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Did you play roleplaying games when you were young?

yes, with some degree of regularity
37
28%
yes, with some degree of regularity
37
28%
yes, from time to time
23
17%
yes, from time to time
23
17%
yes, but only rarely or a few times
13
10%
 
Total votes: 133

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letsgobobby
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Post by letsgobobby » Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:33 am

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Indices
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Post by Indices » Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:49 am

I used to play Rifts in high school. Then I discovered girls!

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Post by jpsfranks » Sun Apr 17, 2011 2:37 am

Indices wrote:I used to play Rifts in high school. Then I discovered girls!
Girls? I've never heard of it. What kind of dice does it use?

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Post by MossySF » Sun Apr 17, 2011 4:04 am

Mostly D&D with some Mechwarrior and a random selection of others.

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Re: Did you play roleplaying games when you were young?

Post by Valuethinker » Sun Apr 17, 2011 4:49 am

letsgobobby wrote:By roleplaying I mean "Dungeons and Dragons" type games. I think they got popular in the 70s and later, but clearly it was a certain 'type' that partook. Wondering if that 'type' grew up to be a Boglehead.

I explored several but really got into Steve Jackson's Car Wars.
Dungeons and Dragons (the original, ie 2nd Edition)
Advanced D&D
Twilight 2000
Traveller
Traveller 2300

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Traveller_ ... ng_game%29

EDIT: The one I wish I had spent more time with was 'Call of Cthulu'- roleplaying game in the world of HP Lovecraft's Cthulus Mythos.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Call_of_Ct ... ng_game%29

Various precursors to Steve Jackson Games GURPS (Generic Universal Role Playing System)

Also Metagaming/ SJG 'Ogre' and 'GEV'
host of SPI board wargames (not role playing per se, but military historical simulations) also Avalon Hill. In particular military historical simulations by a guy called Richard Berg.

Steve Jackson Games is still out there. They survived that Secret Service raid (classic bureaucratic eff-up, having done the raid, and found nothing, they felt they had to prosecute anyways, plus of course they held the assets of the company for years) which was finally dismissed in court, I think. It hurt them badly, but they did manage to make a game out of it afterwards!

http://www.sjgames.com/
Last edited by Valuethinker on Sun Apr 17, 2011 6:27 am, edited 2 times in total.

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Post by Valuethinker » Sun Apr 17, 2011 4:50 am

jpsfranks wrote:
Indices wrote:I used to play Rifts in high school. Then I discovered girls!
Girls? I've never heard of it. What kind of dice does it use?
If you role 99+ on percentile dice, you jump 3 experience levels.

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Post by Quasimodo » Sun Apr 17, 2011 6:12 am

GIRLS = Gorgeously Insane Real Life Stimulation

I think Adolescents R Us made it

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Post by grap0013 » Sun Apr 17, 2011 7:39 am

I'm not surprised by the high correlation of role playing games and enjoying investing. "Leveling up" is fun in both instances.
There are no guarantees, only probabilities.

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Post by verbose » Sun Apr 17, 2011 8:07 am

I spent a significant chunk of my teenage years playing AD&D. I played a bit in college, but just couldn't find the time for it. When I explain my teenage activities to other women, I've often heard, "That explains a lot." :P

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Post by interplanetjanet » Sun Apr 17, 2011 8:24 am

verbose wrote:I spent a significant chunk of my teenage years playing AD&D. I played a bit in college, but just couldn't find the time for it. When I explain my teenage activities to other women, I've often heard, "That explains a lot." :P
I've had a couple relationships with gamers. They were usually introverted, intelligent people with creative problem solving skills. Then again, I also knew some in high school who bordered on being obsessive and socially withdrawn, so I suppose there is a flip side to everything - and the relationships I had were obviously subject to some selection bias. ;)

I liked wargaming better myself. I went to the trouble of building a Mech designer for FASA's Battletech in Applesoft BASIC (I was young, ok!) for the group I played with. :roll:

-Janet

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Re: Did you play roleplaying games when you were young?

Post by JupiterJones » Sun Apr 17, 2011 8:55 am

letsgobobby wrote: Wondering if that 'type' grew up to be a Boglehead.
I think many of the Bogleheads who didn't play RPGs won't click this thread and take the poll. So you might want to make a saving throw for skewed sample population. :P

I did a bit of D&D, but my group of nerdy friends really liked Tunnels & Trolls. Less complicated. More zany.

JJ
Stay on target...

