Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

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Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK » Sat Oct 04, 2014 9:43 am

I work for a large company that has gone through major changes in the last couple of years to stay viable. One of those changes included a new appraisal system that was implemented earlier this year and resulted in a lot of good people not getting pay raises this year. Most of the employees made complaints to which the company acknowledged the system was poorly implemented, but would do better at the next appraisal cycle. Ok, fine.

My manager (who we'll call Angela) has worked for the company for 15 years and recently tendered her resignation, which surprised many, many people. She is the face of a large program she manages and does a very fine job doing it, but Angela felt she was not fairly compensated when compared to her male counterparts. The day after Angela tendered her resignation, her manager (Don) walked around the office (with Angela along side) asking certain employees if they received a pay raise this year, but due to the new appraisal system, most, if not all, said no. Don told those employees the company screwed up and said they'd be getting a pay raise.

Here are the issues I have with the above:

- Knowing Angela is leaving due to being unfairly compensated when compared to her male counterparts is an important matter. I'm not sure if Don is trying to play "hero," if he has a fear that other employees will soon follow Angela out the door, or if he just wants to stick it to Angela. Regardless, for Don to give pay raises to Angela's subordinates in front of Angela was insulting due to what she has meant to the program and because she really wanted to stay, but not when she is unfairly compensated.

- For Don to tell certain employees they would be getting a raise in front of other employees who will not be getting a raise was egregious on Don's part as this will destroy their moral and create animosity within the office.

I'm a male that is compensated well for the work that I do. While I'm one of the office's top performers, if not top performer, and felt I deserved a raise earlier this year, I am uncomfortable receiving a pay raise based on the above circumstances. I am seriously considering telling Don to not consider me for a pay raise.

Am I foolish to decline it? For transparency, the raise would be in the 2% to 3% range.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by cheese_breath » Sat Oct 04, 2014 9:53 am

Yes, IMO you are foolish. While it may be an honorable gesture on your part the damage has already been done, and declining a raise won't fix it. In fact asking Don not to consider you for a raise may put you in his dog house for siding with Angela against him. If you feel that strongly about it perhaps you should seek other employment.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by mhc » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:02 am

You would be foolish to decline the raise. Since Don is walking around the office asking people if they got a raise (why didn't he just look it up on the computer?), something else is going on besides Angela not being happy about being fairly compensated. When a person leaves, the real complete story is rarely communicated, especially the higher up someone is. It sounds like Don is playing some sort of game by walking around asking people if they got a raise. If you tell him you don't want your raise, you may become the target of his next game.

I know people who have been asked to leave a company. When the person "resigns", he always has a story for his co-workers that is not the truth because he cannot tell the truth. That is a condition of the severance package.

Pride, anger, jealousy, ... can get in the way of the truth coming out.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by tim1999 » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:03 am

Was Don telling mostly female employees that they'd be getting raises despite the "system?" Maybe he was making a lame attempt to diffuse a potential gender discrimination lawsuit from Angela? Maybe I'm reading too much into it.

PS: Accept every raise you are offered.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by HoosierJim » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:05 am

Your future sequence of salary "returns" is based on the current salary - miss a raise - you miss it forever.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by tibbitts » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:06 am

You should accept whatever increase you receive. These days many people receive no increases, even cola increases, for many years, so they effectively earn less every year. Ironically, everybody at your company - even Angela - would probably have been (fairly) happy if there had been no salary increases at all. Sadly, there's probably a lesson for management in that.

Come to think of it, my advice just saved your company hundreds of thousands of dollars in future salary increases. Please PM me with the address where I can send my consulting services invoice. Even better, I promise to give the same advice next year, for same price.
Last edited by tibbitts on Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:10 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by LeeMKE » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:09 am

Accept the raise and update your resume and LinkedIn profile.

ALWAYS Put your own oxygen mask on before assisting others. If you can't afford to lose your job without notice, be circumspect and strategic. Let your protest be known after giving notice because you are leaving for a firm that you hope treats women better.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by Boats day » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:12 am

I would take the raise.

