Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

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Brody
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Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by Brody » Fri Jan 13, 2012 11:57 am

If I'm not mistaken, we are supposed to try to stay away from polyunsaturated fats.

Soybean oil has 8 grams.
Olive Oil has 1.5 grams.

If I'm not mistaken, olive oil is not good for cooking. Is their an oil that is lower in polyunsaturated fats that is good for cooking?
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Rodc
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by Rodc » Fri Jan 13, 2012 11:59 am

Olive oil is used the world over for cooking. It is supposedly a key reason that Mediterranean diets are more healthy than American diets.

What you want, as I understand it, is high mono-saturated, and olive oils is very good on that score. And tastes good too.

http://cchealth.clevelandclinic.org/hea ... g-oils-101

Added: Reading to remember the details of healthier oils (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/fat/NU00262):
* Monounsaturated fat. This is a type of fat found in a variety of foods and oils. Studies show that eating foods rich in monounsaturated fats (MUFAs) improves blood cholesterol levels, which can decrease your risk of heart disease. Research also shows that MUFAs may benefit insulin levels and blood sugar control, which can be especially helpful if you have type 2 diabetes.
* Polyunsaturated fat. This is a type of fat found mostly in plant-based foods and oils. Evidence shows that eating foods rich in polyunsaturated fats (PUFAs) improves blood cholesterol levels, which can decrease your risk of heart disease. PUFAs may also help decrease the risk of type 2 diabetes. One type of polyunsaturated fat, omega-3 fatty acids, may be especially beneficial to your heart. Omega-3s, found in some types of fatty fish, appear to decrease the risk of coronary artery disease. They may also protect against irregular heartbeats and help lower blood pressure levels.
I am sure that nothing is really settled fact in this area. :)
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retiredjg
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by retiredjg » Fri Jan 13, 2012 12:14 pm

Olive oil works well for lower heat cooking. It does not work well for high heat cooking - it has a fairly low smoke point. For high heat, I suggest butter, coconut oil, sesame seed oil, or macadamia nut oil. And sometimes, I just mix one of these with olive oil - it seems to help. But I rarely cook at very high temps.

I realize this conflicts with what the Cleveland Clinic says, but I have not had good luck using extra virgin olive oil at high temps.

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Brody
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by Brody » Fri Jan 13, 2012 12:18 pm

I do use a lot of olive oil. I just have always heard that it isn't good for high temp cooking. I do a lot of stir frying do use lots of vegetable oil, so I was looking for an alternative. If the temp isn't high, I do use olive oil.
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drbagel
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by drbagel » Fri Jan 13, 2012 12:36 pm

Brody wrote:I do use a lot of olive oil. I just have always heard that it isn't good for high temp cooking. I do a lot of stir frying do use lots of vegetable oil, so I was looking for an alternative. If the temp isn't high, I do use olive oil.
If you buy extra light olive oil, you will probably be fine with high temp cooking. I generally use soybean oil for stir fry but I suspect extra light olive would work also. Saturated fats and trans fats are thought to promote cardiovascular disease, not mono or poly-unsaturated fats.

Happy frying!

brianH
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by brianH » Fri Jan 13, 2012 12:45 pm

It's not an oil, but I use butter, coconut 'oil', tallow (beef fat), or lard (pig fat) for higher temp cooking/sauteing. Most of those are solid at room temp, so the application may require something like olive oil if the temps don't get too high.

Overall, you want monounsaturated and saturated fats to form the bulk of the diet. Polys should really only be consumed when they are the O-3 variety (fish oils).

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Post by Curlyq » Fri Jan 13, 2012 12:52 pm

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Last edited by Curlyq on Mon May 14, 2012 12:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

mhalley
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by mhalley » Fri Jan 13, 2012 8:24 pm

I think Canola oil is supposed to be good for High heat cooking.
http://www.cookbookpeople.com/blog/2008 ... made-easy/

I think peanut oil is also good, but not as good for your heart.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peanut_oil
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dm200
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by dm200 » Fri Jan 13, 2012 9:01 pm

The Okinawa program/diet recommends Canola Oil. Mediterranean diet is probably Olive Oil. Other things I read say Olive Oil (extra virgin) for uncooked (salads) and low heat cooking and canola Oil for normal cooking. Canola Oil is less expensive.

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BL
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by BL » Sat Jan 14, 2012 2:18 pm

I looked at my Canola Oil (Canola stands for: Canadian Oil Low Acid) and it shows no trans-fats. It is sold by the regular cooking oils. I use olive oil and canola oil most of the time, canola for high heat and cakes. Sunflower may be similar.

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Christine_NM
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by Christine_NM » Sat Jan 14, 2012 2:43 pm

Up to last fall I used olive oil for the mono fats. But the rest of it is poly, something like 15%. I quit adding it to cooking and just use water instead. For baking I use half Smart Balance oil (mostly canola I think) and half applesauce.

My lipid profile has not changed but I lost 8 lb in 3 weeks without trying. I just quit adding oil, like I quit adding salt years ago, and cut down on bread and muffins. I'm not overweight, so that's a lot.

