Medigap Plan G vs Plan F?

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samtex
Posts: 294
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:07 am

Re: Medigap Plan G vs Plan F?

Post by samtex »

Sconie wrote:I've been using an AARP/UHC Plan F and while not necessarily the "cheapest," it is "hassle free"----and that is really worth something!

I've never quite understood paying a higher premium for the same coverage. AARP is one of the highest plans in my state. We picked the cheapest (Omaha) for my wife a few years age. We have never even spoken to them directly. The provider submits the claim automatically and they pay it. We get an EOB showing payment, that's it. It isn't like dealing with a primary insurance company. If medicare approves the bill, your medigap company has to pay it. Between the state regulators and Medicare, I'm not really worried about being hassled. I do think AARP is good at marketing.

Samtex
Sconie
Posts: 925
Joined: Sun Feb 07, 2010 10:23 am
Location: Arizona

Re: Medigap Plan G vs Plan F?

Post by Sconie »

samtex wrote:
Sconie wrote:I've been using an AARP/UHC Plan F and while not necessarily the "cheapest," it is "hassle free"----and that is really worth something!

I've never quite understood paying a higher premium for the same coverage. AARP is one of the highest plans in my state. We picked the cheapest (Omaha) for my wife a few years age. We have never even spoken to them directly. The provider submits the claim automatically and they pay it. We get an EOB showing payment, that's it. It isn't like dealing with a primary insurance company. If medicare approves the bill, your medigap company has to pay it. Between the state regulators and Medicare, I'm not really worried about being hassled. I do think AARP is good at marketing.

Samtex
Well, it certainly can vary by one's state of residence. That said, if you do a Google search on Mutual of Omaha medicare supplement rate increases, you'll see that MofO does not have a very good record, rather, "playing the game" of low-balling rates "up front," and then raising rates significantly after one is enrolled.
I know you think you understand what you thought I said but I'm not sure you realize that what you heard is not what I meant. - Alan Greenspan
Spirit Rider
Posts: 13627
Joined: Fri Mar 02, 2007 2:39 pm

Re: Medigap Plan G vs Plan F?

Post by Spirit Rider »

Workinghard wrote:I retread it. I guess it doesn't make a difference as far as cost but they can still decline him....but I thought they can't decline due to ACA? Anyway, no major issues like cancer just joint replacements (more needed) and some cardiac stuff in which an ablation has seemed to help.


Medigap insurance companies are generally allowed to use medical underwriting to decide whether to accept your application and how much to charge you for the Medigap policy. However, if you apply during your Medigap open enrollment period, you can buy any Medigap policy the company sells, even if you have health problems, for the same price as people with good health.
The ACA does not have any affect on the basic parameters of Medicare or Medigap policies. The limitation on pre-existing conditions only applies to the ACA marketplace, which does not include those on Medicare and with Medigap polices.

Are you confusing the difference between the one-time Open Enrollment period during which you get guaranteed issue and the Annual Enrollment period where you do not. The former you can select any plan, the latter you can not. There are some states that provide the ability to make changes to plans without medical underwriting after the Open Enrollment period.
samtex
Posts: 294
Joined: Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:07 am

Re: Medigap Plan G vs Plan F?

Post by samtex »

Sconie wrote:
samtex wrote:
Sconie wrote:I've been using an AARP/UHC Plan F and while not necessarily the "cheapest," it is "hassle free"----and that is really worth something!

I've never quite understood paying a higher premium for the same coverage. AARP is one of the highest plans in my state. We picked the cheapest (Omaha) for my wife a few years age. We have never even spoken to them directly. The provider submits the claim automatically and they pay it. We get an EOB showing payment, that's it. It isn't like dealing with a primary insurance company. If medicare approves the bill, your medigap company has to pay it. Between the state regulators and Medicare, I'm not really worried about being hassled. I do think AARP is good at marketing.

Samtex
Well, it certainly can vary by one's state of residence. That said, if you do a Google search on Mutual of Omaha medicare supplement rate increases, you'll see that MofO does not have a very good record, rather, "playing the game" of low-balling rates "up front," and then raising rates significantly after one is enrolled.

For example, for 2016 the AARP F plan is about 235.00 vs 175.00 for Omaha. We are trying to switch to Omaha G plan which is about 150.00. I didn't see an AARP G plan listed. So after two years, Omaha is still quite a bit cheaper and if memory serves me, two years ago there was about the same dollar difference.

Samtex
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Watty
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Joined: Wed Oct 10, 2007 3:55 pm

Re: Medigap Plan G vs Plan F?

Post by Watty »

robertalpert wrote:
kaneohe wrote:
I thought medigap plans worked throughout the US and that you could sign up once and keep it forever. Do you need to get it issued again if you change which state you live in? I guess not every policy is issued in every locality but I didn't think about having to change this way.
Plans with networks (Advantage plans) would prevent people for seeking any medical care (other than emergency care) outside their hometown network. If you travel a fair amount of time, Medigap plans (no networks) are needed to obtain medical care out of town.

When you have a medigap plan and you move out of state, your insurance company might have a presence in both states --- but is likely to have a different pricing structure. If you choose the premium structure of the new state, (even with the same insurance company) that is technically a new application. (When moving to a different zip-code with in the same state, may trigger a different premium -- but probably not a reapplication).

