What expenditures improved your happiness/quality of life?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
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mostly_lurking
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What expenditures improved your happiness/quality of life?

Post by mostly_lurking »

If someone has the good fortune to have some extra discretionary income, what ideas can bogleheads recommend as making the most difference in their quality of life or general happiness?
We all know we should save lots and give some to worthy causes, but I'm most interested in getting ideas for spending some "fun" money wisely. Let's keep it somewhat realistic, say ~$100-$1,000/month.
Of course, there are lots of ways one could easily spend that kind of money, either in one fell swoop (e.g., home renovation, 2nd car, an extra/fancier vacation) or a little at a time (e.g., eating out, the latest electronics, yard help, cleaning service, cable, lots of lattes). There are probably many more that I haven't even thought of.
Which ones do you splurge on and find to be have made the biggest difference in your life?
scouter
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Post by scouter »

A really great bed. (memory foam mattress)
Dandy
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Post by Dandy »

recently I bought a new TV, internet Blu Ray DVD and wireless router. Being able to stream Nextflix direct to my TV has been great. I no longer have to scour the TV listings to find some program to watch (and usually settle for something marginal). You can get unlimited DVDs and streaming for about $10/month.

Next up a snow blower- getting too old to keep shoveling.

Vacation/Travel, dinning out and central air make me smile.
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mikestorm
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Post by mikestorm »

I bought a motorcycle. Got a good deal too which helps to augment my enjoyment.
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schnoodlemom
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Post by schnoodlemom »

For us:,#1 travel/vacations as a couple/family. #2 enrichment experiences like music lessons, photography class, summer camps, gym membership, tae kwon do, ski club. In order to do these "extras", we delay gratification in other areas, but we don't shirk college/retirement savings and giving.
traumamoma
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quality of life

Post by traumamoma »

Anything that can be shared with your significant other. In my case it was a boat. Boating is something that my wife and I enjoy tremendously as a couple. No kids, rarely with friends, our most enjoyable times are just the 2 of us floating on the lake spending time together. Its been a life changer for us. Peter
supersharpie
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Post by supersharpie »

1. Laptop

2. LCD TV w/PS3 (bought them 2.5 years ago and have gotten thousands of hours of entertainment out of the investment)

3. Monthly Netflix subscription (best value in entertainment)

4. Our five year old Welsh Pembroke Corgi named Pumpkin (purebred, she cost $800 in 2006 and is worth every penny, my wife is particularly attached to her)

5. A selection of Bob's Red Mill Gluten Free Flours and mixes on sale through amazon...my wife was diagnosed with Celiac Disease and, due to this purchase, discovered a delicious pizza recipe that is both cheap and tasty (she previously was spending about $8 a pop for personal size pizzas at a near-by Gluten Free bakery)

6. The Harry Potter Blu-Ray Collection (Years 1-6) for under $30 on Amazon...for the kid in all of us, being transported to Hogwarts for a few hours can really take the edge off of a tough day!
likegarden
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Post by likegarden »

You can easily spend $100/mo extra on your landscape in supplies, hardscape, trees. bushes and perennials, install all yourself and by that spend more time outside and become healthier, plus increase curb appeal and value of your home. For me yardwork is very relaxing!
ResNullius
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Post by ResNullius »

This might sound corny, but giving money to our favorite charities is one of the most enjoying things we do with out money. We don't have tons of money, but we give what we can to organizations that actually seem to make a difference.
Ron
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Post by Ron »

ResNullius wrote:This might sound corny, but giving money to our favorite charities is one of the most enjoying things we do with out money. We don't have tons of money, but we give what we can to organizations that actually seem to make a difference.
:thumbsup

- Ron
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mikestorm
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Post by mikestorm »

Bernd wrote:You can easily spend $100/mo extra on your landscape in supplies, hardscape, trees. bushes and perennials, install all yourself and by that spend more time outside and become healthier, plus increase curb appeal and value of your home. For me yardwork is very relaxing!
Actually, I've sort of done this as well. I used to pay a landscaper just under $1000 a year for mowing + fall cleanup. I decided that this was a horrible expenditure and that I was young, healthy, and there was no reason why I couldn't do this myself.

