Long Distance Walking

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FrugalInvestor
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Long Distance Walking

Post by FrugalInvestor » Sun Jul 08, 2012 10:39 pm

I read an article today about walking the Cotswold Way, a 100 mile 7-10 day trek between Chipping Campden and Bath England passing through several small villages. Apparently there is lodging available regularly along the way and companies that will transport luggage from one destination to the next so only enough provisions and equipment for the day need to be carried.

This sort of thing sounds very interesting to me - relaxing, healthy and fun. I wonder who here may have taken this or other similar treks and what the experience may have been like. Would you recommend this sort of thing? If so, are there particular treks you would recommend I research?
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VictoriaF
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by VictoriaF » Sun Jul 08, 2012 11:03 pm

Long distance walking is common in parts of Europe. I walked the French GR3 along the Loire River Valley and then assorted GR routes through Brittany.

Another treck that I would like to make is The Way of St James; this is a link to a book describing the first third of the path.

Victoria
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by detroitbabu » Sun Jul 08, 2012 11:14 pm

Appalachian Trail in the US. It is on my bucket list.

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by VictoriaF » Sun Jul 08, 2012 11:18 pm

detroitbabu wrote:Appalachian Trail in the US. It is on my bucket list.

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/
Appalachian Trail is great, I hiked in some of its parts in NY and NJ. But if you want to do it end-to-end, you have to carry a tent, cooking gear, food supplies, etc. In Europe, you go from village to village. You don't need a tent, you can eat in restaurants, you can get water freely. It's a different experience.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by FrugalInvestor » Sun Jul 08, 2012 11:22 pm

VictoriaF wrote:
detroitbabu wrote:Appalachian Trail in the US. It is on my bucket list.

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/
Appalachian Trail is great, I hiked in some of its parts in NY and NJ. But if you want to do it end-to-end, you have to carry a tent, cooking gear, food supplies, etc. In Europe, you go from village to village. You don't need a tent, you can eat in restaurants, you can get water freely. It's a different experience.

Victoria
Yes Victoria, that's what is particularly attractive to me. I would enjoy the more civilized lodging and meals and my wife will demand it. :)

I think it would also be an interesting way to see another country rather than doing the typical tourist things. I'm not big on crowds or popular tourist attractions in the U.S. or elsewhere.
IGNORE the noise! | Our life is frittered away by detail... simplify, simplify. - Henry David Thoreau

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Colorado13 » Mon Jul 09, 2012 8:00 am

Have you seen the movie "The Way", about a trek along the Camino de Santiago? http://theway-themovie.com/ "THE WAY is a powerful and inspirational story about family, friends and the challenges we face while navigating this ever-changing and complicated world. Martin Sheen plays Tom, an irascible American doctor who comes to France to deal with the tragic loss of his son (played by Emilio Estevez). Rather than return home, Tom decides to embark on the historical pilgrimage "The Way of St. James" to honor his son's desire to finish the journey. What Tom doesn't plan on is the profound impact this trip will have on him. Through unexpected and oftentimes amusing experiences along "The Way," Tom discovers the difference between "the life we live and the life we choose.”

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by saves nine » Mon Jul 09, 2012 8:22 am

http://www.nationaltrail.co.uk/thamespath/

http://www.trekkingbritain.com/

The National Trust Book of Long Walks by Adam Nicholson was inspirational to me but is old now.
I liked Hadrian's Wall for its particular antiquity, its long open, empty stretches and their punctuations. Perhaps the first has a special place. And speaking of special places, The Inn Way to the English Lake District by Mark Reid.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by swyck » Mon Jul 09, 2012 10:07 am

FrugalInvestor wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:
detroitbabu wrote:Appalachian Trail in the US. It is on my bucket list.

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/
Appalachian Trail is great, I hiked in some of its parts in NY and NJ. But if you want to do it end-to-end, you have to carry a tent, cooking gear, food supplies, etc. In Europe, you go from village to village. You don't need a tent, you can eat in restaurants, you can get water freely. It's a different experience.

