Has anyone ever quit their job without a job to go to?

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snyder66
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Has anyone ever quit their job without a job to go to?

Post by snyder66 »

I know it's VERY on Bogle-like, but I'm starting to feel a great deal of apathy toward my job. Not sure I could do it, but it would be nice to take some time and find a job that I could be happy with. I do get laid off every winter, so, I could wait until then, but, I'm starting to get fed up.
MWCA
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Post by MWCA »

Yes, when I was in my early 20s. No responsibilities and I had a temper. I turned out fine.. :D Then again Ive probably had more good luck than was my fair share.
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rylemdr
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Post by rylemdr »

I want to say,

"Yes. Go for it!"

Sad to say the economy is just too bad right now to be unemployed..

Stick it out for a bit. Apply for jobs while keeping the one you have now and make a switch when you get a decent offer.
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dm200
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Post by dm200 »

Yes, many years ago. At the time, I was in a very "in demand" field, with good credentials, current experience.

I would not do it today (if I had a choice).

There are increasing (and credible) reports of many prospective employers refusing to consider any applicants who do not have a job at the time of applying.
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fishnskiguy
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Post by fishnskiguy »

Yep. It's called retiring. :lol:

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Rexindex
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Post by Rexindex »

Yes, I did. Mid 40's, had a job that paid well and I hated and worked me almost every weekend. Quit without a job and it was almost impossible to search for a job with the hours I put in.

Have a supportive wife and the finances to allow being out of work a year now, getting some nibbles now and hope to be working a better job soon.

If you can search while working that is a better route. I was a stay at home dad for a year. Great experience with my kid, just hope it does not take too big a toll on my career.

Yes, the job was that bad......... :oops:
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VictoriaF
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Post by VictoriaF »

I was thinking about something like that, did not do it, and was glad that I did not do it.

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DA
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Re: Has anyone ever quit their job without a job to go to?

Post by DA »

snyder66 wrote:I do get laid off every winter, so, I could wait until then, but, I'm starting to get fed up.
You quit now, no unemployment compensation. Let them lay you off in the winter and get unemployment compensation.
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Watty
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Post by Watty »

You might consider talking to some sort of counselor to help determine if there might be something outside your job, like depression, that is making you unhappy. Not liking your job might be a realistic response to a bad situation, but not being motivated enough to focus on getting a better job makes me wonder if there is something else going on.

It doesn’t sound like there is anything dangerous or criminal involved at your current job so just start looking for another job during most of your off hours. In a month you will have either found a good new job, or you will have really good idea how difficult it will be to find work if you quit your current job without another one lined up.
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Post by nisiprius »

I've thought about it, but was able to radically transform my job responsibilities without leaving the company I worked for--new boss, new work, new salary. And it was only a medium-sized company, a couple of hundred employees.

A good way to do it is to look for some project inside the company, for which they need to go outside the company, and say "I think I could take care of that for you." Essentially that technique has worked well for me twice. Of course you actually need to be able to take care of it!
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Post by cantabtim »

Yes, left in January 2000 then ran into a friend of a friend at a party in May 2000 and was persuaded to go work at a then startup. Best move I ever made. Still there and had a lot of fun and made a lot of money.
david99
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Post by david99 »

I once quit a job without having another one and it was the dumbest thing I've ever done. Wait until you get laid off in winter --- it's only a few months away and you can collect unemployment.
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Re: Has anyone ever quit their job without a job to go to?

Post by Sam I Am »

Message deleted.
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Atilla
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Post by Atilla »

Yes, I did it once when I was young and single.

Went to work one day at a job I hated not knowing I was going to quit that morning.

24 hours later I had another job that paid enough to live on while I searched for something more meaningful.

Knock on wood - total time of unemployment over a 30-year working career was that 24 hours.
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FrugalInvestor
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Post by FrugalInvestor »

I did a few times, the last when I was in my early thirties.

