Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

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longinvest
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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by longinvest » Wed Mar 21, 2018 1:25 pm

This topic is already very long with over 700 posts. I think that it would be best to hold ADD related discussions in its own topic: Accumulation-Dynamic Decumulation Strategy
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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by LadyGeek » Wed Mar 21, 2018 1:58 pm

^^^ I have moved the relevant posts to Accumulation-Dynamic Decumulation Strategy.
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longinvest
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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by longinvest » Mon May 21, 2018 7:01 am

In another topic, I explained (yet again) that it would be a bad idea to use valuations to determine VPW's withdrawal rates:
longinvest wrote:
Sun May 20, 2018 7:00 pm
DaufuskieNate wrote:
Sun May 20, 2018 6:35 pm
There is no reason VPW can't use valuation metrics to determine initial withdrawal rates. Returns are a variable that can be defined in the VPW model.
There's a good reason not to use valuation metrics to determine initial withdrawal rates; using valuations to set withdrawal rates would lead to a "sell less when high, sell more when low" behavior. That would be a pretty bad investing approach.

The VPW table doesn't change with "valuation metrics".

The volatility of total retirement income (e.g. portfolio withdrawals + stable lifelong non-portfolio income) is best controlled by the ratio of stable lifelong non-portfolio income and the ratio of stocks and bonds in the portfolio. It's futile to try predicting future long-term returns using simplistic metrics. It's best to accept that we don't know future returns and plan accordingly.
I also explained that VPW doesn't attempt to predict future returns; that its fixed internal growth trend aims to simply be lower than high returns and higher than low returns:
longinvest wrote:
Sun May 20, 2018 11:53 pm
AlohaJoe wrote:
Sun May 20, 2018 9:23 pm
VPW assumes that future stock returns will be 5% real and bonds will return 1.8% real, so of course it will pull a lot more.
This is false. VPW doesn't assume that future stocks returns will be 5% real and future bonds returns will be 1.8% real.

VPW needs fixed internal growth trends for stocks and bonds to avoid "sell less when high, sell more when low" behavior.

A way to understand a growth trend is to view it as a growth rate that is lower than high returns and higher than low returns. In other words, when stocks have just crashed, their future growth should likely be higher than the stocks growth trend. Similarly, when stocks are in a bubble, their future growth should likely be lower than the stocks growth trend. A growth trend is just an imprecise wild-ass guess (WAG). Why 5% real and 1.8% real? Because nobody was able to provide me with better WAGs than using long-term historical world-wide stocks and bonds returns since 1900.
Finally, I explained how ignoring valuations and simply applying VPW on a balanced portfolio leads to good investing behavior:
longinvest wrote:
Mon May 21, 2018 12:25 am
The best time to sell stocks is when they are in a bubble, and the worst time is just after they've crashed. Trying to smooth withdrawals by selling less (lower percentage) when stocks are expensive during a bubble is equivalent to invest the non-withdrawn money into bubbly stocks. After the crash, this additional money will have melted along with stocks. Withdrawing more (higher percentage) after a crash hurts a portfolio at the worst time.

One robust way to protect money, in a stocks bubble, is to put it into bonds (of average short or intermediate duration, to limit volatility). Doing this perfectly is a problem, though; it would require knowing when stocks are in a bubble; unfortunately we only know after the fact.

Fortunately, the Bogleheads investment philosophy provides a solution. It suggests to never try timing the market, but to adopt a strategic asset allocation instead (like a 50/50 stocks/bonds allocation). This results in a good-enough portfolio and leads to sell more stocks when they are "expensive", and sell less stocks when they are "cheap" when rebalancing to keep the portfolio's asset allocation on target (when using VPW with a fixed growth trend, or when using the constant-percentage withdrawal method).
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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by 2015 » Mon May 21, 2018 1:41 pm

longinvest, your ongoing patience in providing thorough explanations regarding VPW are most appreciated, and remain among one of the more useful and robust tools I've acquired from this forum. I've positioned myself such that I can play the investing metagame of being able to ignore valuations talk of all kinds (hat tips to Warren Buffet, Jeff Bezos, among others).

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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by jaj2276 » Thu May 24, 2018 9:01 am

Is there an updated spreadsheet with 2016/2017 returns? I feel awful asking for it because the spreadsheet has been soooo useful to me already (I haven't used it for retirement but to help me with my donor advisor fund).

