Upcoming PBS Special:

Non-investing personal finance issues including insurance, credit, real estate, taxes, employment and legal issues such as trusts and wills
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Upcoming PBS Special:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

I thought you might like the advance tip that PBS and Masterpiece Theater are going to present BBC adaptations of all six major Austen novels in 2008. A trailor is available in the upper right hand corner of the PBS page.

The adaptations include the following:
Pride and Prejudice (1996)
Emma (1997)
Northanger Abbey (2007)
Mansfield Park (2008)
Persuasion (2007)
Sense and Sensibility (2008)


I am a student of literature; my youngest brother, with an engineering background, is not; however, when I purchased the dvd adaptations of Pride and Prejudice and Emma for his viewing pleasure, he so much liked them that he actually surprised me and read the books!

regards,
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Jane Austen on PBS

Post by VictoriaF »

Barry,

Thank you for the tip.
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Post by VictoriaF »

Barry,

Yesterday's Persuasion was excellent. Thanks again for bringing it up to our attention. Also, your Jane Austen's Economics paper is very useful when trying to assess financial situation of various characters.
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Sneak Preview:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

Hi:

This week brings us the 2007 Northanger Abbey.

Here is a sneak preview of the opening:

Northanger Abbey part one

My recent monograph, Jane Austen's Economics: Northanger Abbey, may prove helpful in highlighting the financial forces at work in the novel.

regards,
Barry
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Post by chaz »

Barry, thanks for this nice post.
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More on adaptations:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

Words from Andrew Davis, the writer and adapter of Pride & Prejudice, Sense & Sensibility, Emma, and Northanger Abbey:

Adapting Jane Austen
The Men & Women In Jane Austen
The Romance In Jane Austen
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Adaptations:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

I have placed the current PBS adaptations on my blog devoted to literature and the arts. These productions are the one's shown to British audiences, which are usually uncut. (For example, there are a number of cuts in the Northanger Abbey adaptation broadcast here in the US on January 20, 2008, so if you wish to see the slightly longer version you can find it on my blog.)

From Austen blog:
Cut from NA for the PBS broadcast (we’ll add to this as we get more info)

–Catherine and Mrs. Allen at the Rooms; they go into the tea room, have “how uncomfortable it is to have no acquaintance” conversation; Isabella and John Thorpe stare at Catherine and giggle together
–In the carriage after the ball, Mr. Allen tells Catherine that he investigated Henry’s background, and he is a clergyman (Catherine pulls a sullen face at the news)
–Catherine’s bathtub fantasy scene
–Catherine and Isabella running after young men who ogled them in the Pump Room
–Catherine, Eleanor, and Henry on a second country walk. Catherine and Eleanor discuss marriage for love vs. marriage for money, Isabella and Frederick, and Catherine confesses to Eleanor that she has “terrible dreams sometimes.”
–Catherine saying goodbye to the Allens; Mr. Allen observes, “Those great people don’t like to be kept waiting”
–Catherine and Eleanor run through Northanger to make dinner on time
–Apple tossing scene
–Catherine burning copy of Udolpho
Among the cut scenes from Persuasion:
(1) Harville's response to Wentworth as to how he should end the confusion of liking Louisa; (2) a 4 minute scene where Wentworth confesses his love for Anne to Harville -- the setting of the scene is terrible (i.e. they walk on the shores of Lyme and get drenched by huge waves) and the scene does not exist in the novel, BUT the words do (at the end when Austen explains how Wentworth gradually came to understand his present feelings for Anne); (3) more scenes of Anne talking to Lady Russell; and (4) a little scene that shows how the ride back to Uppercross was for Wentworth and Anne after Louisa's accident. All of the scenes help make this version of the film more cohesive.
Andrew Davies deserves the credit for giving us the best adaptation to date of Northanger Abbey. He is likewise the writer and adapter of the new Sense and Sensibility, which is superb. As of the moment, links for Mansfield Park are not complete, and there are no links yet for Emma.

