9mm pistol for lefty at a shooting range?

Questions on how we spend our money and our time - consumer goods and services, home and vehicle, leisure and recreational activities
User avatar
Topic Author
topper1296
Posts: 684
Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2009 10:50 pm
Location: Nashville TN

9mm pistol for lefty at a shooting range?

Post by topper1296 » Sun Sep 19, 2010 10:17 am

I went to a shooting range for the first time last week with some friends and it was really fun. I have never done anything like that before, but I would like to go back maybe once or twice a month to do it again. I shot a 9mm and I am considering getting my own so I don't have to rent one at the range. Anybody on here have any recommendations for a lefty (good location of safety, clip release, slide release, not having hot shells fall on my right arm)? I shot semi-autos, but I wouldn't be opposed to a revolver (but still need to try one of those). If it helps any, I shot a Ruger, Glock, Sig, and Beretta and they all had 9mm rounds. I don't have enough experience or didn't fire enough rounds to develop a strong preference for any one of them and I'm sure there are others brands out there as well I didn't get to try. I would like to place an emphasis on being low maintenance and reliability (I've read that Glock is good for this).

User avatar
Adrian Nenu
Posts: 5228
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2007 6:27 pm

Post by Adrian Nenu » Sun Sep 19, 2010 10:36 am

Over 60% of US law enforcement agencies use some type of Glock model. There are many good reasons for this. My agency uses the Glock model 21, 30 and 36. I own Glock models 19 and 36 for personal social use. My recommendation is to handle each Glock model at a gun show and see which best fits your hands and needs. I prefer the Glocks chambered for the .45 ACP.

Adrian
anenu@tampabay.rr.com

SteveB3005
Posts: 1425
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 9:29 pm

Post by SteveB3005 » Sun Sep 19, 2010 10:56 am

I agree with Adrian. In those special "social use" occasions, it's better to be a little overdressed than underdressed, go with a .45 in black.

User avatar
norookie
Posts: 3016
Joined: Tue Jul 07, 2009 1:55 pm

Post by norookie » Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:11 am

They all have the same maintenance. Reliability is another factor. Glocks are nice. Had a 17, gen 2. A 36, gen 1.(.45acp) Most Glocks have generations as well as number I.D's. I know the 17 had 3 generations at least IIRC. What did I keep? Ruger P-series 93, and 95. I thought glocks were over priced and got my money back moving to a state where glocks are hard to come by :roll: . You can only buy them on the used Mkt here now where they command a premium :wink: . The Ruger P95 is now a ARMY police firearm after they got a .gov contract a while back. Google it. They are fairly inexpensive too. I'd also add the .gov as well as police buy for price per unit, not quality. Quality is the older sigs like a 226. IMO. As you can see I prefer 9mm's. Ruger has a new line also, no longer the P-Series only AFAIK. I too would suggest trying all at a rental location. ETA Rugers have mag releases on both sides FWIW.
Last edited by norookie on Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:33 am, edited 2 times in total.
" Wealth usually leads to excess " Cicero 55 b.c

kenbrumy
Posts: 394
Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 5:13 pm

Post by kenbrumy » Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:12 am

Shooting revolvers and automatics are pretty much ambidextrous. The only left-right handed issues are where the buttons are and how shells are ejected (autos only). Many autos eject straight up so that shouldn't be an issue. I will frequently fire with both hands.

I don't know if specific handgun models are available in left handed models. I know you can buy left handed rifles. There's nothing like the thrill of firing an semi automatic rifle left handed and watching the bolt come back to scoop your eye out. :o

Before you decide to go left or right handed, figure out which is your dominant eye. I'm left handed but right eye dominant. Rather than retrain my eye, the inconvenience of shooting right handed isn't much of an issue for me.

9 mm ammo is far cheaper than most other handgun ammo except 22 cal, of course. If your primary goal is shooting a "real gun" at the range you'll find a 9 mm will save a good bit of money. For personal protection it's hard to argue with a 44, 45 or 357 mag.

User avatar
bottlecap
Posts: 6419
Joined: Tue Mar 06, 2007 11:21 pm
Location: Tennessee

Post by bottlecap » Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:14 am

I can't help with "lefty" guns, but a 9mm for target is good. Not as easy to shot as a .45, but cheaper ammo.

Nearly all modern guns was reliable and low maintenance. Some are better than others, but I don't think you can go wrong with any of those you mention. I owned a Glock .40 once and really didn't like the feel and accuracy of it. It wasn't very forgiving for prolonged target practice and I just didn't shoot it as well as some other guns. Well made, but just not for me.

If you do go with the .45, don't mess around - just get a 1911. Not only are they elegant, they easy to shoot and very comfortable. To boot, they are manufactured in a variety of forms, including ones for left handers.

Oh, and go take a shooting course or take some lessons. Not only will you get safety training, they will show you how to shoot. It will make shooting much more enjoyable for you and increase your learning curve, rather than spending your first 8,000 learning it yourself. You could do this before you buy and I bet the range or instructor will let you try out some rental guns.