I think Don is an incompetent manager and should be fired !!! His actions are absurd AND HE IS A HUGE LIABILITY to the company> I agree with other posts that
he is just asking for a lawsuit.

Who knows when he get fired you may get his job after all you are a top performer.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by Kenkat » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:31 am

You should take the raise. The last thing you want is the company to think you are perfectly happy. It just makes it that much easier if they decide they aren't giving raises next year. In fact, I think it is always good for a company to think you are always open to walking out the door under the right circumstances.

Angela is like the honey badger. Angela don't care. Angela don't give a...she has a new job. Your current employer underpaid her, she went and found a new job, probably got a big increase and your company either didn't feel they could match it or she said no thanks if they made her a counter offer. It doesn't sound like the company handled this well, but I think Angela was probably just trying to stay on good terms. If she felt she was being insulted, she could have just said no to the request.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by cheese_breath » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:31 am

Had a few more minutes to think about this while in the shower. How do you know Angela is underpaid compared to her male counterparts? And why is Angela discussing her salary with you anyway? And why do you think she’s underpaid compared to males? Did she tell you that? Unless you’re in personnel and have full access to Angela’s personal file and work history you don’t know whether she’s underpaid or not. There’s a lot of information in there that goes into making salary decisions you’re not privy to. Certainly if Angela is being underpaid for equal performance because she’s female that’s wrong. But it would be just as wrong to pay her more just because she’s female if she’s not performing as well. I don’t know the answer, and neither do you.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by livesoft » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:38 am

Many women are clueless when it comes to pay and raises. The NYTimes has had several recent articles on the gender gap which women should read. Many (but not all) men already know how to get better pay.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by Dandy » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:38 am

Take the raise. Lots of companies and bosses do dumb things. If you get involved in them you will never get a raise. Also, refusing a raise will embarrass your boss and your boss's boss. It won't be looked on favorably by them and bosses don't like to be embarrassed and have long memories.

If you feel that strongly it is better to leave the company and work elsewhere.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by tibbitts » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:42 am

Don walking around the office asking if people received raises makes no sense, since he already knew. In any case had to know that discussing in front of multiple employees that some employees would get raise next year and (by omission) some wouldn't would be damaging. Something else must be going on here.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by Raymond » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:42 am

Take the raise.

Start looking for a new job.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by jimb_fromATL » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:50 am

I'm with others who say take the raise -- unless you're prepared to be fired any time, or are planning to leave the company very soon anyway.

Your "protest" won't fix anything that's wrong with the company management and will cost you money, and will label you as a malcontent. So you won't be considered for future raises or promotions, and will be high on their list if they need to downsize.

If it's the poor management is that important to you, take the raise and use the money to build a bigger emergency fund to have on hand when you change jobs. Start looking for another job, but don't let the company know that you're planning to leave.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by 123 » Sat Oct 04, 2014 10:54 am

It would have been fun if, when asked in front of Angela about their raise, an employee had asked Don for the details about his own.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by stan1 » Sat Oct 04, 2014 11:09 am

The whole scenario is bizarre and it makes me wonder if there is more going on that isn't being mentioned. Don should be able to look up raises himself (assuming he really is the supervisor not a team leader in a matrix organization). If he is a team leader in a matrix organization he should be having this conversation at the management level -- not with individual employees. Does he even have the authority to promise a raise?

I'd take the pay raise and look for another job if you don't have confidence in the leadership of your current employer.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by Fallible » Sat Oct 04, 2014 12:42 pm

pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK wrote:I work for a large company that has gone through major changes in the last couple of years to stay viable. One of those changes included a new appraisal system that was implemented earlier this year and resulted in a lot of good people not getting pay raises this year. Most of the employees made complaints to which the company acknowledged the system was poorly implemented, but would do better at the next appraisal cycle. Ok, fine.

