While we are on the topic of dogs- Recommendations?

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thechoson
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While we are on the topic of dogs- Recommendations?

Post by thechoson » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:14 pm

Been thinking of getting a dog, would be first I've ever owned.

However, a huge concern is that I'd be away from the dog 8-10 hours a day due to work.

So is there a dog breed that exists that can be left alone for that long in an apartment on a daily basis?

If not, no problem, I will look into goldfish or hamsters.

But if so, I'd also like a breed that doesn't shed and doesn't slobber too much.

Any recommendations?

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Post by IMADreamer » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:20 pm

Many dogs can be left alone while at work because once you get them on a set eating and pooing schedule they pretty much run like clockwork. I've always prefered the gentle giants myself, Newfoundlands, Mastifs, etc. My gf likes small dogs. Guess who won that battle, we have a Yorkie. Being how you live in an apartment though you may not want a big dog.

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Kashi
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Re: While we are on the top of dogs- Recommendations?

Post by Kashi » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:27 pm

I put off ownership of my first dog for a long time, too. Eventually, I got a dog and she is my best friend and it was everything that I had hoped it would be.

However, I feel a ton of caretaker guilt whenever I leaver her home. This means I try to stay home whenever possible. It's not so great a feeling sometimes. I'm actually considering moving to within a mile of work because, in part, I need to let her out on midday to alleviate my guilt.

In the end, you just can't make a dog not answer to calls of nature for 10 hours...Some dogs are independent enough to be okay, but you'll have to make potty arrangements. Maybe research a welsh corgi. Seems to fit and they're cute as a button.

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Post by poisonivvy » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:29 pm

IMO, being away for 8-9 hours is not a horrible thing if you are a committed dog owner. There are several things one can do to make sure the dog is not destructive and just ready to lounge around while you are gone:

1. Ample Walking and Exercising Time- A must. If we're gone all day long, the dogs get a 45-1 hour walk before we leave (granted we have high energy dogs that need that burning of energy). We've never skipped a day of walking or running with our pups--since we adopted the first one in May 2007. Rain, sleet, shine, warm days with no excuses.

2. Look into a dog walking service- Perhaps a quick potty 15-30 minute break if you get a young pup may be necessary. Have a friend, relative, professional come get the dog out of the 'walls' or the 'crate'.

3. Look into daycare. Some of the spoiled rotten pups I know here get to go to daycare 2-3 times a week to stay socialized and busy. The other days are 'off days' so they just want the calm, peace, quiet of lounging in the house while you're away.

We have Weimaraners--but I don't exactly recommend them for apartment living--they can be notorious recreational barkers, chewers, destroyers if their minds aren't busy!

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Post by norm » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:29 pm

Only an adult dog can be left alone for that length of time. I would restrict it to one room or buy a large crate to keep it in while you are away. The best of both worlds is to hire someone or have a neighbor come in at least once a day to walk the dog.

Small nonshedding dogs:

Shih Tzu, Yorkshire Terrier, Maltese, West Highland White Terrier, Bichon Frise,
Miniature Poodle, Italian Greyhound, Border Terrier, Cairn Terrier,
Havanese, Miniature Schnauzer,Norfolk Terrier, Silky Terrier, Welsh Terrier, Boston Terrier,Scottish Terrier, Chinese Crested, Australian Terrier

Medium To Large Non Shedding Dog Breeds

Airedale Terrier, Standard Poodle, Wirehaired Fox Terrier, Greyhound
Bedlington Terrier, Irish Water Spaniel, Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier, Basenji,
Kerry Blue Terrier

I own a Wheaten and they do not shed (but he is a barker). My gf belongs to a Greyhound rescue group and we own two of them. They don't shed or bark and they are quite content to lay around all day and do nothing.

If you do think some of the breeds listed appeal to you why not contact the breed's rescue org. in your area and check into rescuing an adult dog.

Go to this page and learn more about each of these breeds:
http://www.akc.org
Last edited by norm on Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:45 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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Post by norookie » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:32 pm

:? Get a fish :?
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Post by chaz » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:40 pm

Get a cocker spaniel.
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Re: While we are on the top of dogs- Recommendations?

