10-minute workout?

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jb3
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10-minute workout?

Post by jb3 » Fri Apr 08, 2011 9:21 pm

Anyone ever heard of an effective workout that is this short?

I have a busy schedule, two toddlers, and am realistic. I think this is about all I can do consistently - and if I'm not going to do it consistently there seems to be no point in doing it at all.

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VictoriaF
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Post by VictoriaF » Fri Apr 08, 2011 9:27 pm

You can try Five Tibetan Rites, which are also described in "Ancient Secret of the Fountain of Youth" by Peter Kelder. There are also Youtube videos of the Five Tibetan Rites.

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gatorman
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Re: 10-minute workout?

Post by gatorman » Fri Apr 08, 2011 9:39 pm

jcb3030 wrote:Anyone ever heard of an effective workout that is this short?

I have a busy schedule, two toddlers, and am realistic. I think this is about all I can do consistently - and if I'm not going to do it consistently there seems to be no point in doing it at all.
It is quite possible to do what you want to do working out for 10-12 minutes one time per week. Try reading Body by Science by Dr. Doug McGuff for details.

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MWCA
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Post by MWCA » Fri Apr 08, 2011 9:58 pm

I do a 15 to 20 min chest,bicep, and tricep work out in that time. Its better than nothing. I do it 3 to 4 times a week.
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Post by spin_echo » Fri Apr 08, 2011 10:01 pm

crossfit

raisin mountaineer
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I second the five tibetans

Post by raisin mountaineer » Fri Apr 08, 2011 11:23 pm

You probably get lots of walking around all day with your responsibilities-- the five Tibetans will add strength and flexibility.

CFM300
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Re: 10-minute workout?

Post by CFM300 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 5:28 am

Do as many rounds as possible of:

5 chin-ups
10 push-ups
15 squats

If you can do a round a minute, then you'll do 50 chin-ups, 100 push-ups, and 150 squats total. Not bad for 10 minutes.

Other options:

-Do as many burpees as possible in 10 minutes. Depending on your fitness level, you might find 100 easy. Fine. Then try to hit 150, 200, etc.

-Do as many burpee jumping pull-ups as possible in 10 minutes.

-Stair sprints (example: 6 flights up/down on the minute)

-Treadmill intervals (Run 40, rest 20, 10 rounds). Use a pace that's 2 minutes per mile faster than you'd use for a medium distance run.

More options here:

http://crossfitoneworld.typepad.com/cro ... kouts.html

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gatorking
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Post by gatorking » Sat Apr 09, 2011 7:25 am

+1 on body by science.
It's a 10 minute workout - once a week!!

ohiost90
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Re: 10-minute workout?

Post by ohiost90 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 7:34 am

jcb3030 wrote:Anyone ever heard of an effective workout that is this short?

I have a busy schedule, two toddlers, and am realistic. I think this is about all I can do consistently - and if I'm not going to do it consistently there seems to be no point in doing it at all.
And If you are only going to do it for 10 mins, I dont know why you would bother at all.

Really? you only have enough time to work out for about as long is it will take you to log in, post this message, and read the replies? I would think that you and your two toddlers deserve better.

Its all about choices. finding 1/2 ~ 1 hr 4 to 6 days a week shouldn't be too hard for anyone to find in their schedule. Look at the boob tube and computer for places to cut 1st. This is coming from a husband of a 6 and 3 yr old with a full time working wife.

I've often get up early before kids/wife wake to get a run or swim in. Yes it means going to bed earlier and missing TV, but like I said, its about choices....

Here is a good link from the cleveland clinic.

http://my.clevelandclinic.org/heart/pre ... ntrol.aspx
The American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines call for a minimum of 30 minutes of aerobic physical activity performed at moderate intensity (60%-80% maximum heart rate), either in one continuous period or in intervals of at least 20-minutes duration on most -- preferably all -- days of the week. This is the amount called for to reduce the risk of coronary disease. It is equivalent to briskly walking at least 1.5 miles per day or raking leaves for half an hour. For weight control, you may need to increase the amount of time you exercise to burn more calories.
And to anser your question, no, 10 minutes isn't enough time to be effective with anything. Of course, yes it is better than nothing, but then by that logic so is 1 min.

ohiost90
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Post by ohiost90 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 7:37 am

MWCA wrote:I do a 15 to 20 min chest,bicep, and tricep work out in that time. Its better than nothing. I do it 3 to 4 times a week.
Lol...how do you do a 15 to 20 min routine in 10 minutes? If you did it 10, then it would be a 10 min routine, not a 15 to 20 min routine.

