Share your net worth progression

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tj
Posts: 1980
Joined: Thu Dec 24, 2009 12:10 am

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by tj » Thu Jan 14, 2016 2:55 pm

delete.
Last edited by tj on Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.

ge1
Posts: 235
Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2012 8:15 pm

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by ge1 » Thu Jan 14, 2016 9:48 pm

Just a few milestones which come to mind:

Up until 30: maybe 50k

Sep 2008: Now married, both well earning jobs, made two excellent real estate investments: 1.2m

March 2009: less than 700k, ouch!

YE 2013: 2m

Now: 2.5m

Not including equity in primary residence in this.

mchriton
Posts: 50
Joined: Sat Oct 24, 2015 3:26 pm

Re: Share your story of how you got wealthy

Post by mchriton » Thu Jan 14, 2016 11:27 pm

gunn_show wrote:
mchriton wrote:this salary progression is impressive alone, but to have done it within one organization at your age is extra impressive. how much of that is stock/RSU based? I think I need to head into my (bay area tech company) annual review this year pushing more RSUs. With negotiating using external job offers, has there been any issues or resentment at all from your employer? (one assumes not since you are still there and clocking it..). well done
:beer


Thanks.

Total compensation is 60% base salary now. Early on it was 90-95% salary. Other companies have more generous stock grants. An advantage to my split is predictability but lower ceiling.
Last edited by mchriton on Sun Jan 22, 2017 10:41 pm, edited 1 time in total.

evilityb
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Location: The District of Columbia

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by evilityb » Fri Jan 15, 2016 12:28 am

Returned from Peace Corps service in 2011 with a negative net worth. Took several months to find a full-time job. Re-entered the work force in July 2012 with a starting salary of $62,000 in a HCOLA at the age of (almost) 29. No spouse, no kids. Just me and the dog.

July 2012: -$10,000 (age 28.9)
December 31, 2012: $0 (age 29)
Pay increase in September 2013 to about $65,000 but begin paying 3.2% into a pension system making my take home pay the same as before
December 31, 2013: $25,000 (age 30)
Pay increase in September 2014 to about $76,000
December 31, 2014: $50,000 (age 31)
Pay increase in September 2015 to about $92,000
December 31, 2015: $85,000 (age 32)

My progress is nothing exceptional, only due to keeping a hawk's eye on my spending and putting as much as I can into savings and investments. My parents have helped me out some, as well, by giving me a few thousand dollars some time in 2014. I follow the three-fund portfolio with a small bit of company stock that I recently unloaded.
Make sure the fortune that you seek is the fortune you need - Ben Harper

dziuniek
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Location: Corrupticut

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by dziuniek » Mon Jan 25, 2016 4:01 pm

surfstar wrote:
M_to_the_G wrote:Not to challenge here, but I don't understand your post. You know that Bogleheads are inclined to make some sacrifices early on, save prodigiously, and track their progress. It's very important to most of us that we are on track to retire in comfort, and "wealthy" is relative. There are multimillionaires here, but there are also those of more modest means who are trying to build a nest egg of $1 million or less over the coming decades. Are you saying that you don't care? Why?

Also, don't be so sure that there is a relationship between your low confidence in your retirement prospects and your enjoyment of life; it does not mean that you are having any more fun than anyone else. For all you know, there is a doctor on this thread with over $2 million saved who is having more fun than you. For most of us, it would be hard to enjoy life knowing that our prospects for a comfortable retirement were "too low."


Oh, we save like heck, and live well below our means, while still enjoying ourselves as much as possible.

Too many posts on here, despite coming from a savings standpoint, end up being like "keeping up with the Joneses", except in NW progression or something to that affect. I, and I know others, find it a bit unnerving seeing the numbers some people throw out there. Many BHs in my position would see that and say "I'm done, I can retire now", whereas those BHs keep on chugging away increasing their NW, for whatever reason.


I always see the inverse relationship of those who want to retire extremely early vs those who have the assets to do so. If you are the type of person who does not like working and would prefer to spend your time traveling, exploring, etc, you seem much less likely to have the wealth to do so. If you have the funds available to quit and do the above, you are much more likely to be someone who is content to work their life away. A catch-22 of sorts.

My NW progression is not tracked. I know that we're aiming for mid 50's retirement, although I'd prefer ASAP. That's ~20 years off, so I see no need to plot our path at such as early stage. Its just too much "keeping up with the Bogleheads" -like.
Fine for those who are "inspired" by this thread. In reality, I don't see it as actionable, though.


Keeping up with the bogleheads, haha. I like that.

Not everyone has low expenses and needs a higher networth to accomplish whatever that might be, heck maybe it's being buried wit hall your cash even, but who are you to judge?

Agree on the catch-22 to some extent. That being said, just because you have the cash to do so now, maybe you don't have the time? Also, just because someone is taking 3 weeks vacation to ski, doesn't mean he isn't putting away a high percentage of his savings to accomplish a high net worth, allowing him to retire early and ski everyday dang day.

If you don't track it... how did you ballpark the mid50s number? Income steams (pensions? rentals?).

Finally, even if that's how you see it, I'd rather keep up with the bogleheads than the nojesses .... agreed?

United2008
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by United2008 » Mon Jan 25, 2016 7:29 pm

This is fun and inspiring - the Bogleheads' savings rates and net worth progressions are incredibly impressive. I need to amp up the savings a bit this year to join the 7 figure club (including home equity as we likely will liquidate our home in HCOL market when retirement comes in a couple decades).

