Leaving a Company

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aj44
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Leaving a Company

Post by aj44 » Fri May 29, 2015 2:28 pm

I have been with my current company for 5 years in a professional role and just accepted a position at a different company in management. The new company proposed a tentative start date of 6/28 to which I thought awesome, I can put in my two weeks on Tuesday of next week, be done the 16th, and have 12 days off, I haven't had that many days off since high school summer break 18 years ago.

There is a group of people in my role, but over the last year my position has become very specialized, to the point my boss struggles when I am out on vacation and I technically have no backup. There is no way to train anyone to cover in two weeks time, even 4 weeks would be a struggle (I guarantee it takes them 2-3 days to determine someone to fill in so really only 7 training days).

Questions:

Would anyone feel guilty putting in two weeks with the idea of getting 12 days off when you could stay for 4 weeks and do a better job with training the temporary replacement? I have told my boss several times they need to allocate someone to be my backup (this is a huge company and it could have been easily done, we got burned when I went on vacation for 5 days just 3 months ago)

What has been others experience been with their old company with the time they have left after putting in notice? Was it uncomfortable, productive? Been a while since I have done this and would be interested in others experiences in case I haven't thought of everything.

Jack FFR1846
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by Jack FFR1846 » Fri May 29, 2015 2:49 pm

True story.....I was lead technologist for a $13B company and along with helping with new system archetecture, I reviewed all designs in my specialty and had also developed a new technology for their latest product.

I accepted a new job and knew that my role would include interfacing with my former company on a technical level so sales people could do their thing to make money.

I gave 7 weeks notice.

When did they approach me to get my knowledge of theis system based on my designs? On my last day, of course.

Give them 2 weeks
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yosef
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by yosef » Fri May 29, 2015 2:52 pm

2 weeks is the standard. It's none of your current company's business when you start your new gig. If you decide to work longer because you have personal relationships with folks whom you believe you'd be hanging out to dry so be it, but I would definitely not feel obligated to do so.

Dolphin1
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by Dolphin1 » Fri May 29, 2015 2:57 pm

I think it may vary by country and state, but I work in California/Silicon Valley, and 2 weeks is very standard. If you don't want to use your 12 extra days working, you need to hold your own and tell them you are firm on your ending date. Companies (should) know that any employee can leave at any time, just as employees know their job can end at any time with no notice (in CA at least.) Then you should do your best to document everything you do and leave all your files/whatever organized for your replacement. If you're still feeling guilty, give them your personal email address and tell them if they run into trouble, you'll try to answer their questions if you have time.

123
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by 123 » Fri May 29, 2015 2:58 pm

Two weeks notice is perfectly satisfactory. If the organization has problems because they have insufficient backup for your skills that really is their problem, they likely saved a lot of money over the years by relying on you alone.

Regardless of what you do your old employer will be able to deal with it, they really don't have a choice.
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8foot7
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by 8foot7 » Fri May 29, 2015 3:00 pm

Jack FFR1846 wrote:True story.....I was lead technologist for a $13B company and along with helping with new system archetecture, I reviewed all designs in my specialty and had also developed a new technology for their latest product.

I accepted a new job and knew that my role would include interfacing with my former company on a technical level so sales people could do their thing to make money.

I gave 7 weeks notice.

When did they approach me to get my knowledge of theis system based on my designs? On my last day, of course.

Give them 2 weeks
This.

I was responsible for a huge BI project at my last company. I decided to strike out on my own but gave 5 weeks notice very clearly spelling out that I hoped to use as much of that time as possible to train/transition/troubleshoot the new guys. Kept raising alarm bells that my time was ending as we moved through my notice period and no one seemed interested.

Four working days before my last day I got a call from my boss' boss asking me if I could join a one hour meeting so people could ask me questions. On my last working day at 1 pm, after someone else had taken my access credentials away, I got a frantic call asking why something wasn't working.

Give them 2 weeks.

Rich in Michigan
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by Rich in Michigan » Fri May 29, 2015 3:02 pm

You should feel no guilt whatsoever about giving 2 weeks instead of 4. You should feel obligated to do your normal job to the best of your ability, and that is it. Unless your normal job involved training a replacement, I wouldn't let it worry me too much. Just do your normal job, clean up any loose ends, and congratulations on your new job. It is often good to have a couple of weeks to decompress when transitioning to a new job so by all means take advantage of it if you are able.