Good luck,

JT

rustymutt
Posts: 3948
Joined: Sat Mar 07, 2009 12:03 pm

Post by rustymutt » Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:26 am

SteveB3005 wrote:I agree with Adrian. In those special "social use" occasions, it's better to be a little overdressed than underdressed, go with a .45 in black.
I would have to respectfully disagree with black being the better socially used occasional piece. Stainless is much social acceptable to other because of it's durability and shiny rich luster. I also would consider a 9mm more of a personal special use piece.
Even educators need education. And some can be hard headed to the point of needing time out.

snowwing
Posts: 6
Joined: Sat Mar 13, 2010 5:19 pm

Post by snowwing » Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:28 am

My Beretta 92F (9MM) is "reversible" In fact I am right handed but found it easier to release the magazine on the right side as I have small hands. Glocks are nice. Colts are nice. I prefer my Beretta. Be careful and Good Luck!.
Ron

SteveB3005
Posts: 1425
Joined: Mon Feb 19, 2007 9:29 pm

Post by SteveB3005 » Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:37 am

Don't know your price range, but HECKLER AND KOCH makes some nice pistols and have both 9mm and .45 ACP left hand models for around $700 to $900 new.

User avatar
3CT_Paddler
Posts: 3299
Joined: Wed Feb 04, 2009 5:28 pm
Location: Marietta, GA

Post by 3CT_Paddler » Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:51 am

If you are looking for value... I like the Ruger P95. It just depends on what you are willing to spend.

teacher_in_tx
Posts: 243
Joined: Fri May 07, 2010 8:13 pm

Post by teacher_in_tx » Sun Sep 19, 2010 12:48 pm

SteveB3005 wrote:Don't know your price range, but HECKLER AND KOCH makes some nice pistols and have both 9mm and .45 ACP left hand models for around $700 to $900 new.
+1 for the HK USPC.

-mike

User avatar
BigD53
Posts: 1042
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 7:47 pm

Post by BigD53 » Sun Sep 19, 2010 1:03 pm

For the ultimate in simplicity and reliability, a good revolver. Ruger or Smith & Wesson.

With the Glock, for left handed shooters we were trained to press the mag release button with the trigger finger. It takes practice and you may have to shift the pistol in your hand a bit, but it becomes second nature.

As for the slide, (regardless of right or left hand shooter) the free hand is used to release the Glock slide... pulling it back slightly, and letting it fly forward. We never used the small slide release lever.
Last edited by BigD53 on Sun Sep 19, 2010 1:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Gekko
Posts: 3779
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 5:00 pm
Location: USA

Post by Gekko » Sun Sep 19, 2010 1:05 pm

SteveB3005 wrote:Don't know your price range, but HECKLER AND KOCH makes some nice pistols and have both 9mm and .45 ACP left hand models for around $700 to $900 new.
i was thinking the same thing. Vincent's gun of choice in "Collateral".

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bI1_-a0coag

User avatar
BigD53
Posts: 1042
Joined: Sat Jul 21, 2007 7:47 pm

Post by BigD53 » Sun Sep 19, 2010 1:09 pm

SteveB3005 wrote:Don't know your price range, but HECKLER AND KOCH makes some nice pistols and have both 9mm and .45 ACP left hand models for around $700 to $900 new.
You can get a nice simple Glock for $450-$500, and spend the rest on ammo. 8)

User avatar
dratkinson
Posts: 4940
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:23 pm
Location: Centennial CO

Post by dratkinson » Sun Sep 19, 2010 1:36 pm

Police officers that use a firearm larger than 9mm do so for the increased stopping power. That's good enough for me. When I talked to a local sheriff's deputy, he was using a .45 Glock.

For home defense, a double-action (DA) revolver is the most foolproof design. Just point and shoot and usable by either hand. Shot placement is more important than large magazines expended that miss the mark.

The 10mm is probably too big for the homeowner. It was designed to penetrate barricades, car doors to reach the bad guy hiding on the other side. This capability is not required by the homeowner facing an intruder.

While a DA revolver is recommended for home defense, I wouldn't turn down a nice military standard (uses interchangeable parts) 1911 .45 ACP. For an automatic, they are slim (single-stack magazine) have a reputation for being almost foolproof, very rugged, and are easy to strip and clean.

Problems with the original 1911 are (1) the thumb safety is for right-handed users and (2) they are not DA (which keeps the design simple), so either it is kept unchambered, or chambered and with thumb safety engaged. As the 1911 also has a second grip safety, a chambered round is not really a big problem for the trained user---just pick it up (engaging the grip safety) and click off the thumb safety (if it was on). Also, chambering a 1911 in a quiet house (or racking a shotgun) is akin to a rattlesnake's warning. A wise intruder will flee.

Stopping power, how much is enough?

A Beginner's Guide to Stopping Power: http://www.chuckhawks.com/beginners_stopping_power.htm

"The famous 125 grain .357 JHP [jacketed hollow point] bullet, the most effective one shot stopper of all handgun loads, penetrates 13.25" in ordinance gelatin and produces a football shaped stretch cavity. This is how the very best bullets perform. And bullet performance has a great effect on stopping power."