Victoria
Yes Victoria, that's what is particularly attractive to me. I would enjoy the more civilized lodging and meals and my wife will demand it. :)

I think it would also be an interesting way to see another country rather than doing the typical tourist things. I'm not big on crowds or popular tourist attractions in the U.S. or elsewhere.
I wonder if there's any place in the US that is setup to do these types of hikes? I would assume it's possible in the East but I don't know. I guess you'd need to have food and lodging every 10 or so miles, and a way to travel to the start and from the finish. It would be interesting to layout something like this.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Bylo Selhi » Mon Jul 09, 2012 10:08 am

VictoriaF wrote:Long distance walking is common in parts of Europe...
Try this :twisted:

http://www.viaalpina.com/
The Via Alpina is one of the longest and most spectacular hiking trails in all of Europe and perhaps the entire world. Alpine trekking draws millions of hikers from all over the world each year to traverse ancient European roads and footpaths from glacier-tipped mountain peaks down deep valleys to meadows covered in wildflowers. The Via Alpina is made up of five color-coded sub-sections: the Violet (also known as Purple), Yellow, Green, Blue, and Red trails; covering the whole of the Alps mountain range and more. All together Via Alpina spans approximately 5,000 kilometers or about 3,100 miles and has 342 individually numbered and posted stages. It stretches across no less than seven different countries along the way, starting in Slovenia near Trieste, crossing through Austria, Germany, Liechtenstein, Switzerland, Italy, and France; and finally ending near the world-famous beaches of Monaco.
VictoriaF wrote:In Europe, you go from village to village. You don't need a tent, you can eat in restaurants, you can get water freely. It's a different experience.
In Alpine areas you can stay in mountain huts, most of which are operated by national alpine clubs like ÖAV and DAV. Think of AMC huts but more civilized. Beer and wine are available at virtually all huts. Some have showers and a few even have hot showers ;)

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by hsv_climber » Mon Jul 09, 2012 10:57 am

swyck wrote: I wonder if there's any place in the US that is setup to do these types of hikes? I would assume it's possible in the East but I don't know. I guess you'd need to have food and lodging every 10 or so miles, and a way to travel to the start and from the finish. It would be interesting to layout something like this.
No.
US National Park System (Appalachian Trail is maintained by the NPS) prohibits that. Fortunately, it is a good thing, since US is not Europe and all these tiny villages would've had WalMarts, McDonalds, and big parking lots in no time.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Random Poster » Mon Jul 09, 2012 11:02 am

There are several longish multi-day hikes that can you can do in New Zealand as well.

Lonely Planet publishes many "Hiking in ______" and "Walking in _________* " books that make for interesting armchair traveling. Most of Europe is covered, as is New Zealand and Australia. Most of the books are focused on day hikes and routes, but there are a few multi-day excursions identified as well.


* insert name of country in the blank

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Jul 09, 2012 11:25 am

swyck wrote:I wonder if there's any place in the US that is setup to do these types of hikes? I would assume it's possible in the East but I don't know. I guess you'd need to have food and lodging every 10 or so miles, and a way to travel to the start and from the finish. It would be interesting to layout something like this.
In the White Mountains you can hike from lodge to lodge without having to carry a tent or food.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Jul 09, 2012 11:28 am

Colorado13 wrote:Have you seen the movie "The Way", about a trek along the Camino de Santiago? http://theway-themovie.com/ "THE WAY is a powerful and inspirational story about family, friends and the challenges we face while navigating this ever-changing and complicated world. Martin Sheen plays Tom, an irascible American doctor who comes to France to deal with the tragic loss of his son (played by Emilio Estevez). Rather than return home, Tom decides to embark on the historical pilgrimage "The Way of St. James" to honor his son's desire to finish the journey. What Tom doesn't plan on is the profound impact this trip will have on him. Through unexpected and oftentimes amusing experiences along "The Way," Tom discovers the difference between "the life we live and the life we choose.”
Thank you for the film recommendation. The Way of St. James is on my list of things to do, as I have mentioned earlier.

Victoria
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by gravlax » Mon Jul 09, 2012 12:24 pm

I've done many 100+ mile treks of various sorts. Several times I've logged more than 40 miles a day, although some of it was jogging.

One of my favorites was walking the length of Isle Royale and back in the early spring. I timed it perfectly because the trees had no leaves when I arrived, and they appeared and opened during my trek.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by likegarden » Mon Jul 09, 2012 4:37 pm

I remember hiking in Southern Germany when living in Munich. Probably every mountain in the Alps has hiking paths at least close to the top. Some of them actually have restaurants on top which is then a real surprise once you hike up to have a meal and a beer there. I took a train from Munich to one village in one valley, hiked across a mountain with snow on top in June, hiked down the other side to another town in another valley with a train connection back to Munich. Or you book a vacation to one alpine village and spend 2 weeks hiking up all mountains in its vicinity.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Jay69 » Mon Jul 09, 2012 5:56 pm

Many of our state parks here have 30+ miles of hiking within the park, not quite the same but doable if you want to stay state side. Some of the parks can take 3-4days to see it all.
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by shmidds » Mon Jul 09, 2012 6:08 pm

After reading an article in the September 2003 Smithsonian, my wife and I took three weeks to hike the 191 mile England Coast to Coast walk. We had a wonderful time hiking through the lake district, the dales, and the moors. We arranged accommodations and luggage transport through Sherpavan. The October 2009 Smithsonian has an article about trekking Hadrian's Wall and we plan to do that in the future as well.