My manager (who we'll call Angela) has worked for the company for 15 years and recently tendered her resignation, which surprised many, many people. She is the face of a large program she manages and does a very fine job doing it, but Angela felt she was not fairly compensated when compared to her male counterparts. The day after Angela tendered her resignation, her manager (Don) walked around the office (with Angela along side) asking certain employees if they received a pay raise this year, but due to the new appraisal system, most, if not all, said no. Don told those employees the company screwed up and said they'd be getting a pay raise.
...
Your main question is the pay raise and I would say take it, but watch your back closely from now on. As you say, this is a large company struggling to stay viable so anything can happen as it looks for ways to save money (it's usually by cutting pay, then staff, often higher paid staff such as Angela probably was). The new pay system was either bungled or it was a deliberate move to save money or both. Don's full motives can't be known, but as noted by other posters here, either he made a bad mistake on his own, or he was acting on higher-up orders. Two possible reasons for those orders could be deliberately insulting those who wouldn't get pay raises so they would join Angela in quitting, and trying to show Angela was not discriminated against. A struggling management might consider that a win-win for the company.

Also, if you have a chance to talk to Angela, one question I would ask is why she tagged along with Don since it doesn't sound as if she would approve of what he did. She'd already quit, so it seems unlikely she could've been forced to join him.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by cheese_breath » Sat Oct 04, 2014 2:19 pm

Fallible wrote:Also, if you have a chance to talk to Angela, one question I would ask is why she tagged along with Don since it doesn't sound as if she would approve of what he did. She'd already quit, so it seems unlikely she could've been forced to join him.
Perhaps she had a severance package and didn't want to risk losing it?
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK » Sat Oct 04, 2014 2:35 pm

Hi all, OP here:

Thank you for your responses as I didn't expect them to be unanimous in taking the raise. It made me realize I let my emotions guide my thinking because I am loyal to Angela and to see how things went down with her didn't sit well with me. I also feel bad for those employees who heard or will hear about people getting pay raises when they will not receive one themselves.

I wanted to do the honorable thing and stick up for Angela and those employees not getting a raise, but as mentioned in some of the responses, there are better ways to go about this. I'll be sure to let Don know during my exit interview.

Again, thank you for your responses.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK » Sat Oct 04, 2014 2:38 pm

cheese_breath wrote:
Fallible wrote:Also, if you have a chance to talk to Angela, one question I would ask is why she tagged along with Don since it doesn't sound as if she would approve of what he did. She'd already quit, so it seems unlikely she could've been forced to join him.
Perhaps she had a severance package and didn't want to risk losing it?
I should clarify that she put in her two week notice, so she's on the clock for the next couple of weeks. She more than likely felt compelled or intimidated to go with Don because he's the boss and has a forceful management style to him.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by lululu » Sat Oct 04, 2014 2:42 pm

livesoft wrote:Many women are clueless when it comes to pay and raises. The NYTimes has had several recent articles on the gender gap which women should read. Many (but not all) men already know how to get better pay.
Yes. In my first job I got promoted to manage a small group. We were all doing the same kind of technical work, and I was going to continue to do that work as well as manage. All the people who now reported to me were guys. Once I was promoted, I had access to their salary information, since I would be managing raises. I found that they all made more or less the same salary, about 30% more than I did.

I don't understand the OP's scenario. Both Angela and her manager must know who got raises. I never heard of a program magically assigning raises without human control. Then again, maybe I am out of date.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by Fallible » Sat Oct 04, 2014 2:57 pm

pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK wrote:
cheese_breath wrote:
Fallible wrote:Also, if you have a chance to talk to Angela, one question I would ask is why she tagged along with Don since it doesn't sound as if she would approve of what he did. She'd already quit, so it seems unlikely she could've been forced to join him.
Perhaps she had a severance package and didn't want to risk losing it?
I should clarify that she put in her two week notice, so she's on the clock for the next couple of weeks. She more than likely felt compelled or intimidated to go with Don because he's the boss and has a forceful management style to him.
That's certainly posible. Yet she made what must have been a very hard decision to quit and apparently let it be known that it was over unequal pay. Those are pretty independent and gutsy moves in anybody's book. But she could also have still felt some company loyalty considering her length of service and so went along with Don. And, of course, she may also have agreed with what he did.