Post by Fallible » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:54 pm

thechoson wrote:Been thinking of getting a dog, would be first I've ever owned.

However, a huge concern is that I'd be away from the dog 8-10 hours a day due to work.

So is there a dog breed that exists that can be left alone for that long in an apartment on a daily basis?

If not, no problem, I will look into goldfish or hamsters.

But if so, I'd also like a breed that doesn't shed and doesn't slobber too much.

Any recommendations?
I had a similar experience many years ago when I bought a puppy (dachsund/beagle, etc., mix) who nearly chewed up the entire apartment during my too-long absences. I talked with a vet who said the puppy was probably just lonely and could use a companion. I bought an 8-month-old kitty and, after initial introductions and dealing with some natural jealousy, puppy and kitty got along great and the puppy problems were over. I'm not saying that would always work, but loneliness is usually the cause of dog problems like barking and chewing and a companion animal can help.

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Post by dm200 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 12:55 pm

norookie wrote::? Get a fish :?
Or a garter snake that lives in a cage (or old aquarium). :D

Or, for practical reasons, a cat.

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Post by DiscoBunny1979 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 1:24 pm

poisonivvy wrote:IMO, being away for 8-9 hours is not a horrible thing if you are a committed dog owner.
-------

THis is so NOT true.

In my opinion, dogs should not be left alone for anything more than 4 hours - especially when young. This advice is the same advice given to me by the breeder/show family that I got my dogs from.

It is the younger years in which they develop these "bad habbits" and leaving them to fend for themsevles while you're at "work" can lead to unkown problems . . . such are barking . . . which only the neighbors have to contend with while you're gone. You won't know about the barking, unless you set up baby monitors throughout the house to see the dog's behavior while you're gone on some mobile device or computer OR when the neighbors complain to the management of the building to get you evicted or to force you to sell you condo/apartment.

Many folks will say that a grown dog will just sleep while you're gone. If that's true . . . they will get their sleep while you're at work and when you're at home, you wanting your sleep, the dog will want to play. The problem will be that you and your dog will be on different schedules. They will want to play when you get home, but you probably will be too tired. Therefore, the dog will learn that there's nothing to do while you're gone, and when you get home, you're not emotionally or physically available to do anything. The dog will develop habbits to show its displeasure. . .

Hiring a dog walker is great and good, but dogs are creatures of habbit. They will grow attached to the dog walker at the time the dog walker walks the dog. Therefore, you have to be careful that the dog knows you as the owner, but doesn't get overly attached to the person doing the dog walking. Walks are the most fun part of the day . . . and by hiring someone to do this fun activity . . . the dog will associate pleasure and happiness with the dog walker -waiting for the time of day for its walk by that person. Dogs don't know about what weekdays or weekends are. Those are human calander problems. Therefore, if you're home on the weekends and the dog gets walked at a certain time everyday by a dog walker during the week, don't be suprised for the dog to be good and ready on the weekend at that special time to go for a walk. They will train you.

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Post by livesoft » Thu Jun 23, 2011 1:36 pm

While looking for specific breeds may be useful, each dog has individual personality and traits. Just because someone says, "This breed does this and acts this way" does not mean that every dog of that breed does that or acts that way.

I own a dog of a breed that is supposed to be vocal and hyperactive. It takes some doing to get our dog to bark and it acts like a rug at home, but will run with me when I go running and is very playful outside (but will not bark). Go figure.

Unfortunately, one cannot identify a dog's long-term behavior from a short meeting or even from a week at home. However, you can identify bad behavior whenever you see it.
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Post by Alex Frakt » Thu Jun 23, 2011 1:40 pm

I wouldn't do it. It's unfair to the dog. If you own any pet you take on a responsibility to ensure that its needs are met. And needs for many pets go beyond food and water. Dogs are pack animals, they need to spend time with their pack to maintain mental health. It's OK if the pack consists of just you and the dog, but 8-10 hours of solitary confinement is not acceptable.

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Post by BarryB » Thu Jun 23, 2011 1:40 pm

Poisonivvy makes some good points.

Maybe look to adopt an older dog - not a puppy. Try to find a local rescue group (not a shelter) where the dogs are kept in the volunteers home - you may have a better chance of getting a dog conditioned to home life.