The first time was to look for adventure when I was nineteen. I left an excellent IT job (computer programming) in early days of that industry and found a high paying seasonal job that became full-time. I didn't want to become the typical middle-aged family guy like I was working with who felt cheated out of his youth.

The second time I was in my mid-twenties. I had worked and saved enough to complete my college degree so I wouldn't have to juggle work and school at the same time. I really enjoyed that last 2-1/2 years of college and did quite well. I graduated during very difficult economic times but was young and optimistic and found suitable employment. I eventually went back to my prior employer at double my previous salary.

The third time was to relocate near family. By that time I had a track record in my industry and was able to quickly find a good job through contacts.

Each time worked out well for me but I never played the what-if game, I just forged ahead. I didn't ever leave a job because I was dissatisfied with the job but because I was looking forward to something better.

Edit: P.S. I did not have any family at the time other than my spouse who also worked.
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Post by tibbitts »

Yes. I was much younger (30) and had relatively current and in-demand skills. Still, it was several months before I had a new job. But I was very unhappy at my job, and my 3month relocation package was expiring, so I would have had to pay for relatively expensive short-term housing to stay at the job. And I had a house I had not sold back home, 200mi away. I had learned that I didn't enjoy living in the new location and didn't want to make a permanent move there. So it was not just a case of being bored with something I'd done for a long time and not being able to hold out a few months for a layoff.

Paul
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PaddyMac
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Post by PaddyMac »

In this environment, I would start looking while still employed. Some employment ads even say that you need to be employed to be considered (should be illegal imo).
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Post by stevethefundguy »

I left a job due to a truly nasty, vile boss -- felt sick to my stomach every morning knowing I'd have to face him and he'd start in on my again. I gave one month's notice thinking I'd surely land a new job by then -- I didn't, and was out of work for over 6 months.

Thinking back, I wish I had spoken to HR about the situation; once I gave notice (directly to the monster boss), there was nothing anyone could do about it.
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Post by sschullo »

Twice, if you count the military which was a huge mistake to enlist in the first place. I was so happy to get out of that mess and live to tell about it.

The other time I quit after earning my Masters degree to find a better paying job with more responsiblities.
Both worked out fine.
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Post by Sun88 »

I have done it, but would not recommend it.

My situation was different - I was working overseas for five years and my wife and family had returned stateside a year earlier. I work in manufacturing, and did not see any opportunities stateside with the same company, so I elected to take a severance package and part ways.

Even with the severance package and decent savings in the bank, it was not a good feeling being out of work. It was also a weak position to negotiate from when I did snag an offer. As others have recommended, better to wait for the layoff, take the unemployment if available, and plot your next move while enjoying the comfort of a steady income.

Good luck.

Doug
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Post by Curlyq »

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Post by black jack »

Yes. I was 30, no family, some savings. Quit, spent a year traveling the world, ended up back in my home town (a different state from where I'd been working).

I was considering changing fields, so when I got ready to look for work, I applied the principles in What Color is Your Parachute, was offered a job during my third information interview (in a new field) and took it.
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Post by rob »

dm200 wrote:Yes, many years ago. At the time, I was in a very "in demand" field, with good credentials, current experience.

I would not do it today (if I had a choice).

There are increasing (and credible) reports of many prospective employers refusing to consider any applicants who do not have a job at the time of applying.
What he said :-/
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Post by tim1999 »

No. I always had the next one lined up. When I have quit jobs, I gave them 2 or 3 weeks notice, ended on a Friday, and started the new job the following Monday.
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Re: Has anyone ever quit their job without a job to go to?

Post by natureexplorer »

snyder66 wrote:I know it's VERY on Bogle-like, but I'm starting to feel a great deal of apathy toward my job. Not sure I could do it, but it would be nice to take some time and find a job that I could be happy with. I do get laid off every winter, so, I could wait until then, but, I'm starting to get fed up.
It is one thing to quit without another job lined up, but quitting a few momths before getting laid off is yet another level. Quitting doesn't make you eligible for unemployment benefits. Unless they are insignificantly small.
WatchinU
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Post by WatchinU »

I always had the next job lined up. It's nice to have insurance coverage and other benefits.