Rounds larger than 125 grain are not recommended in .357 for home defense as they will over-penetrate and pass through an intruder. However, larger rounds are appropriate for small game hunting---small deer, coyote,....

.357 Magnum: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.357_Magnum

"Revolvers in .357 Magnum caliber have the significant advantage of also being able to fire .38 Special ammunition, with its lower cost, recoil, noise, and muzzle flash. This trait makes .357 revolvers ideal for novice shooters who are not yet used to firing full-strength .357 loads but do not want the expense of buying a second lower-powered gun to train with."

Ammunition for the Self-Defense Firearm: http://www.chuckhawks.com/ammo_by_anonymous.htm

Whatever you choose for home defense, use good ammo and practice, practice, practice.



The decision to use deadly force.

Choosing a firearm and practicing is the fun stuff.

The hard stuff is deciding to use deadly force for self-defense/home defense.

If you keep a firearm for home defense, be absolutely certain you can use it WHEN the need arises as you don't want it taken from you and used against you.

If someone breaks into you home, then the need for deadly force HAS arisen. You must be absolutely clear in your mind that an intruder's only purpose in being there is they intend you harm and that deadly force is required to protect your life and the life of you family. This is why you must make this decision BEFORE the event, not during the event.

If you can not use deadly force against any and all intruders, then don't keep a firearm around.

In Colorado, we have a "Make My Day" law and it is an "affirmative defense" to kill any intruder in your home---even if the intruder is known to you. This law was recently upheld when an angry neighbor wielding a baseball bat tried to break into a home. The homeowner shot the man on his front porch, through his front door, using his shotgun.

For home defense with a firearm, you must make the decision to use deadly force, BEFORE the need arises.



I may have strayed beyond the original intent of the OP.

When you find you lefty 9mm, the above links should recommend some good ammo for you.
Last edited by dratkinson on Sun Sep 19, 2010 2:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
burnsh
Posts: 145
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 3:09 pm
Location: San Antonio, TX

Post by burnsh » Sun Sep 19, 2010 2:26 pm

Go to a gun show and try to handle as many guns as you can. Pay special attention to how comfortable they feel in your hand (keep in mind some of the new pistols out there have interchangeable modular grips), then try to find a gun club or friend that has the model's you liked and shoot them first. Some guns that seem fine when carrying them feel different when pulling the trigger and controlling them, and as you already noticed, some guns tend to discard casings sideways, and some upward. Most semi-autos have switchable magazine release from right to left. Some semi-autos will also have an ambidextrous safety (personally I don't care for guns with safeties). But a lot of left handed shooters just learn to manipulate right handed controls. For target shooting a 9mm is great and you can use for dual home defense purpose with the right ammunition. For pure target practice I enjoy more shooting .22 caliber pistols (plus it's even cheaper). Revolvers make great target and home defense guns, and with an .357 magnum you can also shoot .38 rounds. They do make some left handed revolvers (Charter Arms if I'm not mistaken), but again, most lefties just learn to manipulate the right handed gun.
Burnsh | ______________________________________ | VFIAX 17%, VVIAX 17%, VEXAX 16%, VTIAX 21%, VGSIX 9%, VIPSX 10%, VBMFX 10%

User avatar
shmidds
Posts: 180
Joined: Fri Jun 12, 2009 6:25 pm

Post by shmidds » Sun Sep 19, 2010 4:21 pm

lefty here, and I love the feel of the Springfield xdm.

kraftwerk
Posts: 180
Joined: Sat Aug 04, 2007 10:56 pm

Post by kraftwerk » Sun Sep 19, 2010 4:32 pm

Just buy a Glock 19. There is no safety and if you want to release the slide just pull it back slingshot style. It's the Honda Civic of handguns. Can't go wrong.

etienne1
Posts: 72
Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2010 8:18 am

Re: 9mm pistol for lefty at a shoting range?

Post by etienne1 » Sun Sep 19, 2010 4:47 pm

topper1296 wrote:I went to a shooting range for the first time last week with some friends and it was really fun. I have never done anything like that before, but I would like to go back maybe once or twice a month to do it again. I shot a 9mm and I am considering getting my own so I don't have to rent one at the range. Anybody on here have any recommendations for a lefty (good location of safety, clip release, slide release, not having hot shells fall on my right arm)? I shot semi-autos, but I wouldn't be opposed to a revolver (but still need to try one of those). If it helps any, I shot a Ruger, Glock, Sig, and Beretta and they all had 9mm rounds. I don't have enough experience or didn't fire enough rounds to develop a strong preference for any one of them and I'm sure there are others brands out there as well I didn't get to try. I would like to place an emphasis on being low maintenance and reliability (I've read that Glock is good for this).
I do some shooting myself, but I really don't think there is such a thing as a lefty pistol. I'm left handed and have a colt 45 that would be considered right handed but it is not a problem for me to shoot left handed. I had a left handed Remingtom 1100 shotgun...but a pistol?

I like my .357 revolver. It is a Taurus model and very accurate, moreso than a 9mm imho. It's a powerful round but you can also shoot .38s which are cheaper. I use to be able to consistently hit pop cans at 30 feet, with open sights.