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Post by SP-diceman » Sun Apr 17, 2011 8:58 am

I played a lot of military type games, “The battle of Gettysburg”, “Strategy and Tactics“, "Blitzkrieg", Chess.
(cant remember the company, most were based on WWII, Civil war)

One of my favorite games was called Feudal, it was like chess except you set your pieces
up on real terrain,(behind a cardboard divider) you didn’t know where your opponents pieces
would be until the game started.

When I went to high school, it was the first year we had the “equality/unisex thing”
(early to mid 1970’s)
So I had home economics, cooking, sewing, to balance all the “killing” I did as a youngster. :)


Thanks
SP-diceman

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Post by Opponent Process » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:13 am

D&D was frowned upon as a tool of Satan in my part of West Texas when I was little.
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Post by nisiprius » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:31 am

SP-diceman wrote:I played a lot of military type games, “The battle of Gettysburg”, “Strategy and Tactics“, "Blitzkrieg", Chess.
(cant remember the company, most were based on WWII, Civil war)
Right, I was going to ask whether war game-simulations counted. I'm guessing you might be thinking of Avalon Hill?

In grad school I went through a period of several years when another student and I were into them; specifically a magazine called "Strategy and Tactics," edited by one Jim Dunnigan. They featured game boards that were always laid out on chickenwire-style hexagon grids, with playing pieces that were little die-cut squares that, of course, didn't fit the hexagons. The rules were incredibly complex. To tell the truth, the best of the bunch was "Napoleon at Waterloo," the simplified game they sent you with your first subscription to introduce you to the genre.

I actually thought they were quite legitimately interesting in helping to understand something about the historical situations they were allegedly simulating.
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Post by anthau » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:42 am

There are even a number of "retro-clones," which use the Open-Game License to recreate earlier editions of the game from Lake Geneva.
Best, | | Anth

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Post by HomerJ » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:44 am

One of the best summers of my life was when I was 13.

Lived on a block with 5 other kids my age (12-14)

We played
  • AD&D nearly every day (we did the whole Against the Giants series that summer (G1-G3))
    Intellivision baseball nearly every single day (We played a whole season, kept track on a piece of paper)
    Basketball and stickball every day
    Kick the can at night

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Post by stevewolfe » Sun Apr 17, 2011 10:16 am

Played some D&D. Mostly played military type games like 'Axis and Allies' and 'Fortress America'. Also played card games a good bit, particularly Magic the Gathering and some Werewolf the Apocalypse (Rage).

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Post by tarnation » Sun Apr 17, 2011 10:29 am

What? No love for Car Wars!
Image

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Post by market timer » Sun Apr 17, 2011 11:19 am

Yes, was very into RPGs ages 10-13. Would go a week or two over vacations without leaving the basement, not even to take a shower. Usually I'd play and my little brother would watch. We lived on a mountain in the woods at the time, far from civilization.

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Post by scrabbler1 » Sun Apr 17, 2011 11:25 am

My cousin had an Avalon Hill game called, "1776" which was a board game simulation game for the American Revolution. We played from time to time in the 1970s, as that war became more popular with the bicentennial and a movie (a musical) by the same name.

Besides the game which I found fascinating, it was a great learning experience. The game also had lots of notes about the war throughout the instructions and elsewhere. I recalled those notes when I later watched a PBS series about the war and I read David McCullough's book about the war.

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Post by Kenkat » Sun Apr 17, 2011 11:30 am

I played a little bit of D&D. But I also really liked wargames as well. In addition to Avalon Hill, I believe there was also a company called SSI that produced a number of games. They could get very complex - I had a D-Day game (I think it was called Operation Overlord) that went down to the battalion level. I had to play it on the ping pong table because the maps were so big.

Other good ones I remember were The Russian Campaign, Air War, and Victory in the Pacific.

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Post by Valuethinker » Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:01 pm

nisiprius wrote:
SP-diceman wrote:I played a lot of military type games, “The battle of Gettysburg”, “Strategy and Tactics“, "Blitzkrieg", Chess.
(cant remember the company, most were based on WWII, Civil war)
Right, I was going to ask whether war game-simulations counted. I'm guessing you might be thinking of Avalon Hill?

In grad school I went through a period of several years when another student and I were into them; specifically a magazine called "Strategy and Tactics," edited by one Jim Dunnigan. They featured game boards that were always laid out on chickenwire-style hexagon grids, with playing pieces that were little die-cut squares that, of course, didn't fit the hexagons. The rules were incredibly complex. To tell the truth, the best of the bunch was "Napoleon at Waterloo," the simplified game they sent you with your first subscription to introduce you to the genre.