They have had time to create a backup for you and didn't do it. That was their choice. If the place falls apart when one person goes on vacation for 5 days, something is very wrong. A rule that I learned when I moved into management many years ago was "always try to have a plan B in case of....". Have no soft spots in your organization. Hopefully your manager will learn this lesson now, but in no way is it your responsibility to compensate for his lack of foresight.

stoptothink
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by stoptothink » Fri May 29, 2015 3:12 pm

8foot7 wrote:
Jack FFR1846 wrote:True story.....I was lead technologist for a $13B company and along with helping with new system archetecture, I reviewed all designs in my specialty and had also developed a new technology for their latest product.

I accepted a new job and knew that my role would include interfacing with my former company on a technical level so sales people could do their thing to make money.

I gave 7 weeks notice.

When did they approach me to get my knowledge of theis system based on my designs? On my last day, of course.

Give them 2 weeks
This.

I was responsible for a huge BI project at my last company. I decided to strike out on my own but gave 5 weeks notice very clearly spelling out that I hoped to use as much of that time as possible to train/transition/troubleshoot the new guys. Kept raising alarm bells that my time was ending as we moved through my notice period and no one seemed interested.

Four working days before my last day I got a call from my boss' boss asking me if I could join a one hour meeting so people could ask me questions. On my last working day at 1 pm, after someone else had taken my access credentials away, I got a frantic call asking why something wasn't working.

Give them 2 weeks.
Just went through something very similar, last month. I gave my previous employer 5wks notice because my wife was due to have our child so I was not going to be around for some of that time. My scheduled final day was April 28th, my wife had our son on the 22nd. On the 27th(after I had spent the week at home with my wife and newborn) at about 7pm I received a text message from our CEO asking if we could talk tomorrow about succession planning. This is for an organization with 300+ employees, I was the director of a program with over 120 direct reports. They made zero contingency plans for five weeks, didn't ask to meet with me once, and waited until late the night before my final day, while I was technically on FMLA, to address it. My response was that I prepared a succession planning binder, with everything I do and a list of suggestions (including a letter of recommendation for a current employee who I thought could take over the duties), and had forwarded it to him over a month ago. And no, I was not leaving my five day old son to meet with him the next day.

You never want to burn bridges, but unless you think there is the possibility that you'd return to that employer in the near future, I would not even consider going above and beyond in that respect.; I guarantee they would not do the same for you.

jubling
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by jubling » Fri May 29, 2015 3:15 pm

Definitely only 2 weeks. Don't worry, if your company decided it was in their best interests to terminate you they wouldn't bother checking if you had everything sorted at home first.
I've been through a lot of layoffs and seen people come and go. Some groups recover, some don't, just do what's right for you and your family.

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by TomatoTomahto » Fri May 29, 2015 3:27 pm

Jack FFR1846 wrote:I gave 7 weeks notice.

When did they approach me to get my knowledge of theis system based on my designs? On my last day, of course.
My wife gave her contractually required 60 days notice. In banking, when leaving to go to a competitor, one usually works another week or so after giving notice for de-briefing, but generally people take what's referred to as "garden leave." A day after my wife's 60 day notice period ended, her old boss called with some questions about personnel.

OP, as others have said, give what you're obligated to give and, beyond that, your time is your own.

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cheese_breath
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by cheese_breath » Fri May 29, 2015 4:52 pm

No you shouldn't feel guilty. If anybody should feel guilty it's your boss for not developing a backup after you warned him of the need. And don't worry about the old company. You're not as indispensable as you think. There may be a couple bumps in the road, but it will get along without you.

Experience with the old company depends entirely on that company's culture. I've left jobs, giving two weeks notice, and there were no hard feelings or repercussions. In fact I hired back into one of them 10 years later. OTOH my last employer had a policy of walking quitters out the door the same day they resigned.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

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LadyGeek
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by LadyGeek » Fri May 29, 2015 5:01 pm

Give your two weeks notice. First, give a written acceptance of your offer (email?) and be very sure to receive a legally binding confirmation of the acceptance. Then, and only then, submit your two-week notice.

Copy-n-paste this into an email to your current manager, cc: HR:

===========================
To whom it may concern,

This is to inform you that I am resigning my position effective June 16, 2015. My last day of employment will by June 16, 2015.