Here is the link.

regards,
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Mansfield Park:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

The upcoming PBS Austen production will be Mansfield Park.

Here is a link to the opening of the adaptation:

Mansfield Park Opening.

I have written a brief monograph on Jane Austen's Economics: Mansfield Park

regards,
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Post by gkaplan »

Mansfield Park is my favorite Jane Austen novel.
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Post by InvestingMom »

Thanks Barry. I caught the first two and have been worried that I would not catch the next ones. It looks like they are always scheduled on Sundays so now I can relax.

Also, I have enjoyed your writings and visited your blog. Thanks again.

IM
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Mansfield Park

Post by Barry Barnitz »

gkaplan wrote:Mansfield Park is my favorite Jane Austen novel.
I hesitate to offer negative criticism prior to an airing, but I must say that the 90 minutes allotted for the adaptations of both Persuasion and Mansfield Park are insufficient for rendering the novels. Fortunately, the excellent, new, Sense and Sensibility adaptation has three hours.

In Mansfield Park. for instance, there is no visit to Sotherton, no ball for Fanny, and no visit to Portsmouth. On the other hand, there are no egregious additions to the novel as was the case in the 1999 film version of the novel. One additional irritant is the fact that Fanny wears her hair down for the entire film. She may not be officially "out", but no Regency era woman at Mansfield Park would have worn her hair so outside the bedroom chamber.

regards,
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Post by arrete »

In Mansfield Park. for instance, there is no visit to Sotherton, no ball for Fanny, and no visit to Portsmouth. On the other hand, there are no egregious additions to the novel as was the case in the 1999 film version of the novel. One additional irritant is the fact that Fanny wears her hair down for the entire film. She may not be officially "out", but no Regency era woman at Mansfield Park would have worn her hair so outside the bedroom chamber.
I took one look at the hair and knew it wouldn't be right. I own several versions of Pride and Prejudice, Sense and Sensibility and Emma. I just wish someone would make a decent Mansfield Park. I have the older one (where Fanny was too uptight). The 1999 one made me gag. Talk about taking license.

My husband can quote parts of P & P. He's never seen it, but he was in the next room when I watched it umpteen times.

Kathy
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This weeks production:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

In going up against Superbowl Sunday, PBS takes a break in showing adaptations of Austen novels, using this week's time slot for the showing of an Austen "biopic" titled Jane Austen Regrets. Interestingly, this production, unlike all of the other productions in this series, has not yet been aired in Britain.

One should also note that the three most meritorious productions in this series (Northanger Abbey excepted) are reserved for the final six weeks of the series.
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Post by Tramper Al »

I have enjoyed the offerings to date very much. I have never before seen a movie adaptation of an Austen novel, nor have I read the novels, so I can't really tell when some bit of the story is missing. I can tell, however, when the resolution/ending seems to occur very quickly, as has been the case with the 90 minute features.

I am inspired to read at least Northanger Abbey, which I understand is considered by some to be within the Gothic horror genre? Knowing that before watching, I assumed there might be some horrible disfigured creature in the dungeon or at least some incestuous or murderous family secret. But it turned out to be an issue of social class, bad manners, and marrying for money. Still very good.

And it's great to see Gillian Anderson on PBS (or anywhere) again. I greatly enjoyed her Bleak House performance.
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Good News for viewers:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

Hi:

For those of you who are enjoying this series of adaptations comes welcome news from PBS. The upcoming broadcasts of Pride & Prejudice and Emma will be uncut, unlike the prior three adaptations.
Hi Everyone-

I am happy to say we can assuage any concerns about editing for Pride and Prejudice. The film will run unedited and in its entirety on MASTERPIECE. This is also true of Emma. Don't forget the added benefit of being able to watch commercial free. We hope you will all enjoy!

Regards.