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Post by BarryB » Sat Apr 09, 2011 8:42 am

JCB

CFM3000 gave some good advice. Exercises like pushups, squats and chin ups are great for short workouts because they incorporate large muscle groups - throw in about 20 jumping jacks at the beginning of each round to help get your heart pumping.

Start out with and stick to your ten minutes for a few weeks and you will probably find yourself extending your workout time because you feel so good about what you are doing.

Whatever you do don't be discouraged by anyone who tries to tell you it isn't worth it. You are trying to make a positive change in your life and that is great.

jb3
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Post by jb3 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 10:01 am

Hey ohiost90, spare me your judgement.

Thanks everyone else for your replies.

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Guest422
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Post by Guest422 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 11:27 am

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Accumulator
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Re: 10-minute workout?

Post by Accumulator » Sat Apr 09, 2011 11:53 am

jcb3030 wrote:Anyone ever heard of an effective workout that is this short?
While I agree that long-term this is unlikely to be affective, people have a tendency to find more time to work out once they get started. I did this by using some basic workouts I found online.

Google for "100 pushups". I found similar programs for sit-ups, chin-ups, and I think a few others. I started with these and have since moved on to finding time for more substantial workouts. These were good because gains came quickly and were easily measurable.

Good luck.

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Guest422
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Post by Guest422 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 11:57 am

there is a tremendous amount of data supporting the effectiveness of shot duration high intensity workouts google tabata.

I lost 36 lbs in 3 months doing shot duration high intensity just be careful to ease into it.

Effects of moderate-intensity endurance and high-intensity intermittent training on anaerobic capacity and VO2max.

Tabata I, Nishimura K, Kouzaki M, Hirai Y, Ogita F, Miyachi M, Yamamoto K.

Department of Physiology and Biomechanics, National Institute of Fitness and Sports, Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan.

This study consists of two training experiments using a mechanically braked cycle ergometer. First, the effect of 6 wk of moderate-intensity endurance training (intensity: 70% of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), 60 min.d-1, 5 d.wk-1) on the anaerobic capacity (the maximal accumulated oxygen deficit) and VO2max was evaluated. After the training, the anaerobic capacity did not increase significantly (P > 0.10), while VO2max increased from 53 +/- 5 ml.kg-1 min-1 to 58 +/- 3 ml.kg-1.min-1 (P < 0.01) (mean +/- SD). Second, to quantify the effect of high-intensity intermittent training on energy release, seven subjects performed an intermittent training exercise 5 d.wk-1 for 6 wk. The exhaustive intermittent training consisted of seven to eight sets of 20-s exercise at an intensity of about 170% of VO2max with a 10-s rest between each bout. After the training period, VO2max increased by 7 ml.kg-1.min-1, while the anaerobic capacity increased by 28%. In conclusion, this study showed that moderate-intensity aerobic training that improves the maximal aerobic power does not change anaerobic capacity and that adequate high-intensity intermittent training may improve both anaerobic and aerobic energy supplying systems significantly, probably through imposing intensive stimuli on both systems.
PMID: 8897392 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Effect of exercise intensity and duration on post exercise energy expenditure.

Sedlock DA, Fissinger JA, Melby CL.

Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

The purpose of this study was to examine 1) the effect of two exercise intensities of equal caloric output on the magnitude (kcal) and duration of excess postexercise oxygen consumption (EPOC) and 2) the effect of exercise of equal intensity but varying duration on EPOC. Ten trained male triathletes performed three cycle ergometer exercises: high intensity-short duration (HS), low intensity-short duration (LS), and low intensity-long duration (LL). Baseline VO2 was measured for 1 h prior to each exercise condition. Postexercise VO2 was measured continuously until baseline VO2 was achieved. The duration of EPOC was similar for HS (33 +/- 10 min) and LL (28 +/- 14 min), and both were significantly longer (P less than 0.05) than the EPOC following LS (20 +/- 5 min). However, total net caloric expenditure was significantly more (P less than 0.05) for HS (29 +/- 8 kcal) than for either LS (14 +/- 6 kcal) or LL (12 +/- 7 kcal). The exercise conditions used in this study did not produce a prolonged EPOC. However, the exercise intensity was shown to affect both the magnitude and duration of EPOC, whereas the exercise duration affected only the duration of EPOC. Moreover, the duration of EPOC and the subsequent caloric expenditure were not necessarily related. Based on the resulting magnitude of the postexercise energy expenditure, it is possible that EPOC may be of some value for weight control over the long term.
PMID: 2626089 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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CarlZ993
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10-Minute Workout