2003 6k
2004 128k (sold investment property; started law school)
2005 74k
2006 190k (still in school; acquired new investment property - not a good idea)
2007 135k
2008 8k (student loans + housing market downturn not good for net worth)
2009 -35k
2010 45k (back to positive territory after graduating about a year before and back to earning a regular paycheck)
2011 150k
2012 280k
2013 380k
2014 610k (sold investment property; acquired new personal residence in hot housing market)
2015 970k (gains almost all attributable to increase in real estate value; value of investments actually falls by 20k due to STUPID MISTAKE of not monitoring a couple of stock positions during year; back to 3 fund portfolio for everything; net worth is about 50% home equity)

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M_to_the_G
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by M_to_the_G » Mon Jan 25, 2016 8:05 pm

dziuniek wrote:
surfstar wrote:
M_to_the_G wrote:Not to challenge here, but I don't understand your post. You know that Bogleheads are inclined to make some sacrifices early on, save prodigiously, and track their progress. It's very important to most of us that we are on track to retire in comfort, and "wealthy" is relative. There are multimillionaires here, but there are also those of more modest means who are trying to build a nest egg of $1 million or less over the coming decades. Are you saying that you don't care? Why?

Also, don't be so sure that there is a relationship between your low confidence in your retirement prospects and your enjoyment of life; it does not mean that you are having any more fun than anyone else. For all you know, there is a doctor on this thread with over $2 million saved who is having more fun than you. For most of us, it would be hard to enjoy life knowing that our prospects for a comfortable retirement were "too low."


Oh, we save like heck, and live well below our means, while still enjoying ourselves as much as possible.

Too many posts on here, despite coming from a savings standpoint, end up being like "keeping up with the Joneses", except in NW progression or something to that affect. I, and I know others, find it a bit unnerving seeing the numbers some people throw out there. Many BHs in my position would see that and say "I'm done, I can retire now", whereas those BHs keep on chugging away increasing their NW, for whatever reason.


I always see the inverse relationship of those who want to retire extremely early vs those who have the assets to do so. If you are the type of person who does not like working and would prefer to spend your time traveling, exploring, etc, you seem much less likely to have the wealth to do so. If you have the funds available to quit and do the above, you are much more likely to be someone who is content to work their life away. A catch-22 of sorts.

My NW progression is not tracked. I know that we're aiming for mid 50's retirement, although I'd prefer ASAP. That's ~20 years off, so I see no need to plot our path at such as early stage. Its just too much "keeping up with the Bogleheads" -like.
Fine for those who are "inspired" by this thread. In reality, I don't see it as actionable, though.


Keeping up with the bogleheads, haha. I like that.

Not everyone has low expenses and needs a higher networth to accomplish whatever that might be, heck maybe it's being buried wit hall your cash even, but who are you to judge?

Agree on the catch-22 to some extent. That being said, just because you have the cash to do so now, maybe you don't have the time? Also, just because someone is taking 3 weeks vacation to ski, doesn't mean he isn't putting away a high percentage of his savings to accomplish a high net worth, allowing him to retire early and ski everyday dang day.

If you don't track it... how did you ballpark the mid50s number? Income steams (pensions? rentals?).

Finally, even if that's how you see it, I'd rather keep up with the bogleheads than the nojesses .... agreed?



Surfstar, there are indeed serial worrywarts among Bogleheads who could probably stand to save a little less, but I think very few people here -- even those who have already amassed a fortune of several million dollars or more -- are amassing more wealth for no reason. Perhaps they have different goals than you. Maybe they want to live in a 200 foot yacht in retirement. That's not my goal, but who am I to judge? If you find it "a bit unnerving seeing the numbers some people throw out there," as you put it, then that is your personal perspective, but I, personally, am not unnerved in any way by any of these numbers. To the contrary, I applaud those prodigiously-saving Bogleheads for saving so much, and I wish them the best and hope they reach their goals, whatever those goals may be.

Talking about traveling and exploring, you wrote, "If you have the funds available to quit and do the above, you are much more likely to be someone who is content to work their life away." That is assuming that everyone has a dream of traveling and exploring at the earliest opportunity possible, and therefore, if someone can already afford to do so and yet continues to work, then he is either trying to "keep up with the Joneses" or "is content to work his life away." Again, perhaps they have different goals than you. Again, maybe some people here want to live in a 200 foot yacht in retirement. Or maybe they genuinely enjoy their careers and just don't want to quit.

You wrote, "I always see the inverse relationship of those who want to retire extremely early vs those who have the assets to do so." You should read more posts here. This forum is chock-full of Bogleheads who retired early because they hit their numbers and are now living happily in early retirement.

You wrote, "My NW progression is not tracked. I know that we're aiming for mid 50's retirement, although I'd prefer ASAP. That's ~20 years off, so I see no need to plot our path at such as early stage." If you want to retire ASAP, I believe conventional wisdom here would advise that the best thing to do would be to start tracking your progression and plot a path. We're probably the same age. I am 36. I plan to retire at 50. I don't believe that will be possible unless I track my progression and plot a path.
"It’s basically the plot of 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.' If you stick around, doing nothing, while everyone around you ****s up, you’re going to win big." - John Oliver

dziuniek
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Location: Corrupticut

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by dziuniek » Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:29 am

Here's my update:
(03/21/2017)

Net Worth (investments, house, cars, etc...)