....addendum looking at some of the other posts, I guess there are, but my .357 is a right hander which I shoot right handed now that I think about it.

User avatar
gatorman
Posts: 2493
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:35 am
Location: The Swamp

Post by gatorman » Sun Sep 19, 2010 6:54 pm

I have a S&W 686, 4" bbl .357 Mag which is a very nice pistol for home defense. The nice thing about revolvers is their simplicity of use, no safety to worry about, no slide to rack, just point and pull the trigger. Disadvantages are smaller capacity (6 shots vs. 10 or more for a high capacity semi-auto) and slower reloading (even using speedloaders). S&W Revolvers are extremely accurate, but I'm not sure that makes much of a difference at the ranges at which most confrontations occur. I also own several semi-auto pistols, but I think that if I heard an intruder I'd probably reach for my revolver first. It is also my pistol of choice for road trips.

Ruger also makes some nice revolvers, but be careful about buying a used gun, some of the early Rugers would tend to discharge if dropped. I don't believe that caution applies to their modern design revolvers, but I'd still do some checking before buying. I'm not sufficiently familiar with Rossi or any of the other imports to say whether they would be suitable for self defense. Rossi pistols seem to get decent reviews in American Rifleman but I still think I would tend to stick with an American made revolver.

In semi-autos though there are plenty of quality choices, both foreign and domestic. SIG, H&K, Colt, Browning and S&W are all good choices.

The main thing is to get some instruction and then practice a lot. If you don't practice a lot, your chance of surviving a confrontation is much reduced, even trained police officers tend to scatter shots all over the place once a gunfight starts.

gatorman
Last edited by gatorman on Mon Sep 20, 2010 3:27 pm, edited 1 time in total.

hudson
Posts: 2913
Joined: Fri Apr 06, 2007 9:15 am

Re: 9mm pistol for lefty at a shoting range?

Post by hudson » Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:12 pm

topper1296 wrote:I went to a shooting range for the first time last week with some friends and it was really fun. I have never done anything like that before, but I would like to go back maybe once or twice a month to do it again. I shot a 9mm and I am considering getting my own so I don't have to rent one at the range. Anybody on here have any recommendations for a lefty (good location of safety, clip release, slide release, not having hot shells fall on my right arm)? I shot semi-autos, but I wouldn't be opposed to a revolver (but still need to try one of those). If it helps any, I shot a Ruger, Glock, Sig, and Beretta and they all had 9mm rounds. I don't have enough experience or didn't fire enough rounds to develop a strong preference for any one of them and I'm sure there are others brands out there as well I didn't get to try. I would like to place an emphasis on being low maintenance and reliability (I've read that Glock is good for this).
Consider a Ruger 22LR single action revolver. It's fun and cheap. You can't just empty the magazine; you pull the hammer back for every shot. After 6 shots, you empty the cylinder one empty at a time. It give you time to reflect on each shot. Since it's a revolver, I don't think it matters that you're left handed.

http://www.ruger.com/products/newModelS ... index.html
Last edited by hudson on Mon Sep 20, 2010 4:25 am, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
TxAg
Posts: 1672
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2009 11:09 am

Post by TxAg » Sun Sep 19, 2010 7:13 pm

I only perused through the replies...so my reading comprehension will be off. That said, I'd go with something like a Glock or a Springfield XD. 9 mm is a fine choice....don't let anyone talk you into a bigger, badder caliber. There are other guns that fall into this price range as well that would be fine. Something like a Kimber or H&K would probably be overkill for you.

If you're able to... shoot several different types of guns. The way the gun feels in your hand and they way you shoot it will play into your choice.
Last edited by TxAg on Sun Sep 19, 2010 10:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Culture
Posts: 248
Joined: Mon Nov 17, 2008 9:49 am
Location: Greater Houston, Texas

Post by Culture » Sun Sep 19, 2010 10:25 pm

Speaking as someone who has one of everything (almost literally), get a 9mm for your first centerfire handgun. Consider a .22 otherwise. Why? The best gun is the one you shoot often. 9mm ammo is 33% to 50% of the cost of anything else. Thus, you get to shoot at least twice as much and have twice the fun. I personally also think it is much easier for a beginner to shoot, as it has less recoil than other common handgun calibers (.45, .40, .357). It is similar in recoil to a 38 special.

You can get a perfectly serviceable new 9mm Taurus for $350. It will be more accurate that you are for several years, unless you are a shooting fanatic. Spend more money on the second gun you get.

.22 ammo is so cheap as to be unbelievable compared to anything else. You can get it for about 10-15% of the cost of 9 mm, per round. You can learn to shoot perfectly well using a .22. Don't get a .22 if you have any intent of using it for self defense. If shooting solely for fun at paper, like I do, they are wonderful handguns.

The more you shoot, the more often you will hit what you are shooting at.

Get a .45 or .40 for your second or third gun.