Go to petfinder.com

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Post by poisonivvy » Thu Jun 23, 2011 1:59 pm

DiscoBunny1979 wrote:
In my opinion, dogs should not be left alone for anything more than 4 hours - especially when young.
I respect your opinion- but I also think you do need to leave it, otherwise separation anxiety sets in starting with puppies--and the dog does not know how to fend for itself because it is so attached to its human. Especially with our breed. ( http://www.weimaranerproblems.com/weima ... n-anxiety/ or http://justweimaraners.com/2010/02/separation-anxiety/) My male has the anxiety, but when left with his companion, the female--they are ok together. She takes over as 'leader' in our absence.

I've never owned (by myself only, not counting when growing up) a young puppy- I've always adopted older pups.

DiscoBunny1979 wrote: It is the younger years in which they develop these "bad habits" and leaving them to fend for themselves while you're at "work" can lead to
If you're a responsible dog owner, then there won't be anything left out to get into, everything is secure, and you will have exercised the dog properly so they don't need to search for trouble and develop bad habits.
DiscoBunny1979 wrote:they will get their sleep while you're at work and when you're at home, you wanting your sleep, the dog will want to play.

Which is why we personally walk twice a day. Once in the morning, then again at night (if it's winter, close to when we get home after we've settled and greeted. Then if it's summer, wait until it gets cool.


DiscoBunny1979 wrote: Hiring a dog walker is great and good, but dogs are creatures of habit. They will grow attached to the dog walker at the time the dog walker walks the dog. Therefore, you have to be careful that the dog knows you as the owner
They do know that I'm the owner. There is no doubt about it. I feed it, sleep with it, walk it, everything else! They know who I am at the infrequent dog park visits, know what I smell like, what my car looks like, etc. I quite prefer, however, that my dog is able to be walked, talked to, taken care of by another professional along with me. What do you do if you have to go out of town for a funeral? What if your dog has to be kenneled/boarded at the vet and taken out to be pottied by another? What if, heaven help us not, you die suddenly and your dog needs a new owner ASAP? I think there is a fine line of balance of caring for a dog and enjoying it as a single owner--but also keeping it well mannered, socialized with other humans, friends, and family.


PS- Spell Check is on for a reason! 8-)

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Post by livesoft » Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:10 pm

poisonivvy wrote:Which is why we personally walk twice a day. Once in the morning, then again at night (if it's winter, close to when we get home after we've settled and greeted. Then if it's summer, wait until it gets cool.
Our dog is too smart to even want to go out of the house when it is above 95 deg F. One sniff of the heat through an open door and he walks back to his cool spot on the marble and lies down. He would burn his feet on the sidewalk/street. :) Nevertheless, with 4 humans in the family, he gets walks/runs of 4 miles in the morning and 4 miles in the evening.
What do you do if you have to go out of town for a funeral? What if your dog has to be kenneled/boarded at the vet and taken out to be pottied by another?
This is one reason why you are friends with your neighbors who also own dogs. While you can board your dog, you can also have neighbors take care of your dog just as you take care of their dog.
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Post by BruDude » Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:11 pm

Boxers win every time

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Post by Khanmots » Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:19 pm

I adopted a 5yr old golden retriever from a local rescue group about a year ago. Found that he could make it almost 10 hours without a potty break. Found that I'm gone almost 10 hours for work. After me bring delayed at work once too often I put doggy door in one of my windows.

Now while this was a solution for me, I own my home (and put off dog ownership until I did) Personally I wouldn't advise that you get a dog, puppy or not, unless you can handle him not bring able to hold it as long as you'd like. In your case what are you going to do if your dog can only hold it 6 hours? Get rid of the dog?

That said, my dog is ok with being left alone. He stays inside, plays with his tennis balls and then is happy when I get home. Worked to make sure he doesn't suffer from seperation anxiety, and its been good.

