Death of co-worker

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investingdad
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Death of co-worker

Post by investingdad » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:30 pm

Per my title, a co-worker passed away very suddenly last week. Guy was in his late fifties and though I didn't work with him that much I'm trying to get my head around not seeing him in the office any more. He went home, had heart trouble, and that was it.

I don't know what his planned retirement age was, but he obviously didn't make it.

It served as a very sobering reminder of why my wife and I want to manage an early retirement. Granted I'm only forty, but there's no way I want to be one of those guys coming into the office and always dreaming of those years when my wife and I just do whatever, and then never getting the chance.

mbres60
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by mbres60 » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:34 pm

Sorry for your loss. It is all a balancing act as we don't know what will happen. If we just lived for today we could be broke for our tomorrows.

livesoft
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by livesoft » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:34 pm

A younger colleague of mine died of heart attack a few years ago. He lived a good life and helped many friends over the years including those who died of cancer. In that sense, he was inspirational, but not for self early retirement, but instead for being unselfish with one's life and helping others.
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nedsaid
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by nedsaid » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:36 pm

At my workplace, we had somebody who died suddenly. Married, had a kid, it was very sad. Some of the top management went to his funeral, I work for a large company. It is a reminder of our mortality. That is why I enjoy life now and am not waiting until retirement to travel.
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yatesd
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by yatesd » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:37 pm

Certainly a reminder that there is more to life than just money...and that we don't really have control over our future. Unfortunately, some people take this to the opposite extreme by not being responsible about what they can control.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Nukeboilermaker » Sun Mar 30, 2014 8:39 pm

investingdad wrote:Per my title, a co-worker passed away very suddenly last week. Guy was in his late fifties and though I didn't work with him that much I'm trying to get my head around not seeing him in the office any more. He went home, had heart trouble, and that was it.

I don't know what his planned retirement age was, but he obviously didn't make it.

It served as a very sobering reminder of why my wife and I want to manage an early retirement. Granted I'm only forty, but there's no way I want to be one of those guys coming into the office and always dreaming of those years when my wife and I just do whatever, and then never getting the chance.
I'm 27 and work in an industry with a quickly aging work force. It is always sobering when a coworker passes for various reasons and it is important to self reflect. Just a month or so ago a coworkers 28year old daughter passed away after a multi year struggle with cancer. She discovered the cancer while pregnant and needless to say that young family has been through a lot. She made video diaries for her son to watch through out his life at various stages and mile stones.

I plan and save a lot, but my wife and I are looking at what we can do to truly give our 11 month old daughter all we can give in a wonderful home and up bringing. Hopefully when retirement comes we can afford to be interactive in her future as well.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by jackpullo997 » Sun Mar 30, 2014 9:44 pm

Contrary to popular belief, it's my opinion that retirement obsession is for fools.
Life is the journey, and the biggest regrets are of actions not taken.
Living on Ramen noodles for 40 years only to die a few months after retirement is a lot more common than you think.
Live the life you enjoy living daily, not the one you endure just to finance some [(lousy) --admin LadyGeek] retirement long past you prime.
I hope to work moderately until I drop dead. Retirement is a sucker's mirage

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Fallible » Sun Mar 30, 2014 9:47 pm

mbres60 wrote:Sorry for your loss. It is all a balancing act as we don't know what will happen. If we just lived for today we could be broke for our tomorrows.
Describes it all in a sentence: the balancing act because of the future we can't know.

OP, I'm sorry about your co-worker. Some of my former co-workers have died of cancer or heart attacks in their late 50s and early 60s and never made it to retirement.
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by basspond » Sun Mar 30, 2014 10:05 pm

It is sad when one dies young but the day we are born we live to die. We have life experiences that shape our lives. Generation before me lived through the depression so most I know live very frugally. I had several close relatives and acquantices die way too young so I try to do anything in my power to enjoy life and be able to retire as soon as I can. Still no guarantees, it is not my biggest goal, only my most material goal.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by littlebird » Sun Mar 30, 2014 11:40 pm

My spouse and I both saw this happen at our workplaces, and it was a large impetus to us taking early (in my case very early) retirement. We started our retirements in very good health and had 25 good, active retirement years but then a combination of his-and-hers infirmities catapulted us suddenly into the "no-go" stage of retirement. I was only slightly past "normal" retirement age at that point and could easily have been a new retiree. We're very grateful for our early retirement.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Mitchell777 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 7:03 am

I've had co workers pass, but I was not real close to them. The bigger hit for me was having about 8 former co workers pass within 6 or so years after I left a company. Almost all between the ages 55 and 66. I had two situations over the years when I saw the obituaries of two coworkers in the newspaper at the same time. I shook me a bit both times

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Mar 31, 2014 7:14 am

investingdad wrote:Per my title, a co-worker passed away very suddenly last week. Guy was in his late fifties and though I didn't work with him that much I'm trying to get my head around not seeing him in the office any more. He went home, had heart trouble, and that was it.

