything when they fire/RIF you.
You don't have to tell anybody why you are leaving.
It's unfortunate. Even in America where our culture is to forge ahead, Corporate expects loyalty but often shows none.
YMMV

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DoubleClick
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby DoubleClick » Wed Aug 31, 2016 3:42 pm

Thanks everyone for the wealth of advice so far!

simplesimon wrote:Two weeks. I have a friend who tried to give the company longer and they actually cut him that day.


This is unlikely where I work because it's tech where leaving is common and generally peaceful. But for curiosity, would the friend be eligible for unemployment in this situation?

itstoomuch wrote:It's unfortunate. Even in America where our culture is to forge ahead, Corporate expects loyalty but often shows none.


I agree 100%. My view though is that despite this, people matter, and I want to try to not perpetuate the resulting defensive environment so common at megacorps.


alfaspider wrote:People leave companies all the time. Unless you are a senior executive where there are market disclosure implications, most departures are just met with a shrug.


Thanks, reminder to me to not worry about this too much.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby cherijoh » Wed Aug 31, 2016 3:47 pm

alfaspider wrote:
DoubleClick wrote:So I've lined up a new job and want to resign from my current job.

I'm in tech, and in perhaps between a lower and a mid-level position. I'm leaving for career growth and pay. I really don't want to burn bridges, since in tech, it's not unusual to come back to a company one left, or to bump into people elsewhere. In fact, I want to leave on the smoothest, friendliest, and most professional note possible. With that in mind:

1) Should I stick with the two-week notice or give 3-4 weeks? They'd have to scramble to find a replacement for me, and I'd like to minimize their trouble since the company has been good to me. What are the risks to giving a longer notice?

2) What should I say is the reason, to keep it as smooth as possible?

3) How do I broach this topic? Literally, what words can I use? It is an "announcement"? Decision? News?

4) Should avoid mentioning where I'm going?

5) Any other tips for how to handle it, before, after, etc.? Eg: When is the best time to inform my co-workers?

Thank you!


1) May depend on employer. You should be prepared for the possibility that they will dismiss you immediately. Two weeks shouldn't burn bridges.

2) You don't need to give a reason. If asked, you can let them know you were presented with an exciting opportunity.

3) Any of those works. Gets the point across.

4) I don't see why you would do this. Better for your professional network for people to know where you are going.

5) Will depend on your relationships. When I left my last job, I let a few trusted friends know as soon as I received the offer. I gave my bosses the customary 2 weeks. Worked out fine.

People leave companies all the time. Unless you are a senior executive where there are market disclosure implications, most departures are just met with a shrug.


+1

At my company it is typical to be walked out the door if you are in technology and going to a competitor, but if you are retiring they let you work out your notice. I would offer 2 weeks - doesn't your new employer want you to come on ASAP?

Typically when someone is leaving they send an email out on their last day with their home email to colleagues with whom they want to stay in touch. As far as informing the immediate team, I would follow the lead of your supervisor. If you are allowed to work out your two-week notice he/she may want work out a plan to reassign duties before you make your big announcement.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby HoosierJim » Wed Aug 31, 2016 3:52 pm

KlangFool wrote:OP,

... BCC a copy to yourself too.


+1
The bcc should be to your current company email address and an outside email (ie. gmail,hotmail,etc)

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby DoubleClick » Wed Aug 31, 2016 3:56 pm

cherijoh wrote:At my company it is typical to be walked out the door if you are in technology and going to a competitor, but if you are retiring they let you work out your notice. I would offer 2 weeks - doesn't your new employer want you to come on ASAP?


If they walk you out the door, is that technically you being fired or do they continue to pay you for two more weeks? Is this a tech company you're talking about or a tech position in a non-tech company?

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby AddingUp » Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:20 pm

DoubleClick wrote:If they walk you out the door, is that technically you being fired or do they continue to pay you for two more weeks? Is this a tech company you're talking about or a tech position in a non-tech company?



You're not fired (or laid off) if you resign. You will be paid through the day you include in your resignation letter, so you determine your last pay date. Also, medical insurance goes through the entire month, so if you determine that September 2, for example, will be your last day, your medical insurance will stay in effect through the endof September. It's something to consider if you don't get medical coverage until 30 or 90 days after you start your new job (very typical nowadays).

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby cherijoh » Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:29 pm

DoubleClick wrote:
cherijoh wrote:At my company it is typical to be walked out the door if you are in technology and going to a competitor, but if you are retiring they let you work out your notice. I would offer 2 weeks - doesn't your new employer want you to come on ASAP?