Sincerely,

aj44
===========================

Do not deep-dive into any details whatsoever on why you are resigning. You'll hear from them soon enough. You don't need to tell them where you are going, and it's simply "time to move on." Done. Do not accept a counter-offer (search for the forum threads where this is discussed).
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terctun
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by terctun » Fri May 29, 2015 5:23 pm

The last 2 jobs I left, it got interesting. First one I gave 3 weeks notice...got cut loose after 2. Its odd sitting around being lame duck.

When I left the job that followed that one, I was required to give 60 days. I offered to stay on that long, but asked for 2-4 weeks. They cut me loose after 2 days.

I try not to burn bridges either.

Train your successor? IF the company can't figure out how to do that before you leave, its their problem.

furwut
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by furwut » Fri May 29, 2015 5:25 pm

I once worked for a company that upon receiving your notice would immediately walk you out the door. Disloyalty was never tolerated.

Assuming you don't work for such a company I would think about giving notice as soon as your plans are set (i.e., new employer has extended official offer and you have accepted). You never know when you are going to need a positive reference or maybe, even, the desire to return to a former employer. So I wouldn't want my exit to create any hard feelings or resentment.

I recommend you give them at least a 2-week notice but also let them know you the degree of flexibility you have and be willing to extend if needed.

True Story
Shortly after I left one employer they began having issues with part of their data processing cycle. While working my new job I was on the phone giving advice. When that proved insufficient I worked a few nights back at my old employer to get things running smoothly again. The CIO was very appreciative.

Fast forward 3 years and this CIO joins my new company in a VP capacity. It's nice having friends in high places :happy. A few years later he left to take a position with another company and let me know that if I ever needed a job there to be sure to contact him first.

The moral of the story is that no matter what field you are in everything always comes down to relationships. So always try to do everything reasonable to make sure they are good ones. :sharebeer

fidobogo
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by fidobogo » Fri May 29, 2015 5:30 pm

There are times when more than 2 weeks seems appropriate, but you're probably good with 2 weeks in this case, and you'll probably feel done after 2 weeks.

Things you might want to do over the 2 weeks:
  • Immediately start documenting the most important "training" info for your future replacement and anyone who will have to act in the interim. This might be the most helpful thing you can do for the company/people.
  • Once other employees know that you've given notice, you might want to let enough people know what you're doing to help smooth the transition. If things are about to get very unpleasant at the company because manager didn't heed your advice to have a backup for you, you don't want your reputation tainted by someone bad-mouthing you after you're gone.
If they need more after that, consider paid consulting, if you want to and are able. If they email you a few quick questions after you leave, you should probably just answer them. If you hear from multiple people, maybe a quick question or two per person (don't tell them about how unofficial freebies are allocated, or manager might game it :). Beyond that, they should be offering a consulting gig, and whether you take it is up to you.

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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by cherijoh » Fri May 29, 2015 6:44 pm

My former employer decided to relocate out of state. We were offered continued employment in the new location or a separation package (if we stayed until they cut us loose). We had about two weeks to make the decision, but they needed to do some work at the new location and kept kicking the can down the road about when the transition would take place and our termination dates. When the decision was finally made, it was quick and HR finally woke up to the fact that they were losing a large chunk of the site employees in 6 weeks - and still hadn't finished interviewing replacements and making offers! The transition was a mess and I really jumped through hoops to try and make my part of it as orderly as possible. In hindsight, I should have let the chips fall where they lay and not stressed out about trying to train my brand new replacement in far less time than was needed. My manager had retired and the new one actually suggested that I leave the same week that my replacement was coming on board. :oops: I should have said OK and let him worry about it, but I was way too conscientious.

steadierfooting
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by steadierfooting » Fri May 29, 2015 7:48 pm

Another vote for absolutely no more than 2 weeks notice.

I'm surprised by the amount of people here who gave more, or were surprised the company didn't bother to follow a succession planning.
This is my procedure for resigning a position, which I've only done twice but still relevant.