I don't know what his planned retirement age was, but he obviously didn't make it.

It served as a very sobering reminder of why my wife and I want to manage an early retirement. Granted I'm only forty, but there's no way I want to be one of those guys coming into the office and always dreaming of those years when my wife and I just do whatever, and then never getting the chance.
Death is bad enough and reminds us to keep our life insurance up to date.

It's disability that is frightening: particularly in my 50s I see people dropping away. Multiple Sclerosis and other ailments. If I am dead, I am dead, regrets are something other people will have. But long term illness or disability...

Knew a girl who lost her leg in her 30s (bacterial infection)... touch and go, she lived, but her quality of life is definitely impeded (escalators are a particular terror).

There was a guy, very successful hedge fund manager. 2 Land Rovers coming home on the motorway, Sunday evening rain, wife and kids in the one in front. Something happened, her Land Rover spun and hit the bridge abutment-- he watched his entire family die before his eyes. He is remarried, new family, very successful... but God, what a thing.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:06 am

Had a relative go, 6 months before retirement, a lifetime of scrimping and saving/investing for naught - now his family benefitted from it immensely, but no amount of financial assets can ever replace that emotional bond.
Had more than 7 former co-workers go at the same time, same day. They left young kids and babies behind with their spouses to pick up the pieces, shell-shocked would be putting it mildly and after all these years we get to re-live it every September. Money means nada, zero!
Another co-worker, the day before annoucement of retirement had a pain, goes to the hospital only to be told he has stage 4 pancreatic cancer - lived another 4 months. Some retirement!
Then we have other co-workers who are significantly younger given these dire prognoses for being asymptomatic - gone in a few months.

Yeah, so work, save/invest but like I've said it before, don't forget to smell those roses while you still can, nothing is promised to no one. I've got to kick myself sometimes to remind myself before I get caught up in the "i should have 12 times final salary or 35x expenses, or I need to save in a 529 plan so my kid doesn't come out with shackles around his neck or got to pay off the mortgage as fast as possible" because at the end, I have this feeling, no one is thinking any of these thoughs, only that they wished they had more time to fix things right or spend it with those closest to them.

Bottom line: Go on living your life.
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scrabbler1
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by scrabbler1 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:55 am

Back in my working days, I remember losing 2 coworkers in the same year (2000). Working for a large company, I did not have many dealings with either one but I did know them. One was a man in his 50s and the other a woman in only her 30s (a few years younger than I was at the time).

Fast forward to the last few years. Three coworkers in my division all passed away a few years apart, all after I left (early retired) from the company in 2008. Two of them (a man and a woman) retired a few years before I did and both died at age 66 or 67. Furthermore, the man who replaced the woman who later died also died (at the office) a few years ago (I was already retired) at age 54. That's one unlucky cubicle. All 3 were good people and I was saddened to hear the news.

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laughlinlvr
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by laughlinlvr » Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:57 am

Correlation does not signify causation. When I hear these carpe diem arguments used to imply saving for retirement is a fool's quest, I cringe. Putting aside money for a retirement no more brings on an early death than writing a will does. (And there are plenty of people who subscribe to that superstition.) The only way this reasoning makes sense in terms of opportunity costs is if the deceased sacrificed in order to build a nest egg and suffered as a consequence.

It's been my experience that this argument finds its most receptive audience with those who have failed to save for retirement. The "fall under a bus" crowd if you will. I have spoken to a few former friends that if their plan depends on them falling under a bus they better take steps to make sure that happens - and in a remote location where there's no chance they'll be rescued and have to live out a long life with disability payments unsupplemented by savings. I guess that's why they are former friends.
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by soccerdad12 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:04 am

Death definitely makes you think twice about your plans. One of the most important things to me is that I like my work. Working has some enjoyment in and of itself. I can't imagine hating my job and can't waiting for the weekend. A lot of weeks I look forward to what the work week will bring. Everyone should strive to have a career that they really love and not just a job (even if it is high paying).