Post by CarlZ993 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 12:26 pm

Most people are doing nothing when they're at the gym. Very little time actually exercising. Then, they do set after set of exercises with very little resistance. Before I retired, I used to grab a quick, 10-minute weight workout at the workplace gym (Universal) several times a week (which complimented my running routine). All exercises were done in one set to muscular failure. Each set was between 8 & 12 (or 10 & 15) repetitions. When you could do the 12 (or 15) repetitions, you'd increase the weight slightly for the next workout.
Routine:
Perform each repetition in a smooth fashion. 'Lift', don't 'throw' the weight. When in doubt, slow down the repetition. Especially when lowering the weight.
1) Leg Press (glutes, quadriceps, & a little bit of hamstrings)
2) Shoulder Press (deltoid muscles and a little bit of triceps)
3) Lat pull (Lats and a little biceps)
4) Bench press (pectorals and a little triceps)
5) Sit-ups on incline board (Abs; 30 - 50; or until you get bored)

By following this routine, I was able to maintain my strength and muscular tone. Annually, I was tested and always made the top 10% for my age in muscular strength.
Carl Z

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Guest422
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Post by Guest422 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 12:39 pm

if you don't have access to a gym pushups pullups and squats are good, all major muscle groups are utilized in these three simple exercises


see how many times you can do this circuit in 10 min
1 pull-ups
2 push-ups
3 squats


if you can do pull-ups do body rows
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Post by norm » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:19 pm

Because of physical problems I can't do pushups, situps, weights etc. I have found that the best exercise for me is walking. I start off walking 1 mile 4-5 times a week and slowly build up to 4 miles each day, Along the way I add wrist and ankle weights.

halfnine
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Re: 10-minute workout?

Post by halfnine » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:26 pm

jcb3030 wrote:Anyone ever heard of an effective workout that is this short?

I have a busy schedule, two toddlers, and am realistic. I think this is about all I can do consistently - and if I'm not going to do it consistently there seems to be no point in doing it at all.
Am in a similar position. I do 15 minutes (or longer when time permits) of some exercise everyday. By making it a daily ritual I don't have to worry about falling off the wagon. I'll vary it by what I have time to do (weight training with bands, shadow boxing while cooking dinner, a quick run, doing stairs, cycling with my bike on a trainer, etc).

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Post by Harold » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:27 pm

jcb3030 wrote:Hey ohiost90, spare me your judgement.

Thanks everyone else for your replies.
He may not have meant to be as judgemental as he came across.

To some people this is akin to asking for an effective toothbrushing method when there's only enough time in a busy schedule to brush once a month.

Hope you find an approach that works for you.

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Post by leonard » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:31 pm

High Intensity Training (HIT) weight workouts are extremely tough. You could do one in 10 minutes - but the reality is an efficient hit workout take 15 - 20 minutes, 3 to 4 times a week. They are extremely difficult and pack a lot of resistance and cardio stress in to a short period - can make your stomach a bit queasy.

The big downside to doing a HIT workout in a commerical gym is the need to be able to move quickly from exercise to exercise. With all the people working out, you can't usually set up 8 or 10 workout stations without someone jumping in - unless you work out very early or very late.
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Post by ohiost90 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:57 pm

jcb3030 wrote:Hey ohiost90, spare me your judgement.

Thanks everyone else for your replies.
I guess I should have asked you what "Effect" you wanted in ten minutes. But I'm not judging you but giving you an honest reply. sure 10 mintues a day is better than none, but certainly not effective for much. There is overwhelming evidence that one needs more time than that to help reduce the risk of coronary disease and to provide other benifits. Did you read the link?

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10-minute workout

Post by Colorado13 » Sat Apr 09, 2011 2:55 pm

I agree that 10 minutes is better than nothing but I also believe that health is so critical and that not making it a priority now is really setting yourself up for financial and physical risks later in life. You want to be available to your kids now, which is great, but in order to be able to be around for your kids later in life, you need to take care of yourself now. I think there's a post on the board about what older folks would "do over" if they could; taking care of their health when they were younger was a pretty frequent response.

Maybe you can find a low-cost gym that provides child care or trade some child care with a friend so you have time to work out? Or, run around outdoors while pushing the kids in a stroller? I recommend that you consider the time spent exercising as an investment in your future and a strategy for lowering/limiting healthcare costs both now and in the long term.