Negotiate start date to have at least one week off between jobs to unwind.
While negotiation and paperwork is being signed off, get copies of whatever I need from work computer, also slowly start to bring home anything personal. The goal is on the day you resign you can walk out if you need to.
On the day of my resignation, print 2 letters. One with 2 weeks notice, one effective immediately. When I tell my boss I'm resigning, I present the two week letter. If he gives me any BS, switch out the letter.
For the 10 business days:
immediately stop doing any work. Need me to do something? Get my replacement and I'll show them how it's done

3 days documentation
3 days training
3 days support
1 day saying goodbye, hand in whatever, leave after lunch

All 10 of those days I roll in at 10 and leave as soon as I accomplished my goals for the day.

My last employer BEGGED me to stay an extra week (well, and begged me to stay on, they'll give me money, etc). I reluctantly agreed to consult with them at $50 an hour for support, and then immediately regretted it. I wanted to sever all ties with them, about 3 hours of support told them I wasn't interested anymore. So for future jobs, no consulting, unless i'm ready to FIRE.

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by TomatoTomahto » Fri May 29, 2015 10:11 pm

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GerryL
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by GerryL » Fri May 29, 2015 11:19 pm

Words of wisdom from a former manager: Never be more loyal to the company than the company is to you.

Give them 2 weeks notice and don't explain what you plan to do before you start your new gig -- or when you have agreed to start. (And, yes, be sure you have a firm offer in hand first.)

dgdevil
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by dgdevil » Sat May 30, 2015 12:19 am

Make sure you have exhausted your FSA, if you have one.

aj44
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by aj44 » Sat May 30, 2015 12:40 am

Thanks all for the replies, with the offer letter in hand and a firm acceptance given I feel comfortable going in Monday, giving my two weeks (technically 12 days calendar days but 10 work days) notice first thing in the morning and then enjoying a nice two week vacation when it is over. If I get asked why I didn't do it today I couldn't, my boss was out of the office.

Now I need to plan how I'm going to enjoy the time off.

fishboat
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by fishboat » Sat May 30, 2015 7:04 am

OP..I'm going through this now..don't concern yourself. If you have a contract requiring more than 2 weeks, then meet the requirement, otherwise give them 2 weeks notice as a courtesy. As often as not, larger companies will want you out within a day or two as they want limit the potential of your co-workers realizing opportunities exist beyond their current positions. The better the employee..the more outside opportunities exist.

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BolderBoy
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by BolderBoy » Sat May 30, 2015 11:54 am

GerryL wrote:Words of wisdom from a former manager: Never be more loyal to the company than the company is to you.
Hear! Hear! If 2 weeks is all they expect, let them have that.

Retired now. During my career I gave one employer literally 1 second notice at the start of the workday and walked out with no job waiting for me; had a better job for much more money inside a week (and told the new people why I walked out of the previous employer). The terrible employer replaced me with two people. Another time I gave an employer 2 hours notice in the middle of the workday, then left town for the weekend, again with no pending job. The next week they tried everything to get me to come back, even agreeing to bump my salary up by 400%!!! But I was steadfast and said, "Either the CEO goes or I never go back." The entire staff ended up quitting over the next week. Had a MUCH better job at the 400% salary increase inside of 6 months.

My last employer was a dream-come-true. Great job at adequate salary. Gave [retirement] notice saying that I'd be happy to work until my replacement's replacement was hired (promoting from within). The first of the replacements didn't work out and I ended up staying 5 months until things settled down. We were both happy with the results and they used me as an independent contractor for 3.5 years more.

ShiftF5
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by ShiftF5 » Sat May 30, 2015 12:13 pm

stoptothink wrote:
8foot7 wrote:
Jack FFR1846 wrote:True story.....I was lead technologist for a $13B company and along with helping with new system archetecture, I reviewed all designs in my specialty and had also developed a new technology for their latest product.

I accepted a new job and knew that my role would include interfacing with my former company on a technical level so sales people could do their thing to make money.

I gave 7 weeks notice.

When did they approach me to get my knowledge of theis system based on my designs? On my last day, of course.

Give them 2 weeks
Great story.

This.

I was responsible for a huge BI project at my last company. I decided to strike out on my own but gave 5 weeks notice very clearly spelling out that I hoped to use as much of that time as possible to train/transition/troubleshoot the new guys. Kept raising alarm bells that my time was ending as we moved through my notice period and no one seemed interested.

Four working days before my last day I got a call from my boss' boss asking me if I could join a one hour meeting so people could ask me questions. On my last working day at 1 pm, after someone else had taken my access credentials away, I got a frantic call asking why something wasn't working.