I do find some solace, as a saver, that if I died tomorrow my wife and kids would be taken care of for the rest of their lives. While the saving might not have benefited me directly, it definitely benefits those that I care about the most.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by tacster » Mon Mar 31, 2014 11:59 am

jackpullo997 wrote:Contrary to popular belief, it's my opinion that retirement obsession is for fools.
Life is the journey, and the biggest regrets are of actions not taken.
Living on Ramen noodles for 40 years only to die a few months after retirement is a lot more common than you think.
Live the life you enjoy living daily, not the one you endure just to finance some crappy retirement long past you prime.
I hope to work moderately until I drop dead. Retirement is a sucker's mirage
Nonsense.
INSERT PITHY QUOTE HERE

countofmc
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by countofmc » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:31 pm

jackpullo997 wrote:Contrary to popular belief, it's my opinion that retirement obsession is for fools.
Life is the journey, and the biggest regrets are of actions not taken.
Living on Ramen noodles for 40 years only to die a few months after retirement is a lot more common than you think.
Live the life you enjoy living daily, not the one you endure just to finance some crappy retirement long past you prime.
I hope to work moderately until I drop dead. Retirement is a sucker's mirage
I'm kinda with you on this. I'm definitely for saving wisely because sometimes retirement is forced upon people. But my ultimate goal has shifted from early retirement to finding a career/ job that I can enjoy well into old age.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by SecretAsianMan » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:38 pm

laughlinlvr wrote:Correlation does not signify causation. When I hear these carpe diem arguments used to imply saving for retirement is a fool's quest, I cringe. Putting aside money for a retirement no more brings on an early death than writing a will does. (And there are plenty of people who subscribe to that superstition.) The only way this reasoning makes sense in terms of opportunity costs is if the deceased sacrificed in order to build a nest egg and suffered as a consequence.

It's been my experience that this argument finds its most receptive audience with those who have failed to save for retirement. The "fall under a bus" crowd if you will. I have spoken to a few former friends that if their plan depends on them falling under a bus they better take steps to make sure that happens - and in a remote location where there's no chance they'll be rescued and have to live out a long life with disability payments unsupplemented by savings. I guess that's why they are former friends.
I don't think anyone was suggesting there was any type of causation, just that such events are a good opportunity to take stock and realize you can't pin all your hopes and dreams on your retirement years and instead must balance enjoying today while preparing adequately for tomorrow. Perhaps I misunderstood, however.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by countofmc » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:43 pm

I wonder how retirement planning would change if there wasn't such a stigma attached to suicide.

Kind of like the movie Looper.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Methedras » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:47 pm

jackpullo997 wrote:Contrary to popular belief, it's my opinion that retirement obsession is for fools.
Life is the journey, and the biggest regrets are of actions not taken.
Living on Ramen noodles for 40 years only to die a few months after retirement is a lot more common than you think.
Live the life you enjoy living daily, not the one you endure just to finance some crappy retirement long past you prime.
I hope to work moderately until I drop dead. Retirement is a sucker's mirage
There is (statistically speaking) an equally large risk that you will live well past retirement age. It is perhaps an even greater tragedy to live in poverty when you are elderly. You must live in the moment when you are young and able, but recognize that those moments may go on for a very long time, and you will need to have funds to support that.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:47 pm

countofmc wrote:I wonder how retirement planning would change if there wasn't such a stigma attached to suicide.
I think it's not as much a stigma of suicide as a mis-prediction of one's future self. At the age of 30, or 40, or 50, it's easy to say, "When I run out of money or health, whichever comes first, I will check out on my own terms." But older people are persistently holding on to their lives, and I expect that we will do so, too, when we get there.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by countofmc » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:52 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
countofmc wrote:I wonder how retirement planning would change if there wasn't such a stigma attached to suicide.
I think it's not as much a stigma as a mis-prediction of one's future self. At the age of 30, or 40, or 50, it's easy to say, "When I run out of money or health, whichever comes first, I will check out on my own terms." But older people are persistently holding on to their lives, and I expect that we will do so too, when we get there.

Victoria
My opinion is that it's just the fear of death, that mainly comes from the fear of the unknown. That's why, like you said, people of any age want to hang on to life. But generally people with terminal illnesses that know when their time will be up gradually accept that and come to peace with their mortality. I'm thinking if people knew exactly when they'd check out, that fear may subside a bit and encourage you to live life more fully, and would also make retirement planning a hell of a lot easier.