If they walk you out the door, is that technically you being fired or do they continue to pay you for two more weeks? Is this a tech company you're talking about or a tech position in a non-tech company?


You get paid your two weeks. NC is a right to work state, so even if you offer them 2 weeks notice they don't have to take you up on it. Most people wouldn't object to getting paid for not working the two weeks notice. :wink:

It is a technology position in a non-tech company.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby DoubleClick » Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:35 pm

cherijoh wrote:You get paid your two weeks. NC is a right to work state, so even if you offer them 2 weeks notice they don't have to take you up on it. Most people wouldn't object to getting paid for not working the two weeks notice. :wink:

It is a technology position in a non-tech company.


Thanks for the info.

I thought this was an "at-will employment" issue. Isn't the "right to work " state related to unions, or am I mistaken and is it relevant here?

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby alshayed » Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:36 pm

With regard to medical, the flip side is you might not become eligible until after 3 full months. (or whatever) It might make sense to ask the new employer what their medical coverage policy is first if possible.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby DoubleClick » Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:43 pm

AddingUp wrote:Also, medical insurance goes through the entire month, so if you determine that September 2, for example, will be your last day, your medical insurance will stay in effect through the endof September. It's something to consider if you don't get medical coverage until 30 or 90 days after you start your new job (very typical nowadays).


Whew, I never even thought of health insurance, thanks for bringing this up. Is coverage through the month the standard (law?) throughout the country?

What happens if one resigns on Friday the 31st of a month, and starts on Monday the 3rd of the next month? Do they not get covered through the weekend?

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby corwin » Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:47 pm

If the company was good to you while you worked there they will likely be good to you when leave. It is in their best interest to let you leave on good terms. A good company doesn't want you saying bad things about them on glassdoor.com or to your friends in tech. (We have had a number of employees leave for better opportunities and then return within a year.)

Two weeks is plenty of notice at your level.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby jayjayc » Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:53 pm

If you want to leave on the best note possible, don't mention anything negative during the exit interview. The HR partner conducting the exit interview will most likely say it's a safe environment where you can voice anything and it will be held confidential. Assume that if you say anything negative about your manager or co-workers, the HR partner will share that.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby AddingUp » Wed Aug 31, 2016 4:56 pm

DoubleClick wrote:
AddingUp wrote:Also, medical insurance goes through the entire month, so if you determine that September 2, for example, will be your last day, your medical insurance will stay in effect through the endof September. It's something to consider if you don't get medical coverage until 30 or 90 days after you start your new job (very typical nowadays).


Whew, I never even thought of health insurance, thanks for bringing this up. Is coverage through the month the standard (law?) throughout the country?

What happens if one resigns on Friday the 31st of a month, and starts on Monday the 3rd of the next month? Do they not get covered through the weekend?



The coverage goes through the end of the calendar month only. I've never known it not to extend throughout the entire month, because technically you've paid for it already even if you work only a day of the new month. In your example above, the coverage would end on the 31st of that month, so you wouldn't be covered over the weekend. Better not climb Everest in that case, eh?

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby fareastwarriors » Wed Aug 31, 2016 5:37 pm

I know it's customary for to give a 2-weeks notice. But is it really enough time for the employer/team side?

I work in a team of 4 total and we are really busy. If team member quits and give me us only 2 weeks, we would have to scramble and suffer for a long while before we can get a replacement.... It takes longer than 2 weeks here just to have the job description approve for external distribution.

I hope my team members give longer notices when they leave or retire...

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby whodidntante » Wed Aug 31, 2016 5:54 pm

I really don't understand the mindset of "I'm leaving, so I'm going to do a total 180 and keep everything to myself" mindset. You've made a big decision that impacts others. If you have worked in this place for several years, you don't have to share things, but it's very polite to do so and people will generally appreciate it.

1. Give 2 weeks, and actually work your usual hours during those two weeks except for maybe the last day. You can give more if you know it would really be appreciated and you can accommodate. However, this depends on the culture where you are. I've also seen cultures/situations where you would be walked out the day you give notice. I've also seen people give months of notice and both sides were happy.

2. I would share the reason with your manager if possible. People generally know if you are lying. However, if the reason is that your boss is a jerk, probably keep that one to yourself. Everybody understands a more exciting project, higher pay, etc.

3. Ask for a meeting with your manager, and let him know you have something urgent to discuss if he's busy.

4. Up to you. If it's a competitor, you might get walked out immediately due to security concerns. But you said you aren't. I personally don't see the harm in it, but you might. For example, if you think they might try to sabotage your new job through connections that someone has.