Give them 2 weeks.


Just went through something very similar, last month. I gave my previous employer 5wks notice because my wife was due to have our child so I was not going to be around for some of that time. My scheduled final day was April 28th, my wife had our son on the 22nd. On the 27th(after I had spent the week at home with my wife and newborn) at about 7pm I received a text message from our CEO asking if we could talk tomorrow about succession planning. This is for an organization with 300+ employees, I was the director of a program with over 120 direct reports. They made zero contingency plans for five weeks, didn't ask to meet with me once, and waited until late the night before my final day, while I was technically on FMLA, to address it. My response was that I prepared a succession planning binder, with everything I do and a list of suggestions (including a letter of recommendation for a current employee who I thought could take over the duties), and had forwarded it to him over a month ago. And no, I was not leaving my five day old son to meet with him the next day.

You never want to burn bridges, but unless you think there is the possibility that you'd return to that employer in the near future, I would not even consider going above and beyond in that respect.; I guarantee they would not do the same for you.
Great story.

I guess it's human nature to wait until the last minute

Tankie
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by Tankie » Sat May 30, 2015 12:30 pm

Don't feel guilty. Two weeks notice is sufficient. Do you think your company would give you two weeks notice if they planned to lay you off?

Best of Luck.

aj44
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by aj44 » Sat May 30, 2015 12:35 pm

It isn't that I am irreplaceable either, it is just the circumstance. I was given a special assignment with a company that was purchased by my company and they way business is done at the aquired company is completely different than what everyone else in the group does making it really difficult for someone to come in and hit the ground running. They are going to have kittens Monday when I give them two weeks notice. They don't walk anyone out in our group historically, they may not be happy but they do need me to document some procedures so I'm confident I'll be there the full two weeks (I would be thrilled if they walked me to the door that day which would give me a month off).

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cheese_breath
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by cheese_breath » Sat May 30, 2015 12:54 pm

I wouldn't be surprised if management found something for you to do that they considered more pressing than documenting procedures. Just do whatever they tell you during those two weeks, and if the documentation doesn't get done c'est la vie. You need to watch out for number one first. You can't be responsible for everyone else. I guarantee you there have been other companies where the only person who knew anything about a system left, and they've always managed to stumble through somehow.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by TomatoTomahto » Sat May 30, 2015 12:58 pm

aj44 wrote:It isn't that I am irreplaceable either, it is just the circumstance. I was given a special assignment with a company that was purchased by my company and they way business is done at the aquired company is completely different than what everyone else in the group does making it really difficult for someone to come in and hit the ground running. They are going to have kittens Monday when I give them two weeks notice. They don't walk anyone out in our group historically, they may not be happy but they do need me to document some procedures so I'm confident I'll be there the full two weeks (I would be thrilled if they walked me to the door that day which would give me a month off).
It might be nice to be walked out the door, but you're doing the right thing. I've known people who managed to get laid-off/fired with severance just as they were accepting a new position.

Remember that careers are longer than you think, that memories are long, and that it can be a small world sometimes (ie, it's good if anyone at a company you're interested in has good memories of how you left your current job).

Lynette
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by Lynette » Sat May 30, 2015 1:06 pm

.....
Last edited by Lynette on Wed Dec 06, 2017 11:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

sfnerd
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by sfnerd » Sat May 30, 2015 1:35 pm

Congratulations on your new job!

Here's what I'd do, assuming you are on good terms with the management at your current employer:

I'd give 2 weeks notice, but I'd talk to my boss and see if s/he legitimately needs more time, and if s/he is really willing to line up training and have people do proper knowledge transfer. I would note that I really want to try to finish up in 2 weeks, but I'm willing to help out more if needed. Then I'd work my ass off transitioning my responsibilities, writing documentation, and working to ensure that things go as well as possible. Then I'd give them my cell number and let them know that if they don't abuse the privilege, an occasional call/email at appropriate times is OK if they are absolutely stuck with something.

You shouldn't feel guilty about giving 2 weeks, but helping your boss would be the good thing to do. All this talk from people of "the company would only give you two weeks..." is a bit cynical to me. Sure, some companies would lay you off with only 2 weeks of pay. Others will give you zero. Others would give you a year of pay, transition assistance, and great references. Treat others how you would want to be treated, to the extent that you're able. Maybe that means two week of really hard work. Maybe it means a month.