I got to thinking why I hated yardwork, and decided that what put me off was the exhausting mowing in sweltering heat week after week, plus the backbreaking raking every fall. And the landscaping companies, with their backpack blowers and riding tractors, did it much more efficiently.

However, I disliked how they mowed my lawn. They mowed it too low, and it burned in the summer. They also ran a mower over it (and charged me) week after week even when it clearly didn't need to be mowed. I decided that the $1000 per season I was spending just wasn't providing enough value anymore.

So, a few years back, I bought an old riding tractor from CL for $400 delivered and put another $120 in it for new blades, sparkplug, air filter, fuel filter, battery, battery tender, oil change, starter and solenoid (all work done by me) and the thing starts right up. I waited for the gas powered backpack blowers to go on sale and picked up a really good one for $200. Finally, another $200 for a gas powered edger/trimmer plus hedge clipper attachment. The total cost was pretty much exactly what I'd pay my landscaper for one season.

That was three seasons ago. I now do all my own yardwork for the cost of gasoline plus an oil change at the beginning of each season. What was once a hassle is now pretty darn relaxing.
tnf
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Post by tnf »

supersharpie wrote:1. Laptop

3. Monthly Netflix subscription (best value in entertainment)

4. Our five year old Welsh Pembroke Corgi named Pumpkin (purebred, she cost $800 in 2006 and is worth every penny, my wife is particularly attached to her)
Loved your post, ditto to a lot of the things you wrote.

> 100$
1. 9 year old Golden Retriever named Pumpkin. She is so much fun.

2. Dumping my MS Windows based PC and migrating to the Mac Mini and the MacOS

3. A 2010 Acura TL AWD with the awesome audio system in the Tech Pkg, and some DVD-As. (If you've been good and saved a bunch, this still qualifies within OPs limits)

4. yard work, for all the reasons the previous posters listed.

< $100

5. gym membership to beat the hell out of a small ball in a court with friends. javascript:emoticon(':D')

6. Verizon FIOS

7. Netflix

8. Spending time and a little bit to learn something new, a hobby or such

Some of the best things are almost free...remember to support this site through your Amazon purchases via the link on the top right of the page.
Valuethinker
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Re: What expenditures improved your happiness/quality of lif

Post by Valuethinker »

mostly_lurking wrote:If someone has the good fortune to have some extra discretionary income, what ideas can bogleheads recommend as making the most difference in their quality of life or general happiness?
We all know we should save lots and give some to worthy causes, but I'm most interested in getting ideas for spending some "fun" money wisely. Let's keep it somewhat realistic, say ~$100-$1,000/month.
Of course, there are lots of ways one could easily spend that kind of money, either in one fell swoop (e.g., home renovation, 2nd car, an extra/fancier vacation) or a little at a time (e.g., eating out, the latest electronics, yard help, cleaning service, cable, lots of lattes). There are probably many more that I haven't even thought of.
Which ones do you splurge on and find to be have made the biggest difference in your life?
1. new stereo. Not expensive as stereos go (USD 1000ish) but more and better quality music. Every time I put something classical or jazz on, I think how much I am enjoying the sound. You get a lot going from $500 to $1000. I think you'd need to spend $3000 or more after that.

2. live theatre and visits to museums

3. travel-- I've been very fortunate

4. living in 2 neighbourhoods I really like (an expensive decision, the tradeoff was a smaller home, no car)

5. small and friendly neighbourhood restaurants and cafes rather than flash ones or fast food or Starbucks. We've pretty much expunged fast food from our lives

We'll see how the renovations go, but we are adding space (which theoretically is the only thing you can do to a house, other than decluttering and a fresh coat of off white paint, that adds any value).
RichC
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Post by RichC »

Convertible - Honda S2000.

Bought it in 2002 and only have about 23,000 miles on it. I don't drive it much by it gives me great pleasure when I do.

And it has given my high school son some pleasure too...
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Midwest_Investor
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Post by Midwest_Investor »

The Adoption of my Daughter.
waitforit
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Post by waitforit »

60 acres of recreational land.

Great hunting, and some of it is tillable which I've rented for income. It has timber (some of which I will sell in the future as it gets over-mature and starts dying). I like managing my little slice of heaven.. cutting trails, removing invasive species, etc. When I'm an old(er) man I'd like to dabble in farming but with young kids it isn't in the cards for me right now.