Bruce
On behalf of MASTERPIECE


The final installment in the series, Sense & Sensibility, which will be shown in two parts, should also be uncut.

regards,
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Next Installment:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

The next installment in the PBS Jane Austen series will be a three week serial of the familiar and well-loved 1995 Pride & Prejudice. The miniseries will be uncut.

Here is a link to the opening of the adaptation

Pride & Prejudice Opening

regards,
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Jane Austen Biography:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

With PBS taking a three week pledge drive, there will be a hiatus in the presentation of Austen adaptations.

To fill the gap, here is a BBC film biography of Jane Austen, narrated by Anna Chancellor, the actress who plays Miss Bingley in the just aired 1995 Pride & Prejudice. Ms. Chancellor is a blood relative of Jane Austen, who is her great aunt, eight generations removed.

The Real Jane Austen 1/8
The Real Jane Austen 2/8
The Real Jane Austen 3/8
The Real Jane Austen 4/8
The Real Jane Austen 5/8
The Real Jane Austen 6/8
The Real Jane Austen 7/8
The Real Jane Austen 8/8

regards,
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Re: Jane Austen Biography:

Post by VictoriaF »

Barry Barnitz wrote:With PBS taking a three week pledge drive, there will be a hiatus in the presentation of Austen adaptations.

To fill the gap, here is a BBC film biography of Jane Austen, narrated by Anna Chancellor, the actress who plays Miss Bingley in the just aired 1995 Pride & Prejudice. Ms. Chancellor is a blood relative of Jane Austen, who is her great aunt, eight generations removed.
Barry,

Thank you very much!

This film biography is delightful. And it is amazing to see Anna Chancellor as an intelligent narrator after getting used to her in the role of an "evil sister."

Victoria
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Post by TheEternalVortex »

I haven't seen any of the adaptations, but I've read all her novels so I thought I would rank them:

1. Emma
2. Pride & Prejudice
3. Northanger Abbey
4. Sense & Sensibility
5. Persuasion
6. Mansfield Park

I apologize for this post's only marginal relevance to this thread.
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Emma:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

The PBS Complete Austen series returns Sunday, March 23 with the 1996 BBC adaptation of Emma.

Here is a preview of the opening.

regards,
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Re: Emma:

Post by InvestingMom »

Barry Barnitz wrote:The PBS Complete Austen series returns Sunday, March 23 with the 1996 BBC adaptation of Emma.

Here is a preview of the opening.

regards,
Thanks for the info. I was wondering what happened to them! I noticed HBO showed Emma last week which I caught on DVR and have not watched yet, but I was begining to wonder what happened to the PBS series.
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2008 Sense and Sensibility

Post by Barry Barnitz »

The PBS series of Jane Austen adaptations concludes this upcoming Sunday, March 30, with Part One of the 2008 adaptation of Sense and Sensibility.

The opening of the miniseries can be viewed:

Sense and Sensibility.

The opening is a dramatization of Willoughby's seduction of Eliza Williams.

regards,
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Sense and Sensibility: Part Two

Post by Barry Barnitz »

The PBS series of Jane Austen adaptations concludes this Sunday, April 6, with the second part of Sense & Sensibility. The original broadcast of this adaptation in Britain came in three parts.

Thus, this clip of the opening of the second installment contains roughly a minute of the conclusion of this broadcast's first part; the action centers on Edward's visit to Barton Cottage.

Sense & Sensibility: Opening Part Two.

regards,
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Emma

Post by InvestingMom »

Hi Barry,
Just wondering if you are watching the latest PBS version of Emma?
IM
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Post by InvestingMom »

BTW: This post seems like it is in the wrong forum?
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Re: Emma

Post by Barry Barnitz »

InvestingMom wrote:Hi Barry,
Just wondering if you are watching the latest PBS version of Emma?
IM
The current PBS broadcast of Emma is, like many of these productions, seriously cut. I will provide you with links to the uncut version, as well as additional background and review links for your pleasure and edification.