Just my opinion. It's worked for me so far...

Dandy
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by Dandy » Sat May 30, 2015 2:45 pm

If they treated me right I would treat them right. It is also good not to burn a bridge or leave a decent boss with a problem. You never know. Even offer to help them out when you are gone if they are in a bind and don't compete directly with your new employer.

Also, many times the new company job isn't all that they told you. I've seen that happen a lot i.e. people take a job and they can tell right away that it was oversold to them. The prior company might take you back but if not they will give you a glowing recommendation for some other job.

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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by cheese_breath » Sat May 30, 2015 9:10 pm

Lynette wrote:I think that terminating someone immediately when they give notice may have a lot to do with the position that they hold. If someone is going to take another position and has highly privileged access to key applications, it would be unusual (and risky) not to terminate them immediately and revoke access. If one is retiring, it might be different.
Anyone wishing to sabotage any systems, steal anything, or perform other nefarious acts could just as easily do it before submitting their notice.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by scooterdog » Sun May 31, 2015 5:50 am

I just resigned with an offer in-hand, and after 5+ years at MegaCorp I made it a point to leave on the best possible terms.

- The two week notice came as a surprise to senior management
- The offer in-hand was also to a management role, with a nice bump in pay :D
- MegaCorp counter-offered with several cool positions. My first thought: "Why didn't you think of me a month ago?"
- What I was doing at MegaCorp, like yourself, was a very difficult to replace function. My thought: "It's not my problem."

Make sure you leave on the best possible terms by fulfilling every commitment and saying only the most positive things to everyone (like to HR on the exit interview). You have little idea what the future can hold, you might be hired in the next role after this one from a colleague at the job you are currently leaving, or might hire someone you are currently reporting to. You never know!

nukewerker
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by nukewerker » Sun May 31, 2015 7:44 am

There is a saying in the contracting world about giving your two-day notice...as in I am leaving today.

Consider this-when the layoffs come, do they give you even to weeks notice? Often not. One of my former employers would tell them the day of the layoff and hire security to escort them out without their belongings (they were mailed). Same thing if someone went to a competitor. You often were asked to leave within the hour even if you gave 2 weeks notice.

Dandy
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by Dandy » Sun May 31, 2015 9:52 am

Consider this-when the layoffs come, do they give you even to weeks notice? Often not. One of my former employers would tell them the day of the layoff and hire security to escort them out without their belongings (they were mailed). Same thing if someone went to a competitor. You often were asked to leave within the hour even if you gave 2 weeks notice.

How true and how times have changed. I guess the risk of fired employees hurting the company if they stayed another two weeks is greater than in the past. But, if you are in good standing and offer two weeks notice you often get the same treatment. I think that makes remaining employees distrust the company - nobody likes to be treated like a security risk or see a good employee get treated that way.

Often now the your boss has an HR person with him and he reads a script so there is no chance of a misstep that could cause legal issues. That was done with me (felt like to me) even with a generous separation package and a request by them at the same meeting to stay for 4 months to wrap up a project.

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Watty
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by Watty » Sun May 31, 2015 3:01 pm

It can be awkward for "short timers" to be around for very long and that can hurt office moral, and you may be approached by other employees wanting to know if there are other job openings at your new company and how the job market is. Often it is to avoid problems like this companies don't want a long transition period.

Two weeks notice is plenty and the company can always ask for a longer period if they need it.

I once left a job with two weeks notice and they later contacted me about contracting back for a few days to help train my replacement. They seemed surprised when I told them I could only do it in the evenings and weekends since I wasn't going to try take time off my new job to do the training. They reluctantly agreed to that but then the question about money came up. I gave them a realistically low end contractor rate, which I knew was accurate. They were then upset that I was not going to work in the evening or weekend for my old salary. I never heard from them again.

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TomatoTomahto
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by TomatoTomahto » Sun May 31, 2015 3:07 pm

Watty wrote:... you may be approached by other employees wanting to know if there are other job openings at your new company and how the job market is. Often it is to avoid problems like this companies don't want a long transition period.
Another way to deal with this is how my wife's ex-employer does it. She had a 6-month no-poaching clause in her employment contract. She knows someone who might have breached this (up to the court to decide or parties to settle); the individual and the new company were both included in the lawsuit.