Despite what anyone tells you, a 9mm is perfectly fine for self defense also. I mean, a .45 is more powerful, but less powerful than a 357 magnum. However, a .44 magnum is more powerful than a 357 magnum. Perhaps a 454 Casull which is even more powerful than a .44 magnum? You get my drift? The question is "Is it powerful enough?" The 9mm (and variants) have been used by the worlds military powers of over 100 years, and is still the most widely use military pistol and sub-machine gun cartridge today. It is highly likely the most widely used by police officers also (The data is a little unclear).

User avatar
Adrian Nenu
Posts: 5228
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2007 6:27 pm

Post by Adrian Nenu » Sun Sep 19, 2010 11:56 pm

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewIt ... =191229336

A used Ruger Mark II in .22 lr. can be had for a reasonable price. It's a durable and fun training/plinking pistol.

Adrian
anenu@tampabay.rr.com

User avatar
TJAJ9
Posts: 1241
Joined: Sat Sep 12, 2009 3:37 am
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Post by TJAJ9 » Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:02 am

My favorite is the S&W 686 that holds 7 rounds.

Image

User avatar
gatorman
Posts: 2493
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:35 am
Location: The Swamp

Post by gatorman » Mon Sep 20, 2010 3:48 am

TJAJ9 wrote:My favorite is the S&W 686 that holds 7 rounds.

Image
The older version that holds 6 rounds, which is what I have, is also a very fine revolver, and might be available for a little less money. I paid $350 for mine, but that was 15 years ago.

You might also find a S&W 586, which is the blued steel version, for a little less.

gatorman

User avatar
TJAJ9
Posts: 1241
Joined: Sat Sep 12, 2009 3:37 am
Location: Philadelphia, PA

Post by TJAJ9 » Mon Sep 20, 2010 3:57 am

gatorman wrote:The older version that holds 6 rounds, which is what I have, is also a very fine revolver, and might be available for a little less money.
Definitely. You can't go wrong with a S&W revolver.

User avatar
Topic Author
topper1296
Posts: 684
Joined: Fri Apr 03, 2009 10:50 pm
Location: Nashville TN

Post by topper1296 » Mon Sep 20, 2010 7:28 am

Thanks for the responses everybody. The primary reason for the purchase will be for target shooting, but home defense is a secondary reason (that is why I don't want a 22). I also don't plan on carrying it with me and getting a concealed weapon permit, but I'm a never say never type of person. Lastly, I plan on taking some shooting lessons at a local range once I buy one.

Right now I am leaning towards a 9mm Glock or .357mag revolver where I plan to shoot mainly .38 special rounds in it. I am going to rent a .357 mag this week or next to see if I like it since I haven't ever fired a revolver. I have spent a lot of time researching on the net this past weekend and have read that revolvers are great for beginners because of simplicity, reliability, and low maintenance.

User avatar
gatorman
Posts: 2493
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:35 am
Location: The Swamp

Post by gatorman » Mon Sep 20, 2010 8:03 am

topper1296 wrote:Thanks for the responses everybody. The primary reason for the purchase will be for target shooting, but home defense is a secondary reason (that is why I don't want a 22). I also don't plan on carrying it with me and getting a concealed weapon permit, but I'm a never say never type of person. Lastly, I plan on taking some shooting lessons at a local range once I buy one.

Right now I am leaning towards a 9mm Glock or .357mag revolver where I plan to shoot mainly .38 special rounds in it. I am going to rent a .357 mag this week or next to see if I like it since I haven't ever fired a revolver. I have spent a lot of time researching on the net this past weekend and have read that revolvers are great for beginners because of simplicity, reliability, and low maintenance.
Make sure to buy some regular .38 special ammo, some +p .38 special ammo and a box of .357 magnum. Start with the regular .38s, then try the +p ammo and finish up with the .357 mag. There is a quantum leap in recoil and muzzle blast between the +p ammo and the .357 mag ammo. For that reason, I usually keep my revolver loaded with +p ammo, which is still quite potent, but is a lot more pleasant to shoot.

Have fun, shooting is a great hobby!

gatorman

Dagwood
Posts: 1026
Joined: Mon Mar 02, 2009 5:26 pm
Location: MD

Post by Dagwood » Mon Sep 20, 2010 9:59 am

topper1296 wrote:Thanks for the responses everybody. The primary reason for the purchase will be for target shooting, but home defense is a secondary reason (that is why I don't want a 22). I also don't plan on carrying it with me and getting a concealed weapon permit, but I'm a never say never type of person. Lastly, I plan on taking some shooting lessons at a local range once I buy one.

Right now I am leaning towards a 9mm Glock or .357mag revolver where I plan to shoot mainly .38 special rounds in it. I am going to rent a .357 mag this week or next to see if I like it since I haven't ever fired a revolver. I have spent a lot of time researching on the net this past weekend and have read that revolvers are great for beginners because of simplicity, reliability, and low maintenance.
Unless you are very comfortable with the handgun, and that will take time, for home defense a shotgun is better because it requires less accuracy. And when you are under pressure like that you would be under in a "home invasion" you don't want to have to rely on sub-par accuracy.