I like to plant stuff.. I started grafting fruit trees and so this is a match made in heaven. 70 apple, pear, and plum trees to transplant next spring.

I also like to make wine from various fruits and so this land will be a nice tie-in to that too (have some vines ordered for next year).

Other thing that I learned in the last few years is eating GOOD food. I buy premium raw ingredients now (real peanut butter, salad greens vs salad in a bag, etc) and this has been a real benefit.
Fallible
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Re: What expenditures improved your happiness/quality of lif

Post by Fallible »

mostly_lurking wrote:If someone has the good fortune to have some extra discretionary income, what ideas can bogleheads recommend as making the most difference in their quality of life or general happiness?
We all know we should save lots and give some to worthy causes, but I'm most interested in getting ideas for spending some "fun" money wisely. Let's keep it somewhat realistic, say ~$100-$1,000/month.
Of course, there are lots of ways one could easily spend that kind of money, either in one fell swoop (e.g., home renovation, 2nd car, an extra/fancier vacation) or a little at a time (e.g., eating out, the latest electronics, yard help, cleaning service, cable, lots of lattes). There are probably many more that I haven't even thought of.
Which ones do you splurge on and find to be have made the biggest difference in your life?
How about saving that "extra discretionary income" for the next financial crisis (and it will come) and spending no money to improve your happiness/quality of life? I mean volunteering for worthy causes that can leave not only you happy and fulfilled, but those you've helped.
nokkieny
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Post by nokkieny »

netflix
dual monitors
eating out
owning a house, I enjoy doing yard work and maintenance, I would rather have a full plate of chores on a saturday than be sitting around watching TV.
an accountant, but that probably saves me money
Last edited by nokkieny on Sun Jan 16, 2011 1:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Opponent Process
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Post by Opponent Process »

anything related to exercise. older folks keep saying that health becomes a #1 priority and I'm starting to believe them.
30/30/20/20 | US/International/Bonds/TIPS | Average Age=37
nokkieny
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Re: What expenditures improved your happiness/quality of lif

Post by nokkieny »

Fallible wrote: How about saving that "extra discretionary income" for the next financial crisis (and it will come) and spending no money to improve your happiness/quality of life? I mean volunteering for worthy causes that can leave not only you happy and fulfilled, but those you've helped.
As long as you aren't saving it in US dollars, otherwise it might be better spent now :p
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Fletch
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Post by Fletch »

ResNullius wrote:This might sound corny, but giving money to our favorite charities is one of the most enjoying things we do with out money. We don't have tons of money, but we give what we can to organizations that actually seem to make a difference.
My wife and I agree with you that charitable giving makes us most joyful.

Secondly, buying things for our adult children that they would not have the extra cash to afford; helps improve the quality of their families' lives.

... Fletch
“Meaningless! Meaningless!” says the Teacher. Whoever loves money never has enough; whoever loves wealth is never satisfied with their income. This too is meaningless.
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Taylor Larimore
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A world cruise

Post by Taylor Larimore »

Hi ML:

When Pat and I retired, we had saved enough (thanks to Jack Bogle) to take a 3-month cruise around-the-world on Holland America's, SS Rotterdam.

It was a wonderful experience we will always treasure.
"Simplicity is the master key to financial success." -- Jack Bogle
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jidina80
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Post by jidina80 »

1. Electric garage door opener.

2. Sea kayak.

3. Pizza stone.
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NAVigator
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Post by NAVigator »

I get the most enjoyment from things that add to my life; books, movies through Netflix, and my hobby. For me that is amateur radio. I learn all I can about the hobby. I have joined ham radio clubs and have met some great people as a result. I have made contacts in many countries, making the world smaller.

Bring enjoyment into your life and share it with others.

Jerry
"I was born with nothing and I have most of it left."
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femur
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Post by femur »

I have several that i have done that add value and happiness to my life:

1. A dachshund.
2. A complete genetic profile (very interesting health and ancestry info).
3. An eBook (like the Kindle)
4. A really good matress.
5. Any travel/museums/learning experience.
6. Tango lessons.
7. Fruit trees.
8. A cat.
9. Good running shoes.
10. A very nice hunting rifle.
11. Very good fruit/produce.
12. Zen Meditation retreat.
13. Ski trip.
14. A professional massage.
shuchong
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Post by shuchong »

Autostart.