I'd suggest you make a list of what you do not like. Then on the opposite side of the page, write what you do want for each item. once you write a new item of what you want, then draw a line through what you don't want. This may help you get some clarity on what you do want. read the list of what you do want every day...tweak as necessary. once you get really clear on what you do want then it becomes easier to target specific opportunities.

Hang on to the current role. Focus on adding value to the company and use the time to boost your career. You can also research, retool, reskill during this time.

if you quit without having a specific plan, then think about how you will explain that in an interview and the impression it creates. In this job market, companies pay attention and are trying to hire the right talent but their definition can be different than yours. how would you be perceived? how would you explain it?
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Post by p14175 »

When my last contract ended (contract engineer) I decided it was time to get my masters degree. I was about to turn 50 and felt I had better do it now rather than wait. That was in late 2008. I'll be defending this fall and I hope to find work before the end of the year.

Now that I am almost finished. I wished someone had told me what a waste of time and money a graduate program is. If I had to do it over, I would have just looked for a new job instead.
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snyder66
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Post by snyder66 »

This is all great advice. My current job is a landscape foreman, so I'm not exactly a supremely high-skilled, high-earning worker. My wife carries me on insurance, so that's not an issue. Thought about going back to school, but, that's not a slam dunk either. Maybe a career counselor would be a good option. I'm just really confused and I know that I'm going nowhere with my current employer. Thanks for your help.
WatchinU
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Post by WatchinU »

snyder66 wrote:This is all great advice. My current job is a landscape foreman, so I'm not exactly a supremely high-skilled, high-earning worker. My wife carries me on insurance, so that's not an issue. Thought about going back to school, but, that's not a slam dunk either. Maybe a career counselor would be a good option. I'm just really confused and I know that I'm going nowhere with my current employer. Thanks for your help.
do you like working in landscaping? do you like being the foreman?
if so, perhaps a new employer in the same type of business would provide you more opportunities???
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Post by Dude2 »

During the dot com era, there were many companies of all shapes and sizes that all had "vision" of the future. They would hire engineers and computer programmers like it was going out of style, recruiting them from their current jobs with 20% salary increases and signing bonuses. However, once hired, they often had no idea what to do with the new employees. They knew they had to hire talent, but they weren't quite sure what projects were going to take off. Often many new employees sat around doing absolutely nothing.

I had such an experience, and I gave it about 3 months before I quit (and paid back the signing bonus and moving expenses). The stock had just started to go south at that time, and people were scratching their heads trying to figure out what was happening.

It took me about a month, and I got something else. I only stayed there about six months. Ultimately I returned to my original job, and I have been there ever since.

There were articles in the media not long ago with surveys saying how something like over 70% of the Gen-X and Millenium demographics surveyed had said they planned to leave their jobs as soon as the economy turned around. I believe that people are getting pushed around more and more due to the lack of opportunities. Once the economy finally does start to recover, the turnover is going to be massive.

In the OP situation, I agree he should wait and get laid off. Take the benefits you can get, but I suggest actively searching for a job while receiving those benefits. All you do is put yourself back in the hopper and hope that the next pick is more to your liking. You shouldn't have to miserable.
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Post by madbrain »

Yes. I have actually done exactly that, 2 years ago. I had not planned it at all. I was under lot of stress and just left on the spot one day. Not my finest decision, I have to admit. I should probably post it under the thread about "stupid moves during the financial crisis".

It took about 4 months to find another job with comparable responsibilities & pay. I had enough savings to weather it, but the time in between jobs was probably just as stressful as staying with the company would have been.
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Post by FabLab »

Snyder66

Left without something waiting? Yes, of course! And I'd expect far more have done so than will admit. I certainly wouldn't want to characterize it for you, as you know your situation best.