Did wind up adopting a second last weekend as he really does need more stimulation during the day... and boy had that been interesting :p

Oh one very important piece of advice given your conditions. Don't get a working dog like a terrier. You're not going to be able togive out enough of an outlet for its genetic drive to do its job and you'll have issues as it finds other ways to get its fix. People with herding breeds will have the dog take control of all family and guests trying to herd them as it thinks appropriate.... Which involves snapping at heels and such. Could be a perfectly fine pet if you had time to give him 6 hours of herding tasks to do a day but who does?

in my own case goldens were bred to retrieve. my evenings don't have a period of longer than 15 minutes between ball throws. But I knew this going in. :)

Tldr: plan for what you do if the dog has a small miniscule bladder. Read up on breed behavior and find a good fit for you. And yes an appropriate dog will be able to handle you being gone during the day; especially if he has a friend.

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Post by Khanmots » Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:26 pm

Oh, one last bit of advice. Adopt an older dog. Puppies are lots of messes and chewed things... And lots of time and frustration training.

1-3 year olds are going to be crazy high energy, that's ok if it's what you want, but odds are that teenager levels of enthusiasm and neverending energy aren't what you're looking for.

Personally I look for big dogs from 3-7. they're still active, but out of puppy exuberance mode and calmer. I can leave my house a mess and not have things chewed up when I get home. Generally they're a lot easier to live with and are still happy to play at least as much as you'll want to :)

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Post by Winthorpe » Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:36 pm

I currently have two German Shepherds.

I see two red flags here:
1) being away 8-10 hours daily.
2) apartment living.

I think 8-10 hours on a DAILY basis is just too long and unfair to the dog. They are very social animals and would not thrive under those conditions. 8-10 hours once or twice a week is not too bad, but daily? Probably not a good idea.

Assuming dogs are allowed in your apartment, having a dog in an apartment may cause some friction for you. Even if you search out the breed that "never" barks, Murphy's law would have it that you will get the one oddball that barks every time a bird chirps or the wind blows. They are all individuals, so take that breed book and throw it out the window if you plan to use it to get a dog that will act a certain way as described in the book.

I once had a friend that purchased a Golden Retriever puppy from a reputable breeder. He was an absolute maniac. Aggressive towards other dogs (not humans) from day one and completely destructive because he had unbelievable energy that he could not contain, even in adulthood. I have also had two other friends that got Golder Retriever puppies that were absolute angels from day one and still are today.

My own experience with German Shepherds over the years has been all over the map, and not one of them fit the description in any of my German Shepherd books. They have all been great dogs in general, but they all had clear positives and negatives as individuals.

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Post by gofigure » Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:43 pm

We're both at work all day and so the dog is home with two cats. Not sure how much they're there for each other.

We've had two Airedales. They are great dogs but they need to exercise. I wouldn't have any other dog. I think I read somewhere that Wheaton terriers were good apartment dogs.

We've had lots of luck house training our dogs over the years using a crate. I was told by a professional dog trainer that they don't mind nor does it do any harm to them to be in the crate all day. Our experience is that within a few weeks they're done and can be given the run of the house.

Good luck.
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Post by campy2010 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 2:55 pm

Kind of wish this thread had pictures. Love dogs but can't have one due to being out of the house 8-10 hours/day.

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Post by Exige » Thu Jun 23, 2011 3:43 pm

we are out of the house 8-10 hours a day when we got our puppy we started with a crate to train her and I came home on lunch for about 20 minutes to let her out and play a little bit. After about 8 months we put a gate in the kitchen walkway that allowed her the whole kitchen and we installed a dog door in the kitchen outside door.

We have had extremly good luck with her she has the whole kitchen food / water / bed and the whole back yard. She is our best friend and we could not be happier.

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Post by retiredjg » Thu Jun 23, 2011 4:02 pm

Many dogs can adjust to 8 to 10 hours alone a day. It can be easily done with an adult dog. Never with a puppy - you and the puppy would both hate it, your place would be destroyed and your neighbors would complain.

Rescue groups tend to know the dogs they are taking care of and perhaps could help you find an individual dog that is ready for a long lazy day at home while you are at work.

(Edit - when I said "never with a puppy" I did not mean situations like the one described in the post just above mine.)

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Post by TxAg » Thu Jun 23, 2011 4:31 pm

You can look into adopting an older dog. They generally sleep all day. You could take it for a walk after work, and that might very well be all the exercise it wants or needs. Plus, not many people are willing to adopt an older dog...everyone wants a puppy.