We also hope to walk the following trails as time and finances allow:

The Path of the Gods on the Amalfi Coast
Cinque Terre
The Robert Louis Stevenson Trail in the Cevennes
Tour of Mount Blanc

A long distance walk is truly a life changing event. I highly recommend it.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by VictoriaF » Mon Jul 09, 2012 7:27 pm

Here is a private Youtube video about The Way of Saint James (Camino de Santiago de Compostela 2011). It is just under 10 minutes long and provides a good review of what to expect.

This is another video, this one is 54 minutes.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Urechis » Mon Jul 09, 2012 11:33 pm

Two years ago we did the Coast-to-Coast Walk which traverses England from Saint Bees on the Irish Sea to Robin Hood's Bay on the North Sea (about 200 miles). The route goes through the Lake District, the Yorkshire Dales and the North York Moors. Great scenery and quaint villages along the way. We spent each night in a B&B and had our bags transported from village to village so that we hiked with light day packs only. We spent 18 days, 16 walking and 2 rest days, but some do it in 2 weeks. It requires advance planning because some of the villages have a limited number of B&B rooms which fill up. If you are not restricted on when you can go September is supposed to be a good month. We started in late May. It was a truly memorable vacation and the feeling of accomplishment upon reaching the destination was overwhelming. I would highly recommend it. Wikipedia has a brief description. There are several guidebooks available at amazon.com. We used the one by Henry Stedman which was good.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by CrazyPete » Mon Jul 09, 2012 11:51 pm

swyck wrote: I wonder if there's any place in the US that is setup to do these types of hikes? I would assume it's possible in the East but I don't know. I guess you'd need to have food and lodging every 10 or so miles, and a way to travel to the start and from the finish. It would be interesting to layout something like this.
http://www.yosemitepark.com/high-sierra-camps.aspx

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by texasdiver » Tue Jul 10, 2012 1:19 am


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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by gd » Tue Jul 10, 2012 5:43 am

Internet search for walking tours or guided walking tours. Lots available overseas. The scale of the US doesn't seem to fit the concept. Consider also bicycle tours; lots of them are pretty casual bicycling if you pick the tour correctly, and it's not unheard of for participants to spend more time in the support van than their bike if they punk out. I took 2 overseas trips with Classic Bicycle Tours about 25 years ago, starting me off on lots of trips on my own. They're still in business and I think my guides (sons of the founder) still run it, so I guess a 25-year-old recommendation is still valid. They set up accomodations, supply routes, carry luggage, perhaps evening meals, you bike at your own pace. Also, as others have indicated, travel in europe can be much different from the US. It's pretty easy to walk from town to town (carrying your clothing) and find accomodations. Ireland or the outskirts of England might be an easy start. Lots of guide books at your local bookstore or slightly outdated at the library.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by cinghiale » Tue Jul 10, 2012 6:49 am

We hiked the Cotswalds in the mid-1990s. Loved it. I would highly recommend it. If possible, go in May to take advantage of the better weather and the shoulder season before the tourist rush begins. We took in some gorgeous countryside and then finished each day with a pub meal (and each stop featured different ales and bitters from local sources) and a comfortable bed. While some of the recommendations on this thread are excellent, you will want to consider the length of the trek. If you haven't done much hiking before (and if you intend on carrying your own backpack), the 100+ miles of the Cotswold Way is plenty.