In the words of that great philosopher, Mike Ditka, please remember that, "This too shall pass."

It's always worked out pretty well for me, and with the passage of time it will for you as well, I don't doubt.

Best wishes to you,
Ron
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fandango
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Post by fandango »

Test the job market while you are working.

You have nothing to lose if you do it discretely.

Then you will know the degree of difficulty of finding another job.
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Post by Wagnerjb »

dm200 wrote:There are increasing (and credible) reports of many prospective employers refusing to consider any applicants who do not have a job at the time of applying.
I can personally vouch for this comment. I hire accountants for my department periodically - about 1 or 2 per year for the past 6-8 years - and I wonder about people who are out of work when they apply.

Let me be clear - there may be some very stellar people in that crowd. But I cannot tell those people from the losers who got fired, those who were too lazy to get a job, those who just don't perform well enough as contractors to get hired, etc. I also wonder about the judgment and commitment of somebody who quits without another job. It just isn't worth the risk to hire somebody with that situation.

It is a much better risk to hire somebody who has a job, but has a very good excuse for wanting to leave it. Maybe they are moving to a bigger employer. Maybe they are leaving a large auditing firm for a regular company. Maybe they are moving to be near a fiance' or family. Maybe their entire department is going to be outsourced.

This is all about putting the odds on your side.

Think of it like buying a used car. The guy who doesn't have a job when he applies at my company is like the used car on the corner car lot. Lots of dingy cars, many banged up, rock bottom prices. Clearly, you expect many of these to have been poorly taken care of. They aren't the quality required to sit on the Auto Dealer lots. Might you find one that was only driven to church on Sundays by the little old lady? Maybe....but the odds are very much against you. You are much more likely to find the one that was totalled or had major water damage....but isn't disclosing that damage.

I am not saying this is how all hiring managers think. But it is how I think.

Best wishes.
Andy
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Post by scrabbler1 »

fishnskiguy wrote:Yep. It's called retiring. :lol:

Chris
Same here. I did once quit a summer job without having another one lined up. It was still early in the summer (actually late Spring) so I was able to get one at a day camp which began in late June.
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Post by midareff »

fishnskiguy wrote:Yep. It's called retiring. :lol:

Chris

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Post by jridger2011 »

Yep, when I was a teenager at a part time job where the conditions and the management (dishonesty in business ethics) got to me. I blew up almost. I would not do it now and have learned over the years that a lot of businesses are not ethical and do not treat employees with respect.
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Post by Keim »

Yes, I have.

I was the new Executive Director of the local Chamber of Commerce. I had come into a dysfunctional situation (I was the 3rd director in 1 year, and they had just mismanaged an event so badly that they'd almost bankrupted themselves), and was working through it. I felt we were making good progress. Then the Pres. and I had a major blow-up. It was an issue I knew I could win on-but I didn't feel it was worth the damage it would do to the Exec. Committee. And, short of getting him removed from the Presidency, I didn't want to have to deal with him as Pres. for the next two years. The job wasn't worth my health.

Thanks to my families frugal style-and a supportive wife-we had adequate reserves. I exercised my F.U. option in a major way.

Turns out I quit two weeks before Lehman went kaput, and all local major employers put in place a hiring freeze. I made out okay-but it was a nerve racking time.

Not recommended if you have an alternative.
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serbeer
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Post by serbeer »

Yes. But not just at some random point.

Company was trying to trim staff during crisis of 2000 and offered 6 months of salary and benefits for volonteer departure to anyone willing to take it (depended on number of years too). I was young (early 30s), single, had good savings, rented appartment month-to-month, and was thinking about moving to another state where my parents lived anyway. Moved selling most things and just driving a car with the rest, settled down, found equivalent job in about 4-5 month.
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