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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by aj44 » Mon Jun 01, 2015 11:35 am

OP here, thanks again all for the advice. I put in my two weeks this morning and it went very well, my manager and his boss both shook my hand and congratulated me and thanked me for the two weeks notice.

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cheese_breath
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by cheese_breath » Mon Jun 01, 2015 11:54 am

Sounds good, but are they going to let you finish the documentation during those two weeks.
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by aj44 » Mon Jun 01, 2015 12:05 pm

cheese_breath wrote:Sounds good, but are they going to let you finish the documentation during those two weeks.
Yup, spent an hour with my manager this morning going over a timeline for what needed done for the last two weeks. I was 99% sure I wouldn't get walked out today.

Someone else in the group put their two weeks in on Friday so they are reeling a bit.

Fixmen
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by Fixmen » Mon Jun 01, 2015 12:59 pm

I'm a little surprised at how casually everyone is agreeing that 2 years is sufficient notice. In my book, it really depends. If you're a waiter at a place that has tons of turn over, go ahead and give 2 weeks (or less). If you're in more of professional role where you own business processes or client relationships, then 2 weeks seems very abrupt to me. It also depends on how quickly they can backfill you. It's not really about loyalty to the company but rather respect for your co-workers. Do want you need to do to make sure you're not screwing over your colleagues (boss included). The new company is probably more flexible in their start date than they let on.

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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by AZAttorney11 » Mon Jun 01, 2015 1:05 pm

Fixmen wrote:I'm a little surprised at how casually everyone is agreeing that 2 years is sufficient notice. In my book, it really depends. If you're a waiter at a place that has tons of turn over, go ahead and give 2 weeks (or less). If you're in more of professional role where you own business processes or client relationships, then 2 weeks seems very abrupt to me. It also depends on how quickly they can backfill you. It's not really about loyalty to the company but rather respect for your co-workers. Do want you need to do to make sure you're not screwing over your colleagues (boss included). The new company is probably more flexible in their start date than they let on.
In private law firms it is not unheard of for an attorney with a portable book of business to resign and open up shop elsewhere the very next day. It is also not unheard of for a firm to walk an attorney out of the door shortly (like an hour or two) after giving notice if they believe the attorney will poach clients.

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cheese_breath
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by cheese_breath » Mon Jun 01, 2015 1:13 pm

Fixmen wrote:I'm a little surprised at how casually everyone is agreeing that 2 years is sufficient notice....
I would think two years would be more than sufficient. :P
The surest way to know the future is when it becomes the past.

dolphinsaremammals
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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by dolphinsaremammals » Mon Jun 01, 2015 1:25 pm

Give the required notice, but first remove all your personal belongings and personal files/email.

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Re: Leaving a Company

Post by wfrobinette » Mon Jun 01, 2015 1:28 pm

Fixmen wrote:I'm a little surprised at how casually everyone is agreeing that 2 years is sufficient notice. In my book, it really depends. If you're a waiter at a place that has tons of turn over, go ahead and give 2 weeks (or less). If you're in more of professional role where you own business processes or client relationships, then 2 weeks seems very abrupt to me. It also depends on how quickly they can backfill you. It's not really about loyalty to the company but rather respect for your co-workers. Do want you need to do to make sure you're not screwing over your colleagues (boss included). The new company is probably more flexible in their start date than they let on.
In most of the organizations I have worked for it takes 3 to 6 months to back fill a position and a week or two to get someone on the team up to speed to cover for you. Even if you give 4 weeks, it's not enough time to get everything at 100%.

Sure the new company is going to be flexible on start date but remember they're likely filling a hole left by someones departure.

IMO - companies don't care and have no idea what turnover really costs. In most roles, it's certainly 10x the cost of just giving these people market wages and making sure the wages stay competitive over the employee tenure.

I once was offered a job in November but knew I was going to receive a 50k bonus in mid-March. I gave the new employer the opportunity to meet me part of the way there to start in January but they decided to wait until end of March. I gave my 2 week notice the day the bonus was paid out. (I had been setting things up for about 8 weeks prior to minimize the disruptions.

I theoretically could have given them 12 weeks notice but I was worried I would have been canned before the bonus was paid.

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