Another marvelous hike is around the Dingle peninsula in western Ireland.
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by texasdiver » Tue Jul 10, 2012 9:59 am

My 75 year old dad and 74 year old mom did the Cotswalds last year. The entire route. They are pretty healthy and active for their age and enjoyed it.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by JupiterJones » Tue Jul 10, 2012 1:07 pm

FrugalInvestor wrote:I read an article today about walking the Cotswold Way, a 100 mile 7-10 day trek between Chipping Campden and Bath England passing through several small villages. Apparently there is lodging available regularly along the way and companies that will transport luggage from one destination to the next so only enough provisions and equipment for the day need to be carried.
That sounds brilliant! I don't suppose the article you read is online anywhere, is it? I'd love to read it.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by FrugalInvestor » Tue Jul 10, 2012 2:13 pm

JupiterJones wrote:
FrugalInvestor wrote:I read an article today about walking the Cotswold Way, a 100 mile 7-10 day trek between Chipping Campden and Bath England passing through several small villages. Apparently there is lodging available regularly along the way and companies that will transport luggage from one destination to the next so only enough provisions and equipment for the day need to be carried.
That sounds brilliant! I don't suppose the article you read is online anywhere, is it? I'd love to read it.

JJ

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Epsilon Delta » Tue Jul 10, 2012 8:17 pm

swyck wrote:I wonder if there's any place in the US that is setup to do these types of hikes? I would assume it's possible in the East but I don't know. I guess you'd need to have food and lodging every 10 or so miles, and a way to travel to the start and from the finish. It would be interesting to layout something like this.
You could certainly do this along some sections of the Erie Canal towpath, using B&Bs. I also know of a few rail trails that also have potential.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by CFM300 » Tue Jul 10, 2012 9:41 pm

Hiking in Europe is incredible, especially in the mountains.

Two famous hikes worth considering are the Tour du Mont Blanc (TMB) and the Alta Via 1.

The first circumnavigates Mont Blanc. You begin in France, climb up and over several passes into Italy, and then up and over several passes into Switzerland, and then up and over several passes back into France. About 100 miles. Unbelievable views. Lots of elevation loss and gain, but you carry next to nothing. No sleeping bag, no food except lunch, a change of clothes, and a liter of water. Sometimes you stay in villages, sometimes in mountain huts. The villages have dorms and hotels. The dorms and huts are clean and cozy. They all have showers, and provide multi-course meals. Most have beer and wine. You meet lots of interesting people. Amazing experience overall.

The second is in Northern Italy. Fewer villages and hotels. You stay mostly in huts. But again, they're nice. Clean with good food.

Both hikes might be challenging depending on your level of fitness, but the villages/huts are spaced close enough together that you don't have travel far each day, if you want to go slowly. I encountered several couples in their 60's while walking the TMB a couple of years ago.

You can also do guesthouse hiking in Nepal, particularly in the Annapurna region. Many do the Annapurna circuit which circumnavigates the mountain, but I'd recommend the hike in the Annapurna Sanctuary to the base camp. The guesthouses in Nepal are no where near as nice as Europe. In fact, they're dirty. But they still provide meals and (typically) a shower. The temps are quite a bit colder, and the elevation quite a bit higher, but again, you don't need to carry much. You can even hire porters to carry everything for you, if you want.

There's another walk along the eastern border of Nepal, just west of Darjeeling, where you can do a guesthouse trek. It's a northern walk along the ridge dividing Nepal and India. You walk toward Kangchenjunga (3rd highest mountain in the world). I can't recommend it though. The guesthouses are even more primitive and dirtier than those in the Annapurna region.

I've heard that Southern Spain has some great village walking, but I haven't done any yet. Hope to soon.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by JupiterJones » Wed Jul 11, 2012 10:47 am

FrugalInvestor wrote: Here you go..... http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/t ... alk08.html
Thanks!

JJ
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by heyyou » Wed Jul 11, 2012 11:32 am

Your daily mileage will increase significantly if you train for months instead of weeks before your trip. Knowing you can walk another ten miles in the next five hours gives you more time to spend before lunch.

The leading edge of backpacking equipment is towards much lighter gear. Retirees using that light gear are the most common remote trail users these days, but not on the overcrowded weekend trails. The younger hikers are mostly at work or looking for work.

Without food and water, common pack weights for overnight gear are below 15 pounds, often below 10 pounds for summer trips. Food per day could be 1.5 pounds or less by choosing higher calorie per unit weight foods. When shopping look for 125 calories per ounce (2000 calories per pound) then add more nuts (whole nuts or nut butters) or olive oil (pesto) to the dishes before the meal.

My suggestion is to reconsider light weight backpacking as a way to broaden your choices of trekking. You have more options if you can spend just one night out between cabins or B&Bs. Look into the thousand kilometer (600+ miles) Bibbulmun Tract near the coast of Australia.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Amaya » Wed Jul 11, 2012 8:34 pm

Nepal is also supposed to have some incredible options for trekking, many of which allow you to stay in villages and carry minimal gear.