Here are some links:

PBS:Emma

Reviews and posts from the Austen blogosphere:

*Emma 2010 on PBS Masterpiece Classic: A Review
*Emma (2009) on Masterpiece Classic – Miss Woodhouse, a Nonsensical Girl!
*In Jane Austen's Words:Highbury Society and Emma Woodhouse's Place In It
*Deconstructing Miss Emma Woodhouse
*Austenonly (background material on Regency life)
*Emma 4 Episode One
*Emma 4 Episode Two
*Emma 4 Episodes Three and Four


I will now provide you with these links to the first and second episodes. These were shown by PBS as a single episode:

*Episode 1/1
*Episode 1/2
*Episode 1/3
*Episode 1/4
*Episode 1/5
*Episode 1/6


*Episode 2/1
*Episode 2/2
*Episode 2/3
*Episode 2/4
*Episode 2/5
*Episode 2/6


Here is the uncut version of episode three:

*Episode 3/1
*Episode 3/2
*Episode 3/3
*Episode 3/4
*Episode 3/5
*Episode 3/6


And the uncut version of episode four:


*Episode 4/1
*Episode 4/2
*Episode 4/3
*Episode 4/4
*Episode 4/5
*Episode 4/6

regards,
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Post by bc3x »

The 2009 production of Emma with Romola Garai is vastly more enjoyable than the 1997 one with Kate Beckinsale. Ms. Beckinsale's portrayal leaves one wondering why Mr. Knightley would bother with such a preachy, smug and at times cold busy body. Ms. Garai presents a silly creature who basically has a good heart if not superior judgment or keen observation. Michael Gambon as Mr. Woodhouse is just as delightfully inane with his comments such as no cakes for Miss Taylor's wedding and their effects on children. The young ladies' faces are easier on the eyes in this last presentation. The 1997 version was so off putting that this latest version was almost passed over.

Will definitely visit the various links. Thank you.
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Additional Links:

Post by Barry Barnitz »

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Post by InvestingMom »

Hi Barry,
I guess my question was a stupid one. Of course you were watching!
Thanks for the links.
IM
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Post by bc3x »

Just finished the third episode, beautifully done.

Can't agree with Vic about Romola Garai's "facial contortions". It adds to her silliness and should be understood as facial slapstick. As the character matured, the facial expressions became more muted. Even her curtsey became more deliberate and dignified, less wobbly and childish. Mr. Knightley's remark about no woman would bear his criticisms except Emma would have made no sense spoken to the Kate Beckinsale's haughty, supercilious creature. It made eminent sense to the ridiculous Emma of Ms. Garai who grew up.


Barry,

Did the women during the Regency stayed home and sequestered during pregnancy? It was known as a period of "confinement" until very recently. Lucille Ball was "enceinte" while carrying Desi Jr. in one episode of "I Love Lucy" because the censors would not permit the word "pregnant". I remember a picture of a pregnant woman from Ken Burn's series on the Civil War wherein she was encased in the equivalent of tent to hide the gravid condition. Would Mrs. Weston be allowed to go gallivanting about and looking like Demi Moore of the Regency?
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Post by Barry Barnitz »

bc3x wrote:

Barry,

Did the women during the Regency stayed home and sequestered during pregnancy? It was known as a period of "confinement" until very recently. Lucille Ball was "enceinte" while carrying Desi Jr. in one episode of "I Love Lucy" because the censors would not permit the word "pregnant". I remember a picture of a pregnant woman from Ken Burn's series on the Civil War wherein she was encased in the equivalent of tent to hide the gravid condition. Would Mrs. Weston be allowed to go gallivanting about and looking like Demi Moore of the Regency?
I do not have (as of now) an authoritative answer. My guess is that strict confinement during pregnancy would have been likely in the case of the upper classes, but not among the laboring classes.

For a wonderful look at the novel's calender, please refer to Ellen Moody's Emma Calendar. Also, since the last installment of the pbs series was horrifically cut, make sure you take a look at Episode 4 via the youtube links. I must also point out that, thankfully, the DVD edition of this production comprises the full, uncut version.