If you choose to keep the pricing structure of your initial state, your insurance company will likely charge a premium surcharge for "out of state residence". All health Insurance companies are regulated at the state level. My particular insurance company (Medical Mutual of Ohio) only does business in Ohio. They do not have any presence for permanent residence of any other state. And they have told me that if / when I permanently move my residence to another state, they could no longer insure me.
FYI,

I was looking into this more in trying to decide which Medigap policy to get and I found this on the Medicare web site.

https://www.medicare.gov/supplement-oth ... lapse-2513
Q: I'm moving out of state.

A: You can keep your current Medigap policy regardless of where you live as long as you still have Original Medicare. If you want to switch to a different Medigap policy, you'll have to check with your current or the new insurance company to see if they will offer you a different Medigap policy.

If you decide to switch, you may have to pay more for your new Medigap policy and answer some medical questions if you're buying a Medigap policy outside of your Medigap open enrollment period.
It sounds like if the poster above had moved to a different state where their company has does business then they would be charged the rate for customers in that state which could be a lot different especially if it changes from "age of issue" to "community rated" or something like that.

For states where they don't normally do business I can see that they have a very high rate to encourage you to drop the policy but the quote above was not clear about them being able to actually drop the policy.

It is not uncommon for incorrect information to be give so if that is important then it would be good to confirm if they can really drop the policy or not.

Older people having to move to be near or with kids is a real common situation so I would think there would be a good way to handle moves like that.
Workinghard
Posts: 371
Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2014 4:56 am

Re: Medigap Plan G vs Plan F?

Post by Workinghard »

Spirit Rider wrote:
Workinghard wrote:I retread it. I guess it doesn't make a difference as far as cost but they can still decline him....but I thought they can't decline due to ACA? Anyway, no major issues like cancer just joint replacements (more needed) and some cardiac stuff in which an ablation has seemed to help.


Medigap insurance companies are generally allowed to use medical underwriting to decide whether to accept your application and how much to charge you for the Medigap policy. However, if you apply during your Medigap open enrollment period, you can buy any Medigap policy the company sells, even if you have health problems, for the same price as people with good health.
The ACA does not have any affect on the basic parameters of Medicare or Medigap policies. The limitation on pre-existing conditions only applies to the ACA marketplace, which does not include those on Medicare and with Medigap polices.

Are you confusing the difference between the one-time Open Enrollment period during which you get guaranteed issue and the Annual Enrollment period where you do not. The former you can select any plan, the latter you can not. There are some states that provide the ability to make changes to plans without medical underwriting after the Open Enrollment period.
Sorry I didn't respond sooner. I just saw your reply. Yes, I was thinking of the open enrollment and thought since it's a guaranteed issue, pre-existing conditions don't really matter. My husband needs some ortho surgeries.With a medigap policy it would be covered 100% --- if he can wait until April and if there's no problem getting coverage.
britsmak
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Feb 01, 2017 9:48 am

Re: Medigap Plan G vs Plan F?

Post by britsmak »

I just signed up for insurance through United Medicare Advisors. They were very helpful. Jason, the agent, told me about dental, vision and hearing coverage through Central United Life, whose parent company is Manhatten Life. I have had a Medicare supplemental policy G for a couple of years with Manhatten Life and have found them to be a good company. They have caused me no problems thus far, and I have had several claims with them. The Plan G seems to pay out just as good as the Plan F that I had for the previous couple of years. During the Plan F years, I also used United Health Care company. Frankly, the price was better with Manhatten Life for Plan F, and even better when I switched to Plan G. There were a couple of differences, but I thought the change was doable, and we didn't plan to travel outside the USA anyway. They are good to check back at renewal time for any changes, but they don't annoy the devil out of me with emails and phone calls every week. I have been happy with both the Plan G and with Manhatten Life, so today, being in the market for dental coverage for my husband and me, I was glad to see that Manhatten Life (Central United Life) had that, also. They not only quoted a very good rate, but the plan included vision and hearing. The deductible was only $100.00, and had a very favorable percentage of coverage, with $1000.00 upfront coverage. We will see how it pans out, but the agent freely provides his personal phone numbers, license #, etc. and follows up with email confirmations, so it does not appear so shady like some companies do.
robertalpert
Posts: 455
Joined: Wed Aug 22, 2007 10:09 pm

Re: Medigap Plan G vs Plan F?

Post by robertalpert »

britsmak wrote:I just signed up for insurance through United Medicare Advisors. They were very helpful. Jason, the agent, told me about dental, vision and hearing coverage through Central United Life, whose parent company is Manhatten Life. I have had a Medicare supplemental policy G for a couple of years with Manhatten Life and have found them to be a good company. They have caused me no problems thus far, and I have had several claims with them. The Plan G seems to pay out just as good as the Plan F that I had for the previous couple of years. During the Plan F years, I also used United Health Care company. Frankly, the price was better with Manhatten Life for Plan F, and even better when I switched to Plan G. There were a couple of differences, but I thought the change was doable, and we didn't plan to travel outside the USA anyway. They are good to check back at renewal time for any changes, but they don't annoy the devil out of me with emails and phone calls every week. I have been happy with both the Plan G and with Manhatten Life, so today, being in the market for dental coverage for my husband and me, I was glad to see that Manhatten Life (Central United Life) had that, also. They not only quoted a very good rate, but

the plan included vision and hearing. The deductible was only $100.00, and had a very favorable percentage of coverage, with $1000.00 upfront coverage.

We will see how it pans out, but the agent freely provides his personal phone numbers, license #, etc. and follows up with email confirmations, so it does not appear so shady like some companies do.


Your new plan apparently is an advantage plan (not plan g). Did you intend to purchase an advantage plan?
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