I actually thought they were quite legitimately interesting in helping to understand something about the historical situations they were allegedly simulating.
In some ways the 'Gamer's Workshop' (it's a listed company in the UK, active in a number of countries)/ Warhammer games and miniatures are what is left of all this. They are quite a cult.

I subscribed to Strategy and Tactics for about 10-15 years. I came to it through an ad in the back of Analog Science Fiction/ Science Fact magazine-- considerable overlap between the two fan bases (in those days, military history was bigger than SF or Fantasy, now either of those is 100 times military historical simulation, maybe 1000 times).

I learned a lot about military history from S&T. There was a companion magazine (Moves) which was about gaming itself.

Dunnigan now runs StrategyPage, a think-blog about military issues.

SPI failed as a business, and left a legacy of that-- there was a lot of bitterness between Dunnigan and some other people who worked for S&T. When the creator company of D&D (which was an also-ran derided by real wargamers when it was first launched) took over S&T from the wreckage, they cancelled accumulated subscription rights to subscribers. That community never really covered.

Many of the most talented game designers came from that incubation. And went on to found West End Games, which had some particularly good games (I think it went out of business too).

Avalon Hill was the granddaddy, in fact the most popular war games of all time came from that stable: Panzerblitz and the 'Squad Leader' series by John Hill. Owned by Monarch Publishing in Baltimore, AH never had the variety or volume of SPI games, nor the commitment to real military history, but they had distribution power with retail outlets and with department stores-- many of us got our start with Avalon Hill Games.

AH has recently been taken over by someone else, and I think a lot of the old catalogue dumped.

There were some brilliant designers out of the SPI stable:

- Richard Berg
- Greg Costikyan who still blogs about games - very quirky games (such as 'Bug Eyed Women: they want our women'-- a very droll take on 1950s Schlock movies; the aliens are usually ahead, but then they become 'lust crazed' and move irrationally. See also 'The Monster that Ate Sheboygan' about US national guardsmen and state troopers fighting off giant reptilian monsters)
- Len Qualm
- Redmond Simonsen was the art director: SPI pioneered some of the best parts of the graphics in the counters and maps
- Al Nofi - a history teacher in the NYC school system, who wrote some very clever games about the Roman and Byzantine periods
- David Isby - talented British military historian, also writes for Strategy Page

SPI games suffered from sami-ness of approach, sometimes you could not tell the tanks from the medieval knights. They used the 'Feedback' section at the back of the magazine to pick topics for new games, and the result was they were producing more and more games for a fairly fixed community of existing fans.

Richard Berg, a serious designer of games from all periods (for example a masterpiece from the Mexican-American war 'Veracruz') wrote a powerful piece once criticizing the 'Nato, Nukes & Nazis' mentality of wargamers. That actually influenced me to widen my military historical tastes.

This in fact led to a 'Feedback' game proposal that got voted up, and SPI had to quell it because of its possible attractions for pro-Nazis (not then quite the issue they became in the 1990s). 'Case Geld' postulated a 1948 invasion of the USA and what was left of the British North America by the Germans, having finished off the Russians. So you see, you would have had 'Nato, nukes & Nazis' ;-). It was SPI later admitted, a practical joke to insert it into Feedback, that then ran away with them ;-).

D&D's strength was it reached beyond that and found new fans. There were even women playing D&D ;-).

But SPI were innovative in many ways, and there were some real classics:

- Terrible Swift Sword - the 3 days of Gettysburg, on company level scale
- Sniper - house to house fighting in WWII
- some of the 'quad' games which used a simple game system at the brigade level to illuminate some of the great battles of history

(whereas a normal game had 200-400 counters, a quad game came in a pack of 4, with 100 counters per game and 4 maps, one for each different battle-- the result was a game which could be played in under 2 hours).

Almost everything I know about the US Civil War comes from wargames, and the odd battlefield visit.

The nature of manual games meant that in some ways they were (and are) technically superior to computer games (the budget gets spent on real research, not on software design and effects).

I have seen serious strategic analysis pieces that started with the basis of a commercially published wargame, and then made (classified) adjustments based on military intelligence info.

I have read in a number of sources that in gameplay and realism of outcome (in particular the capacity for an abrupt reversal where the Blue (ie the good guys) are defeated by the Reds (not allowed in conventional military gaming) the commercial products were as good as, or better than, the Pentagon in house ones-- more balanced.