I wouldn't spend a lot of money on a handgun until you know that it is an interest that will stick and until you have spent some time firing different models. Spend time at a course or with a friend. Shows are fine, but there is sales pressure of some sort generally.

Larry Johnson
Posts: 183
Joined: Mon Dec 08, 2008 10:30 am
Location: Tulsa, Oklahoma

9 mm pistol

Post by Larry Johnson » Mon Sep 20, 2010 10:17 am

Pisotl shooting if fun and economical if all you are doing is punching holes in paper. In the back of everyone's mind owning a pistol is keeping it for self defense. In that case the only caliber to consider is the .45. During the early years the army used a .38 but had to abandon it because of its poor stopping power and went to the .45 1911 model. Now, the govt in its inherent stupidity abandoned the .45 and went to the 9mm, originally designed in 1898 for the king of all pistols, the Luger. Experience with the 9 mm now reveals its poor stopping power. A revolver, because of its limited capacity, leaves one in a perilous position. A client of mine exterminated two miscreants trying to rob and raper her. She got off one shot on the older one's stomach, then both of them grabbbed her and another shot went into the ceiling until her boyfriend woke up and joined the fray. Another shot went into the younger one's stomach and brain, and the other into the older one's face. Now out of ammo with a 5 shot revolver, she was essentially disarmed. Buy a good quality .45.

NateW
Posts: 448
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 11:44 am

Post by NateW » Mon Sep 20, 2010 10:33 am

I recently purchased a Baretta 92 FS (9 mm semi-auto) pistol. Prior to that I took the NRA Pistol Basics gun safety course and during that course I fired a pistol for the first time.

All I can speak to is the Baretta. I do believe it is set up so leftys can use it. I really like this pistol. Good solid firm feel and from reviews I read, very reliable and made well. Shoots nice. I held a Glock, but that felt too lightweight (due to the composite construction). I prefer the heavier feel.

Get a good pistol. Don't cheap out here. The Baretta was a little over $600. Get one rated for "plus pressure" ammo and even though you may only use standard pressure cartridges, the pistol will be stronger.

9 mm is a good size, does not kick too much. Ammo is inexpensive and available everywhere it is sold.

--Nate

sopogah
Posts: 184
Joined: Wed Jun 11, 2008 10:27 pm
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Post by sopogah » Mon Sep 20, 2010 10:49 am

topper1296 wrote:Thanks for the responses everybody. The primary reason for the purchase will be for target shooting, but home defense is a secondary reason (that is why I don't want a 22). I also don't plan on carrying it with me and getting a concealed weapon permit, but I'm a never say never type of person. Lastly, I plan on taking some shooting lessons at a local range once I buy one.

Right now I am leaning towards a 9mm Glock or .357mag revolver where I plan to shoot mainly .38 special rounds in it. I am going to rent a .357 mag this week or next to see if I like it since I haven't ever fired a revolver. I have spent a lot of time researching on the net this past weekend and have read that revolvers are great for beginners because of simplicity, reliability, and low maintenance.
Try the RUGER GP100 4inch barrel in stainless steel. It is one of the toughest guns out there, almost industructible and barely kicks with light target 38 ammo. Glocks are very popular, but is there any gun uglier than a Glock? I tried my friend's Glock once, it felt very low rent. The BERETTA 92F is better choice, and it fits my hands like a glove. Try all of them yourself at a gun shop/show.

To keep the cost (and recoil) of ammo down you may later consider reloading your own ammo. you can reduce your cost 50-80% depending on the caliber. Find a local gun club and join it, you learn a lot from some of the old hands.

Good luck and good shooting :lol:
_________________________________ | | "Money is a good servant, but a bad master" | | "The fewer our wants, the nearer we resemble the Gods". Socrates

chaz
Posts: 13604
Joined: Tue Feb 27, 2007 2:44 pm

Post by chaz » Mon Sep 20, 2010 12:51 pm

Bogleheads with guns - shooting the breeze and shooting bullets.
Chaz | | “Money is better than poverty, if only for financial reasons." Woody Allen | | http://www.bogleheads.org/wiki/index.php/Main_Page

Gekko
Posts: 3779
Joined: Fri May 11, 2007 5:00 pm
Location: USA

Post by Gekko » Mon Sep 20, 2010 1:40 pm

i read somewhere that statistically the average person is much more likely to have their gun involved in a tragic act or accident than it is for them to actually need to use their gun in a self defense situation.

i'm not sure if this was propaganda but it seemed to make sense except for maybe those who live in a super high violent crime area and/or involved in dangerous activities.

User avatar
gatorman
Posts: 2493
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:35 am
Location: The Swamp

Post by gatorman » Mon Sep 20, 2010 1:55 pm

Gekko wrote:i read somewhere that statistically the average person is much more likely to have their gun involved in a tragic act or accident than it is for them to actually need to use their gun in a self defense situation.

i'm not sure if this was propaganda but it seemed to make sense except for maybe those who live in a super high violent crime area and/or involved in dangerous activities.
Now, Gekko, we all know there is nothing average about a Boglehead!
gatorman

Tabs
Posts: 231
Joined: Mon Dec 08, 2008 8:48 am

Post by Tabs » Mon Sep 20, 2010 1:55 pm

Topper, I recommend searching and perhaps posting that question at The High Road. I believe some of the residents there are southpaws like yourself, and I'm sure they would be more than happy to help you.