Year, Age Net-Worth) Investments Commens

2011 YE 26 $(20,000.00) $- Graduated B.S. w/ student loans.
2012 YE 27 $(10,000.00) $7,000.00 Got my first "big boy job"
2013 YE 28 $(40,000.00) $31,500.00 Got married (more student loans!), bought a house, new car. Started at BIG4.
2014 YE 29 $(15,000.00) $68,000.00 Finished my MSAT and started to tackle student loans seriously.
2015 YE 30 $26,500.00 $84,500.00 NW positive(finally!), dang student loans. We have a kid now! Started MBA & State job(67k).
2016 YE 31 $94,000.00 $110,000.00 A good year, methinks, made progress due to debt payoff." Wifu started a new job (117k)
2017 YTD 32 $101,000.00 $134,500.00 Decent start to the year. Let's see if I don't take a hit on selling the house. - Did :/
Last edited by dziuniek on Tue Mar 21, 2017 11:55 am, edited 2 times in total.

chuckb84
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Location: New Mexico

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by chuckb84 » Tue Nov 15, 2016 1:18 pm

The primary account, which is with TSP, went as shown below. I knew nothing at age 29, but could clearly see that it was (1) tax-free going in, (2) DOUBLED my money due to .gov matching 5% of my salary. I was way too conservative, spent a stupid couple of years in 100% G fund, then switched to nearly all stocks for most of the rest of the time. The other issue was that my prolonged time in graduate school delayed the start of investing.

Two major non-Boglehead market timing moves: In 2000 I saw the .com bust coming and moved into 100% G, same again, nearly, in 2008, when the portfolio took only a 5% hit. In hindsight, these "smart" moves were smart, but less smart than I thought at the time, because---typically for market timers---I missed some of the rebound because I didn't get back in at the exactly right time.

On top of the .gov pension, SS, wife's small 401K, we're quite comfortable, and that's how a civil servant got here at age 61. Now sitting at a comfortable 40% G Fund, 60% split across the stock funds, watching the markets, but ignoring the noise.


1990 1000
1993 15260
1996 32270
1997 41225
1998 49145
1999 60015
2000 134228
2001 174236
2002 181378
2003 179797
2004 203941
2005 260205
2006 354000
2007 387000
2008 367600
2009 401000
2010 422000
2011 461000
2012 503000
2013 670000
2014 700000
2015 703875
2016 707929

WildBill
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Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by WildBill » Tue Nov 15, 2016 2:45 pm

I had a good job and a good income, and my wife and I lived well below our means. I saved a lot and invested aggressively for growth. My allocation was usually around 70/30, sometimes higher in equities.

I was lucky and have had strong markets most of the time, and never did anything stupid in a major way. Lots of minor stupid stuff, but avoided serious errors.

My hobby is financial and economic history, and that gave me the confidence to invest aggressively in 2001 and 2009. That made a big difference.


1977 - $-5000 Graduated
1978- $2000
1980 -$5000 -Started Grad School
1984 -$50000 3rd year of pretty good job, saving and investing
1990 -$500000 - Good job, saving and investing, strong markets
1996- $1000000 -Good job and strong markets, saving and investing
1998 - $1500000 -Ditto
2000 - $3000000- Ditto
2001 - $2200000 Oops dot com crunch
2005 - $3500000 -Bought some good crunched up stocks in 2001, 2002 saving and investing
2007 -$4500000 Good job, saving and investing
2009 - $3000000- Oops
2012 - $6000000 Went 95% equities in 2009
2016 -$8000000 - Retired, 60/40 allocation

LBYM, save and invest, don't do anything stupid. High income and a good career are worthwhile and rewarding.

Good luck to all

W B
"Through chances various, through all vicissitudes, we make our way." Virgil, The Aeneid

VAslim16
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by VAslim16 » Tue Nov 15, 2016 4:41 pm

VAslim16 wrote:Current age: 36. Unfortunately wasted my 20s and early 30s spending too much and not saving. Over the last 4 years since finding this site I'm proud of the progress I've made. Hopefully I'm on track now to be in good shape around 60-65.

May 2011: -$46,118
May 2012: -$13,336
May 2013: $2,978
Apr 2014: $34,900
Apr 2015: $64,475

Current salary is $60K


My update:

Oct 2016: $107,950. Feels good to have amassed the first 100K. Still a long ways to go though.

TRC
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by TRC » Tue Nov 15, 2016 8:51 pm

Started tracking in 2010. I'm in software sales and wife is a part time RN. We've learned to live off my base and mostly invest my commissions and bonuses.

Jan 2010 - $708K - age 32
Jan 2011 - ?
Jan 2012 - $1,084,000 - age 34
Jan 2013 - $1,347,747 - age 35
Jan 2014 - $1,560,411 - age 36
Jan 2015 - $1,809,508 - age 37
Jan 2016 - $1,965,531 - age 38
Jan 2017 - I hope to be around $2.1 - $2.2M - age 39 (God Willing)

Dottie57
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by Dottie57 » Tue Nov 15, 2016 9:19 pm

1988 - 401k introduced to smallish company. Contribution of 6%
Next 5 years upped percentage until hit 15% contribution.
1996. 401k at 115k
1996 New employer 15% here too. Salary of 43k. Decent choices available.
2016.Same employer with 572k at fidelity with good choices. Saving 24% with 3 % match and 3% safe harbor.
48k in Roth
67k in taxable
300 k in rollover ira.
130k in savings
Met my number. Working on the savings for 5 years of no income until SS at70. Need about 150 in safe money. Hopefully save for Roth conversion too.

tj
Posts: 1980
Joined: Thu Dec 24, 2009 12:10 am

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by tj » Tue Nov 15, 2016 10:38 pm

tj wrote:
tj wrote:I didn't start really keeping track until the middle of 2010 at the age of 25.