Morbid, I know, but I've thought about this for myself quite frequently.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by bengal22 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:56 pm

I think if one looks at their career as a prison sentence then yes this death should be a cautionary tale where one should retire as soon as possible. However, if one enjoys his vocation, and utilizes his free time to build relationships and experience life then retirement is just an easy transition in that game called life. I would not want to know my death date but I certainly want to maximize whatever I am experiencing right now.
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by technovelist » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:56 pm

soccerdad12 wrote:Death definitely makes you think twice about your plans.
I assume you mean the death of others, but perhaps not... :confused
In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, they often differ.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:57 pm

countofmc wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
countofmc wrote:I wonder how retirement planning would change if there wasn't such a stigma attached to suicide.
I think it's not as much a stigma as a mis-prediction of one's future self. At the age of 30, or 40, or 50, it's easy to say, "When I run out of money or health, whichever comes first, I will check out on my own terms." But older people are persistently holding on to their lives, and I expect that we will do so too, when we get there.

Victoria
My opinion is that it's just the fear of death, that mainly comes from the fear of the unknown. That's why, like you said, people of any age want to hang on to life. But generally people with terminal illnesses that know when their time will be up gradually accept that and come to peace with their mortality. I'm thinking if people knew exactly when they'd check out, that fear may subside a bit and encourage you to live life more fully, and would also make retirement planning a hell of a lot easier.

Morbid, I know, but I've thought about this for myself quite frequently.
Knowing the exact date of one's death could be either energizing or depressing. Or one could still hope against hope that there was a mistake in the date (just as people disbelieve their medical diagnoses). What does help to live more fully is having periodic reminders of one's mortality--like this thread.

Victoria
Last edited by VictoriaF on Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by JW-Retired » Mon Mar 31, 2014 12:59 pm

OP,
Learn something from it. When your doctor tells you [medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by technovelist » Mon Mar 31, 2014 1:01 pm

JW Nearly Retired wrote:OP,
Learn something from it. When your doctor tells you [medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
JW
I would never [response to medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, they often differ.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Grt2bOutdoors » Mon Mar 31, 2014 1:44 pm

technovelist wrote:
JW Nearly Retired wrote:OP,
Learn something from it. When your doctor tells you [medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
JW
I would never [response to medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
I choose to follow a horse's diet - lots of oats, apples and carrots. An occasional stick of licorice root helps to keep the breath fresh. :D
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Mar 31, 2014 1:47 pm

Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
technovelist wrote:
JW Nearly Retired wrote:OP,
Learn something from it. When your doctor tells you [medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
JW
I would never [response to medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
I choose to follow a horse's diet - lots of oats, apples and carrots. An occasional stick of licorice root helps to keep the breath fresh. :D
How is your gallop?

Victoria
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by dm200 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 1:55 pm

A few years ago, I noticed, more and more folks my age (mid 60's) or younger, having heart attacks, strokes, and so on. Some died as a result and some others had to deal with continuing (and sometimes severe) disability. That was part of a wake-up call for am, and I stopped eating crap, lost (and now maintain) weight, do regular exercise almost every day. It seems like nearly everyone my age (and many much younger) take both cholesterol medication and blood pressure medication (I took both!). After making those "lifestyle" changes, within 10 or 11 months, my weight was in the middle of "normal" (well under 25 BMI), and I was able to stop all blood pressure medication (was taking 2) and cholesterol medication - all with the 100% concurrence of my primary care physician.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by IlliniDave » Mon Mar 31, 2014 2:03 pm

Methedras wrote:
jackpullo997 wrote:Contrary to popular belief, it's my opinion that retirement obsession is for fools.
Life is the journey, and the biggest regrets are of actions not taken.
Living on Ramen noodles for 40 years only to die a few months after retirement is a lot more common than you think.
Live the life you enjoy living daily, not the one you endure just to finance some crappy retirement long past you prime.
I hope to work moderately until I drop dead. Retirement is a sucker's mirage
There is (statistically speaking) an equally large risk that you will live well past retirement age. It is perhaps an even greater tragedy to live in poverty when you are elderly. You must live in the moment when you are young and able, but recognize that those moments may go on for a very long time, and you will need to have funds to support that.
Yep, living in the moment and spending money are not strictly synonymous. Maybe I'm just defective, but I find ways to get increased fulfillment from life without purchasing it.