With the deepest of respect, but I do not entirely agree with some of the responses in this thread. I too have some thoughts on the matter, but the bottom line is, I am right-handed as well, and I believe only a truly experienced left-hander can help you the most.

User avatar
dratkinson
Posts: 4940
Joined: Thu Jul 26, 2007 6:23 pm
Location: Centennial CO

Post by dratkinson » Mon Sep 20, 2010 2:37 pm

Just for fun, while you are testing handguns, you might want to try a .22 wmr (Winchester magnum rimfire). The energy delivered by the .22wmr is approximately equal to that delivered by a 9mm (300+ foot pounds).

The .22wmr in jacketed hollow point is not recommended for small game (rabbits, squirrels,...) because of the extensive damage done to the animal by a body shot. The JHP round should translate well into home defense (but much less effective than .357 jhp, 500+ foot pounds). Again, shot placement being the critical determining factor.

If the handgun comes with the second cylinder (.22lr, .22l,...), you can practice with the cheaper .22 rounds ($10/box of 50).

I've never shot a .22wmr jhp, but it's on my list of things to do. Supposed to be an impressive display when the target is a water-filled milk jug.

Alex Frakt
Founder
Posts: 11086
Joined: Fri Feb 23, 2007 1:06 pm
Location: Chicago
Contact:

Post by Alex Frakt » Mon Sep 20, 2010 4:42 pm

You don't need or want a .45 for your first gun. Ammunition is more expense, recoil is higher which makes the guns more difficult to learn to shoot well. Also the classic 1911-style pistol takes much more training to use competently than the modern double-action pistol.

There are reasons that by and large military and police agencies have moved to the double action 9mm in general and the style pioneered by the Glock - polymer-framed high-capacity 9 with simplified trigger action - in particular. Those reasons are economy, ease of training, reliability, firepower and light weight. The 9mm round is as effective at stopping an attacker as the .45 when using proper self-defense ammunition. It only suffers against the .45 if you are forced to use fully-jacketed ammunition or you chose to use the subsonic, heavy bullet (147grain) loads that were designed for penetration rather than stopping power. And even some of the latter are decent today. If you really want a little more power, go for the .40S&W, which has the advantage of being chambered in 9mm-sized guns and thus have all the 9mm advantages except relatively inexpensive ammunition.

As to which 9mm... Thanks to the computer-aided manufacturing techniques that have become prevalent in the last decade, anything from the traditional first or second tier handgun makers, from H&K and Sig through S&W and Glock down to Taurus, Ruger, and Springfield Armory are all more than good enough. I would go to a couple of well-stocked gunshops or shooting ranges and figure out which of the ones that meet your price requirements handle the best for you. For example, I find Glocks are not natural pointers for me (meaning if I'm looking at the target and bring the gun up into position, the sights will not be aligned with target). Also many double-stack nines have grips that are too large for me to comfortably manipulate the controls. You'll undoubtedly find that controls on some models are not easily usable by southpaws.

OTOH, I love revolvers. For a home defense gun, 6 rounds is enough and they do require a little less in terms of ongoing training than even the modern semi-auto. If you find that a particular .357 is comfortable to shoot with .38 Special +P rounds or .357 rounds, you will be well served. And you'll have the option of shooting .38 Special cartridges which are usually the cheapest ammo around, at least if you can find reloads.

User avatar
RJB
Posts: 321
Joined: Sun Sep 21, 2008 12:39 pm
Location: /earth

Re: 9mm pistol for lefty at a shoting range?

Post by RJB » Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:36 pm

topper1296 wrote: I would like to place an emphasis on being low maintenance and reliability (I've read that Glock is good for this).
Our Glocks have been super reliable. I am glad I bought ours years ago. The new Glocks have finger moldings that are too small for my big paws.

User avatar
Adrian Nenu
Posts: 5228
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2007 6:27 pm

Post by Adrian Nenu » Mon Sep 20, 2010 6:37 pm

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewIt ... =191235021

http://www.gunbroker.com/Auction/ViewIt ... =190027035

If you decide to go with a revolver, I recommend S&W K or L frame in .38 Special or 38/357 magnum configuration. There are a few good deals on the gun auction sites once in a while on used police revolvers. These have been shot with target loads mostly and are in good mechanical condition but less than perfect cosmetically. They are some of the best values in handguns available. Handle a few guns and shoot them at the range before you buy so you get an idea of what you like and suits your needs.

Adrian
anenu@tampabay.rr.com

jef
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Dec 21, 2007 11:35 pm

Post by jef » Mon Sep 20, 2010 8:04 pm

Springfield XD is my favorite.

I prefer the grip safety vs Glock, no safety.