OP, will you be letting us know what you decide? Entirely your call, of course.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by cheese_breath » Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:01 pm

pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK wrote:
cheese_breath wrote:
Fallible wrote:Also, if you have a chance to talk to Angela, one question I would ask is why she tagged along with Don since it doesn't sound as if she would approve of what he did. She'd already quit, so it seems unlikely she could've been forced to join him.
Perhaps she had a severance package and didn't want to risk losing it?
I should clarify that she put in her two week notice, so she's on the clock for the next couple of weeks. She more than likely felt compelled or intimidated to go with Don because he's the boss and has a forceful management style to him.
Makes sense now. She didn't want to risk losing those two weeks of pay and having her resignation turn into a termination on her record. I can't blame her.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK » Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:01 pm

lululu wrote:Yes. In my first job I got promoted to manage a small group. We were all doing the same kind of technical work, and I was going to continue to do that work as well as manage. All the people who now reported to me were guys. Once I was promoted, I had access to their salary information, since I would be managing raises. I found that they all made more or less the same salary, about 30% more than I did.

I don't understand the OP's scenario. Both Angela and her manager must know who got raises. I never heard of a program magically assigning raises without human control. Then again, maybe I am out of date.
OP here: That's part of my disgust with all of this. Don tends to do things off-the-cuff; instead of him looking at the payroll system or getting that information through the proper channels, he instead goes to the employee directly to look like a hero to him or her. I will be interested in seeing if he'll come through because I don't think he has the authority to give raises!

lululu, did you go to management and seek a raise after seeing the men being paid 30% more than you? What was the company's reaction??

It irks me to no end that women are not compensated equally for the same level and quality of work.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK » Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:06 pm

Fallible wrote:OP, will you be letting us know what you decide? Entirely your call, of course.
I won't decline the pay raise; however, I will be looking for another job elsewhere as I can't work for someone I don't respect (Don in this case). It's not a big deal as I've had fleeting thoughts of moving on anyway, but this will accelerate that process.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by Lynette » Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:37 pm

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by KyleAAA » Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:37 pm

I'd take the raise and then find another job, using your now-higher pay as a bargaining chip. The problem here doesn't appear to be Don at all but rather a systemic issue causing women to be paid less than their male counterparts (allegedly).

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by dm200 » Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:50 pm

My suggestions and input:

1. Take the pay raise and either say nothing, or softly say something like you were disappointed that the new system seemed to have been implemented so poorly. Your declining the raise and/or raising a fairness issue regarding Angela is very unlikely to help anyone.

2. From what you have described, you do not have sufficient facts and background to be certain that Angela was treated in a grossly unfair way.

3. Assuming you have a good relationship with Angela, I think it would be appropriate that you express your disappointment that she is leaving and disappointment that her being treated unfiarly has had this result.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by Dutch » Sat Oct 04, 2014 3:56 pm

If you're a top performer, then a raise of 2 - 3% is too low. Ask for more.

Apply for the vacancy that "Angela" left.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by cheese_breath » Sat Oct 04, 2014 5:50 pm

Dutch wrote:Apply for the vacancy that "Angela" left.
Or get in touch with Angela at her new job. Maybe she has some open positions and might hire you.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by FedGuy » Sat Oct 04, 2014 7:29 pm

pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK wrote:I will be interested in seeing if he'll come through because I don't think he has the authority to give raises!
Well, then it will be really interesting to see what happens when employees that Don promised raises to don't get them. I wouldn't be the slightest bit surprised if lawsuits were threatened.