I had two co-workers I was close to pass away in their fifties (heart failure and inoperable brain cancer). I have at least a dozen who retired early (in their fifties), securely, and are living happy, healthy retirements pursuing second "careers" with various hobbies and volunteer/charitable occupations that a substantially frugal life earned them. I guess I'm an optimist--I'm betting on life. If I lose the bet my children will benefit which is some comfort.
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Gnirk » Mon Mar 31, 2014 4:17 pm

I'm sorry to hear of your co-worker's death.
None of us know how long we'll be on this earth.
My dad decided to retire early at 55 (he planned for it, because two of his brothers had passed in their early 50's of massive heart attacks.) Dad and Mom enjoyed ten great years of retirement, until he was diagnosed with esophageal cancer just after his 65th birthday. He endured the chemo to hopefully gain another year, but said if he'd known how awful it would make him feel, he wouldn't have done it. Nine months after diagnosis, he died.

My brother and I always said it was a good thing dad retired when he did, because if he'd waited until he was 65, all of his retirement plans would have been for naught.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by wander » Mon Mar 31, 2014 4:38 pm

In my opinion, you want to keep it balanced. You cannot live in the past, will or will/not live in the future, but you surely have to live in the present.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by lws6772 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 4:45 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
Grt2bOutdoors wrote:
technovelist wrote:
JW Nearly Retired wrote:OP,
Learn something from it. When your doctor tells you [medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
JW
I would never [response to medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
I choose to follow a horse's diet - lots of oats, apples and carrots. An occasional stick of licorice root helps to keep the breath fresh. :D
How is your gallop?

Victoria
Horse walks into a bar and the bartender asks, "Why the long face?" :P

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by chaz » Mon Mar 31, 2014 5:13 pm

soccerdad12 wrote:Death definitely makes you think twice about your plans. One of the most important things to me is that I like my work. Working has some enjoyment in and of itself. I can't imagine hating my job and can't waiting for the weekend. A lot of weeks I look forward to what the work week will bring. Everyone should strive to have a career that they really love and not just a job (even if it is high paying).

I do find some solace, as a saver, that if I died tomorrow my wife and kids would be taken care of for the rest of their lives. While the saving might not have benefited me directly, it definitely benefits those that I care about the most.
I enjoyed my work, so I didn't retire until 74.
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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by rec7 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 5:13 pm

Not a co-worker but we had three neighbors pass away before age 62. Sometimes I wonder if people are living longer?????

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by jackpullo997 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 5:42 pm

technovelist wrote:
JW Nearly Retired wrote:OP,
Learn something from it. When your doctor tells you [medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
JW
I would never [response to medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
+1. [Explanation of +1 response to medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek] Caveat Emptor.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Tortoise » Mon Mar 31, 2014 5:55 pm

OP, Sorry for the loss of your co-worker. Our lab manager died a few months ago while at a customer's site. He was in his mid-fifties, married, with kids. It's always sad and sobering when someone you know dies.

I am closer than many to death because I have an incurable cancer (multiple myeloma, stage 3) for which the average lifespan after initial diagnosis is 4-to-5 years. I have had it for 4.5 years. I continue to live, work, and save as I always have. Although I take a day off each week for chemo, which was not something I ever planned for.

None of us know how long we really have. I know my time is relatively short, but no one can tell me when I will cash in my chips.

It's OK if I don't get to enjoy the fruits of my labor in retirement. I mainly want to make sure that my family is well cared for. At this point in my life, hanging out with my wife and son, as well as assuring a good monetary future for them, is the reward I strive for.
"Always do right. This will gratify some people, and astonish the rest." --Mark Twain

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by runner9 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:05 pm

My father in law was 57. My mother in law is still upset at time that he didn't get to retire, that he paid into Social Security for so many years and never collected a penny back (and she can't either as she gets a DB from a school and windfall provision eliminates his SS benefits)

I'm young, I hope that I live a long time. If for some reason I don't I'll know my wife and son have a good home and the assets to not have to worry about the finances going forward. We're not there yet, but getting there...for a day that will hopefully never come.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by cbeck » Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:44 pm

This discussion is a good example of availability bias. The OP has encountered an example of unexpected, early death in his workplace and he is making the mistake of overweighting that risk because it is available. The other side of the risk is people who are very old and have outlived their resources, but the OP is much less like to encounter people like this because he probably knows few retirees, much less very old ones. In terms of financial risk the two outcomes can hardly be compared. The risk of being broke in addition to being old and probably sick is not much like the risk of dying while never having visited Hawaii.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:50 pm

cbeck wrote:This discussion is a good example of availability bias. The OP has encountered an example of unexpected, early death in his workplace and he is making the mistake of overweighting that risk because it is available. The other side of the risk is people who are very old and have outlived their resources, but the OP is much less like to encounter people like this because he probably knows few retirees, much less very old ones. In terms of financial risk the two outcomes can hardly be compared. The risk of being broke in addition to being old and probably sick is not much like the risk of dying while never having visited Hawaii.
I was also thinking about the availability heuristic and resulting biases when reading the original post and the responses. However, in this case availability counteracts another cognitive flaw of forgetting about our mortality.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by selftalk » Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:54 pm