Something can still have under half a gram of partially hydrogenated fats (the worst kind) and still say "0 trans fat". Add two of those ingredients together at 0.4 g each (listed as zero) and it rounds up to a gram of trans fat per serving.
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epilnk
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by epilnk » Sat Jan 14, 2012 2:46 pm

We use four types of oil. Extra virgin olive oil is reserved for salads, pasta, and anything where flavor matters. Same with sesame oil. Extra light olive oil is sometimes used in cooking. But our general purpose frying pan oil is canola.

djorg
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by djorg » Sat Jan 14, 2012 9:39 pm

Brody wrote:If I'm not mistaken, we are supposed to try to stay away from polyunsaturated fats.
You are receiving two types of responses. Some from the conventional wisdom, low-fat, PUFAs are good camp, who are recommending canola oil and the like. Sesame oil and Peanut oil are also high-PUFA. But if you believe as stated in your OP that we should stay away from PUFAs you may have been looking at either a Paleo or whole food/WAPF style diet. These diets would recommend saturated fats as your primary fats a la BrianH's response, even preferentially to monounsaturated. Extra virgin coconut oil is outstanding for high heat cooking. Some also use organic palm oil, avocado oil, and macadamia oil though I've never tried those (only one of those last two is ok for high heat and I can't remember which). Tallow, lard, and bacon fat are also popular and great for high temperature cooking. Ghee is supposed to work better at high temps than regular butter. I mainly use coconut oil and butter, and put the extra virgin olive oil on my salads. On the subject of olive oil, I have seen contradictory advice over the usability of extra virgin olive oil at high heats... haven't decided what I think about that but I believe that "light" olive oil gets processed just as much as all the PUFA/seed oils and should be avoided.

paulsiu
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by paulsiu » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:31 pm

It just seems like studies flip back and forth for decades on whether polyunsaturated fat is good for you or not. In some years, palm oil or canola oil is bad, then next year it's good. Monosaturated fats like olive oil seems to be always good, so I have been using that for just about everything. I get it cheaper by buying in bulk. Good for most things except baking, which I don't do.

Frankly, I wouldn't worry too much about polyunsaturated fat or the bad food of the week. If we follow every study, we won't be eating anything at all. Just eat stuff in moderation.

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rustymutt
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by rustymutt » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:35 pm

We use olive oil for almost all cooking. I love it mixed in with salads. We're having a 5 bean salad for dinner tonight with apple cider vinegar and olive oil as the base, to go with our wild catch salmon.
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by AQ » Mon Jan 16, 2012 5:56 pm

Guess this is not a settled topic? We used olive oils for everythin, even for frying.. What could be wrong with that, in particular for frying with olive oils?

paulsiu
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by paulsiu » Mon Jan 16, 2012 8:36 pm

AQ wrote:Guess this is not a settled topic? We used olive oils for everythin, even for frying.. What could be wrong with that, in particular for frying with olive oils?
Well olive oil has a strong taste, so using extra virgin olive oil is probably not a good idea in certain foods. For example, you probably don't want to use olive oil with cake. As someone else pointed out olive oil has a low smoking point, so high temperature frying may not be a good idea.

For tasteless oil, you can use the cheap vegetable oil or grape seed oil. I have a small bottle for the occasional uses.

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LAbob
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by LAbob » Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:22 am

Right or wrong, I view oil as non-nutritional liquid fat and wasted calories. I try not to use any all. When absolutely needed, I spray with canola oil. My understanding is that olive oil is just fat as well, although better than most other oils; it has a low smoke point, however, and is generally not good as a cooking oil.

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Brody
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by Brody » Tue Jan 17, 2012 9:24 am

LAbob wrote:Right or wrong, I view oil as non-nutritional liquid fat and wasted calories. I try not to use any all. When absolutely needed, I spray with canola oil. My understanding is that olive oil is just fat as well, although better than most other oils; it has a low smoke point, however, and is generally not good as a cooking oil.
Why is it "non-nutritional"? Fat is a necessary part of our diet.

The only reason why I don't use olive oil with cooking is because it burns too easily. Thus, I use olive oil whenever possible, but when I'm cooking in oil I use Canola or some other vegetable oil.
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gatorking
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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by gatorking » Tue Jan 17, 2012 9:56 am

I use ghee or coconut oil for all my high temperature cooking.
I hate the taste of vegetable oils and never use them at home.
Definitive Guide to Oils. Also check out the links at the bottom of the page.
http://www.marksdailyapple.com/healthy- ... z1jjBgfzW6

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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by retiredjg » Tue Jan 17, 2012 10:32 am

LAbob wrote:Right or wrong, I view oil as non-nutritional liquid fat and wasted calories. I try not to use any all.
I find this is a little scary.

Yes, oils are fats. However, since every cell in the body needs fat, it is hard to understand why you see fat as "non-nutritional". What concerns me is if you are avoiding fats (by trying to not use any at all) that might mean that all you actually eat are some bad fats that are not easily avoided.

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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by SPG8 » Tue Jan 17, 2012 10:33 am

1. Smoke Point = temperature at which oil begins to break down into glycerol and free fatty acids

2. Stability = degree to which fatty acids are susceptible to oxidation (PUFA > MUFA > SFA), oxidation leads to free-radical formation

Two different considerations.

Oxidation can occur at room temperature with exposure to air or light, and is accelerated with heat.

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Re: Cooking oil polyunsaturated fat

Post by epilnk » Tue Jan 17, 2012 11:40 am

SPG8 wrote:1. Smoke Point = temperature at which oil begins to break down into glycerol and free fatty acids

2. Stability = degree to which fatty acids are susceptible to oxidation (PUFA > MUFA > SFA), oxidation leads to free-radical formation

Two different considerations.

Oxidation can occur at room temperature with exposure to air or light, and is accelerated with heat.
We store the olive oils in the cabinet but the canola oil in the fridge.

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