The only concern would the the potty habits....sometimes the really old dogs have trouble holding it. As mentioned above, a daily schedule is key.

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Post by rec7 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 4:43 pm

BruDude wrote:Boxers win every time
Are Boxers easy going?
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Post by gofigure » Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:36 pm

Image

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Post by crow » Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:38 pm

I have a 4 year old boxer. She is the sweetest tempered, smartest dog I've ever owned. She is protective without being in the least agressive. She is great with kids. The first time we encountered a small child that wanted to pet her, she went to the ground and didn't move while the toddler petted her. She did that without any training to do so. Boxers are really people dogs and like lots of attention, but do require early obedience training because they're large dogs and you want assurance that they will follow your commands. She's not a barker and could be kept in an apartment as long as you're willing to walk daily. She does shed some, but no slobber problems as with some mastiffs. I'd never own any other breed after having a boxer.

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Post by frugalhen » Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:45 pm

Alex Frakt wrote:I wouldn't do it. It's unfair to the dog. If you own any pet you take on a responsibility to ensure that its needs are met. And needs for many pets go beyond food and water. Dogs are pack animals, they need to spend time with their pack to maintain mental health. It's OK if the pack consists of just you and the dog, but 8-10 hours of solitary confinement is not acceptable.
I have to agree. Dogs need to be WALKED more than anything so they get exercise and know YOU are the pack leader. Being left alone for 8 hours or so is just not fair.

Keep in mind also, almost all dog behavior problems stem from dogs not being exercised properly. As Cesar says "exercise, discipline, then affection in that order" Hard to do that when you are away so long.

If you shun the advice, try going with low energy dog, like a pug (although they shed a ton)
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Post by campy2010 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:47 pm

gofigure wrote:Image
Thank you! So cute.

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Post by livesoft » Thu Jun 23, 2011 7:54 pm

The boxer that lived next door to me when I was a kid was a raving maniac barker, fence jumper, terrifying dog. Once again, you cannot generalize that all dogs of a given breed act the same.
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Post by grok87 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:00 pm

Alex Frakt wrote:I wouldn't do it. It's unfair to the dog. If you own any pet you take on a responsibility to ensure that its needs are met. And needs for many pets go beyond food and water. Dogs are pack animals, they need to spend time with their pack to maintain mental health. It's OK if the pack consists of just you and the dog, but 8-10 hours of solitary confinement is not acceptable.
good point- maybe a pair of dogs?
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Post by Harold » Thu Jun 23, 2011 8:38 pm

Haven't seen the breed mentioned on this forum before, buy may I suggest a Pit Bull?

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Post by stan1 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:13 pm

Another option is a Maine Coon, which although a cat the breed has some peculiar dog-like characteristics such as weighing 15-20 pounds, liking water, vocalizing, trainability, and being independent yet friendly around people. I would suggest avoiding a potential ethical dilemma by adopting a rescue that has been declawed by a prior owner since the claws on a 20 lb cat can do quite a bit of damage to flesh as well as household objects, drywall, and cabinets. Fortunately most Maine Coon's are friendly enough that you can clip their claws as is done for a dog.

If you do decide to go with a dog, be sure you really want to spend most of your non-working waking hours with the dog. It really is a big lifestyle commitment. Between feedings, potty, playing, walking, and grooming a dog can take up several hours per day of your time. On top of a 10 hour day you really have to be dedicated. Sure you can spend less time, but why have a dog if you don't want or are unable to spend time with it?

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Post by Dagwood » Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:15 pm

grok87 wrote:
Alex Frakt wrote:I wouldn't do it. It's unfair to the dog. If you own any pet you take on a responsibility to ensure that its needs are met. And needs for many pets go beyond food and water. Dogs are pack animals, they need to spend time with their pack to maintain mental health. It's OK if the pack consists of just you and the dog, but 8-10 hours of solitary confinement is not acceptable.
good point- maybe a pair of dogs?
We actually deal with the problem by having a dogwalker come in once a day in the early afternoon to take the dog for a nice walk. Then when we get home in the evening, he is happy to see everyone but not stressed and we do the morning / evening walk routine too of course. Weekends, weather permitting (not too hot) he comes on errands and he can stay in the car with the windows down, unless we go to a dog-related store and then he comes in the store with me.