From memory, Mrs. Watson's pregnancy is acknowledged in the text during Emma's painful reevaluation of herself after the revelations of the Churchill/Fairfax secret engagement and Harriet's revelation of her interest in George Knightley. I would have to re-read the text to catch an earlier notice.

In the adaptation, Mrs. Weston first reveals her condition in the Ball scene. We next see her at her home at Randalls, where she and Emma quiz Knightley about his relations with Jane Fairfax. We next see her at home when Knightley extends an invitation to pick strawberries. We then see Mrs. Weston walking with the group of Highbury residents to Hartfield (for the alphabet tiles scene). This is true to the novel's text. The chapter is interesting since it covers much of this segment of the adaptation.
In this state of schemes, and hopes, and connivance, June opened upon Hartfield. To Highbury in general it brought no material change. The Eltons were still talking of a visit from the Sucklings, and of the use to be made of their barouche-landau; and Jane Fairfax was still at her grandmother's; and as the return of the Campbells from Ireland was again delayed, and August, instead of Midsummer, fixed for it, she was likely to remain there full two months longer, provided at least she were able to defeat Mrs. Elton's activity in her service, and save herself from being hurried into a delightful situation against her will.

Mr. Knightley, who, for some reason best known to himself, had certainly taken an early dislike to Frank Churchill, was only growing to dislike him more. He began to suspect him of some double dealing in his pursuit of Emma. That Emma was his object appeared indisputable. Every thing declared it; his own attentions, his father's hints, his mother-in-law's guarded silence; it was all in unison; words, conduct, discretion, and indiscretion, told the same story. But while so many were devoting him to Emma, and Emma herself making him over to Harriet, Mr. Knightley began to suspect him of some inclination to trifle with Jane Fairfax. He could not understand it; but there were symptoms of intelligence between them -- he thought so at least -- symptoms of admiration on his side, which, having once observed, he could not persuade himself to think entirely void of meaning, however he might wish to escape any of Emma's errors of imagination. She was not present when the suspicion first arose. He was dining with the Randalls' family, and Jane, at the Eltons'; and he had seen a look, more than a single look, at Miss Fairfax, which, from the admirer of Miss Woodhouse, seemed somewhat out of place. When he was again in their company, he could not help remembering what he had seen; nor could he avoid observations which, unless it were like Cowper and his fire at twilight,

"Myself creating what I saw,"

brought him yet stronger suspicion of there being a something of private liking, of private understanding even, between Frank Churchill and Jane.

He had walked up one day after dinner, as he very often did, to spend his evening at Hartfield. Emma and Harriet were going to walk; he joined them; and, on returning, they fell in with a larger party, who, like themselves, judged it wisest to take their exercise early, as the weather threatened rain; Mr. and Mrs. Weston and their son, Miss Bates and her niece, who had accidentally met. They all united; and, on reaching Hartfield gates, Emma, who knew it was exactly the sort of visiting that would be welcome to her father, pressed them all to go in and drink tea with him. The Randalls' party agreed to it immediately; and after a pretty long speech from Miss Bates, which few persons listened to, she also found it possible to accept dear Miss Woodhouse's most obliging invitation.

As they were turning into the grounds, Mr. Perry passed by on horseback. The gentlemen spoke of his horse.

"By the bye," said Frank Churchill to Mrs. Weston presently, "what became of Mr. Perry's plan of setting up his carriage?"

Mrs. Weston looked surprised, and said, "I did not know that he ever had any such plan."

"Nay, I had it from you. You wrote me word of it three months ago."

"Me! impossible!"

"Indeed you did. I remember it perfectly. You mentioned it as what was certainly to be very soon. Mrs. Perry had told somebody, and was extremely happy about it. It was owing to her persuasion, as she thought his being out in bad weather did him a great deal of harm. You must remember it now?"

"Upon my word I never heard of it till this moment."