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Post by CaliJim » Sat Apr 09, 2011 5:56 pm

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Post by retiredjg » Sat Apr 09, 2011 7:21 pm

If 10 minutes a day is all you can do, I'd consider tai chi and/or chi gong. It starts with a warm up and you don't have to change clothes or go anywhere.

I can't say that a 10 minute routine will make you much stronger or give you a lot of aerobic challenge, but it's good for joints, ligaments and tendons, organs, flexibility, balance, and it calms your brain. Lots of bang for the buck if 10 minutes is really all you can do.

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Post by TRC » Sat Apr 09, 2011 7:58 pm

Me and my wife have 2 toddlers too. Time is also precious in our house. We choose to get to bed at a decent hour and get up at 5:30am (well before kids are up) and get in a solid 1 hour workout in 6 days a week in our basement. You get out what you put in.....find more than 10 minutes if your committed to getting in shape.

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Re: 10-minute workout?

Post by Mister Whale » Sun Apr 10, 2011 3:23 pm

CFM300 wrote:Do as many rounds as possible of:

5 chin-ups
10 push-ups
15 squats

If you can do a round a minute, then you'll do 50 chin-ups, 100 push-ups, and 150 squats total. Not bad for 10 minutes.
I second this. Great workout for both strength and cardio. Most folks can't do three sets at first.

Once you get good at this, start looking into other CrossFit exercises.
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Re: 10-minute workout?

Post by arthurb999 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 8:26 am

CFM300 wrote:Do as many rounds as possible of:

5 chin-ups
10 push-ups
15 squats

If you can do a round a minute, then you'll do 50 chin-ups, 100 push-ups, and 150 squats total. Not bad for 10 minutes.
Monday - the above
Wednesday - as many burpees in 10 min
Frday - the above

Every session try to beat your last # of rounds / reps.


I have a 3 year old and a 9 month old and my wife worked this past sunday. I worked out while the 9 month old took a nap and i took my 3 year old out into the garage. He played in the garage/driveway while i exercised (~ an hour)... granted i had to stop every now and then but it was great.

It can be done.

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ryuns
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Post by ryuns » Mon Apr 11, 2011 10:11 am

I think there have been some great suggestions for effective, high intensity workouts that can be done in only about 10 minutes. I will throw in the caveat that for a short workout to be effective, it needs to HARD. And before you do something HARD, you really should take 10 minutes of calisthenics and light stretching to get warmed up.

I think the goal should be 20 to 30 minutes (including warmup), but in that amount of time, if you're ready to work hard, you can get a great workout.

Ryan
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CFM300
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.

Post by CFM300 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 12:46 pm

I should add that it's also possible to build significant strength using 10 minute workouts as well.

Volume can come from lifting every day, e.g. Pavel's deadlift / press routine. Every day, do 2 sets of 5 reps of deadlift and 2 sets of 5 reps of overhead press. Begin with a light weight, and increase the weight slightly for the next two days. Then drop the weight back to the prior day's load and continue. E.g., 300, 310, 320, 310, 320, 330, 320, 330, 340, 330, etc.

Or go the high volume, high intensity route. Some examples:

-Do as many reps as possible in 10 minutes using a major lift like squat, deadlift, overhead press, clean, chin-ups, dips. Some goals to shoot for: Deadlift 1.5 times your bodyweight for 100 reps in 10 minutes. Clean your bodyweight 50 times in 10 minutes. Get 70 dead-hang chin-ups.

-Load a bar to your bodyweight and see if you can squat it 50 times without racking the bar for rest.

-Spend 7 minutes warming up, and then do set of 20 rep squats with the weight you think you can do 10 reps with moderate of effort. Increase the weight 10 pounds each workout.

You get the idea.

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Post by rasputin » Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:19 pm

since you have kids, i'd recommend trying to find a way to incorporate them. i'm thinking a jogging stroller or a trip to the park were you can do exercise while they play nearby.

i commute by bike. instead of spending an hour on a train, i spend time on my bike. makes time investment sense :)

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SamGamgee
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Post by SamGamgee » Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:24 pm

If you can only find 10-minute intervals to exercise, why not try to fit them in twice a day? There's nothing that says you can't exercise for 10 minutes, 14 times a week.

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Post by marco1910 » Mon Apr 11, 2011 1:30 pm

There are tons of great workouts that can be done in 10 mins..here is on

10 mins (as many reps as you can)

20 yards broad jumps
30 Kettlebell swings (53 pounds)
30 Double Unders (Jump ropes)


This is a Crossfit workout that is great metabolic conditioning

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