5. Speak with your manager about how to announce your departure. You really don't want to go blurting it out without having thought it through. This can cause rumors, confusion, hurt feelings, etc.

If they value you and you mention money or responsibilities as your reason for leaving, it's not unusual to make you a counter offer. However, it's not really expected that you will take it. You can refuse, but you should be thankful for the attempt to close the gap that caused you to leave.

There is really no reason to be a jerk on the way out. I'm not saying that you would be, but I have seen others do that and it's a mistake. Be yourself.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby DoubleClick » Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:20 pm

whodidntante wrote:I really don't understand the mindset of "I'm leaving, so I'm going to do a total 180 and keep everything to myself" mindset. You've made a big decision that impacts others. If you have worked in this place for several years, you don't have to share things, but it's very polite to do so and people will generally appreciate it.


I have no clue where you got the idea that that mindset was behind my question, but you are 100% incorrect. In fact, the mindset is the opposite, and I asked my question precisely because I want to be as friendly, helpful, and professional as possible, but learn from others' experience as to when and why things are best done a certain way.

whodidntante wrote:1. Give 2 weeks, [...] You can give more if you know it would really be appreciated and you can accommodate. However, this depends on the culture where you are. I've also seen cultures/situations where you would be walked out the day you give notice. I've also seen people give months of notice and both sides were happy.


If I had the mindset you brought up, I wouldn't be asking if I could give a longer notice, would I?

whodidntante wrote:5. Speak with your manager about how to announce your departure. You really don't want to go blurting it out without having thought it through. This can cause rumors, confusion, hurt feelings, etc.


I was asking about broaching the topic with my manager. I'll edit the OP to clarify.

whodidntante wrote:There is really no reason to be a jerk on the way out. I'm not saying that you would be, but I have seen others do that and it's a mistake. Be yourself.


Your post largely seems to be based on telling someone there's no need to be a jerk. I really have no clue why you projected that on to the question. Thanks for sharing though, and for the rest of your points.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby LadyGeek » Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:25 pm

This thread is now in the Personal Finance (Not Investing) forum (career guidance). I did this for real last month:

1. Give two week notice.

2. Send an email to your boss and HR. Word it exactly as shown:
To whom it may concern,

This is to inform you I am resigning my position effective (date). My last day in the office will be (date).

Regards,

3. Send the email a few minutes before you tell your boss in person.

4. Tell everyone else after you tell your boss.

Prepare to be walked out the same day. Remove every personal item from your office space, scrub your PC for personal info.

I never told my coworkers or former company where I was going. In that type of environment, I had no qualms to withhold information. They never gave me an exit interview, just a checklist to be sure I turned everything in.
To some, the glass is half full. To others, the glass is half empty. To an engineer, it's twice the size it needs to be.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby DoubleClick » Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:25 pm

fareastwarriors wrote:I know it's customary for to give a 2-weeks notice. But is it really enough time for the employer/team side?

I work in a team of 4 total and we are really busy. If team member quits and give me us only 2 weeks, we would have to scramble and suffer for a long while before we can get a replacement.... It takes longer than 2 weeks here just to have the job description approve for external distribution.

I hope my team members give longer notices when they leave or retire...


This is closer to my group's situation. I think a longer notice will be appreciated, so I'll consider this.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby cherijoh » Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:29 pm

You could be right, I may have flipped my terms. My point was that OP doesn't want to announce he is leaving too soon or he may be out before he wants to be.

DoubleClick wrote:
cherijoh wrote:You get paid your two weeks. NC is a right to work state, so even if you offer them 2 weeks notice they don't have to take you up on it. Most people wouldn't object to getting paid for not working the two weeks notice. :wink:

It is a technology position in a non-tech company.


Thanks for the info.

I thought this was an "at-will employment" issue. Isn't the "right to work " state related to unions, or am I mistaken and is it relevant here?

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby hcj » Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:36 pm

I usually book a meeting with my manager (or just walk in if they look free) and say "I got a really great job offer and I'm going to take it." There's some back and forth and conversation so you would work in something positive about the team/manager/company. If appropriate you could ask if they want you to work on a transition plan, but you have to see how they react first (because as PPs mentioned, sometimes its policy to walk you out immediately). Last day can be up for discussion, if you're open to staying longer than two weeks you would discuss that as well. I then follow up with the written resignation via email including the agreed-on last day.