"Never! really, never! Bless me! how could it be? -- Then I must have dreamt it -- but I was completely persuaded -- Miss Smith, you walk as if you were tired. You will not be sorry to find yourself at home."

"What is this? what is this?" cried Mr. Weston, "about Perry and a carriage? Is Perry going to set up his carriage, Frank? I am glad he can afford it. You had it from himself, had you?"

"No, sir," replied his son, laughing, "I seem to have had it from nobody. Very odd! I really was persuaded of Mrs. Weston's having mentioned it in one of her letters to Enscombe, many weeks ago, with all these particulars; but as she declares she never heard a syllable of it before, of course it must have been a dream. I am a great dreamer. I dream of every body at Highbury when I am away; and when I have gone through my particular friends, then I begin dreaming of Mr. and Mrs. Perry."

"It is odd though," observed his father, "that you should have had such a regular connected dream about people whom it was not very likely you should be thinking of at Enscombe. Perry's setting up his carriage! and his wife's persuading him to it, out of care for his health -- just what will happen, I have no doubt, some time or other; only a little premature. What an air of probability sometimes runs through a dream! And at others, what a heap of absurdities it is! Well, Frank, your dream certainly shows that Highbury is in your thoughts when you are absent. Emma, you are a great dreamer, I think?"

Emma was out of hearing. She had hurried on before her guests to prepare her father for their appearance, and was beyond the reach of Mr. Weston's hint.

"Why, to own the truth," cried Miss Bates, who had been trying in vain to be heard the last two minutes, "if I must speak on this subject, there is no denying that Mr. Frank Churchill might have -- I do not mean to say that he did not dream it -- I am sure I have sometimes the oddest dreams in the world -- but if I am questioned about it, I must acknowledge that there was such an idea last spring; for Mrs. Perry herself mentioned it to my mother, and the Coles knew of it as well as ourselves -- but it was quite a secret, known to nobody else, and only thought of about three days. Mrs. Perry was very anxious that he should have a carriage, and came to my mother in great spirits one morning because she thought she had prevailed. Jane, don't you remember grandmamma's telling us of it when we got home? I forget where we had been walking to -- very likely to Randalls; yes, I think it was to Randalls. Mrs. Perry was always particularly fond of my mother -- indeed I do not know who is not -- and she had mentioned it to her in confidence; she had no objection to her telling us, of course, but it was not to go beyond: and, from that day to this, I never mentioned it to a soul that I know of. At the same time, I will not positively answer for my having never dropt a hint, because I know I do sometimes pop out a thing before I am aware. I am a talker, you know; I am rather a talker; and now and then I have let a thing escape me which I should not. I am not like Jane; I wish I were. I will answer for it she never betrayed the least thing in the world. Where is she? Oh! just behind. Perfectly remember Mrs. Perry's coming. Extraordinary dream indeed!"

They were entering the hall. Mr. Knightley's eyes had preceded Miss Bates's in a glance at Jane. From Frank Churchill's face, where he thought he saw confusion suppressed or laughed away, he had involuntarily turned to her's; but she was indeed behind, and too busy with her shawl. Mr. Weston had walked in. The two other gentlemen waited at the door to let her pass. Mr. Knightley suspected in Frank Churchill the determination of catching her eye -- he seemed watching her intently -- vain, however, if it were so Jane passed between them into the hall, and looked at neither.

There was no time for farther remark or explanation. The dream must be borne with, and Mr. Knightley must take his seat with the rest round the large modern circular table which Emma had introduced at Hartfield, and which none but Emma could have had power to place there and persuade her father to use, instead of the small-sized Pembroke, on which two of his daily meals had, for forty years, been crowded. Tea passed pleasantly, and nobody seemed in a hurry to move.

"Miss Woodhouse," said Frank Churchill, after examining a table behind him, which he could reach as he sat, "have your nephews taken away their alphabets -- their box of letters? It used to stand here. Where is it? This is a sort of dull-looking evening, that ought to be treated rather as winter than summer. We had great amusement with those letters one morning. I want to puzzle you again."