In many ways, I don't think military simulation has exceeded its peak with those old boardgames in the early 80s. Computer gaming has in my experience been a step backward. Those old sims had huge amounts of information buried in the counters and rules.

Also computer gaming is largely real time now, and I have a strong preference for turn based.

Avalon Hill used to run a shindig in July in Baltimore called 'Origins'. 3 days of mad gaming. Drove all night from Ontario to be there. Played games all night.

Met some people from various US National Guards, also 'government workers' from unspecified (;-)) parts of the US government who would attend symposia on gaming design and the Soviet Forces, etc. ;-).

Great fun.

Ahh youth ;-).
Last edited by Valuethinker on Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by Valuethinker » Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:18 pm

kenschmidt wrote:I played a little bit of D&D. But I also really liked wargames as well. In addition to Avalon Hill, I believe there was also a company called SSI that produced a number of games. They could get very complex - I had a D-Day game (I think it was called Operation Overlord) that went down to the battalion level. I had to play it on the ping pong table because the maps were so big.

Other good ones I remember were The Russian Campaign, Air War, and Victory in the Pacific.
There was certainly an SSI which wrote computer games. 'Steel Panthers' in particular-- one of my alltime favourites on the Intel386 processor I think.

I am not sure if there was a board game company SSI (there may well have been). SPI and Avalon Hill were the granddaddies.

After that there was Chaosium (huge and intensely complex games from a very talented designer named Frank Chadwick). Also Metagaming and then Steve Jackson Games.

West End Games came out of the wreckage of SPI and produced some interesting titles.

One of the great games publishers (by name at least) was 'Flying Buffalo' of Scottsdale Arizona. Produced the really clever card game 'Nuclear War'.

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Post by chaz » Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:28 pm

These games came along when I was already an adult - too bad.
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Post by HomerJ » Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:36 pm

stevewolfe wrote:Played some D&D. Mostly played military type games like 'Axis and Allies' and 'Fortress America'. Also played card games a good bit, particularly Magic the Gathering and some Werewolf the Apocalypse (Rage).
Oooh... Axis and Allies was a very good board game... Like Risk x10...

A couple of us got into that game in college.... we played it constantly for a month or two..

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Post by Sheepdog » Sun Apr 17, 2011 12:42 pm

Does playing Cowboys and Indians or cops and robbers with the neighborhood kids count?
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Post by Kenkat » Sun Apr 17, 2011 1:31 pm

Valuethinker wrote:
kenschmidt wrote:I played a little bit of D&D. But I also really liked wargames as well. In addition to Avalon Hill, I believe there was also a company called SSI that produced a number of games. They could get very complex - I had a D-Day game (I think it was called Operation Overlord) that went down to the battalion level. I had to play it on the ping pong table because the maps were so big.

Other good ones I remember were The Russian Campaign, Air War, and Victory in the Pacific.
There was certainly an SSI which wrote computer games. 'Steel Panthers' in particular-- one of my alltime favourites on the Intel386 processor I think.

I am not sure if there was a board game company SSI (there may well have been). SPI and Avalon Hill were the granddaddies.
Yes - it was SPI I was thinking of. Thank you - didn't make the connection from your posts above - duh.

Here's Air War - I even remember the red cover:

http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/1629/air-war

Edited to add:

Here's some of the other favorites:

Atlantic Wall (not Operation Overlord):
http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/5485/atlantic-wall

Victory in the Pacific:
http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/1442 ... he-pacific

The Russian Campaign:
http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/2808 ... n-campaign

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Post by chaz » Sun Apr 17, 2011 2:02 pm

Sheepdog wrote:Does playing Cowboys and Indians or cops and robbers with the neighborhood kids count?
Those were my kid games.
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Post by interplanetjanet » Sun Apr 17, 2011 2:47 pm

