Vehicle for newly licensed daughter

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zzcooper123
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Vehicle for newly licensed daughter

Post by zzcooper123 » Sat Mar 01, 2008 7:23 pm

I am interested in the experience of other diehards on buying, insuring, owning a vehicle for a newly licensed 16 year old. :roll:

Gekko
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Post by Gekko » Sat Mar 01, 2008 7:56 pm

if i had a 16 year old son or daughter and had to help them buy a car, i'd get them a used, older, basic Toyota Corolla or Honda Civic. Maybe like a 2003 with like 40-50k miles on it. safe, high quality, and reliable. i'd also make them contribute towards the cost of the car and/or insurance to make them appreciate it. even $10 per week if that's all they could afford. then i'd secretly take those contributions and start a secret savings account for them and eventually move it to VG STAR when it hits $1k. as far as insurance, be careful putting them on your policy. it is cheaper to do that, but any accidents they have will go on your record and will be your liability if they are catastrophic. good luck.

wenzee
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Buying car for newly liscenced 16 year old

Post by wenzee » Sat Mar 01, 2008 7:58 pm

Hi,
We just went through this as my second daughter turns 16 soon. When my other daughter turned 16 ,2 years ago, we had a 5 year old Honda to pass on with 75 k miles on it. This time, no such luck. My daughter also wanted a Scion TC, very much, as a personal preference. she found a used Scion tC that was very minimally used for a reasonable price at a dealer. We bought it and feel we paid a fair price.
Wenzee

dougpnca
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Post by dougpnca » Sat Mar 01, 2008 8:26 pm

We've been thru this twice with daughters & it's not as onerous as a lot of publications make it. With #1, we purchased a well used Chevy Lumina 4 door with the understanding that she would also ferry around daughter #2 as her part of the deal. She put gas in the car out of pocket money but we handled insurance, maintenance, etc., as it was fairly cheap to add (no collision or frills) to our policy.

With #2 we were able to share 2 cars between 3 of us (not as hard is it sounds) until she moved to college.

Consumers Reports suggests a car in the size range of the Taurus, Camry, Accord, etc. for teenagers so they have a bit of bulk around them & something that's not quite so sporty to drive. Corolla & Civic size may be OK too but are a bit smaller. Get as new a car as possible to take advantage of the additional safety features that get added every year.

dougP
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leonard
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Post by leonard » Mon Mar 03, 2008 11:34 am

Find a lower mile Toyota Tercel. I have a Tercel and they run forever. Good dependable car and should be reasonably cheap.
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turboLT
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Post by turboLT » Mon Mar 03, 2008 1:41 pm

dougpnca wrote: Consumers Reports suggests a car in the size range of the Taurus, Camry, Accord, etc. for teenagers so they have a bit of bulk around them & something that's not quite so sporty to drive.
+1.

Don't worry about it being too new as long as it has working seatbelts and airbags. Avoid an SUV - the accidents are more severe. Also please don't give her a Truckasaurus, as its a danger to everyone else on the road!

Good things to look for in a "beater" car:
-working safety equipment (seatbelt, airbags, brakes)
-really common model year (like a '99 camry). Choosing the most common car generally means lower repair costs because of used parts availability.

My buddy and I kept a 12 year old Taurus running through 4 years of college with only $500 because salvage yard parts were available everywhere. Plus if its not a newer model year, backing into a mailbox doesn't turn into family drama.

Good luck!

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nisiprius
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Post by nisiprius » Mon Mar 03, 2008 2:33 pm

Make sure the seats aren't capable of reclining all the way to a near-horizontal position?

(Some people still get that faraway look in their eyes when you say "Nash Rambler...")
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robertts12
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Post by robertts12 » Mon Mar 03, 2008 2:56 pm

A Studebaker 1955. Just kidding.
Seriously, choose a car that cannot develop high velocity. Think that sometimes other person with reduced age can be driving this car.

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Sheepdog
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Teach her to be safe

Post by Sheepdog » Mon Mar 03, 2008 3:14 pm

Train her well, and watch her. Sixteen year olds think they know everything about driving. They just don't know that people don't look out for them on the road. They have to look out for themselves.
When I bought my new 79 Ford Mustang, my son asked if he could have it when he reached 16 which was 7 years away. I kept it up and gave it o him in mint condition. He was so happy and proud. It was a neat car for any teenager.
He drove it to school the first day after his license was awarded. It was raining as he drove home. He obviously wanted to show off and took off too fast on the wet road and followed a car too close. A car ahead of him put on their turn signal to go left. He didn't notice until he had to slam on the brakes and he slid into the card, totally destroying the Mustang. No one was hurt. He did wear his seat belt.....that was good. I was very disappointed in him, but he learned from it.
What did he get to replace it? A beat up Ford Maverick (cost $195) which he was too ashamed to drive. Too bad. So sad. He had to work to buy a better car for himself.
Jim
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Sheepdog
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Post by Sheepdog » Mon Mar 03, 2008 3:25 pm

One more thing. For both my sons, they were told that if they were to drive they had to earn to pay for the insurance premiums themeselves and to pay for fuel and oil changes. Autos were not a complete giveaway in our opinion.They both learned how to change oil and lubricate themselves, by the way. They did do that.
Jim
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ol_pops
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car

Post by ol_pops » Mon Mar 03, 2008 4:23 pm

How about a 1979 Buick Road Master? As close to a full metal shell as you can get..

blood_donor
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Not small!!!