Emma was pleased with the thought; and producing the box, the table was quickly scattered over with alphabets, which no one seemed so much disposed to employ as their two selves. They were rapidly forming words for each other, or for any body else who would be puzzled. The quietness of the game made it particularly eligible for Mr. Woodhouse, who had often been distressed by the more animated sort, which Mr. Weston had occasionally introduced, and who now sat happily occupied in lamenting, with tender melancholy, over the departure of the "poor little boys," or in fondly pointing out, as he took up any stray letter near him, how beautifully Emma had written it.

Frank Churchill placed a word before Miss Fairfax. She gave a slight glance round the table, and applied herself to it. Frank was next to Emma, Jane opposite to them -- and Mr. Knightley so placed as to see them all; and it was his object to see as much as he could, with as little apparent observation. The word was discovered, and with a faint smile pushed away. If meant to be immediately mixed with the others, and buried from sight, she should have looked on the table instead of looking just across, for it was not mixed; and Harriet, eager after every fresh word, and finding out none, directly took it up, and fell to work. She was sitting by Mr. Knightley, and turned to him for help. The word was blunder; and as Harriet exultingly proclaimed it, there was a blush on Jane's cheek which gave it a meaning not otherwise ostensible. Mr. Knightley connected it with the dream; but how it could all be, was beyond his comprehension. How the delicacy, the discretion of his favourite could have been so lain asleep! He feared there must be some decided involvement. Disingenuousness and double-dealing seemed to meet him at every turn. These letters were but the vehicle for gallantry and trick. It was a child's play, chosen to conceal a deeper game on Frank Churchill's part.

With great indignation did he continue to observe him; with great alarm and distrust, to observe also his two blinded companions. He saw a short word prepared for Emma, and given to her with a look sly and demure. He saw that Emma had soon made it out, and found it highly entertaining, though it was something which she judged it proper to appear to censure; for she said, "Nonsense! for shame!" He heard Frank Churchill next say, with a glance towards Jane, "I will give it to her -- shall I?" and as clearly heard Emma opposing it with eager laughing warmth. "No, no, you must not; you shall not, indeed."

It was done however. This gallant young man, who seemed to love without feeling, and to recommend himself without complaisance, directly handed over the word to Miss Fairfax, and with a particular degree of sedate civility entreated her to study it. Mr. Knightley's excessive curiosity to know what this word might be, made him seize every possible moment for darting his eye towards it, and it was not long before he saw it to be Dixon. Jane Fairfax's perception seemed to accompany his; her comprehension was certainly more equal to the covert meaning, the superior intelligence, of those five letters so arranged. She was evidently displeased; looked up, and seeing herself watched, blushed more deeply than he had ever perceived her, and saying only, "I did not know that proper names were allowed," pushed away the letters with even an angry spirit, and looked resolved to be engaged by no other word that could be offered. Her face was averted from those who had made the attack, and turned towards her aunt.

"Ay, very true, my dear," cried the latter, though Jane had not spoken a word: "I was just going to say the same thing. It is time for us to be going indeed. The evening is closing in, and grandmamma will be looking for us. My dear sir, you are too obliging. We really must wish you good night."

Jane's alertness in moving, proved her as ready as her aunt had preconceived. She was immediately up, and wanting to quit the table; but so many were also moving, that she could not get away; and Mr. Knightley thought he saw another collection of letters anxiously pushed towards her, and resolutely swept away by her unexamined. She was afterwards looking for her shawl -- Frank Churchill was looking also: it was growing dusk, and the room was in confusion; and how they parted, Mr. Knightley could not tell.

He remained at Hartfield after all the rest, his thoughts full of what he had seen; so full, that when the candles came to assist his observations, he must -- yes, he certainly must, as a friend -- an anxious friend -- give Emma some hint, ask her some question. He could not see her in a situation of such danger, without trying to preserve her. It was his duty.