I`m sorry for your loss.Eat, drink and be merry as each day is a new opportunity. Look ahead and exercise common sense.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Kenkat » Mon Mar 31, 2014 7:00 pm

I've been through unexpected deaths and it really does shake you. Co-workers, a friend, a friend's child, a young family member with children of their own. It just reminds me that life is fleeting. I always think that the living have an obligation to those that have passed to try to leave a positive mark on the world, no matter how small.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Paul78 » Mon Mar 31, 2014 7:55 pm

exactly why I make sure to spend some money now.

My plan is to retire mid 50's but it is a possibility I do not make it that far or I have a health conditions that limits my (physically and/or mentally) in retirement.

No I am not just gonna spend everything I have in the present but I do set limits. My retirement consist of maxing out my TSP (17.5k plus employer match), maxing out roth ira (5.5k), whatever my SS will be, and my gov pension. I can save more on top of that but it goes into other funds (just but a new car also will need about 100k in today's money for a down payment on a house/condo in 10-20 years).

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by cromwell » Mon Mar 31, 2014 8:56 pm

Life in a way is like investing. It is reasonable to make assumptions based on statistics but there are no certainties. I am an 80 yr old physician and I see death occurring from the unborn to the aged. One of my sons died in his 20's. I plan financially for the future but strive to enjoy each day not knowing which will be my last.I am grateful for the time granted me. Please inform me if you have a preferred formula. Best to All

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by Calm Man » Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:16 pm

technovelist wrote:
JW Nearly Retired wrote:OP,
Learn something from it. When your doctor tells you [medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
JW
I would never [response to medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
I will not comment on this other than to suggest that if anybody reads this and thinks they should heed these statements, then please read further. This poster needs to present some link or evidence to support an assertion that flies in the face of all of the literature that I have reviewed. If he/she is correct, it is very important that we see what the evidence is as it can impact on how I personally evaluate this and others as well. I am looking forward to seeing the evidence.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by JW-Retired » Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:25 pm

Calm Man wrote:
technovelist wrote:
JW Nearly Retired wrote:OP,
Learn something from it. When your doctor tells you [medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
JW
I would never [response to medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
I will not comment on this other than to suggest that if anybody reads this and thinks they should heed these statements, then please read further. This poster needs to present some link or evidence to support an assertion that flies in the face of all of the literature that I have reviewed. If he/she is correct, it is very important that we see what the evidence is as it can impact on how I personally evaluate this and others as well. I am looking forward to seeing the evidence.
I don't think many of us are competent to evaluate the evidence all by ourselves. Best to listen to the medical profession. I'm not one them but I have enormously benefited from their advice and from me following it.
JW
Retired at Last

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by technovelist » Mon Mar 31, 2014 9:51 pm

Calm Man wrote:
technovelist wrote:
JW Nearly Retired wrote:OP,
Learn something from it. When your doctor tells you [medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
JW
I would never [response to medical advice removed by admin LadyGeek]
I will not comment on this other than to suggest that if anybody reads this and thinks they should heed these statements, then please read further. This poster needs to present some link or evidence to support an assertion that flies in the face of all of the literature that I have reviewed. If he/she is correct, it is very important that we see what the evidence is as it can impact on how I personally evaluate this and others as well. I am looking forward to seeing the evidence.
This is one source, [link to article removed by admin LadyGeek]
There are many others; seek and ye shall find.
In theory, theory and practice are identical. In practice, they often differ.

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Re: Death of co-worker

Post by LadyGeek » Mon Mar 31, 2014 10:17 pm

I removed a number of comments and replies regarding advice to treat a medical condition. As a reminder, see Forum Policy
Medical Issues

Questions on medical issues are beyond the scope of the forum. If you are looking for medical information online, I'd like to suggest you start with the Medical Library Association's User's Guide to Finding and Evaluating Health Information on the Web which, in addition to providing guidance on evaluating health information, includes lists of their top recommended sites in the following categories: consumer health, cancer, diabetes and heart disease. They also provide a larger, but less frequently updated, list called Top 100 List: Health Websites You Can Trust.
Please stay on-topic, which is the death of a co-worker.
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