Valuethinker wrote:- Greg Costikyan who still blogs about games - very quirky games (such as 'Bug Eyed Women: they want our women'-- a very droll take on 1950s Schlock movies; the aliens are usually ahead, but then they become 'lust crazed' and move irrationally. See also 'The Monster that Ate Sheboygan' about US national guardsmen and state troopers fighting off giant reptilian monsters)
Greg Costikyan has done some great stuff. Paranoia had me falling over laughing far too often, and I came to see it as an almost dadaist dystopian storytelling opportunity. One of his better known books, First Contract, is in my opinion a must read - though fundamentally humorous and none too serious, it takes the rare opportunity to look at economic fallout from a brush with interstellar civilization and the collapse of local industry that would likely follow the introduction of more advanced goods.
In First Contract, Costikyan has resurrected an idea from some long-forgotten shoebox, a novella originally titled "Sales Reps from the Stars." A savvy CEO, a power-suit-wearing, proper Indian businessman by the name of Johnson Mukerjii, gets screwed by an alien invasion. The ETs want to do business, except we're the Aztecs and they're the Spaniards, and we can kiss our gold good-bye. But Mukerjii, after losing everything--his millions, his San Jose manse, his leggy wife--figures out how to beat the aliens at their own game in a characteristically Costikyan way: by producing exports in the form of cheesy, shoddily constructed spaceship beverage accoutrements:

"Made in Japan," "Made in Taiwan," and now--I gestured grandly--"Made on Earth."
-Janet

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Post by dave.d » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:42 pm

Valuethinker wrote:Richard Berg, a serious designer of games from all periods (for example a masterpiece from the Mexican-American war 'Veracruz') wrote a powerful piece once criticizing the 'Nato, Nukes & Nazis' mentality of wargamers. That actually influenced me to widen my military historical tastes.

This in fact led to a 'Feedback' game proposal that got voted up, and SPI had to quell it because of its possible attractions for pro-Nazis (not then quite the issue they became in the 1990s). 'Case Geld' postulated a 1948 invasion of the USA and what was left of the British North America by the Germans, having finished off the Russians. So you see, you would have had 'Nato, nukes & Nazis' ;-). It was SPI later admitted, a practical joke to insert it into Feedback, that then ran away with them ;-).
LOL, a game of this title was actually published in 1990, altho it looks different from what you describe: http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/5958 ... ukes-nazis
Value-based allocation.

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Post by Snowjob » Sun Apr 17, 2011 10:05 pm

I've played the last 4 versions of Axis and Allies which I discovered when I was probably 13 or so. For a while I was kicking myself for not getting the aniversary limited edition run but now with the European / Pacific theater sets that combine for 30+ by 70+ inches of WWII awesomenes I dont mind. Several times a year we dedicate a saturday for rewriting history over cigars and homebrew.

Also played D&D maybe 6 or 7 times in middle / highschool. It was very long to set up and since I didnt own any of the books I wasnt to aware of what was going on. That said, it was mostly social sillyness of whatever age we were at mixed with some throwing of dice when the one informed person told you you to do so. That said I have played a few times this winter with some old friends from highschool and I have a much better appreciation for it now.

Anyone ever try Flames of War? Its a table top game similar to Warhammer but WWII scenario based. It looks neat but I've never seen anyone play when I stop by a comic shop.

And a little off topic but sufficiently nerdy -- Magic the Gathering drafts are really really really awesome.

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Post by quijybo » Sun Apr 17, 2011 10:12 pm

D&D, AD&D, Axis and Allies, Risk, Panzer Blitz, Avalon Hill's Civilization, Squad leader, 3rd Reich, World in Flames, Starfleet Battles, Supremacy, I loved RPGs and strategy games.

Two years ago, 21 years after I stopped playing AD&D, I found a group that plays, great people, and I became fast friends with them. It is just as fun as it was when I was 12, just harder for everyone to get together.

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Post by Opponent Process » Sun Apr 17, 2011 10:22 pm

Sheepdog wrote:Does playing Cowboys and Indians or cops and robbers with the neighborhood kids count?
turns out the Cowboys finally won. cops and robbers are still at it though.
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Post by bottlecap » Sun Apr 17, 2011 11:01 pm

Wow. Too many to remember. I don't think I could play RPG's anymore, but I'd still love to play a good war game.

RPG's:

D&D
AD&D
Star Frontiers
Boot Hill
Marvel Super Heroes
Twilight 2000
Robotech
Cyberpunk
Ghostbusters
Star Wars
Paranoia

War Games:

Third Reich
Axis & Allies
Hitler's War
Diplomacy
Gettysburg
Shiloh
Blitzkrieg
Fortress America
Shogun
The American Civil War
The Crusades

Others:

Car Wars
Rail Barons
Junta
Illuminati

Cripes, I know there are more, buts it's been a long time...

JT

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Post by james22 » Mon Apr 18, 2011 1:22 am

Never played, but owned many RPGs. I liked comparing the modelling.