At places I've worked, it's customary to send a goodbye email on your last day to people you worked with. It has some positive things like how much you learned and how much you will miss them. And your personal contact info if you want to stay in touch. Add the people you worked with closely to your LinkedIn.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby ToastCrunchToast » Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:42 pm

I resigned from my technology company a month ago (to retire early).

Most large tech companies have this policy: if you are taking a job with a "competitor", you WILL be escorted out of the building as soon as HR and your management chain is satisfied that you can be spared without further cross-training, etc. They will not tell you when security is coming, they just will, and your co-workers will watch. It's embarrassing, but there's not much to be done about it. Take the high road and be gracious all around, and take those extra days of free time between the day they escort you out and the termination date you gave them.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Billionaire » Wed Aug 31, 2016 6:47 pm

Your boss should be the first person to know about your plans. Otherwise, you are burning bridges.

I've never told anybody the name of the new company I am heading, until after I'm situated there. You don't want to give anybody the opportunity to rain on your parade by saying something such as "oh, that company just laid a bunch of people off" or something similar. I sure there are also cases where somebody called up the new employee and attempted to sabotage your reputation. Extreme cases I'm sure, but better to be cautious.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Watty » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:01 pm

+1 on just giving two weeks notice, few people are as critical as they think they are.

If you can go on vacation and the company can get by for a couple of weeks without you then they will do fine.

I retired last year earlier than my employer expected and transitioning my work was easy since I had been on vacation a few months before so people already knew what to do when I was out of the office. I just gave two weeks notice and spent most of that time wrapping up a few projects and passing a few other projects on to other people.

A huge problem is that having you around as a "short timer" could be very bad for office moral in general.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby LadyGeek » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:19 pm

I'm fresh off the "new job" experience, so I'd like to pass along a few pointers that you should plan for.

1. Your medical benefit plan will be terminated on the last day of employment. While you might be covered on Day 1 of your new job, it will take a few weeks to get everything back to normal.

Do you have a drug plan with currently active subscriptions? If so, stock up for one month of medication before the plan stops and you run out. My new employer took a few weeks longer than planned to turn on the new plan, so I was scrambling to restart things.

You'll also be covered under COBRA for 30 days after termination of your old employer. This is an option if things go awry. You can file for COBRA within this 30 day window.

2. You will have 2 employers for 2016. Use caution on 401(k) contributions, as the IRS limits apply to all of your accounts - the aggregate for the year. You might need a spreadsheet to keep track of everything. Your final paycheck should have a summary of year-to-date info.

3. You will be paid for unused vacation. This is taxable income, so be prepared to do a quick recalculation of your W-4 withholding info when you start your new job. The IRS Withholding Calculator knows how to work with 2 jobs.

4. Do you have a Flexible spending arrangement? If so, buy medication / get tests / take exams, etc. up to your allocated amount for the year. You're entitled to your full election amount and do not have to reimburse your employer for the difference.
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby simplesimon » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:30 pm

DoubleClick wrote:
simplesimon wrote:Two weeks. I have a friend who tried to give the company longer and they actually cut him that day.


This is unlikely where I work because it's tech where leaving is common and generally peaceful. But for curiosity, would the friend be eligible for unemployment in this situation?


If I recall correctly, he filed for UI and it was fine.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby whodidntante » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:31 pm

DoubleClick wrote:Your post largely seems to be based on telling someone there's no need to be a jerk. I really have no clue why you projected that on to the question.


It is possible you have taken offense where I meant none. My comments regard mistakes I've observed others make in their stress over leaving a job. I have not made a judgement about you.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby DoubleClick » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:38 pm

whodidntante wrote:
DoubleClick wrote:Your post largely seems to be based on telling someone there's no need to be a jerk. I really have no clue why you projected that on to the question.


It is possible you have taken offense where I meant none. My comments regard mistakes I've observed others make in their stress over leaving a job. I have not made a judgement about you.


It's your first para that seemed to be speaking to me in specific (see below). Either way, good to know, it's all good, thanks for the message and the post.

whodidntante wrote:I really don't understand the mindset of "I'm leaving, so I'm going to do a total 180 and keep everything to myself" mindset. You've made a big decision that impacts others. If you have worked in this place for several years, you don't have to share things, but it's very polite to do so and people will generally appreciate it.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby cherijoh » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:42 pm

LadyGeek wrote:I'm fresh off the "new job" experience, so I'd like to pass along a few pointers that you should plan for.

1. Your medical benefit plan will be terminated on the last day of employment. While you might be covered on Day 1 of your new job, it will take a few weeks to get everything back to normal.