7/1/10 - $44k
1/1/11 - $69k (I think this increase is a combination of bull market and I bought a new car towards the end of 2010)
1/1/12 - $79k (In late '11 I refinanced condo loan from 30 year 5.25% to 15 year 3.625%)
1/1/13 - $132k (Have to assume that this is mostly from the stock market
1/1/14 - $232k (Most of this was from fairly significant appreciation in my condo)
1/1/15 - $251k (Most of 2014, I worked part time for lower salary with a long expensive commute - lived by the beach. That I still managed to grow my Net worth by 10% seems a bit shocking.



1/1/16 and I'm almost exactly where i was on 1/1/15.


As of 11/1/16 I was at 286k. Currently a bit higher with market movement the past couple weeks.

ThinkingRunner
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by ThinkingRunner » Tue Nov 15, 2016 11:27 pm

ThinkingRunner wrote:Ballpark year-end NW, first single, then a couple post-2007. Present ages: 34, 33.

2002 - $1.6K (arrived in the U.S. for graduate school mid-2002)
2003 - $8K
2004 - $20K
2005 - $32K
2006 - $45K
2007 - $55K (got married, spouse graduate student, individual NW: $0)
2008 - $96K (graduated mid-2008, started first real job)
2009 - $213K (spouse graduated and started first real job early 2009)
2010 - $360K
2011 - $509K
2012 - $767K
2013 - $1.01M
present - $1.13M

No jackpots or inheritances. Less than 4% of our current NW comes from family gifts. Always saved over 50% of gross income in tax-advantaged and taxable accounts.


Just realized that I'd posted this over 2.5 years ago. Current ages: 36, 35.

2014 - $1.28M
2015 - $1.54M
2016 (projected) - $1.88M

Unless something bad happens, we should hit the $2M milestone in Q1 2017.

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snackdog
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by snackdog » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:52 am

Working 20 years. Ours seems to increase 10-fold every ten years, which seems about right combining market returns and increasing savings rate on increasing earnings. Definitely do not plan on nor need to work another ten years.

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Downtown
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Location: Austin, TX

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by Downtown » Wed Nov 16, 2016 12:24 pm

I just noticed this thread today...interesting to see the diversity of NW progressions amongst the Bogleheads. I'll share mine in the hopes of inspiring someone 20 years my junior. I'm currently 52 years old. Life will bring you many challenges...stay the course!

1992 $38k (28 yrs old, active duty military, married in 1988, bought condo in 1989...10.5% mortgage!)
1993 $53k (started graduate program, $43k AGI)
1994 $46k (30 yrs old)
1995 $76k (left military, completed graduate program)
1996 $137k (child #1 born, $109k AGI)
1997 $171k (bought house)
1998 $229k
1999 $347k (35 yrs old, child #2 born, changed careers to sales)
2000 $400k
2001 $350k (oops...internet bubble bursts, moved cities, bought house)
2002 $386k
2003 $420k ($121k AGI)
2004 $500k (40 yrs old)
2005 $696k
2006 $1,045k ($484k AGI, bought big house...comfortable living, but overkill)
2007 $1,151k (promoted to management role)
2008 $963k (oops...global economic downturn)
2009 $1,109k (45 yrs old, $226k AGI, DW starts graduate program)
2010 $1,202k (DW finishes graduate program)
2011 $1,430k
2012 $1,515k ($500k AGI)
2013 $1,833k (sold big house, start huge college tuition bills!)
2014 $2,087k (50 yrs old, bought downsized primary home and 2 rental properties)
2015 $2,414k ($899k AGI)
2016 ~$2,825k (52 yrs old, ~$500k AGI, conservative property values, so actual NW ~$3M)

Our income has fluctuated a lot during economic updrafts and downdrafts - 2015 was an unusually great year, 2016 is more normal, yet still a blessing. Currently saving a high percentage of income (after getting killed on taxes) and live off ~$110-120k per year. Targeting $3.3-$3.5M net worth to early/semi retire around 54/55 years old. We are getting excited about the next stage in life. We have been blessed with a great marriage, reasonable saving and spending habits, and eventually a powerful income. Investing has helped, but it's really the savings rate that dominates the end result. Life's been good! Best wishes to all on your own unique journey!

Downtown

BW1985
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by BW1985 » Wed Nov 16, 2016 12:47 pm

Downtown wrote:I just noticed this thread today...interesting to see the diversity of NW progressions amongst the Bogleheads. I'll share mine in the hopes of inspiring someone 20 years my junior. I'm currently 52 years old. Life will bring you many challenges...stay the course!

Downtown


Very impressive income! What type of sales?
"Squirrels figured out how to save eons ago. They buried acorns. Some, they dug up, for food. Others, they let to sprout, in new oak trees. We could learn from squirrels." -john94549

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Downtown
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Location: Austin, TX

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by Downtown » Wed Nov 16, 2016 1:11 pm

BW1985 wrote:
Downtown wrote:I just noticed this thread today...interesting to see the diversity of NW progressions amongst the Bogleheads. I'll share mine in the hopes of inspiring someone 20 years my junior. I'm currently 52 years old. Life will bring you many challenges...stay the course!