And, as several people have said above, there are numerous options in the US if you're willing to do a bit of tent camping. Backpacking is cheap (after an initial outlay for gear), and IMO a much more rewarding way to explore our national parks and wilderness areas than simply car camping/day hiking. Your wife might be surprised how much she enjoys it, if she can be convinced to give it a try...

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Dingle » Fri Jul 13, 2012 4:00 am

detroitbabu wrote:Appalachian Trail in the US. It is on my bucket list.

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/
Looks like fun, thanks for the link.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by VictoriaF » Thu May 23, 2013 6:46 am

Has anyone done long distance walking last year or is planning it for this summer?

Victoria
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by detroitbabu » Thu May 23, 2013 8:29 am

I am hiking (up and down) Pikes Peak via Barr trail in July.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Dave_M » Thu May 23, 2013 9:16 am

detroitbabu wrote:
I am hiking (up and down) Pikes Peak via Barr trail in July.
A great hike. They run an up and down marathon there too.

make sure and train quite a bit for the downhill, it is usually what people say is the toughest thing. I did it last summer (after the fires), and was happy I spent time preparing for the sustained downhills. Knees and ankles are obvious problem areas, and one guy in our group had back issues.

Have fun, we all loved it.

Dave

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by bungalow10 » Thu May 23, 2013 9:26 am

I can't believe no one has mentioned A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson!

I want to walk segments of the Glacial Drumlin Trail in Wisconsin this summer with my kids. We probably won't be able to do very long portions of it (I'm thinking four miles in a day would be a stretch with my three little ones), but we can make it a family tradition to walk parts of it. I might even get a map so we can mark segments that we've walked.
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Norton750 » Thu May 23, 2013 7:03 pm

My wife and I walked the Cotswold Way last fall. We went with an organized tour group (that we have used before to hike the Grand Canyon rim-to-rim) and enjoyed it greatly. We are in our early 60's and we hiked approximately 10 miles per day. There actually is a fair amount of up and down - much of the 100 mile trail follows a several hundred foot escarpment and the towns tend to be at the foot of the escarpment. So you start off in the AM and climb the escarpment, see a town below, descend into the town for lunch or sightseeing, climb the escarpment again and then descend again for your night's lodging. It's not terribly steep, but it does add up after a few days! I developed a shin splint at one point - I think from spending too much time keeping up with the "fast" group.

Going with an organized group was very convenient and we saw many sights (castles and gardens) that we would probably have missed if on our own. Accommodations had all been checked out ahead of time and all we had to do was to get ourselves to Heathrow at the appointed time. Also there were a couple of shuttles that were very handy and saved a few miles of on-road trudging. The trail is generally well-marked, but it's not that hard to miss a turn or get confused here and there where multiple trails are merging. But there were hikers there who were on there own and there are companies there that will shuttle your luggage ahead to the next night's inn - very handy.

Nick

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by z0r » Thu May 23, 2013 7:34 pm

detroitbabu wrote:Appalachian Trail in the US. It is on my bucket list.

http://www.appalachiantrail.org/
read this book before you hike, it's the lightweight backpacking bible: http://www.rayjardine.com/ray-way/Trail-Life/index.htm
(and consider the PCT instead, it covers much nicer terrain)

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Skerrick » Thu May 23, 2013 7:58 pm

I don't have time to carefully read through this thread right now but I am very glad this thread was resurrected. It will be bookmarked and studied.

I have never been drawn to travel, but the experiences described in this thread really intrigue me.

THANKS!

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by VictoriaF » Thu May 23, 2013 8:05 pm

I have resurrected this thread because I want to do a long-distance walk next year. Right now, my first choice is Camino de Santiago, but I am interested in exploring other options.

Victoria
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by yukonjack » Thu May 23, 2013 8:56 pm

I happen to be reading a good book on The Way of Saint James. The title is Paris to the Pyrenees by David Downie. Lots of interesting history and a nice book for those interested in hiking in Europe.

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VictoriaF
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by VictoriaF » Fri May 24, 2013 11:28 am

yukonjack wrote:I happen to be reading a good book on The Way of Saint James. The title is Paris to the Pyrenees by David Downie. Lots of interesting history and a nice book for those interested in hiking in Europe.
The Way of Saint James and Camino de Santiago are different names of the same route. The book you are reading is about the French portion of the walk. Does David Downie write anything about his proficiency in the French language?