Post by blood_donor » Mon Mar 03, 2008 10:58 pm

FWIW, I am an actual automotive engineer, I work on stability control systems (safety).

DO NOT buy a 2500 lb car, a light pickup, an old sports car, or a lifted Jeep.

You want an underpowered, boring, car which weighs at least 3200lbs or so. It should have airbags, ABS, and three point belts all around.

I am partial to old Volvos, but a Camry, Taurus, Century, or Accord, would do well. Even a hand-me-down minivan. Check with your insurance to see what cars are safer--cheaper insurance often signals lower injury claims.

If you can afford the gas, Great-Aunt Berthas Grand Marquis is an excellent choice.

The idea is to have decent handling and braking, coupled with protective mass.

Also, you must make a rule: no seatbelt, no keys. Period.

Gekko
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Post by Gekko » Mon Mar 03, 2008 11:07 pm

"old Volvos"???

mechanical nightmares! turn in your engineer's badge!

blood_donor
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Post by blood_donor » Mon Mar 03, 2008 11:26 pm

Gekko wrote:"old Volvos"???

mechanical nightmares! turn in your engineer's badge!
Actually, Volvos from the 240 era are quite robust. It is when they went to the S60 types that they got complicated and expensive to fix.

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Post by Valuethinker » Tue Mar 04, 2008 2:53 am

nisiprius wrote:Make sure the seats aren't capable of reclining all the way to a near-horizontal position?

(Some people still get that faraway look in their eyes when you say "Nash Rambler...")
I've never asked my parents ;-).

Well... it saved on motel bills.

These days, one gathers, the 'youth of today' as my grandmother would have put it are a bit more brazen-- since Mum and Dad both work, there is lots of private time at home.

Or as my 80 year old mother once said to me with a tired smile, without any further explanation

'every generation thinks it invented it'

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Post by spacepilot » Tue Mar 04, 2008 9:10 am

blood_donor wrote: Actually, Volvos from the 240 era are quite robust. It is when they went to the S60 types that they got complicated and expensive to fix.
Though old Volvo's (240s) may be mechanically reliable, I wouldn't recommend them from a safety standpoint. They may have been among the safest cars in the 80's, on todays road filled with oblivious motorists driving 5000-pound SUVs, they simply don't provide adequate protection. Even a recent model compact car provides much better protection during a crash, not to mention it probably also has better electronic nannies to prevent the crash in the first place. You can get an idea from this video how much the safety of cars has improved in the last twenty year.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=86M_fV-1yKY


I agree with other posters that a car that has some heft, that's not too fast, that's reliable and cheap to insure is probably the best choice for a new driver. My wife is re-learning how to drive after years of being away from the steering wheel. We can get by with one car so she'll take our Passat when she starts driving again. But if we wanted to get a second car for her or me, we would probably look into a low mileage Buick or Ford Taurus or Crown Victoria that's not older than 2000. Hope this helps.

cdelena
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Post by cdelena » Tue Mar 04, 2008 12:12 pm

Odds are that the car will be involved in at least one accident. Get something economical, with safety equipment, and expect it will be an expensive learning experience for parent and child.

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kathyet
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Re: car

Post by kathyet » Wed Mar 05, 2008 1:10 pm

ol_pops wrote:How about a 1979 Buick Road Master? As close to a full metal shell as you can get..
Or a Mack Truck...

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Post by veryanya » Tue Mar 18, 2008 11:02 pm

When I was a teenager my parents purchased for me a 2-door 1996 Saturn that was about 5-6 years old at the time. However I was required to put forth half of the money for it (which I had from summer jobs). I was not required to pay insurance or gas money because I was responsible for taking my younger sister to ballet practice every evening. I think it is a great idea to ask the teenager to pay for part of the car, it teaches responsibility. The car is still in worknig condition after some fixes (although it is quite loud!!) and is now in the posession of my grandpa who for the first time ever two years ago obtained his drivers license.

Having the teenager pay for part of the car makes them take more responsibility. I still remember the proud feeling of going to the bank and withdrawing 3,000 for my car!

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gatorman
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Post by gatorman » Wed Mar 19, 2008 5:59 am

A full sized late model Ford Crown Victoria or the Mercury equivalent has the following advantages: can be purchased fairly economically, has enough heft, and safety equipment, to be reasonably safe, is not cool, can be maintained by your local garage. It has, however, one big disadvantage, a very large flat rear seat. Hopefully, the lack of coolness will compensate.
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Buckeye
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Post by Buckeye » Wed Mar 19, 2008 6:27 am

I was in an accident once while in a small car (a civic) and it taught me one thing for sure.