Downtown


Very impressive income! What type of sales?


Enterprise software. Software is always a super dynamic industry, and the sales profession, like many careers, is undergoing a lot of change right now, but I've found it rewarding to help companies leverage technology to transform their businesses and embrace new opportunities. When everything aligns it can be magical (and lucrative), but it's not for everyone as there can be lots of ups and downs - both within the industry and the sales profession, too. The advent of SaaS, cloud delivery, subscription revenue models, etc. is impacting software profit margins, which, in turn, is impacting compensation plans. So, proceed with caution!...but, for the right skill mix it can be a really interesting and rewarding professional environment.

B0bL0blawsLawBl0g
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by B0bL0blawsLawBl0g » Wed Nov 16, 2016 1:34 pm

Age: 28; NW: -135k (graduated from law school)
29; -100k
30; -25k
31; 110k (got married, joint NW)
32; 220k
33; 350k
34; 470k
35; 560k (forecast a couple months)

SQRT
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by SQRT » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:28 pm

I hesitate to post this but it might give some inspiration to late starters. My net worth was slightly negative at age 42 when I separated from my first wife. Bitter 15 years of very expensive litigation followed. My only asset turned out to be me-ie my career although in effect she got a piece of that too.

Hit $1million at about age 48 and then I got a significant promotion and raise with extensive equity based incentive comp (mostly options). Did all the wrong things by holding on to the options as long as I could but it all worked out really well. Retired at 56 with mid eight figure net worth. Extremely lucky and I know it. Not a day goes by that I don't thank my "lucky stars".

Don't be discouraged if you are starting late. You can still make it up.

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HomerJ
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by HomerJ » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:38 pm

SQRT wrote:I hesitate to post this but it might give some inspiration to late starters. My net worth was slightly negative at age 42 when I separated from my first wife. Bitter 15 years of very expensive litigation followed. My only asset turned out to be me-ie my career although in effect she got a piece of that too.

Hit $1million at about age 48 and then I got a significant promotion and raise with extensive equity based incentive comp (mostly options). Did all the wrong things by holding on to the options as long as I could but it all worked out really well. Retired at 56 with mid eight figure net worth. Extremely lucky and I know it. Not a day goes by that I don't thank my "lucky stars".

Don't be discouraged if you are starting late. You can still make it up.


Heh, one can make it up assuming one makes $300k+ a year, and gets a bunch of options worth millions. :)

But, in general, I agree with your statement. I didn't have a positive net worth until I was 30. Now, at 47, doing very well. But the key was a high joint income and saving a good chunk of it.

Two professionals making $75k - $125k each (which is not unreasonable after 5-10 years of working) and living on one salary can save a ton of money over the next 10-20 years.
Last edited by HomerJ on Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:48 pm, edited 3 times in total.

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InvestorNewb
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by InvestorNewb » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:44 pm

HomerJ wrote:Heh, one can make it up assuming one makes $300k+ a year, and gets a bunch of options worth millions. :)

I was thinking the same. It's almost like saying you can make it up too if you happen to win the lottery.
My Portfolio: VTI [US], VXUS [Int'l], VNQ [REIT], VCN [Canada] (largest to smallest)

KlangFool
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by KlangFool » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:45 pm

SQRT wrote:I hesitate to post this but it might give some inspiration to late starters. My net worth was slightly negative at age 42 when I separated from my first wife. Bitter 15 years of very expensive litigation followed. My only asset turned out to be me-ie my career although in effect she got a piece of that too.

Hit $1million at about age 48 and then I got a significant promotion and raise with extensive equity based incentive comp (mostly options). Did all the wrong things by holding on to the options as long as I could but it all worked out really well. Retired at 56 with mid eight figure net worth. Extremely lucky and I know it. Not a day goes by that I don't thank my "lucky stars".

Don't be discouraged if you are starting late. You can still make it up.


SQRT,

One family member early retired after the divorce and the ex-spouse took 50% of the asset.

KlangFool

BW1985
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by BW1985 » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:49 pm

InvestorNewb wrote:
HomerJ wrote:Heh, one can make it up assuming one makes $300k+ a year, and gets a bunch of options worth millions. :)

I was thinking the same. It's almost like saying you can make it up too if you happen to win the lottery.


How's the saying go- Luck is when preparation meets opportunity.

The lottery is dumb luck. This was compensation. :happy
Last edited by BW1985 on Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.
"Squirrels figured out how to save eons ago. They buried acorns. Some, they dug up, for food. Others, they let to sprout, in new oak trees. We could learn from squirrels." -john94549

SQRT
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by SQRT » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:50 pm

InvestorNewb wrote:
HomerJ wrote:Heh, one can make it up assuming one makes $300k+ a year, and gets a bunch of options worth millions. :)

I was thinking the same. It's almost like saying you can make it up too if you happen to win the lottery.

Right there is some truth in that, but being successful, although requiring some luck, is a far cry from winning the lottery. My advice would still be not to get discouraged. Don't give up, good things can happen. Have faith in yourself. Easy for me to say, I know, but I still believe it.

SQRT
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by SQRT » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:53 pm

KlangFool wrote:
SQRT wrote:I hesitate to post this but it might give some inspiration to late starters. My net worth was slightly negative at age 42 when I separated from my first wife. Bitter 15 years of very expensive litigation followed. My only asset turned out to be me-ie my career although in effect she got a piece of that too.