Victoria
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by HardKnocker » Fri May 24, 2013 12:31 pm

swyck wrote: I wonder if there's any place in the US that is setup to do these types of hikes? I would assume it's possible in the East but I don't know. I guess you'd need to have food and lodging every 10 or so miles, and a way to travel to the start and from the finish. It would be interesting to layout something like this.
You could do this just about anywhere in most of the USA. Just stay off the interstates and walk against traffic on the shoulder. There are towns every 5-10 miles.

There are hotels and motels in every town that has a interstate exit.
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Bylo Selhi » Fri May 24, 2013 12:41 pm

VictoriaF wrote:I have resurrected this thread because I want to do a long-distance walk next year. Right now, my first choice is Camino de Santiago, but I am interested in exploring other options.
Let's talk at BH12. There are lots of options in Europe depending on your interests, fitness level, time constraints, etc.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by VictoriaF » Fri May 24, 2013 12:47 pm

Thank you, Bylo,
Victoria
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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by michaelsieg » Fri May 24, 2013 12:59 pm

Victoria,
There is a company in Switzerland that specializes in long distance hiking vacations/trips. Their website is http://www.baumeler.ch - I know they speak English if you call, not sure if they have an English version of their website. They offer hiking (and bike) trips all over Europe, the advantage is that you don't have to carry a heavy backpack with supplies for a week with you, all that people carry is the hiking gear/food/drinks for the day. The company transports your luggage to each night quarter - so it makes it really enjoyable.
My godmother and family used to go with them all the time, and apparently there were a fair amount of British tourists hiking with them on some trips, so they have experience with English speaking costumers. It might be worth checking it out.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by FrugalInvestor » Fri May 24, 2013 1:22 pm

Bylo Selhi wrote:
VictoriaF wrote:I have resurrected this thread because I want to do a long-distance walk next year. Right now, my first choice is Camino de Santiago, but I am interested in exploring other options.
Let's talk at BH12. There are lots of options in Europe depending on your interests, fitness level, time constraints, etc.
Additional discussion here would be nice for those of us who may not be included in that discussion.
IGNORE the noise! | Our life is frittered away by detail... simplify, simplify. - Henry David Thoreau

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by frugaltype » Fri May 24, 2013 2:46 pm

I went hiking in Southern Algeria in a group organized by these folks: http://www.terdav.com/ some years ago. Algeria seems correctly off their list now (I would also avoid Egypt), but they still have Morocco and many other treks in numerous countries. They don't generally have facilities at stops, you bring sleeping bags.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by Bylo Selhi » Fri May 24, 2013 6:07 pm

FrugalInvestor wrote:Additional discussion here would be nice for those of us who may not be included in that discussion.
There is some upthread, e.g. my post on Via Alpina and the alpine hut network, both of which span Europe. My offer to Victoria was to answer more specific stuff at BH12 but I'd be happy to answer questions on related topics here.

FWIW I've done a lot of hiking in the Alps, ranging from day hikes to 2 to 3 week treks, over the past 30-odd years. I'm heading back for more next week and planning to come back again in August.
michaelsieg wrote:There is a company in Switzerland that specializes in long distance hiking vacations/trips. Their website is http://www.baumeler.ch
A similar company located in the UK is http://www.hfholidays.co.uk/. There are other operators in the UK but HF is the best by far. They specialize in guided tours/treks however they also offer self-guided ones.

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Re: Long Distance Walking

Post by FrugalInvestor » Fri May 24, 2013 6:57 pm

Bylo Selhi wrote:
FWIW I've done a lot of hiking in the Alps, ranging from day hikes to 2 to 3 week treks, over the past 30-odd years. I'm heading back for more next week and planning to come back again in August.
michaelsieg wrote:There is a company in Switzerland that specializes in long distance hiking vacations/trips. Their website is http://www.baumeler.ch
A similar company located in the UK is http://www.hfholidays.co.uk/. There are other operators in the UK but HF is the best by far. They specialize in guided tours/treks however they also offer self-guided ones.

What is your experience with tours vs. going it on your own? I tend to shy away from tours and away from the 'crowd' whenever possible.

What particularly interests me is seeing the countryside, meeting the locals and learning about the culture first hand and up close. Both my wife and I like to be active - but we're not out for bragging rights - just a relaxing time. My wife is not into camping so going from village to village - and having luggage transported ahead - sounds like a great option.

What might you suggest based on your experience that would meet these criteria?
IGNORE the noise! | Our life is frittered away by detail... simplify, simplify. - Henry David Thoreau

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