Image

User avatar
Adrian Nenu
Posts: 5228
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2007 6:27 pm

Post by Adrian Nenu » Mon Sep 20, 2010 8:18 pm

The XDs have quality control problems that's why LEO (law enforcement) agencies avoid them. They tested them against the Glock and other pistols and picked Glock as the winner most of the time unless they wanted to save a few bucks. Also the Glock type action doesn't need a safety because the pistol will only fire if the trigger is pulled, just like revolvers. If you are not squeezing the safety hard enough or it fails, the results could be deadly. Just one more thing that could go wrong so why take the chance?

Adrian
anenu@tampabay.rr.com

User avatar
tat2ng
Posts: 473
Joined: Tue Feb 20, 2007 9:15 pm
Location: Michigan
Contact:

Post by tat2ng » Mon Sep 20, 2010 8:33 pm

my room-mate/best friend from college went on to become a police officer, and his issue gun is a Glock 17. he also keeps a Glock 26 as his back-up (partly due to police policies, I think - he also has a .40 caliber). when I was deciding on which type of pistol to buy, he left me fire both of his Glocks at a shooting range - the full-size 17, and the sub-compact 26. I then also held the Glock 19 later at the gun shop.

I found that I was most comfortable with the full-size Glock 17 - my pinkie finger didn't fit (well) on the other 2 sizes, and I felt like I didn't have as good of a grip and thus control over the smaller size. I wasn't worried about carrying it concealed, so the full size option didn't bother me.

I've been very happy with it, though. I would definitely handle them, and shoot various models to make sure you are comfortable with the way it shoots and handles.

cheers,
tag

amh
Posts: 100
Joined: Tue Jun 22, 2010 7:52 pm

Post by amh » Mon Sep 20, 2010 10:05 pm

Just a quick note on the grip size of the 17 vs. 26... there are magazines available with grip extensions on the bottom which give your pinky a place to rest. For some people it makes all the difference.

I also have a Glock 17 and have been very satisfied. I prefer the Glock action to most other pistols. If I were to buy it over again though, I'd consider the 10mm version. 8)

I once had a Taurus .357mag which served me well too. Some people will tell you that revolvers are more reliable than any autoloader, personally I'd have no concern about putting my life in the hands of a Glock.

james22
Posts: 1698
Joined: Tue Aug 21, 2007 2:22 pm

Post by james22 » Tue Sep 21, 2010 1:05 am

The Beretta PX-4 and CX-4 make a nice combo.

Wide Right
Posts: 48
Joined: Mon Aug 18, 2008 12:59 pm

Post by Wide Right » Tue Sep 21, 2010 6:57 am

Gekko wrote:i read somewhere that statistically the average person is much more likely to have their gun involved in a tragic act or accident than it is for them to actually need to use their gun in a self defense situation.

i'm not sure if this was propaganda but it seemed to make sense except for maybe those who live in a super high violent crime area and/or involved in dangerous activities.
Your instincts were right. That "fact" is a pure piece of propaganda. It is usually cited as "a firearm kept in the home is (anywhere from 3 to 43) times more likely to be used to kill a family member than an intruder." The origin of that statistic is a series of studies by Dr. Arthur Kellerman, an ER physician.

Unfortunately for Dr. Kellerman, his "studies" have been debunked so many times and on so many levels that their only remaining use is as textbook examples of how not to run a scientific study.

Google "Kellerman debunked" for more information.

User avatar
Adrian Nenu
Posts: 5228
Joined: Thu Apr 12, 2007 6:27 pm

Post by Adrian Nenu » Tue Sep 21, 2010 9:34 am

http://www.gunblast.com/Cumpston_K22s.htm

The S&W K-22, probably my favorite revolver. I have one with a 6" barrel and it is a very accurate and fun gun.

Adrian
anenu@tampabay.rr.com

User avatar
gatorman
Posts: 2493
Joined: Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:35 am
Location: The Swamp

Post by gatorman » Tue Sep 21, 2010 9:56 am

Adrian Nenu wrote:http://www.gunblast.com/Cumpston_K22s.htm

The S&W K-22, probably my favorite revolver. I have one with a 6" barrel and it is a very accurate and fun gun.

Adrian
anenu@tampabay.rr.com
The Colt diamondback in .22 LR is also a very nice pistol. Here is a link to some info:

http://www.chuckhawks.com/colt_diamondback_classic.htm

I have one with a 4" bbl which is quite enjoyable to shoot. If you get a .22 pistol, shoot copper jacketed .22's to reduce barrel fouling. They may cost a tad more, but are worth the extra money.
gatorman

User avatar
SpringMan
Posts: 5421
Joined: Wed Mar 21, 2007 11:32 am
Location: Michigan

Post by SpringMan » Tue Sep 21, 2010 10:05 am

Adrian Nenu wrote:http://www.gunblast.com/Cumpston_K22s.htm

The S&W K-22, probably my favorite revolver. I have one with a 6" barrel and it is a very accurate and fun gun.

Adrian
anenu@tampabay.rr.com
Great revolver though it has been replaced by the model 617 which holds 10 rounds. The S&W 617 is a bit pricey though.
Best Wishes, SpringMan

Post Reply