Hit $1million at about age 48 and then I got a significant promotion and raise with extensive equity based incentive comp (mostly options). Did all the wrong things by holding on to the options as long as I could but it all worked out really well. Retired at 56 with mid eight figure net worth. Extremely lucky and I know it. Not a day goes by that I don't thank my "lucky stars".

Don't be discouraged if you are starting late. You can still make it up.


SQRT,

One family member early retired after the divorce and the ex-spouse took 50% of the asset.

KlangFool

I gave her all our assets as well as paying off her bills and mortgage. I doubt there is much you could tell me about divorce. My case was very well known and actually made the front page of Canada's largest newspaper when the court judgement was announced. It was awful.

KlangFool
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by KlangFool » Wed Nov 16, 2016 3:57 pm

BW1985 wrote:
InvestorNewb wrote:
HomerJ wrote:Heh, one can make it up assuming one makes $300k+ a year, and gets a bunch of options worth millions. :)

I was thinking the same. It's almost like saying you can make it up too if you happen to win the lottery.


How's the saying go- Luck is when preparation meets opportunity.

The lottery is dumb luck. This was compensation. :happy


BW1985,

Great saving rate make up for bad luck and the bad mistakes too!

1) Person A worked at Enron for 22 years. All his 401K which is about 50% of his asset was wiped out by Enron. But, he survived and retired at 62 years old.

2) I gambled on Telecom stock and lost 50% of my whole life savings about 10+ years ago. But, I recovered and hopefully on schedule for early retirement.

KlangFool

KlangFool
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by KlangFool » Wed Nov 16, 2016 4:00 pm

SQRT wrote:
KlangFool wrote:
SQRT wrote:I hesitate to post this but it might give some inspiration to late starters. My net worth was slightly negative at age 42 when I separated from my first wife. Bitter 15 years of very expensive litigation followed. My only asset turned out to be me-ie my career although in effect she got a piece of that too.

Hit $1million at about age 48 and then I got a significant promotion and raise with extensive equity based incentive comp (mostly options). Did all the wrong things by holding on to the options as long as I could but it all worked out really well. Retired at 56 with mid eight figure net worth. Extremely lucky and I know it. Not a day goes by that I don't thank my "lucky stars".

Don't be discouraged if you are starting late. You can still make it up.


SQRT,

One family member early retired after the divorce and the ex-spouse took 50% of the asset.

KlangFool

I gave her all our assets as well as paying off her bills and mortgage. I doubt there is much you could tell me about divorce. My case was very well known and actually made the front page of Canada's largest newspaper when the court judgement was announced. It was awful.


SQRT,

My point is your spouse could be so expensive to maintain that you may not be retiring if you are still married to her.

<<I gave her all our assets as well as paying off her bills and mortgage. >>

She might cost a lot more than that.

KlangFool

Rodc
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by Rodc » Wed Nov 16, 2016 4:48 pm

1990 got out of grad school - NW = $0 (age 33, I was a slow learner)

2000 nearing top of tech bubble - NW = ~$350K (guesstimate)

2002 bottom of crash - NW = ~$280K (guesstimate)

2008 top of next bubble - NW = ~$720K

2009 bottom of crash = NW = ~$600K

Jan 2013 = NW =$1,000 (crossed over $1 million!)

Current NW = ~$1,600K

Your basic exponential curve with some wobbling. More wobbling to come no doubt. (also wife and I have modest pensions coming, so things look good)
Last edited by Rodc on Wed Nov 16, 2016 4:55 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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lostdog
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by lostdog » Wed Nov 16, 2016 5:11 pm

Networth November 2016-$569,887

Net Income-$31,668
Yearly Expenses/Budget-$16,272
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Simple Simon
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by Simple Simon » Wed Nov 16, 2016 5:21 pm

Couple in early 40s. Listing our net financial assets, excluding the value of our pensions because if we die before 55 they are worth ZERO. And excluding the value of our house as a sort of thought experiment. Put this way our net financial progression is:

2008: -454,377 + one house (our home) + pensions worth 9,442 per year from age 55
2009: -423,161 + one house + pensions worth 12,983 per year from age 55
2010: -386,135 + one house + 15,579 per year...
2011: -355,314 + one house + 18,588...
2012: -294,674 + one house + 22,012...
2013: -314,909 + one house + 25,161...
2014: -234,765 + one house + 28,861...
2015: -235,308 + one house + 30,630...
2016: -177,841 + one house + 31,822...

Edit: I hope the first number will hit zero in perhaps 4 or 5 years time. Technically I think I could retire at (55 - age)*X + 30*(pension-X) where X is projected annual spend in retirement.
Last edited by Simple Simon on Sat Nov 19, 2016 5:12 am, edited 1 time in total.

corgimom11
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by corgimom11 » Wed Nov 16, 2016 8:14 pm

Downtown wrote:
BW1985 wrote:
Downtown wrote:I just noticed this thread today...interesting to see the diversity of NW progressions amongst the Bogleheads. I'll share mine in the hopes of inspiring someone 20 years my junior. I'm currently 52 years old. Life will bring you many challenges...stay the course!

Downtown


Very impressive income! What type of sales?