"Pray, Emma," said he, "may I ask in what lay the great amusement, the poignant sting of the last word given to you and Miss Fairfax? I saw the word, and am curious to know how it could be so very entertaining to the one, and so very distressing to the other."

Emma was extremely confused. She could not endure to give him the true explanation; for though her suspicions were by no means removed, she was really ashamed of having ever imparted them.

"Oh!" she cried in evident embarrassment, "it all meant nothing; a mere joke among ourselves."

"The joke," he replied gravely, "seemed confined to you and Mr. Churchill."

He had hoped she would speak again, but she did not. She would rather busy herself about any thing than speak. He sat a little while in doubt. A variety of evils crossed his mind. Interference -- fruitless interference. Emma's confusion, and the acknowledged intimacy, seemed to declare her affection engaged. Yet he would speak. He owed it to her, to risk any thing that might be involved in an unwelcome interference, rather than her welfare; to encounter any thing, rather than the remembrance of neglect in such a cause.

"My dear Emma," said he at last, with earnest kindness, "do you think you perfectly understand the degree of acquaintance between the gentleman and lady we have been speaking of?"

"Between Mr. Frank Churchill and Miss Fairfax! Oh! yes, perfectly. Why do you make a doubt of it?"

"Have you never at any time had reason to think that he admired her, or that she admired him?"

"Never, never!" she cried with a most open eagerness "Never, for the twentieth part of a moment, did such an idea occur to me. And how could it possibly come into your head?"

"I have lately imagined that I saw symptoms of attachment between them; certain expressive looks, which I did not believe meant to be public."

"Oh! you amuse me excessively. I am delighted to find that you can vouchsafe to let your imagination wander -- but it will not do -- very sorry to check you in your first essay -- but indeed it will not do. There is no admiration between them, I do assure you; and the appearances which have caught you, have arisen from some peculiar circumstances; feelings rather of a totally different nature: it is impossible exactly to explain -- there is a good deal of nonsense in it -- but the part which is capable of being communicated, which is sense, is, that they are as far from any attachment or admiration for one another, as any two beings in the world can be. That is, I presume it to be so on her side, and I can answer for its being so on his. I will answer for the gentleman's indifference."

She spoke with a confidence which staggered, with a satisfaction which silenced, Mr. Knightley. She was in gay spirits, and would have prolonged the conversation, wanting to hear the particulars of his suspicions, every look described, and all the wheres and hows of a circumstance which highly entertained her: but his gaiety did not meet her's. He found he could not be useful, and his feelings were too much irritated for talking. That he might not be irritated into an absolute fever, by the fire which Mr. Woodhouse's tender habits required almost every evening throughout the year, he soon afterwards took a hasty leave, and walked home to the coolness and solitude of Donwell Abbey.
In the text, Mrs. Weston stays indoors (as does Mr. Woodhouse) during the strawberry picking scene and, as in the adaptation, does not attend the Box Hill outing. Her later conversations with Emma occur at Randalls.

regards,
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TimDex
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Re: Upcoming PBS Special:

Post by TimDex »

Thought I would resurrect this thread to mention how good the BBC adaptations of Sense and Sensibility, Pride and Prejudice, and Emma are. They are very well worth ordering on dvd and watching.

I didn't find Northanger, Mansfield Park or Persuasion as good. Considering the much shorter length of those productions, I don't think they had the budget.

For an excellent take on finances in this era, Barnitz's article can be found at:

http://publicportal.lwsd.org/schools/IC ... nomics.pdf

tim
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Bongleur
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Re: Upcoming PBS Special:

Post by Bongleur »

I'm waiting for the Elton John version:

http://www.filmschoolrejects.com/news/j ... edator.php
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LazyNihilist
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Re: Upcoming PBS Special:

Post by LazyNihilist »

Have any of you seen Downton Abbey? I enjoyed the 1st season, it was great.
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Bongleur
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Re: Upcoming PBS Special:

Post by Bongleur »

2nd season also great. 3rd in production. Somebody's gonna die...
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