By the way, since everyone was so certain the OP should take the raise--and I'm not saying he shouldn't--I just wanted to point out that there are sometimes valid reasons to refuse raises. I was once left a job in advance of layoffs because I was paid more than most of the others at my level, so I was convinced that I would a top target when the layoffs hit. Again, I'm not saying that the OP should decline the raise, but if I had known that taking that job at a somewhat lower salary might have made my employment more secure, I would have at least considered accepting a slightly lower salary (the counter-argument, of course, is that I might have been targeted anyway, and then I would have had less money in the bank to fall back on).

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by seeshells » Sat Oct 04, 2014 7:50 pm

Consider:
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by jimmy123 » Sat Oct 04, 2014 9:08 pm

Consider: Unless you've a employment contract, are a owner, a co. owner, self-employed or there are union contract onsiderations, your a day laborer, 30+ yrs or not. Your employment is not guaranteed in reality*.
This.

But IMHO a reasonable alternative to a pay rise is more vacation days. Which, if you were to leave for a new job, would still be a negotiating point along with salary.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by bluejello » Sat Oct 04, 2014 9:31 pm

As a proudly feminist woman, first of all I say bravo to the OP for caring about this issue so deeply. Second of all, I say take the raise.

There is no good that could possibly come out of you declining the raise. Don will not suddenly realize the error of his ways and become a better, more fair manager because you did this. The culture of your workplace will not improve because you took a stand.

There are, however, other things you can do. As other posters have mentioned, start looking for another job if you are disgusted with the leadership at your company. If it's just Don that bothers you, look for ways to get transferred to another department. Wait for a few months and see if things improve. It sounds like your company is undergoing an upheaval right now anyways; things may well get better. Speak to HR about how you feel if you're comfortable doing that.

Best of luck to you!

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by LeeMKE » Sun Oct 05, 2014 1:13 am

Do not talk to HR about your concerns. HR is not a counseling service. Everything you say to them is taken back to the managers in charge for action, and documented for the lawyers to build a case against any legal action you might take.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by tibbitts » Sun Oct 05, 2014 8:02 am

jimmy123 wrote:
Consider: Unless you've a employment contract, are a owner, a co. owner, self-employed or there are union contract onsiderations, your a day laborer, 30+ yrs or not. Your employment is not guaranteed in reality*.
This.

But IMHO a reasonable alternative to a pay rise is more vacation days. Which, if you were to leave for a new job, would still be a negotiating point along with salary.
We've had this discussion before. While there are exceptions, vacation is one of the least-negotiable terms with most large organizations.

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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by LadyGeek » Sun Oct 05, 2014 12:08 pm

FYI - I split off Jack FFR1846's comments and replies into a new thread, as it was taking this one in a new direction. See: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise [Minimum work 1 hour / day]
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by cfs » Sun Oct 05, 2014 12:25 pm

Take it.

Take that pay raise and use part of the money to purchase a copy of the book "Die Broke" by Stephen Pollan and Mark Levine (and read the whole thing).
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by LadyGeek » Sun Oct 05, 2014 12:41 pm

LeeMKE wrote:Do not talk to HR about your concerns. HR is not a counseling service. Everything you say to them is taken back to the managers in charge for action, and documented for the lawyers to build a case against any legal action you might take.
^^^ This. The job of HR is not to protect you, it's to keep the company from being sued. Anyone who thinks otherwise should change their perception.

All of those company training courses about diversity and workplace equality are there for a reason. Concern for your personal well-being is not one of them.

Take the raise, lay low (don't make waves), and let the actors finish the play.