Enterprise software. Software is always a super dynamic industry, and the sales profession, like many careers, is undergoing a lot of change right now, but I've found it rewarding to help companies leverage technology to transform their businesses and embrace new opportunities. When everything aligns it can be magical (and lucrative), but it's not for everyone as there can be lots of ups and downs - both within the industry and the sales profession, too. The advent of SaaS, cloud delivery, subscription revenue models, etc. is impacting software profit margins, which, in turn, is impacting compensation plans. So, proceed with caution!...but, for the right skill mix it can be a really interesting and rewarding professional environment.


Your story resonates a lot with me. I appreciate you sharing. I'm in my third year of software sales myself, but landed pretty early on to a startup experiencing some crazy explosive growth (50%+ YOY growth, injected with roughly $50M investment cash since I joined 3 years ago, doubling employee counts each year). Although I'm in a farmer role, I've been given a handful of enterprise accounts to manage, basically ones before we actually created an enterprise team last year. I've been able to get almost $400K in additional revenue out of the highest profile one this year alone, which is starting to get a lot of looks from our company president to formally move me into the enterprise team when the growth lends itself in the next year or so to need a true enterprise level account manager for our existing customer base. Lot of potential and looking forward to taking on the challenge.

More back on topic. I'm 28 years old and my husband is 31.

2013 NW: -$15K (prior to my software sales position, I made around $40K and my husband was at $35K. Had a TON of student loans & car debt.)
2014 NW: $80K (My first year in software sales - made $120K, husband got a raise to $47K. Paid off a lot of our student debt and purchased our first home for $195K).
2015 NW: $150K (A good year for me at $135K! Experiencing a lot of appreciation on the home we purchased, paid off even more student debt, and maxed my 401K!)
2016 NW: ~$260K (My best year yet - $160K. We completely paid off all our student debts and maxed 401Ks. Only debt we currently have is now our mortgage! Our real estate market is also still booming and experiencing a lot of price appreciation on our home.)

hikeandbike
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by hikeandbike » Wed Nov 16, 2016 9:23 pm

46 years old male, not married but in long term relationship, planning to marry in the next few years. She is a good bit younger and frugal. She has no retirement funds yet..but is just getting out of debt from school and life. She will be debt free by March of next year, and will begin to add to her ROTH then.

NW is all stocks, bonds and cash. no house, renter. no debt except for $20K 1.9% vehicle loan.

Haven't maxed my 401K until this year. I have a relatively low paying job - $30K, 3% company contribution to 401K, no match.
I started a business in 2012 and it has provided me with around $75K this year before taxes. Before this I was recouping my investment, which has been paid back.

Plan to semi-retire next year and hike the Appalachian Trail in March, then travel the country.
I have $25K in cash currently, planning on getting that to $50K by next October.
Budgeted $30K/year for living, $20K in emergency fund, and investing $20K each year in my taxable accounts as well as maxing my ROTH contributions for the foreseeable future. Any additional funds will be added to taxable.
Income will be from business, if needed I will get another job.


Personal goal is $1.25M by 60 (2030), will settle for $875K-$1M.
Wife will add to that amount in her accounts.
We want to find a quiet place to call home, live frugally, and get by on less than $50K a year.
All retirement funds are at Vanguard: Target Retirement, LifeStrategy, Moderate Allocation Annuity, VTI, VXUS
AA is Age - 20 in bonds. So 74/26 right now.

End of year numbers
2008 $347K
2009 $434K
2010 & 2011 ?
2012 $344K (invested cash in business, moved accounts including an annuity to Vanguard...thanks Bogleheads!)
2013 $390K
2014 $428K
2015 $421K (financed vehicle $26K)
2016 YTD $482K (first year I maxed my 401K. Business is starting to turn a nice profit so I was able to Invest $45K this year in retirement funds: taxable, 401K and IRA. )

Thanks to everyone who posts at Bogleheads. I've learned a lot and feel like I have a good plan for my financial future.

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zaboomafoozarg
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by zaboomafoozarg » Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:42 pm

I thought I was doing alright until I read this thread, LOL.

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abuss368
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by abuss368 » Wed Nov 16, 2016 10:51 pm

I am planning to capitalize the value of my name until I am a BILLIONAIRE!
John C. Bogle: "You simply do not need to put your money into 8 different mutual funds!" | | Disclosure: Three Fund Portfolio + U.S. & International REITs

NYCguy
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by NYCguy » Wed Nov 16, 2016 11:29 pm

1993 age 28 -$80k student loan debt
1997 $0
1999 $100k
2002 $400k
2005 $1 million
2007 $2 million
2010 $5 million
2014 $10 million
2016 $12 million

Always saved 30-60% of after tax income. Blessed with great job though 24/7/365 commitment. Low cost, tax efficient index funds.
If your out-go is greater than your income, your upkeep will be your DOWNFALL.

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White Coat Investor
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by White Coat Investor » Wed Nov 16, 2016 11:56 pm

zaboomafoozarg wrote:I thought I was doing alright until I read this thread, LOL.