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Re: While we are on the topic of dogs- Recommendations?

Post by LadyGeek » Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:38 pm

thechoson wrote:Been thinking of getting a dog, would be first I've ever owned.

...If not, no problem, I will look into goldfish or hamsters.

But if so, I'd also like a breed that doesn't shed and doesn't slobber too much.
The way this is worded, I'm thinking that this is the first pet you've ever owned, not the first dog?

Are you that concerned about the animal leaving a mess? Dogs slobber and shed. Cats shed and heave fur balls. Hamsters are not potty trained. Rabbits shed and will chew every piece of furniture within 12" off the ground.

Don't even think about a parakeet or any other bird. They require even more maintenance and will be totally stressed out to be left alone all day.

My recommendation: Fish or Ball Python

A Ball Python is the best possible snake you can have as a pet. It's maximum length is about 3' - 4', is mild tempered, shy personality, likes to be held, and is easily adaptable to a 20 gallon tank. It sheds about once a month (one piece!) and eats about once a month.
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Post by livesoft » Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:49 pm

Our parakeets required virtually no maintenance and were not stressed out when left alone. Cheap, too. $15 a bird and a cage. Maybe $10 worth of bird seed per year. We would let the birds out of the cage all the time because they loved to be at the center of action. They would fly to your shoulder and just hang out. Noisy though, especially if you were trying to talk on the phone. I'd highly recommend parakeets as a first warm-blooded pet.
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Post by lawman3966 » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:21 pm

From what this owner says, leaving this breed alone for 8 hours is not a problem. Shedding and slobbering don't appear to be issues either.


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Post by poisonivvy » Thu Jun 23, 2011 11:58 pm

campy2010 wrote:Kind of wish this thread had pictures. Love dogs but can't have one due to being out of the house 8-10 hours/day.

Sure!


Image

Image

Image

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Location: In a van down by the river

Post by gofigure » Fri Jun 24, 2011 4:06 am

great pics...I'm still smiling... :lol:

gofigure
Posts: 240
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Location: In a van down by the river

Post by gofigure » Fri Jun 24, 2011 4:13 am

My experience with Boxers has been that they're great dogs. They have allot of energy, they're playful and they have the mug.

There was a group of us that would meet in a ball field on the weekends with our dogs. Among the dogs there were two boxers in the group. They were lively, friendly with the others and fun to watch. I didn't know it at the time but Boxers actually box....each other and other dogs.

Great dogs.. those Boxers.

magicmom
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Post by magicmom » Fri Jun 24, 2011 5:21 am

I have a Yorkie. Yorkies are loyal, fun dogs.

beardsworth
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Post by beardsworth » Fri Jun 24, 2011 6:20 am

Harold wrote:Haven't seen the breed mentioned on this forum before, buy may I suggest a Pit Bull?
Surely you jest––both about suggesting that breed and about saying you haven't seen it mentioned on this forum before.

Folks who'd like to know about pit bulls––pro or con––will find their heart's content in the following long (but now locked) thread:

http://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=76933

rather than derailing the current thread. :)

beardsworth
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Post by beardsworth » Fri Jun 24, 2011 6:32 am

poisonivvy wrote:
campy2010 wrote:Kind of wish this thread had pictures. Love dogs but can't have one due to being out of the house 8-10 hours/day.

Sure!


Image

Image

Image
Really cool that you chose your chair upholstery and porch paint to match your dogs. (Didn't you? :) )

Ziggy75
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Post by Ziggy75 » Fri Jun 24, 2011 7:21 am

pet rock

rocket
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Location: Hard Scrabble, MS

no dog

Post by rocket » Fri Jun 24, 2011 7:24 am

You are unfit for having a dog. The dog would be very unhappy. Get a snake.

muhtar1938
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Post by muhtar1938 » Fri Jun 24, 2011 10:15 am

Fellow Dog Lovers:

I think I’ll weigh in with those who advise against leaving a dog alone for 8 to 10 hours a day. Dogs (our Beatrice is a flat-coat retriever) are attachment “junkies;” they need love and attention, and proximity to us humans. When I’m home mine is everywhere I am. She is rarely more than a few feet away from me. I’m semi retired, so I do have a lot of time with her, and she’s not alone more than five or six hours two days a week. This closeness makes her infectiously happy, and my wife and I miss her even when we go out for dinner. We call Camp Bow Wow several times while we are on vacation to see how she is doing.