Do you have a drug plan with currently active subscriptions? If so, stock up for one month of medication before the plan stops and you run out. My new employer took a few weeks longer than planned to turn on the new plan, so I was scrambling to restart things.

You'll also be covered under COBRA for 30 days after termination of your old employer. This is an option if things go awry. You can file for COBRA within this 30 day window.

2. You will have 2 employers for 2016. Use caution on 401(k) contributions, as the IRS limits apply to all of your accounts - the aggregate for the year. You might need a spreadsheet to keep track of everything. Your final paycheck should have a summary of year-to-date info.

3. You will be paid for unused vacation. This is taxable income, so be prepared to do a quick recalculation of your W-4 withholding info when you start your new job. The IRS Withholding Calculator knows how to work with 2 jobs.

4. Do you have a Flexible spending arrangement? If so, buy medication / get tests / take exams, etc. up to your allocated amount for the year. You're entitled to your full election amount and do not have to reimburse your employer for the difference.


Good checklist. Also find out when you'll be able to start making contributions to your 401k plan. Some companies are slower than others to start payroll deductions. In a few rare cases, you may have to wait for a specified period before you can join the 401k plan and other companies don't start matching immediately.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby TravelGeek » Wed Aug 31, 2016 7:45 pm

ToastCrunchToast wrote:Most large tech companies have this policy: if you are taking a job with a "competitor", you WILL be escorted out of the building as soon as HR and your management chain is satisfied that you can be spared without further cross-training, etc. They will not tell you when security is coming, they just will, and your co-workers will watch.


One benefit of working from home :). I guess the electronic equivalent will be the disabling of the VPN account.

I never really understood this security drama. Those who were tempted to copy the source code repository or other confidential material would presumably do that before giving notice.

And it would be particularly weird in a multinational company where different countries have different policies.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby munemaker » Wed Aug 31, 2016 9:08 pm

AddingUp wrote:You will be paid through the day you include in your resignation letter, so you determine your last pay date. Also, medical insurance goes through the entire month, so if you determine that September 2, for example, will be your last day, your medical insurance will stay in effect through the endof September. It's something to consider if you don't get medical coverage until 30 or 90 days after you start your new job (very typical nowadays).


I don't think we do that at our company. If you are walked out, I think your pay stops that day. Medical insurance ends on your last day of work.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby LadyGeek » Wed Aug 31, 2016 9:29 pm

^^^ That's what happened to me.

I set my resignation date for Sunday so I could start my new job on Monday and maintain my coverage. What happened? HR stated they always hire on Monday, fire on Friday. My employment was terminated on Friday, with benefit coverage ending at midnight.

Employment at will works both ways.
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby hcj » Wed Aug 31, 2016 10:01 pm

At my last few jobs you got paid through your last day at work (so if they walked you out the same day, that's the last day you got paid). And insurance was good for the rest of the calendar month. Seems like (from above replies) that this varies by company?

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Watty » Wed Aug 31, 2016 10:12 pm

LadyGeek wrote:3. You will be paid for unused vacation.


Not always, it may depend on your state law and company policies. The company I retired from switched from vacation and sick time to a combined paid time off a few years ago. When they did that they also changed the policy to not pay for unused paid time off when you left in states that did not specifically require it.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Watty » Wed Aug 31, 2016 10:14 pm

LadyGeek wrote:3. You will be paid for unused vacation.


Not always, it may depend on your state law and company policies. The company I retired from switched from vacation and sick time to a combined paid time off a few years ago. When they did that they also changed the policy to not pay for unused paid time off when you left in states that did not specifically require it.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Epsilon Delta » Wed Aug 31, 2016 10:52 pm

LadyGeek wrote:You'll also be covered under COBRA for 30 days after termination of your old employer. This is an option if things go awry. You can file for COBRA within this 30 day window.

I'm not sure that's accurate. You have 60 days from the date the COBRA notice is sent to apply for COBRA. If you apply during that period the coverage is retroactive to the date of termination, as are the insurance premiums you must pay. Many people take advantage of this to cover a short term gap by leaving a filled in application with a trusted person to be sent in in the case of a medical emergency.

You also have a special open enrollment period for the ACA exchanges. ACA insurance may be a better deal than COBRA. This is nominally two months, but if you want continuous coverage you must apply before your prior insurance expires, there are other details that matter if you go that route, but hopefully you are healthy and your new employer starts insurance quickly, however I have always had at least a month interval between insurance plans (which I have filled using the COBRA trick I mentioned above).