This is only a big deal if you live in a cold climate, but if you do, it's worth every penny. Allows you to turn your car on from indoors, and skip those first few minutes where it's -20 inside your car.
mark500
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Post by mark500 »

10% to charity.

Family vacation.
stan1
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Post by stan1 »

Travel to many places around the world - no question that's at the top of my list.
Topic Author
mostly_lurking
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Post by mostly_lurking »

Thanks for so many great responses.
btenny
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Post by btenny »

I bought a part ownership in several mountain condos when we were young for investment purposes. While we repaired them and sold off the units we discovered we liked to go to the mountains for fun as well so we kept one unit long term. We rented them out part time when we did not use them to cover most of the expenses. Thus out costs were just travel costs to get there plus our labor to do upkeep and repairs. It turned out to be great family spot to go in the summers and winters for family vacations and so forth.

I taught both my kids to fish in mountain streams and hike and bike the trails. They are both good snow skiers as well due to all the time we spent playing there in the winters.

When my kids were grown and off on their own we sold that condo and made a good profit on our initial costs. I think we made 10X profit over 25+ years. Overall it was just a great investment and a good expense as we had wonderful family times using that condo......

The initial costs to buy that particular condo was $5K as I remember.

Bill
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Post by KlangFool »

TS,

A nice cup or two coffee everyday. You can get gourmet freshly roasted coffee for about $15 per pound shipped straight to you. I consumed about one pound per week.

You can get a VERY GOOD coffee grinder for about $300 to $500. If you are even more picky, you can get a home roaster to roast your own coffee..

Ditto on you can brew your own beer. Blend your own wine and so on...

http://www.beveragefactory.com/coffee/e ... lack.shtml

If you are into coffee, you can get a fully automatic coffee brewer / grinder.

KlangFool
Fallible
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Post by Fallible »

femur wrote:I have several that i have done that add value and happiness to my life:

1. A dachshund.
2. A complete genetic profile (very interesting health and ancestry info).
3. An eBook (like the Kindle)
4. A really good matress.
5. Any travel/museums/learning experience.
6. Tango lessons.
7. Fruit trees.
8. A cat.
9. Good running shoes.
10. A very nice hunting rifle.
11. Very good fruit/produce.
12. Zen Meditation retreat.
13. Ski trip.
14. A professional massage.
A dog tops your list and a cat is No. 8??!!! Hope your cat doesn't see this....

(Cat and former dog owner)
protagonist
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Post by protagonist »

Losing 50% of my assets to my ex-wife in divorce.
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Steelersfan
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Post by Steelersfan »

It's a tie between my DVR and my large LCD hi-def flat screen TV.
maxinout
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Post by maxinout »

Definitely our 50" plasma and Fios with every channel they offer.
protagonist
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Post by protagonist »

protagonist wrote:Losing 50% of my assets to my ex-wife in divorce.
Also anything ever spent on children (with the possible exception of "Life-Size Barbie"??), and a vintage 1955 Selmer Mark VI tenor sax, which the ex-wife didn't get.
nokkieny
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Post by nokkieny »

protagonist wrote:
protagonist wrote:Losing 50% of my assets to my ex-wife in divorce.
Also anything ever spent on children (with the possible exception of "Life-Size Barbie"??), and a vintage 1955 Selmer Mark VI tenor sax, which the ex-wife didn't get.
Probably the first laugh I got on this forum so far, everyone is so serious, DIVERSIFY DIVERSIFY
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chuck-lyn
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Post by chuck-lyn »

I really enjoy treating the family to a good meal out after one of my granddaughter's basketball games.
tim1999
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Post by tim1999 »

private golf club membership
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touchdowntodd
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Post by touchdowntodd »

$250 for my pure bread mini dauchsund... nothing brings me and my wife joy with little effort like she does, especially with us being a few years from affording a child

more than that for my 63 impala LOL.. but every time im behind the wheel i dont have a problem in the world..
Atilla
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Post by Atilla »

Making the decision to give a significant portion of my income away was the best financial/mental health/spiritual decision I ever made. Letting go of your money with no reservations frees you in a lot of ways.
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Post by ossipago »

touchdowntodd wrote:$250 for my pure bread mini dauchsund.
Yum ...
Grasshopper
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Post by Grasshopper »

Atilla wrote:Making the decision to give a significant portion of my income away was the best financial/mental health/spiritual decision I ever made. Letting go of your money with no reservations frees you in a lot of ways.
I believe the return on giving is 10X. I know Ms G and I are truly blessed from tithing of our money, time and love.
yobria
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Post by yobria »

I don't splurge, which to me means "wasting money".