Yea, humbling isn't it! But you know what, there is a lot of value in having some "friends" who make more and have more than you. For some reason it's way easier for me to talk about money with someone who has more of it than me than with someone who has less of it. Plus their advice is often pretty useful since they've been there done that and they actually know how it feels to reach milestones since they got there before you.
1) Invest you must 2) Time is your friend 3) Impulse is your enemy | 4) Basic arithmetic works 5) Stick to simplicity 6) Stay the course

lumberingc
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by lumberingc » Thu Nov 17, 2016 1:43 am

I'm in my early 30s. whitecoatinvestor is my hero. I will be as rich as him someday (though he will be much richer by then :D )

2005: $0
2009: -$180,000 (educational debt)
2014: -$220,000 (paid off some of my loans but married someone with debt)
2016: $0
11/2016: ~$60,000

I basically just follow the advice on the wiki. Allocation is 90% equities aside from house fund.

bigcmagor
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by bigcmagor » Thu Nov 17, 2016 10:01 am

deleted
Last edited by bigcmagor on Thu Nov 17, 2016 1:22 pm, edited 1 time in total.

worldtraveler
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by worldtraveler » Thu Nov 17, 2016 10:30 am

Here's mine. Started tracking in 2005 at Age 35

Age Year Net Worth
35 2005 $560K
40 2010 $1.15M
43 2013 $2.0M
46 2016 $3.1M (projected end of year)

B0bL0blawsLawBl0g
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by B0bL0blawsLawBl0g » Thu Nov 17, 2016 11:22 am

worldtraveler wrote:Here's mine. Started tracking in 2005 at Age 35

Age Year Net Worth
35 2005 $560K
40 2010 $1.15M
43 2013 $2.0M
46 2016 $3.1M (projected end of year)


This is awesome. I'm about where you were at 35, and would love for the next 11 years to follow your path.

travellight
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Location: San Diego

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by travellight » Fri Nov 18, 2016 1:57 pm

[quote]by NYCguy » Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:29 pm

1993 age 28 -$80k student loan debt
1997 $0
1999 $100k
2002 $400k
2005 $1 million
2007 $2 million
2010 $5 million
2014 $10 million
2016 $12 million
/quote]

what do you attribute the million per year to? salary, real estate, or equities?

NYCguy
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by NYCguy » Fri Nov 18, 2016 3:50 pm

travellight wrote:
by NYCguy » Wed Nov 16, 2016 7:29 pm

1993 age 28 -$80k student loan debt
1997 $0
1999 $100k
2002 $400k
2005 $1 million
2007 $2 million
2010 $5 million
2014 $10 million
2016 $12 million
/quote]

what do you attribute the million per year to? salary, real estate, or equities?


Depends by year but basically 90% salary 10% investment return. I carry my personal real estate conservatively at the lesser of cost basis and FMV.
If your out-go is greater than your income, your upkeep will be your DOWNFALL.

travellight
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Location: San Diego

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by travellight » Fri Nov 18, 2016 4:43 pm

^ interesting, nycguy.... I have achieved the same per year amount of progression (although I am behind you in net amount) for the past 4 years but mine is 10% salary and about 80+% real estate. I have about an 80% savings rate.

stoptothink
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by stoptothink » Fri Nov 18, 2016 4:49 pm

zaboomafoozarg wrote:I thought I was doing alright until I read this thread, LOL.


My wife and I are in the 95th percentile for net worth in our age groups on every calculator I've ever played with. Here; I'm not even going to bother posting.

NYCguy
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by NYCguy » Fri Nov 18, 2016 8:27 pm

travellight wrote:^ interesting, nycguy.... I have achieved the same per year amount of progression (although I am behind you in net amount) for the past 4 years but mine is 10% salary and about 80+% real estate. I have about an 80% savings rate.


Wow! An 80% savings rate of after-tax income is amazing!

Help me out with the math here.

If I understand you correctly you're net worth is growing at approximately $1 million a year 10% of which is from salary. That means your after-tax income is approximately $125,000 and you're saving $100,000. Well done sir.

The math gets harder for me. There is another approximately $800,000 per year of real estate appreciation? That is crazy good. I am guessing this is not personal homes but investment property and with leverage.
If your out-go is greater than your income, your upkeep will be your DOWNFALL.

travellight
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Location: San Diego

Re: Share your networth progression

Post by travellight » Sat Nov 19, 2016 12:11 am

oh, my math was off, nycguy.... I looked at it again and real estate appreciation was only 1 million over the past 3 years. I guess my salary was a much bigger role than I realized. Hence, the savings rate and a good salary really plays a major role. You are right; it is 2 personal homes and 6 investment homes. My savings rate was over 80% 2-3 years ago but has relaxed a bit since I have been on BH as I realize I can loosen things up a bit.

nukewerker
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by nukewerker » Sat Nov 19, 2016 7:21 am

These threads are fun and give (at least me) some perspective. I didn't start doing a yearly tracker of net worth until 2009 so the number before that are approximate based on memory.

2005: -$10,000 (Graduated College)
2006: $70,000 ($55,000 from Grandfather for home purchase)
2007: $80,000
2008: $60,000
2009: $90,625
2010: $86,571
2011: $103,607
2012: $106,479
2013: $113,892
2014: $162,370
2015: $186,859
2016: $379,335

As many have said, that first $100k was/seemed the hardest. Things now appear to be getting exponential and since we just refi'd to a 15 yr mortgage, I expect that number to continue to go up. Granted a portion of this years increase is due to home price appreciation, realized due to appraisal required for said refi.

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market timer
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Re: Share your networth progression

Post by market timer » Sat Nov 19, 2016 7:47 am

1/1/09: -$210K (started working this year)
1/1/10: -$120K
1/1/11: -$35K
1/1/12: $150K
1/1/13: $300K
1/1/14: $510K
1/1/15: $670K
1/1/16: $740K
11/19/16: $1.1mn

Does not include wife's assets.

Currently have a good work/life balance, raising a young family, and feel little need to add another digit to my net worth. Another 10-15 years of this and I'll be potentially looking at real retirement.

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