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Mike83 » Thu Sep 01, 2016 12:42 am

Almost all of the advice offered so far is relevant, and as noted some of it depends on the company culture, which you likely know.

I will add this, which is in the keep-it-classy realm.

• If you harbor any unhappiness about your current employer, management, or peers... stifle any urge to let these feelings surface, even within your peer workgroup. Avoid even informal comments to friends along the lines of omg I'm so glad to be out of here or the "real reason" you are leaving if it is a negative one.

• Be upbeat about your future, but don't cross the line to gloating about your good fortune.

• But if you really want to leave a great impression, walk the building and speak personally with anyone you've been in a meeting with at any level, across all departments, including friends, frenemies, and those who have been difficult or adversarial. Also stop by the offices of anyone two levels up who might know you tangentially. This can be a 15-30 second handshake.... "you might know that this is my last day here... I've enjoyed the opportunity to work with you... and wanted to say goodbye personally... I wish you the best, and perhaps someday we'll cross paths again." No more than that is needed and keep moving. Over many years, I have only seen a few people actually do this, but it does create a very positive vibe that spreads like a wave before you get to the next person, and they will anticipate your short visit.

• Yes, on your last day, do an email after the above. Make sure the signature line had your phone number.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby Kenster1 » Thu Sep 01, 2016 8:01 am

A bit of a side note which doesn't pertain to the OP's situation but are some strange circumstances when trying to leave a company.

I also work in TECH and I know of numerous cases where a big Tech firm wanted to hire X but beforehand wanted X to get the blessing/approval from their current company Y.

The reason is because the big Tech firm has an alliance or partnership with company Y and wanted to be on friendly terms and didn't want to be seen as poaching.

I have seen this on numerous occasions in the TECH industry - and that's because a lot of strategic alliances & partnerships going on between companies.

I know of someone going thru this right now - a BIG Silicon Valley Tech firm is asking the candidate (friend I know) to do just that - securing blessing from the current company before they will officially hire. The Big Silicon Valley Tech firm doesn't want to hurt any of the business relationship/alliance they have with my friend's current employer.

This isn't just a one-time odd ball scenario --- I've seen it numerous times.
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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby canga » Thu Sep 01, 2016 8:25 am

imsomeguy wrote:1 - depends on a few things, but 3-4 weeks would be courteous. But be firm too and ensure your new employer is ok with your start date too

2 - be honest, if you are leaving for more $ and better opportunities stay so, you aren't the first who left for those reasons But be careful because you might get counter-offered so be prepared on how to handle that if necessary. Some will say its never good to accept a counter for a variety of reasons but that may be a different discussion

3 - Depends on your relationship with your boss and employer. My employers have always required a formal resignation email, but I always went up to my boss and had the discussion in person then followed up with the formal email for HR purposes.

4 - Yea I usually avoid mentioning it because I'm always going to a competitor and it could make the final few weeks awkward. But again people try to beat that info out of you so be prepared to handle it.

Congrats on the offer and new gig, just stick to your guns


About 5 years ago I accepted a counter offer from my boss. I'm still here.

I do have a great relationship with my boss and he is a great person.

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby KlangFool » Thu Sep 01, 2016 8:53 am

Kenster1 wrote:A bit of a side note which doesn't pertain to the OP's situation but are some strange circumstances when trying to leave a company.

I also work in TECH and I know of numerous cases where a big Tech firm wanted to hire X but beforehand wanted X to get the blessing/approval from their current company Y.


Kenster1,

Why do I think this could be both unethical and illegal?

https://pando.com/2014/03/22/revealed-a ... employees/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High-Tech ... Litigation

http://time.com/76655/google-apple-sett ... g-lawsuit/

KlangFool

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby TravelGeek » Thu Sep 01, 2016 10:11 am

hcj wrote:At my last few jobs you got paid through your last day at work (so if they walked you out the same day, that's the last day you got paid).


I think it's been asked before, but I didn't see a reply:

If that happens, does that turn a voluntary resignation into an involuntary one and thus makes you eligible for unemployment coverage?

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Re: Resigning from a job: best practices and advice?

Postby tinscale » Thu Sep 01, 2016 6:28 pm

1. Give at least 2 weeks notice, 3 if you are amidst a key project (if new employer is ok with waiting).
2. What you already said - I'm leaving for career growth and pay.
3. Just go in and tell the boss. It's always awkward/uncomfortable. Hand him/her a letter.
4. Why not? Who cares?
5. Co-workers will know before you get back to your desk.

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