I also think that crates are poor compromise, and I don’t feel any dog feels comfortable in them. We got our rescue dog when she was around one year old, so she had a thing for my socks and must have “divorced” pairs in the double figures. She also liked to chew Oriental carpets, but she seemed to know which ones were valuable. So she only chewed the smaller, easily replaceable variety. She got over that in a year and a half, and we only put her in the crate for about eight months to salvage what she couldn’t help but chew. When we did, we had to drag her to it and force her in. When we dismantled the crate and left her have free reign of our home, she acted like a welcome guest. No bad behavior.

I agree with generalizations about breeds; dogs are like people--distinctly themselves. But they share one trait that we don’t have. They love unconditionally. I see that as an invaluable and fortuitous quality they have. To be loved unconditionally brings out the best in us. The oxytocin flows and we are more positively predisposed toward others and, I feel, happier in general.

Our flat-coat retriever—not a breed one sees a lot--has the temperament of the “typical” golden, but she is black with wavy fur that shines like silk. She looks like a black Irish Setter. She is as bright as a border collie, learns everything quickly, anticipates with uncanny perception, reacts to children and older folks with deference and gentleness. She’s a large dog, but, if she’s indicative generally of her breed’s qualities, she’s in a league of her own.

Don’t get a dog if you have to leave her home for 8 to 10 hours. What they have to give us and what we have to give them cannot thrive on that degree of absence.

Cheers,
Muhtar

Harold
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Post by Harold » Fri Jun 24, 2011 10:22 am

MarcMyWord wrote:
Harold wrote:Haven't seen the breed mentioned on this forum before, buy may I suggest a Pit Bull?
Surely you jest––both about suggesting that breed and about saying you haven't seen it mentioned on this forum before.

Folks who'd like to know about pit bulls––pro or con––will find their heart's content in the following long (but now locked) thread:

http://www.bogleheads.org/forum/viewtopic.php?t=76933

rather than derailing the current thread. :)
Yes, it was a joke.

User avatar
G12
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Post by G12 » Fri Jun 24, 2011 10:47 am

A cat may be a lot better fit for your situation. If you really want a dog, these two were the best I ever had, just magnificent companion pets:

Image

And yes, I love my Pit Bull and she is moving up the list fast but still too energetic/rambunctious in the house and needs morematuration. Dobermans may not be a good fit for a first time dog owner, but by far have been better companions than others I have had including a yellow Lab, German Shepherd, and Beagle, plus the Dobes have a single coat of short hair greatly reducing shedding issues. Any breed you choose if you adopt/rescue a mature dog that is already housebroken it would make life much easier for you and will benefit from knowing its adult temperament unlike a puppy. Good luck.

norm
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Post by norm » Fri Jun 24, 2011 11:10 am

Having a medium to large adult dog in an apartment should not be a problem since the average adult dog sleeps about 14 hours a day. Certain breeds need to keep their brains busy and if left alone for too long can get destructive just out of boredom. As someone new to dogs I suggest you spend a lot of time in finding the specific breed(s) that will fit your needs. Try to find breeders in your area for those breeds and talk to them.

I have bred and shown German Shepherds and currently live with 5 dogs (4 different breeds), each one of them has it's own personaility and character traits.

pshonore
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Post by pshonore » Fri Jun 24, 2011 11:26 am

muhtar1938 wrote:I also think that crates are poor compromise, and I don’t feel any dog feels comfortable in them.
I have to disagree. If a dog is crated at a young age (still a puppy), they learn to think of the crate as their own little area and are quite comfortable in it. Now I don't think crating a dog for 8-10 hours is a good idea at all, nor should it be used as a punishment. It can also be a great help while housebreaking and when the dog is in a "chew" stage.

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