I would not look for a new job unless you don't like what you're doing now. Changing jobs doesn't solve problems, it just changes them. Consider that your "new" job environment might be worse.
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by Johno » Sun Oct 05, 2014 1:15 pm

pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK wrote: Am I foolish to decline it? For transparency, the raise would be in the 2% to 3% range.
If any doubt remains, yes, that would be foolish. :D
And in fact while you know your company better than we or than what you could briefly describe, the only really clear fact from your description is that 'Don' is a bad manager and a jerk, at least wrt his recent actions you describe. It's not actually clear whether 'Angela's' treatment is an example of sex discrimination, in true fact (what lawsuits might say is something else) rather than some personal animus against her or just a good faith difference in opinion between you and management as to what 'Angela' is worth, again, aside from the other obviously morale damaging practice of managers discussing employee compensation openly in a way that could reasonably be construed as disparaging to any employee, that's wrong.

Setting compensation as a manager is a bit the inverse of selling cars. The car dealer wants each customer to pay as much as possible, as little discount from sticker, as they are willing to without walking away, and an enlightened one should also avoid having the customer feel badly enough to recommend against the dealer to friends. The manager wants to pay each employee as little as possible without them walking away (someone the manager really thinks is hurting the company should be let go outright, not given a poor raise) or morale falling generally to the point where productivity per $ suffers. It's not easy to say in each case what the right balance is, but the manager isn't there to deliver to the employee all the compensation they'd like as long as they do a good job, and HR is definitely not there to make employees happy, but mainly to prepare to defend against lawsuits.

Complaining even in a 'constructive' way about how the company could deal with employees better, especially those other than yourself, is a fool's errand IMO/IME as both a subordinate and a manager.

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akblizzard
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by akblizzard » Sun Oct 05, 2014 1:44 pm

Would you be foolish? Yes. Are you making too big a deal of this? Maybe. I've worked for several large companies for the last 35 years, the last 20 in management. In my experience I think you should consider there is much more at play here than you are aware of. And although you say you're certain of what Angela & Don are motivated by or feeling, you may not be correct. Don't take it personally and don't get an ulcer. It's not worth it. You note you believe you are adequately paid, that's really all you need to worry about. I was always told what my pay would be before I accepted any job. If I considered it adequate, I took it. It never mattered to me what anyone else made. Good luck.

lululu
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by lululu » Sun Oct 05, 2014 2:29 pm

pa7VQbb1kTkj1eLn3spK wrote:
lululu wrote:Yes. In my first job I got promoted to manage a small group. We were all doing the same kind of technical work, and I was going to continue to do that work as well as manage. All the people who now reported to me were guys. Once I was promoted, I had access to their salary information, since I would be managing raises. I found that they all made more or less the same salary, about 30% more than I did.

I don't understand the OP's scenario. Both Angela and her manager must know who got raises. I never heard of a program magically assigning raises without human control. Then again, maybe I am out of date.
OP here: That's part of my disgust with all of this. Don tends to do things off-the-cuff; instead of him looking at the payroll system or getting that information through the proper channels, he instead goes to the employee directly to look like a hero to him or her. I will be interested in seeing if he'll come through because I don't think he has the authority to give raises!

lululu, did you go to management and seek a raise after seeing the men being paid 30% more than you? What was the company's reaction??

It irks me to no end that women are not compensated equally for the same level and quality of work.
Yes, my manager's plan was that he increase my salary in steps over 2-3 years to match the others'. My plan was that he raise my salary immediately and I get back pay. What happened was I got the immediate raise and no back pay. And ever since I have politely but firmly talked about salary instead of being a nice little girl and assuming a company would "do the right thing."

I was so stupid I hadn't even asked for a raise when the promotion was discussed.

spectec
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Re: Voluntarily Declining Pay Raise

Post by spectec » Sun Oct 05, 2014 7:26 pm

1) Take the raise.
2) If you think it's unfair, buy gift cards from time-to-time for the employees you think are underpaid.
3) Keep going your best - Don's job will become open soon and maybe you'll be in line for it.
4) Stay in touch with Angela - if the company is so dysfunctional that they replace Don with someone else like him, you may want to look into working somewhere else.
Don't gamble; take all your savings and buy some good stock and hold it till it goes up, then sell it. If it don't go up, don't buy it. - Will Rogers

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