I have a set of discretionary things money can buy that increase the quality of my life: travel, media/entertainment, food/dining out, outdoors (biking/snowboarding), spending money on others, etc.

Any money beyond this is saved. If I make more money, I just save more.

Nick
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Post by VictoriaF »

Attendance of Bogleheads reunions.

Victoria
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Tyrobi
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Post by Tyrobi »

Travel with family is the top of my list. Even better, spread out even more months or year and travel abroad such as Latin America or Asia. Those experiences and memories are well worth it.
Three-fund portfolio | "Simplicity is the master key to financial success." John C. Bogle
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Re: What expenditures improved your happiness/quality of lif

Post by bob90245 »

Re: What expenditures improved your happiness/quality of life?

Paying for my community college education improved my happiness/quality of life by gaining an entry-level job in my field. Paying for my upper-level 4-year college further improved my happiness/quality of life by gaining a professional position in my field.

From there, I was able to start my saving and investing program which has enabled me on the path to financial independence. (Not there yet, but closer every year.) Everything else is icing on the cake.
Ignore the market noise. Keep to your rebalancing schedule whether that is semi-annual, annual or trigger bands.
supersharpie
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Re: What expenditures improved your happiness/quality of lif

Post by supersharpie »

Fallible wrote:
mostly_lurking wrote:If someone has the good fortune to have some extra discretionary income, what ideas can bogleheads recommend as making the most difference in their quality of life or general happiness?
We all know we should save lots and give some to worthy causes, but I'm most interested in getting ideas for spending some "fun" money wisely. Let's keep it somewhat realistic, say ~$100-$1,000/month.
Of course, there are lots of ways one could easily spend that kind of money, either in one fell swoop (e.g., home renovation, 2nd car, an extra/fancier vacation) or a little at a time (e.g., eating out, the latest electronics, yard help, cleaning service, cable, lots of lattes). There are probably many more that I haven't even thought of.
Which ones do you splurge on and find to be have made the biggest difference in your life?
How about saving that "extra discretionary income" for the next financial crisis (and it will come) and spending no money to improve your happiness/quality of life? I mean volunteering for worthy causes that can leave not only you happy and fulfilled, but those you've helped.
Because life is short and is about more than investing?
supersharpie
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Post by supersharpie »

yobria wrote:I don't splurge, which to me means "wasting money".

I have a set of discretionary things money can buy that increase the quality of my life: travel, media/entertainment, food/dining out, outdoors (biking/snowboarding), spending money on others, etc.

Any money beyond this is saved. If I make more money, I just save more.

Nick
Why deny yourself? What's the point of dying a multi-millionaire? You can't take it with...although you can give it away I suppose.
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norookie
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Post by norookie »

Fallible wrote:
femur wrote:I have several that i have done that add value and happiness to my life:

1. A dachshund.
2. A complete genetic profile (very interesting health and ancestry info).
3. An eBook (like the Kindle)
4. A really good matress.
5. Any travel/museums/learning experience.
6. Tango lessons.
7. Fruit trees.
8. A cat.
9. Good running shoes.
10. A very nice hunting rifle.
11. Very good fruit/produce.
12. Zen Meditation retreat.
13. Ski trip.
14. A professional massage.
A dog tops your list and a cat is No. 8??!!! Hope your cat doesn't see this....

(Cat and former dog owner)
:D O' Come on!!!!! dogs know what your talking about. A cat......I mean. Its laying down in front of you, remembers it has a appointment in another room. Gets up and sprints like lightning next to a plant upstairs and lays down having kept the appointment. :roll: OP,your Question-> ETA: This newer PC diplays stuff in blue shades on BHeads. The older one did'nt. I still need another 1st gen unibody Macbook pro. This little 13" macbook is to small.
" Wealth usually leads to excess " Cicero 55 b.c
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