No small cars for me or my loved ones!

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Post by bearcat98 » Thu Mar 20, 2008 12:22 am

Buckeye wrote:I was in an accident once while in a small car (a civic) and it taught me one thing for sure.

No small cars for me or my loved ones!
The IIHS does crash testing and collects information on insurance payouts by model. It's an insurance industry organization and, in this case, their interests are closely aligned with yours: they don't want to pay out much for an accident, and you don't want an accident to be bad enough for them to pay out much.

Overall payouts, organized by model year and size class (although it only goes up to the 2006 model year):
http://www.iihs.org/research/hldi/composite_intro.html

Crash test results:
http://www.iihs.org/ratings/default.aspx

The current iteration of the Civic (2006 to present) actually has very good crash test scores; it's heavier than the Civics of yore, it has a beefier frame, and airbags all around. Insurance payouts are a bit higher than I would be comfortable with, but I imagine that part of that is the type of people who tend to drive Civics: teenagers (who will make any model look bad). If I were buying new, I wouldn't hesitate to give my kid a modern Civic.

The back seat isn't small enough, but I suppose that the only car that would satisfy me on that criteria would be a Smart car.

Another advantage of a newer small car over an older large car is that the kid with the larger car will tend to be the one who gives rides to everyone who lacks wheels.

If you don't want to spring for a new Civic, you can get a four-year-old Taurus for a third of the price; it's a big, sturdy car, surprisingly reliable (as well as dirt cheap to fix), and uncool. If you can get one with the Vulcan engine (8th digit of the VIN is "U", "1", or "2", depending on whether it can run on E85), it'll also have mediocre performance and better reliability - just what a teenager needs.

Mercury Grand Marquis also fits the reliable/safe/uncool/value criteria, although it's a pain to park something that huge, and you probably get to the area where big => greater chance of getting into an accident in the first place.

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Post by DaleMaley » Thu Mar 20, 2008 5:42 am

After having 2 teenagers........if I were you.....I would assume whatever vehicle you get for her will be wrecked.

We got our 16 year old daughter a Cavalier.......after turning 18, she totalled it when she was talking on her cell phone.....driving somewhere she never drove before.......and rear-ended the car in from of her at a stop light. Air bag deployed and she wasn't injured. Knock on wood, at 21 she has not wrecked her current vehicle.

I bought my son a 10 year old 1989 Ford F150. He never totalled it.....and I don't want to know all the places he drove it through. I sold it on Ebay for $350 to a father buying a replacement vehicle for his daughter....who at 16 had totalled her first car.

At 22, my son was driving a borrowed Chevy S10 pick-up......and totalled it driving to work in Chicago when someone in front of him stopped quickly to make a left turn. Air bags did not deplay, but the S10 front end is made up of hundreds of plastic pieces that cost $6,000 to replace.

I would go for a used big vehicle with air bags if I were you.
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daryll40
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Post by daryll40 » Thu Mar 20, 2008 6:53 am

I live in Pittsburgh and bot my 16 year old (now approaching eighteen) a brand spankin' new HONDA CR-V. She's been driving for almost 2 years and SO FAR has not even put a scratch on it (knock on burled walnut plastic fake wood).

Spoiled? Yup! But here is the rest of my thinking:

1. I wanted a vehicle that has AWD as we live in Pittsburgh and I drive a Lexus LS460 (RWD) so I wanted the 3rd vehicle to have AWD as my backup.

2. In our affluent suburb, there are LOTS of Suburbans and Expeditions. Even a CR-V isn't that much protection against one, but certainly a Corolla/Civic or smaller would be deadly. CR-V was a reasonable compromise between efficiency and safety.

3. I wanted a NEW vehicle with all the latest safety features...lots of airbags, the anti-rollover computer thingie, etc.

4. Now that daughter is signed up to go away to college, the CR-V will become the wifemobile and we'll get rid of her old Explorer.

Insurance was about $1000 per year extra for the 3rd vehicle and about $1000 per year additional for a 3rd teen driver. $168/month total ($2000/year) for the kid to drive. Nasty expensive but my father did it for me, so....

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Post by MDOmnis » Thu Mar 20, 2008 8:07 am

A used Ford Taurus can probably be obtained pretty cheap and my family has had decent luck with three different ones. It's not a flashy car, but it's roomy and you can fit a lot of groceries in the trunk! :)
-Matt

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gunn_show
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Post by gunn_show » Fri Mar 21, 2008 1:13 am

Older Toyota Camry. I have a '95 4 door LE as my daily beater when I don't feel like taking the convertible out. The thing is a tank, gets 20 to the gallon or so, has sub par hp (so speeding tix are out of the question), has 4 doors and a HUGE trunk, airbags... and it's a Toyota, it will run forever, cheap to fix and maintain, cheap to insure... etc

Or a Civic, but the Camry is bigger and safer ...
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