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Post by MossySF » Mon Apr 18, 2011 2:12 am

interplanetjanet wrote:I liked wargaming better myself. I went to the trouble of building a Mech designer for FASA's Battletech in Applesoft BASIC (I was young, ok!) for the group I played with. :roll
Oh wow. Me too except I did mine in Turbo Pascal. Handled Mechs, Vehicles, Fighters and printed out sheets to be used in games. The printing of sheets was the biggest time saver since to use a mech in a game (as I'm sure you know) , you'd have to fill in all those armor bubbles by hand.

I released it as freeware a long time ago and ran across it while searching the net a few years back. Wonder if it's still hosted anywhere on the internet? ... Searching ... searching ... searching ... found it on Sarna.net -- and one of many mech designer programs people have written over the ages. Too bad the concept of open-source (and the web itself) was not in vogue at the time as that's a lot of wasted effort all the authors could have collaborated together on.

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Post by Random Musings » Mon Apr 18, 2011 9:41 am

What's wrong with roleplaying when you're an adult. :wink:

RM

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Post by paulsiu » Mon Apr 18, 2011 11:07 am

Yes, I did, but I don't think it has any bearing on whether I become a boglehead. I started investing when a friend lend me a really terrible book on investing (name that I cannot recall). Being the type of person who have a tendency to over-analyze, I end up reading a tons of other investment book until I encounter Bernstein online and became a boglehead.

Paul

Valuethinker
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Post by Valuethinker » Mon Apr 18, 2011 11:31 am

bottlecap wrote:Wow. Too many to remember. I don't think I could play RPG's anymore, but I'd still love to play a good war game.

RPG's:

D&D
AD&D
Star Frontiers
Boot Hill
Marvel Super Heroes
Twilight 2000
Robotech
Cyberpunk
Ghostbusters
Star Wars
Paranoia

War Games:

Third Reich
Axis & Allies
Hitler's War
Diplomacy
Gettysburg
Shiloh
Blitzkrieg
Fortress America
Shogun
The American Civil War
The Crusades

Others:

Car Wars
Rail Barons
Junta
Illuminati

Cripes, I know there are more, buts it's been a long time...

JT
I am looking at your location and thinking the one about breaking the siege-- Missionary Ridge?

I think that game designers tried very hard on that one, but it was just too improbable: Union advanced guard just refuses to give up and eventually forces Confederacy off an unassailable ridge-- was too difficult to actually have that happen in the game ;-).

It's a bit like Midway: you can't actually create a game that comes out the way it does, the descending circle of more improbable events that led to a complete and decisive American victory, and the loss of 4 Japanese carriers.

You've listed some great games. I had forgotten about Paranoia ;-).

Valuethinker
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Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 11:07 am

Post by Valuethinker » Mon Apr 18, 2011 11:32 am

interplanetjanet wrote:
Valuethinker wrote:- Greg Costikyan who still blogs about games - very quirky games (such as 'Bug Eyed Women: they want our women'-- a very droll take on 1950s Schlock movies; the aliens are usually ahead, but then they become 'lust crazed' and move irrationally. See also 'The Monster that Ate Sheboygan' about US national guardsmen and state troopers fighting off giant reptilian monsters)
Greg Costikyan has done some great stuff. Paranoia had me falling over laughing far too often, and I came to see it as an almost dadaist dystopian storytelling opportunity. One of his better known books, First Contract, is in my opinion a must read - though fundamentally humorous and none too serious, it takes the rare opportunity to look at economic fallout from a brush with interstellar civilization and the collapse of local industry that would likely follow the introduction of more advanced goods.
In First Contract, Costikyan has resurrected an idea from some long-forgotten shoebox, a novella originally titled "Sales Reps from the Stars." A savvy CEO, a power-suit-wearing, proper Indian businessman by the name of Johnson Mukerjii, gets screwed by an alien invasion. The ETs want to do business, except we're the Aztecs and they're the Spaniards, and we can kiss our gold good-bye. But Mukerjii, after losing everything--his millions, his San Jose manse, his leggy wife--figures out how to beat the aliens at their own game in a characteristically Costikyan way: by producing exports in the form of cheesy, shoddily constructed spaceship beverage accoutrements:

"Made in Japan," "Made in Taiwan," and now--I gestured grandly--"Made on Earth."
-Janet
I had forgotten about Paranoia: Logan's Run meets THX 1138 meets Terry Gilliam's 'Brazil' meets....

Warm memories ;-).

manuvns
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Post by manuvns » Wed Apr 20, 2011 11:57 pm

dr , nurse and patient with my girlfriends when i was kid . :)

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