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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by icetrap » Fri May 25, 2018 7:45 am

jaj2276 wrote:
Thu May 24, 2018 9:01 am
Is there an updated spreadsheet with 2016/2017 returns? I feel awful asking for it because the spreadsheet has been soooo useful to me already (I haven't used it for retirement but to help me with my donor advisor fund).
I've partially updated the returns for 2016-2017 in the accumulation-dynamic decumulation spreadsheet (only the US rates update).

You can get the new rates directly from Vanguard using the following two links and click display annually. Use the "Total return by NAV" :
US stock proxy : VTSMX

International stock proxy : VGTSX

US bond proxy : VBMFX

The advantage here compare to using directly the index is that it reflects the management cost that you would not be able to escape. Depending on your need for the donor advisor fund, you may want to be careful to disclose that a management fee is already included.

I hope this helps

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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by LadyGeek » Fri May 25, 2018 7:54 am

icetrap wrote:
Fri May 25, 2018 7:45 am
I've partially updated the returns for 2016-2017 in the accumulation-dynamic decumulation spreadsheet (only the US rates update).
Here is the wiki link: Accumulation-dynamic decumulation
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longinvest
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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by longinvest » Fri May 25, 2018 8:00 am

I'll be posting an updated spreadsheet soon, hopefully this weekend.

VPW's backtesting spreadsheet already uses real-fund (after-fee) returns for year when such information is available (e.g. for data extracted from the Simba spreadsheet including VTSMX, VBMFX, and VGTSX actual returns).

All data sources (sometimes indirect, e.g. Simba) are provided in the spreadsheet.
Bogleheads investment philosophy | Lifelong Portfolio: 25% each of (domestic/international)stocks/(nominal/inflation-indexed)bonds | VCN/VXC/VLB/ZRR

longinvest
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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by longinvest » Sun May 27, 2018 8:29 am

I have uploaded a new version of the VPW backtesting spreadsheet.

As usual, you can find the download links on the Bogleheads wiki Variable percentage withdrawal page.

Changes:
  • Added 2016 return data.
  • Added 2017 return data.
  • Started directly collecting US historical returns and inflation data (for 2015 and later) based on NAV returns of Vanguard ETFs (VTI, VXUS, and BND) and the Bureau of Labor Statistics historical CPI-U data.
Nothing was changed in the presentation.

As usual comments are welcome.

Enjoy!
Bogleheads investment philosophy | Lifelong Portfolio: 25% each of (domestic/international)stocks/(nominal/inflation-indexed)bonds | VCN/VXC/VLB/ZRR

jaj2276
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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by jaj2276 » Mon May 28, 2018 9:27 am

longinvest wrote:
Sun May 27, 2018 8:29 am

[*]Started directly collecting US historical returns and inflation data (for 2015 and later) based on NAV returns of Vanguard ETFs (VTI, VXUS, and BND) and the Bureau of Labor Statistics historical CPI-U data.[/list]
What is the reason for this (and why start in 2015)?

longinvest
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Re: Variable Percentage Withdrawal (VPW)

Post by longinvest » Mon May 28, 2018 11:01 am

Jaj2276,
jaj2276 wrote:
Mon May 28, 2018 9:27 am
longinvest wrote:
Sun May 27, 2018 8:29 am

[*]Started directly collecting US historical returns and inflation data (for 2015 and later) based on NAV returns of Vanguard ETFs (VTI, VXUS, and BND) and the Bureau of Labor Statistics historical CPI-U data.[/list]
What is the reason for this (and why start in 2015)?
This is a good question. To answer, I have to provide some context.

In July 2014, Vanguard Canada launched the first all-in-one Ex-Canada Stock ETF (VXC). The historical data source I had been using, until then, to fill the Canadian data of the VPW spreadsheet provides historical returns for US, EAFE, and emerging markets separately (no all-in-one "international" returns). Note, too, it only provided index returns, not real-life fund or ETF returns.

I've decided to start collecting myself real-life ETF returns for the three assets (Canadian stocks, Ex-Canada stocks, and Canadian bonds) using the returns of the appropriate total-market index ETFs offered by Vanguard Canada (VCN, VXC, and VAB). As 2015 is the first full-year in which all three ETFs existed, it is the year for which I started collecting the data myself.

Now, as I'm already doing the collection of Canadian return data based on 3 ETFs, I've decided to do the same with US data based on the three appropriate Vanguard ETFs (VTI, VXUS, and BND). It's very easy to do and it reduces the dependence of the VPW backtesting spreadsheet on indirect data sources for recent data. This is more transparent for users who want to double-check the data. I could try to go back a few additional years, as long as the three US ETFs existed. I might do that in a future version. For now, I just started with the same year as the Canadian data collection.
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